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:DUULRU J O I N T September 21, 2012 Vol. 3, No. 37

B A S E

L A N G L E Y - E U S T I S

P u b l i s h e d i n t h e i n t e re s t o f p e r s o n n e l a t J o i n t B a s e L a n g l e y - E u s t i s

ARMY EDITION

w w w. p e n i n s u l a w a r r i o r. c o m

SUICIDE

Eustis prepares for suicide prevention stand-down — Page 3

HISTORY

Building blocks of Virginia nestled in woods of Eustis — Page 12

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Air Force, Army bands join forces for a Constitution Day concert – Page 13

TRAUMA Former Chief reflects on family’s history of illness — Page 6


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

SEPTEMBER 21, 2012


SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

(XVWLV SUHSDUHV IRU $UP\ZLGH VXLFLGH SUHYHQWLRQ VWDQGGRZQ GD\ 6HSW  By Senior Airman Jason J. Brown 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Fort Eustis will host a series of events as part of the Army-wide suicide prevention stand-down day, scheduled for Sept. 27. Gen. Lloyd J. Austin III, the Army’s vice chief of staff, ordered the Army-wide suicide stand-down as a way to empower leadership to prevent further loss of life from suicide. “The Army dedicates a significant amount of resources to prevent loss of life due to suicides, but we haven’t turned the corner. That is why we are invigorating our efforts,” said Maj. Gen. Bradley W. May, the senior commander of Army Element Eustis and deputy commanding general of Initial Military Training. The stand-down was issued after Austin visited installations around the Army and listened to Soldier feedback and suggestions, said Walter O. Morales, chief of the Army Suicide Prevention Program. “He realized more work was needed to address the issue of suicides in the Army and to ensure the awareness and training momentum continues,” Morales said. The day-long slate of events at Fort Eustis will feature a “run for resilience,” a two-anda-half mile run-walk in the early morning hours; “command time,” reserved for Soldiers to conduct peer-to-peer and leader-led activities; a senior leader luncheon; suicide prevention awareness training at the Regimental Memorial Chapel and a Comprehensive Fitness Fair at the Fort Eustis Club. Bob Delaney, a National Basketball Association referee and victim of post-traumatic stress, will serve as guest speaker at the senior leader luncheon and will also speak to Soldiers, civilians and family members at Jacobs Theater at 3 p.m. Delaney, who suffered from PTSD as a result of his service as a New Jersey state trooper, hopes to empower leadership to engage with Soldiers and communicate that it is acceptable to ask for help. The Army stand-down is meant to familiarize all members of the Army family with the health promotion, risk reduction,

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Suicide prevention stand down day list of events: ■ Bob Delaney, a National Basketball Association referee and victim of post-traumatic stress, will serve as guest speaker at the senior leader luncheon and will also speak to Soldiers, civilians and family members at Jacobs Theater at 3 p.m. ■ “Run For Resilience” is a 2.5 mile Run-Walk, 5:30 a.m. at Murphy Field. Opening remarks by Maj. Gen. Bradley May. Run concludes at Lee Blvd. Parking available at Exchange/Commissary lots. Open to all.

Photo courtesy U.S. Army

The Army will conduct an Army-wide Suicide Prevention Stand Down, Sept. 27, to focus on promoting good health, teammate involvement, risk reduction and resilience training.

suicide prevention, and comprehensive Soldier and family-fitness resources available in the Army. The stand-down will also focus on how to improve the health and discipline of the force, and how to reduce the stigma associated with seeking care for behavioral health issues. The last Army-wide suicide prevention stand-down took place in 2009. During that event, Morales said, the Army used the “chain teach” approach to push information down to Soldiers. “For example, the Army required that specific training materials would be used and specific training requirements met, although some supplemental training was allowed, such as leader-led discussions,” he said. This time, Morales said, the stand-down will be different. “Activities and training will be less prescriptive,” he said. “Commanders now have the flexibility to assess the needs of their units and customize the training and activities.”

Although the stand-down is just for one day, Morales said training and activities will be conducted throughout September, which is recognized in the Army as Suicide Prevention Month. Efforts will likely continue into October, particularly for the Reserve Component. The theme this year for Suicide Prevention Month – “A healthy force is a ready force” – reflects the Army’s awareness that healthy people and mission go together, Morales said. “We’re not just worried about suicides; we’re concerned with the overall fitness and well-being of our Soldiers, Army civilians, and family members,” he said. “It is especially important that leaders lead the charge in changing the Army culture, wherever seeking help for suicide or other issues is stigmatized.” Editor’s Note: David Vergun of the Army News Service and Stephanie Slater of Initial Military Training contributed to this report.

For more information on suicide prevention awareness, visit the Army Suicide Prevention website at

www.preventsuicide.army.mil

■ Comprehensive Fitness Fair, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. at Fort Eustis Club. Open to all. The fair will feature outreach and servicing agencies such as Army Community Service, United Service Organization, the Chaplain Corps, Family Life, Health Services, Soldier Fueling, Soldier and Family Assistance Center, and Morale, Welfare and Readiness. These organizations will remain open at their respective locations as well to accommodate visitors. ■ Command time: Unit-specific peer-to-peer training and leaderled discussions to enhance awareness of risk and protective factors, resilience and support services available. ■ Senior leader luncheon, noon at Fort Eustis Club. Bob Delaney, a NBA referee and victim of posttraumatic stress, will serve as guest speaker. Delaney will also speak to a public audience at the Jacobs Theater at 3 p.m. ■ Suicide prevention counseling at the Regimental Memorial Chapel: 9 a.m, 10 a.m., and 1 p.m. Register by contacting Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Timothy Smith at 878-1316. ■ Faith-based suicide prevention training at RMC, Sept. 26 from 3 to 4 p.m.


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

SEPTEMBER 21, 2012 The third annual Chief Master Sgt. Denise E. Mikolajezyk Memorial GolfTournament is scheduled to be held Oct. 5 at the Eaglewood Golf Course at Langley Air Force Base. All proceeds will be donated to enlisted programs throughout Langley, including Airman Leadership School, the base honor guard and others.

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All Service members can think back through their careers, no matter how long, and name at least one person who impacted and shaped them to be the person they are today. Those who knew Chief Master Sgt. Denise Mikolajczyk thought of her as a rolemodel. She is fondly remembered as a leader, model Airman and the epitome of what a chief should be. In January 2009, Mikolajczyk died as a result of a benign tumor that blocked her mitral valve. Mikolajczyk was stationed at Langley Air Force Base, Va., where she served as the manpower functional manager for Air Combat Command’s Directorate of Manpower, Personnel and Services. “I was hurt when I got the phone call,” said Chief Master Sgt. Walt Bonner, Air Combat Command base operating support manpower requirements section chief, full of emotion. “I just couldn’t believe it.” Bonner thinks of Mikolajczyk as an important influence on his career - and life. “She had high expectations, but she led by example,” said Bonner. “I wouldn’t be the chief I am today if it wasn’t for her.” According to Bonner, Mikolajczyk loved interacting with Airmen, and would often take time from her schedule to speak to young Airmen during their briefings at the First Term Airmen Center. “She truly cared about Airmen,” said Bonner. “I try to provide the same leadership for my Airmen every day.” Although Bonner said he would not be the same person without Mikolajczyk’s

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guidance, she was more than a career mentor. Mikolajczyk was a close friend to Bonner and his family, and is considered by he and his wife, Linda, to have been instrumental in their relationship. Mikolajczyk helped keep Linda and Walt in contact and remained supportive of the couple while Walt was deployed during the early stages of their relationship. “You don’t want to lose her,” Mikolajezyk said to Bonner many years ago. “She’s the one.” When Bonner and Linda were married, Mikolajczyk was there to show her continued support for her friends. “She was our best man,” said Linda, with a laugh. The couple remained close to Mikolajczyk, and their two families would often spend time together. After a time, however, military life forced them move apart. After her death, the Langley Chief’s Group renamed their annual golf outing in her honor. The tournament now serves as an annual memorialization to pass on the legacy of Mikolajczyk. This year’s tournament marks the third annual outing, and is scheduled to be held Oct. 5, at the Eaglewood Golf Course at Langley Air Force Base, Va. All proceeds from the outing are donated to enlisted programs throughout Langley, including Airman Leadership School, the base honor guard and others. Those who knew Mikolajczyk can attest to her goodwill and giving nature, as these traits are carried on through the tournament. “In life she was very giving, and she helped everyone,” said Bonner. “This outing is a great representation of her personality.”


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“When I was growing up some family members had what we referred to as the ‘family disease’ that ran on my mother’s side. It was killing people.” Retired Chief Master Sgt. Helen Noel paused, shifting uncomfortably in her chair. “I didn’t know it was killing me too.” It started when Noel began feeling tired all the time. Noel made an appointment at U.S. Air Force Hospital Langley with Dr. (Lt. Col.) Kevin Kaps. After several tests, Kaps diagnosed Noel with a vitamin B-12 deficiency. “If a doctor says you are B-12 deficient, how many people would know that could be fatal?” Noel said. “I didn’t.” Noel was told her B-12 level was 89. This terrified her, because according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, normal B-12 values should be between 200 and 900

picograms per milliliter. This diagnosis caused her to question how her B-12 levels could be so low. The answer led her on a journey into her family’s past, a journey that would shake Noel to her very core.

The Rosenwald Fund and Tuskegee Studies Noel was able to trace the ‘family disease’ to a little-known medical study designed to record the natural history of syphilis in the African-American population. Initially, it included 600 men – 399 with the disease and 201 without. It was called the “Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male.” According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the study began in 1932 as U.S. Public Health Service medical personnel conducted these tests without the benefit of patients’ informed consent. SEE TRAUMA PAGE 7


SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

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TRAUMA FROM PAGE 6 conduct a study like this.” Researchers told subjects they were being treated for “bad blood,” a local term which described a multitude of illnesses, including syphilis, anemia and fatigue. However, none of the subjects received the proper care promised to them. Originally, the study was supposed to last six months. It went on for 40 years. “My family was presumably part of a study that preceded the Tuskegee Study,” Noel said. “It was during the Great Depression; many African Americans were migrating throughout the country.” She was referring to the Julius Rosenwald Fund Syphilis Seroprevalence Studies, which began in 1929, and had virtually the same scope and doctrine as the Tuskegee Study. African-Americans were diagnosed, in some cases inaccurately, with syphilis – and then treated with improper methods, including prescribing high doses of mercury. “The mercury they were treating these patients with was passed on congenitally to children,” Noel said. “They were passing it on to different generations. It was really the worst possible time to

Mercury Treatments According to Harvard University, treating syphilis with mercury, while seemingly barbaric by today’s medical standards, was a common practice since its initial discovery in 1494, and well into the early 20th century. This resulted in tooth loss; mouth, throat and skin ulcerations; neurological damage and death in the initial patients. The ramifications to future generations have not fully been explored. During the Tuskegee Study, subjects were given free medical exams, free meals and burial insurance, in exchange for their participation. “It’s not surprising that African-Americans went along with the study when you think about that time frame [and] people’s mindsets,” Noel said. “Through my own research, I learned that mercury depletes a person’s B-12 level. What gives people the right to experiment on human beings without their knowledge and consent?” The issue found a voice when the Associated Press published a story on the Tuskegee Study in July 1972. The subsequent pub-

lic outcry led to the Assistant Secretary for Health and Scientific Affairs to appoint a panel to review the study. While it was revealed that the study subjects had freely agreed to be examined and treated, no evidence suggested that the researchers had informed them of the study or its true purpose. Often, according to the CDC, the subjects were misled by the researchers to ensure cooperation. During the study, adequate treatment was often withheld. “Even when penicillin became the drug of choice for syphilis in 1947, researchers did not offer it to the subjects,” according to the CDC report. “The advisory panel found nothing to show that subjects were ever given the choice of quitting the study, even with this new, highly effective treatment became widely used.” The last direct participant to the Tuskegee study died in January 2004. Currently, there are 15 descendants of study subjects receiving medical and health benefits for congenital conditions. Noel said several members of her family have become ill or passed away from diseases which could be directly related

to congenital mercury poisoning. She said Kaps’ accurate diagnosis gave her a new lease on life. “He was a heavenly angel assigned to me,” she said. “I attribute him and his actions to saving my life. Had he not been so aggressive in my treatment, I would not be here today.”

The Road Ahead Noel said she counts her days alive as a blessing. After her B-12 treatments she feels wonderful – like she could run a marathon. She is not looking to exact vengeance on the ghosts of her family’s past. But she is looking toward the future. “This was never an issue of race,” Noel said. “This was an issue of human rights.” Noel encourages people to pay attention to the levels of B-12 in their system, noting a severe deficiency could be fatal if left untreated for more than three years. The CDC also states that one in every 31 adults over the age of 51 have a B-12 deficiency. “I’m not the type of person to blame others for the wrongs that have been committed here,” she said. “You can’t change the past, but you can educate the next generation.”

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SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

FeatureStory

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Captain Rebecca Bush watched as the message was passed from the U.S. Air Force doctor, through two translators, and finally reaching the woman who waited patiently with her sister inside a tent that served as a makeshift hospital in Huancavelica, Peru. The final translator dropped the proverbial bombshell in Quechua, the native language of the woman. “You have cancer.” The woman’s eyes began to fill with tears as the doctor further explained that her stomach pain was due to pancreatic cancer, which had spread throughout her body. She only had weeks to live. “Thank you,” the woman said, earnestly, before leaving the hospital with her sister – their eyes filled with tears. Bush, who normally works with the 633rd Inpatient Operations Squadron as a neonatal intensive care nurse, shook her head sadly as she remembered this woman. “I never saw her again,” Bush said. “It makes you wonder what happens to these people after they leave.” While on a five-week medical mission to Peru, the Texas native worked in the emergency room, helping treat local residents who came to the hospital tent in need of medical care. “I was very much out of my comfort zone,” she said. “But I loved every second of it.” The mission was part of New Horizons 2012, a joint medical and civil engineering assistance mission which ran from June 4 to Aug. 31, 2012. According to the U.S. embassy in Lima, Peru, the mission Bush took part in at Huancavelica provided free medical and surgical proce-

Graphic by Senior Airman Jarad A. Denton

This story is part of the 2012 Joint Base Langley-Eustis fall series, highlighting individuals with interesting stories.

dures for more than 7,000 people. “They were so appreciative,” Bush said. “It made me realize how much we take for granted here.” Children from a local orphanage came to the hospital one day for routine checkups. Bush said they would repeat the same phrase over and over. Finally, she asked a translator what they were all saying. “Don’t forget us,” he said. With that in mind, Bush walked through the tent and noticed a young boy, another member of the orphanage, staring at her. She walked over and said hello, but he did not speak English and there were no translators nearby. Instead

Photo by Staff Sgt. Michael C. Zimmerman

A Peruvian boy gives a thumbs-up after surgery at an Expeditionary Medical Support mobile field hospital in Huancavelica, Peru, July 2, during New Horizons 2012. New Horizons is a U.S. Southern Command-sponsored annual series of joint humanitarian assistance exercises deploying U.S. military engineers, veterinarians, medics and other relief professionals to Central and South American nations for training, construction projects and humanitarian and medical services.

of talking, the boy showed Bush why he had been staring. On a plain piece of paper he had drawn Bush, smiling in her uniform. “We were like movie stars,” she said.

The mission was part of New Horizons 2012, a joint medical and civil engineering assistance exercise which ran from June 4 to Aug. 31, 2012. According to the U.S. embassy in Lima, Peru, the mission Capt. Rebecca Bush took part in at Huancavelica provided free medical and surgical procedures for more than 7,000 people.

Bush said their gratitude sometimes made the various differences in lifestyle and living conditions readily apparent. “They work really, really hard and have nothing,” Bush said. “We work really hard and it pays off – we can see our success.” Despite the hardships she saw in Peru, Bush would not trade her experience in the country, or her time in the Air Force, for anything. She said her journey through Huancavelica only strengthened her own appreciation for life in America. “I will say that the grass isn’t any greener,” Bush said, smiling. “It’s just a different shade.”

“I was very much out of my comfort zone. But I loved every second of it. They were so appreciative. It made me realize how much we take for granted here.” — Capt. Rebecca Bush 633rd Inpatient Operations Squadron neonatal intensive care nurse talking about her five-week medical mission to Peru


SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

www.peninsulawarrior.com

9

0F'RQDOG 3KDUPDF\ DLGV LQ SURSHU GLVSRVDO RI PHGLFDWLRQV By Marlon J. Martin MCDONALD ARMY HEALTH CENTER

The McDonald Army Health Center is hosting a 2012 National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day event Sept. 29 at the Fort Eustis, Va., Post Exchange from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This drug take-back day event will give the Fort Eustis community an opportunity to dispose of unwanted and unused prescription drugs that may be piling up at home, in a medicine cabinet or bathroom drawer. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration initiated National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day in September 2010 to encourage Americans to turn in unused or expired prescribed medication for proper disposal. After reports showed that 242,000 pounds of prescription drugs had been turned in, Congress passed legislation amending the Controlled Substances Act to allow the DEA to develop a more per-

manent process for people to safely and conveniently dispose of their prescription drugs. This resulted in take-back sites being made available in all 50 states and U.S. territories. According to DEA Administrator Michele M. Leonhart, these events have “dramatically reduced the risk of prescription drug diversion and abuse, and increased awareness of this critical public health issue.” “The amount of prescription drugs turned in by the American public during the past three Take-Back Day events speaks volumes about the need to develop a convenient way to rid homes of unwanted or expired prescription drugs,” Leonhart said. The U.S. Army is onboard with providing continued support of this initiative, as well. In a collaborative effort, U.S. Army Installation Management Command and U.S. Army Medical Command are coordinating Army support on Army installations. MDAHC Pharmacy Services per-

sonnel will host the Take-Back Day here. The Health Center’s support of this initiative is bringing national focus to the issue of pharmaceutical controlled substance abuse. As the Health Center gears up to host this event once again, it is working closely with local DEA and law enforcement officials to carry out the proper procedures for accepting, handling and disposing of all medications collected. Along with members of the Provost Marshal’s office, Sgt. 1st Class Taurus Buck, Pharmacy Services non-commissioned officer-in-charge, will be present throughout this event to monitor the collection process. According to Buck, this event will educate the community of the dangers associated with keeping unwanted medications in the home, as well as the effects these medications can have on our environment if residents flush these drugs down the toilet – something the Health Center warns against. Unfortunately, communi-

ty residents are often unaware of the potential dangers associated with flushing drugs down the toilet or tossing them away in the trash as a means of disposal. The Health Center’s clinical pharmacist and acting chief of pharmacy, Dr. Heather Pena, BCPS, said it is not healthy to dispose of medications this way. According to Pena, the prescription drug take-back events present a great opportunity for patients to dispose of their medications safely. “Drugs should never enter into our water supply, and therefore flushing or putting medications down the sink is bad for our environment,” said Pena, adding that it is also imperative that patients do not just throw their medications in the trash. “Children or animals may take these medications out of the garbage and ingest them. The best way to [prevent] this is to crush the medications and then mix them with used coffee grounds or kitty litter and then throw this mixture away,” Pena said.


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

-XVW VKRZ XS  PLVVLQJ DSSRLQWPHQWV KDUPV HYHU\RQH By Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

We have all done it -- we are too busy that day, we have too much work to do or we just do not feel like going. When we decide to skip appointments, we do not think we have done any harm. Some of us might even say, “Maybe I left a spot open for someone else,” and casually brush off the incident. However, for places that operate by appointment, such as the finance office or the U.S. Air Force Hospital Langley, this can lead to money, time and personnel losses. “When a member doesn’t make an appointment, that is a time slot lost,” said Airman 1st Class Kaitlynn Privett, 633rd Air Base Wing special action technician. “With mandatory appointments, that means we know they will reschedule, taking up another time slot.” At the finance office, roughly 10 percent of appointments are “no-shows” for mandatory separations and retirement briefings. Since Service members must attend the briefing to finalize these actions, personnel have to

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It is estimated that USAF Hospital Langley expends $128,186 on no-shows. That money is going to waste. scramble to ensure that no-shows ultimately “do show,” causing a disruption in work flow. The ripple-effect caused by one no-show could affect the finance office’s other missions, which in turn can affect other Service members looking for assistance. If the Service member knows the appointment must be cancelled, Privett said a notification 24 hours ahead of the appointment, at a minimum, is preferred. “The notification gives us an opportunity to fill the spot again,” said Privett. “So the schedule is more or less the same.” If you doubt the actual impacts of missed appointments, just look at the evidence. The Department of Defense measures military healthcare value in accordance with standards used by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid. From those measurements, Hospital Langley expends an estimated $128,186 on no-

shows. That money is going to waste since a patient is not being treated. Of the 4,327 no-shows at Hospital Langley from May 1 to July 31, 2012, 35 percent were active duty Airmen. In the family health clinic, roughly 50 percent of no-shows are active duty Air Force Airmen and family members. So how does one person make a difference? A physician in the family health clinic sees, on average, about 20 patients a day. If 26 people (the daily number of no-shows at the family health clinic) miss an appointment, essentially one physician is not being used per day in the family health clinic. But for the staff, the numbers do not matter. It is the lack of care being given to patients that matters most. “We’re here to keep people healthy,” said Stewart. “I’m not happy until everyone can get an appointment whenever they want.” Stewart and the medical community fol-

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low a continuity of care. This means that a patient should interact with the same medical team whenever possible. Stewart said that patient health increases once a continuity of care is established. When people cannot get the appointments they need with a familiar physician, that continuity of care is broken. Establishing continuity of care becomes more difficult with a high number of no-shows. No-shows do more than upset bank accounts or physician interaction; they have the potential to impede emergency personnel. “When there are no-shows, we have to send folks down to the emergency room for non-emergencies,” said Stewart. “That increases the cost of routine procedures and places other, more urgent patients further back in the line for treatment.” In the end, appointment-oriented personnel agree that no-shows cause frustration for the staff and Service members. This prevents personnel from giving Service members the quality care that everyone deserves. “When a customer is frustrated, we want to let them know we are working for them,” said Privett. “We are here for their benefit, always.”

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SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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$LU )RUFH $UP\ EDQGV MRLQ IRUFHV IRU D &RQVWLWXWLRQ 'D\ FRQFHUW By Senior Airman Jason J. Brown 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Photos by Staff Sgt. Ashley Hawkins

Photo by Staff Sgt. Wesley Farnsworth

Th he Langley Air Force Base Honor guard posts the colors during the Natio onal Anthem at the fourth annual Constitution Day celebration in Williamsburg, Sept. 15. Constitution Day commemorates the formation and sig gning of the U.S. Constitution on September 17, 1787.

Remains of a steam engine (left) and a boiler from the Davis and Kimpton Brickyard rest in the woods at Training Area #23 on Fort Eustis, Sept. 14.The brickyard, which operated from 1898 to the early 1900s, used these machines to power a series of lines and pulleys, which automated much of the brick-making process.

Building blocks of Virginia’s industrial past are nestled deep in the woods of Fort Eustis By Senior Airman Jason J. Brown 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Fort Eustis, Va. is located at one of the most historic regions in the United States, nestled among sites that tell the story of how the nation was born through colonization, battle and commerce. As expected, the history of the area makes ďŹ nding artifacts and remnants of the past very likely. A few hundred yards inside the woods, at the post’s Training Area #23, lies the remains of the Davis and Kimpton Brickyard – a late 19th-century-era complex that used locally-dug clay and industrial machinery to manufacture bricks. While little remains of the brickyard, the artifacts are preserved in a way that explains the manufacturing process. The rusted, piecemeal setup includes the hulk of a boiler and steam engine, which drove a system of pulleys automating a majority of the process. Pieces of a disintegrator, used to grind the clay and other elements into a uniform consistency, rest in a shallow, brickwalled pit. A worker would use a pug mill and brick machine to shape the clay composite into a long rectangular length of brick, cutting the mass into the pieces. The pieces were then ďŹ red in a kiln, where they hardened into ďŹ nished brick.

Photo by Staff Sgt. Wesley Farnsworth

Fragments of bricks from the Davis and Kimpton Brickyard lay scattered in and across the ground atTraining Area #23.The brickyard is one of 230 archaeological sites on the installation.

Like other pieces of machinery, remains of the kiln, including trenches, brick foundations, and even pieces of the kiln door assembly, remain. According to Christopher McDaid, the 733rd Civil Engineer Division’s cultural resources manager, workers unearthed clay from large borrow pits in the earth adjacent to the machinery. Workers dug the pits out toward the Warwick River,

leaving a small earthen dam to prevent ooding. Small man-made locks allowed workers to allow river water into the clay pits, softening the clay for easy removal. From the pits, workers carted the clay to the machinery along a rail system. Remnants of the rail system, including an overturned cart embedded in the soil, are still visible. Even parts of a crudely fashioned road remain, which was built using a patchwork of waste bricks, or unusable product from the brickyard. McDaid said records indicate the brickyard opened in 1898, ofďŹ cially closing in 1918 when the War Department purchased the land to establish Camp Abraham Eustis. However, he believes manufacturing ceased several years prior to the purchase, as the brickyard owners hastily accepted the purchase amount and abandoned their equipment. Surviving records from 1906 summarize the brick-making business in eastern Virginia, but neither Davis nor Kimpton is mentioned. McDaid believes the small operation simply could not compete against larger, more industrialized operations in the area, and ceased production. “Kimpton sold out to Davis after six or eight years, and the property started to be used as collateral for other actions, such as a loan or a deed of trust, by the time

the government purchased the land,� McDaid said. “The owners basically said ‘thank you for the money, we’re out of here.’ That leads me to believe it had stopped being economically viable by the time the government came in.� McDaid said he is most surprised the artifacts have remained in the woods over time. “It’s surprising it survived the Second World War,� he said, noting the era’s scrap metal drives to fuel war production. “Perhaps it was too far back off the beaten path and too bulky for anyone to bother with.� McDaid said the brick manufacturing operation is integrally related to both the local history and to general trends within the industry. “The high integrity of the remains is an important characteristic of the site since it allows for a comprehensive understanding of an applied manufacturing process in a technological and regional historic context,� he explained. As with all areas of Fort Eustis, unauthorized access is strictly prohibited. The area is regularly patrolled by military police and state authorities. For more information about the Davis and Kimpton Brickyard, contact McDaid by emailing christopher.l.mcdaid.civ@mail.mil.

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Jeff Warner, Air Force Heritage of America Band co ommander, conducts the AFHOA and U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Co ommand bands during the Constitution Day celebration. Approximately 50 performers in their respective service dress uniforms performed patrio otic classics in honor of Constitution Day.

Me embers of the U.S. Air Force Heritage of America and U.S. ArmyTraining an nd Doctrine Command bands perform during the Constitution Day ceremo ony.This year marked the fourth year the AFHOA Band performed in the show, and the second year of joining forces withTRADOC.

Amidst the quaint store fronts, cafes and brick-hewn streets of Colonial Williamsburg, Va., the U.S. military’s world-class musicians took the stage to celebrate the nation’s Constitution in a rousing, patriotic concert at Merchant’s Square, Sept. 15. Soldiers of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Band and Airmen from the U.S. Air Force Heritage of America Band joined forces to perform an 80-minute set of songs in honor of Constitution Day. These songs included patriotic classics, contemporary country hits and cinematic scores. Approximately 50 performers decked out in their respective service dress uniforms participated. The Colonial Williamsburg Fife and Drum Corps joined the show, as well, marching clad in their distinctive red uniforms and regalia and performing traditional American marches. Throughout the show, guest narrator Raymond Jones, an on-air personality from a local public radio station, guided fans in attendance through the storied history of the birth of the country, from colonization through revolution and independence. Character actors portraying presidents George Washington and James Madison performed historic speeches promoting the show’s titular theme, “To Support and Defend.� U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Jeff Warner, the AFHOA Band commander, said Merchant’s Square’s colonial charm and American ancestry provided the perfect site for the Constitution Day performance. This year marked the fourth year the AFHOA Band performed in the show, and the second year it joined forces with TRADOC.

Soldiers of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Band and Airmen from the U.S. Air Force Heritage of America Band joined forces to perform an 80-minute set of songs in honor of Constitution Day. These songs included patriotic classics, contemporary country hits and cinematic scores.

Photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Hawkins

Musicians with the Colonial Williamsburg Fife and Drum Corps perform during the Constitution Day ceremony.

“Williamsburg is a place where both commands have interacted with the community for many years. What better place to have this concert than in the seat of American history?,� said Warner. “When we achieved joint basing a few years ago, we saw this as the perfect opportunity to represent the joint base to the peninsula community.� U.S. Army Maj. Leo Pena, the commander of the TRADOC Band, echoed Warner’s sentiment. “We’re always happy to reach out and be part of the community, as it’s what we do as a band,� Pena said. “It’s even better to enjoy doing the show in this joint partnership. We look forward to these opportunities.� The local community appreciated the show, with hundreds pack-

ing Merchant’s Square’s brick streets. Fans camped in lawn chairs, watched from sidewalks and cafe patios, and listened from storefronts – any place they could to get a glimpse of the band and the sound of the music. Melissa Baylor, a Williamsburg resident and mother of two, called the performance “outstanding,� and said she was more than happy to bring her children out to enjoy the “wonderful weather and beautiful music.� The TRADOC Band accomplished more than 400 mission performances in the last year, with nearly 15 concert performances. The AFHOA Band tallies nearly 300 performances annually, with a growing schedule slated for 2013.

Want to catch these military bands in action? For more information about the AFHOA Band, visit www.heritageofamericaband.af.mil. To learn more about the TRADOC Band, visit www.tradocband.com.


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

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Secretary of the Air Force Michael Donley, Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Welsh III and Chief Master Sgt. of the Air Force James Roy issued the following message to the Airmen of the United States Air Force: As we celebrate the United States Air Force’s 65th birthday, we salute all of the dedicated Airmen who serve or have served in our Nation’s youngest and most innovative Service. Throughout our proud history, the Air Force has embraced the technology that continues to revolutionize our capabilities in air, space and cyberspace. We owe an enormous debt to the ground-breaking visionaries and engineering pioneers who brought the technology of flight to life, and to the professional strategists and tacticians who imagined the military possibilities of these new technologies and propelled the science, theory and application forward. While our Service enjoys an unbreakable connection to state-of-theart technology, we must never forget that everything we do depends on our people, the living engine of our Air Force. Today, more than ever, the Air Force can take pride that our Service culture promotes and bene-

Photo by Tech. Sgt. Bennie J. Davis III

Doris Hernandez models a Khaki Shade 1Women in the Air Force transition uniform worn between 1947 and 1950.

fits from the know-how, determination, and commitment of a diverse group of men and women who embody our Core Values – Integrity First, Service Before Self, and Excellence In All We Do – while pursuing adaptive and innovative solutions for our Nation’s security. Every day, our Airmen have an opportunity to add a bright new chapter to the Air Force story by serving

our Nation in the world’s finest air force. The challenges confronting our country are great; but our active duty, Guard, Reserve, and civilian Airmen have never failed to answer our Nation’s call. Working together in common purpose as one Air Force, we will keep America secure today and for all the years to come. Happy birthday, Air Force! Aim High ... Fly, Fight, and Win!

0&$+& XVHV +(',6 WR PHDVXUH SHUIRUPDQFH By Gina Moore MCDONALD ARMY HEALTH CENTER

HAMPTON ROADS

CENTRAL VIRGINIA

Although the term HEDIS is commonly used in a healthcare environment, many who hear mention of this acronym may wonder what it actually means. So, what is HEDIS? Healthcare Effectiveness Data Information Set (HEDIS) is a tool used by McDonald Army Health Center to measure performance on breast cancer screening, cervical cancer screening, colorectal cancer screening, comprehensive diabetes care, and use of appropriated medications for people

with asthma, Chlamydia and wellchild screenings. HEDIS data are collected through medical charts and insurance claims for hospitalizations, medical office visits and procedures. For example, a measure titled “Well Child Screening” monitors the frequency of well-child visits during the first 15 months of life. The plan reports the number of children continuously enrolled to a military treatment facility (MTF) which receives six or more well-child visits during the first 15 months of life. Plans may collect data for this measure by reviewing insurance claims billed to

TriCare and MTF appointments. The goal for McDonald Army Health Center is to be “green” in all performance measures and to ensure patients are current on all screenings as they apply to individual patients. The next time an individual is in for an appointment, they can ask their provider about screenings to ensure they are up to date. They are preventative measures performed either by receiving a phone call from the health center’s nursing staff or through the mail. Don’t ignore any of these measures. These health screenings are conducted to ensure patients a healthy life.


SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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NOMINATE A DESERVING MILITARY RETIREE OR VETERAN

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They have served our country and are still serving our region by making significant contributions to the Hampton Roads community through their work, philanthropic and volunteer efforts. Help us recognize our retired and veteran military by nominating them for the 2012 Still Serving Awards. Honorees will be recognized at a reception on December 5th at the Sheraton Norfolk Waterside Hotel and highlighted in our Still Serving Special Section published on December 6th.

Nominations can me made online at www.flagshipnews.com/stillserving PRESENTED BY: SPONSORED BY:


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SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

Spousal Preference Program helps military spouses find jobs By Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

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For a military spouse, moving constantly is not necessarily a benefit when it comes to finding a job. While Service members receive orders and a place to continue their careers, their spouses are often left to find their own job at the new location. At least, that used to be the case until the Civilian Personnel Office at Langley Air Force Base, Va. offered the Spousal Preference Program to all spouses of active duty Service members. “Before, spouses had to be previously federally employed to utilize our program,” said Sloan Maurice, 633rd Force Support Squadron human resources assistant. “Now, all spouses of active-duty Service members can utilize our services.” Maurice helps spouses find jobs funded by appropriated funds, government jobs that fall under wage grade or general schedule positions. In order to receive aid from the CPO, spouses must register with the CPO, provide a copy of orders from the active-duty member, attach any school transcripts and file a federal-style resume. For those new to the Air Force, “wage grade” and “general schedule” hardly describe what kind of work an employee will be doing. In essence, GS positions tend to lean more towards clerical and administrative positions, while WG positions are more physical and labor-intensive. Depending on which fields are available, a resume should be adjusted accordingly. But what is a federal-style resume? A federal-style resume is more detailed than an average resume and

more complicated. The Airman and Family Readiness Center can help spouses write this resume. Spouses can also visit www.usajobs.gov, and access an online resume tutorial. The website also lists available jobs. After the registration and filing process, spouses will sit down with a CPO staff member and go over the program, as well as discuss any questions. Spouses have two years from the date the active-duty Service member’s orders were drafted to be employed. Spouses will also be removed from the Spousal Preference Program if they turn down an offered position. Also, if a spouse finds a job independently while registered in the program and turns it down, the spouse will be removed from the program. Aside from appropriated funds, there are also non-appropriated funds positions. These jobs are not backed by the government, but instead by civilian companies. NAF also has a Spousal Preference Program. “What’s great about NAF applica-

tions is that it can be done entirely online,” said Marion Grubb, 633rd FSS human resources officer. “However, we are always here if an applicant has any questions.” All applicants must go to www.nafjobs.org and create a profile. To complete the process, applicants must attach a digital resume (it does not have to be federal style), a digital copy of the active-duty Service member’s orders and any transcripts the applicant might have. If spouses are aware of a move, they have an additional 30 days before the reporting date on the orders to look for jobs at their new location, said Grubb. NAF positions also have pay bands similar to the GS and WG pay grades; however, Child and Youth Services follows its own pay scale. With the help of the CPO, all spouses have the ability to not only find employment quickly, but also the ability to continue a career while living the sometimes chaotic military lifestyle.

For more information on the Civilian Personnel Office or appropriated-funds positions, call Sloan Maurice at (757) 764-6262. For NAF positions, call the NAF Human Resource Office at (757) 764-2992 for the Langley AFB office, or (757) 878-5100 for the Fort Eustis office.

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

EustisCommunity Lost and Found Items Have you lost anything on Fort Eustis? The 733rd Security Forces Squadron has cell phones, wallets, keys, tools and other items that have been lost and found on Fort Eustis. For more information, please contact Sgt. Chris Bowen at 878-5515. Property can be picked up at Bldg. 648, Washington Blvd.

Family Advocacy Program ■ Anger Management – Tuesdays, 1 to 2:30 p.m. (ongoing), Bldg. 213 Calhoun St. Do you find yourself fuming when someone cuts you off in traffic? Does your blood pressure go through the roof when your child refuses to cooperate? Anger is a normal and even healthy emotion but it’s important to deal with it in a positive way. Classes are open to all DoD ID cardholders. Call 878-0807 to register. ■ Play Morning – Wednesdays, 9:30 to 11 a.m. (ongoing), Youth Services Gym, Bldg. 1102, Pershing Ave. This playgroup features fun and socialization for parents, caregivers, and children up to school age. For more information, call 878-0807. ■ Couples Communication – Sept. 24, 10 to 11 a.m., Bldg. 213, Calhoun St. To register, call 878-0807.

Balfour Beatty Communities ■ TerraCycle Donation Bash – Join BBC staff for the TerraCycle Donation Bash today from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the Community Center. Don’t forget your donations of used oral care, personal beauty product packages, and used paired shoes. Come out and listen to the DJ and enjoy the Splash Park. There will be snacks, crafts and prizes for the largest donation. ■ Family Bingo Night – Residents can enjoy an evening of pizza and bingo with family and friends Wednesday from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the Community Center. Due to limited space, please call 328-0691 to make your reservations by Monday. The activities listed above are for BBC residents only. The Community Center is located at Bldg. 126, Madison Ave. For more information, call 328-0691.

SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

Submit Eustis Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com Friday); and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. (Saturday). For more information, call 878-3694.

Class Jeffery Bowers at 314-7526.

Retiree Health Extravaganza

The Regimental Memorial Chapel is hosting a Marriage Enrichment program from 6 to 8 p.m. each Thursday through Oct. 25 at the chapel, Bldg. 923, Lee Blvd. This program is open to all married and engaged couples, and spouses of service members who are deployed or training elsewhere. Free child watch-care will be provided for children up to age 11 years old. For more information, contact Mike and Carole Carkhuff at 218-1034 or email carkhuffs2@verizon.net.

The Retiree Health Extravaganza will be held Sept. 29 from 9 a.m. to noon at McDonald Army Health Center, Bldg. 576, Jefferson Ave. Health topics will include immunizations, orthopedic injury prevention, breast and cervical health, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, asthma, healthy eating, medication safety and more. Clinic tours will also be available. For more information, call Army Public Health Nursing at 314-8037 or visit http:// mcdonald.narmc.amedd.army.mil.

Prescription Drug Take-Back Day McDonald Army Health Center is hosting the National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day on Sept. 29 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Post Exchange, Bldg. 1386, Lee Blvd. National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day was initiated in September 2010 by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration to encourage American citizens to turn in unused or expired prescribed medication for proper disposal. This event will give the Joint Base Langley-Eustis community an opportunity to dispose of unwanted and unused prescription drugs that may be piling up at home in a medicine cabinet or bathroom drawer.

Gold Star Mother’s Day Tribute Survivor Outreach Services is hosting a Gold Star Mother’s Day Tribute on Sept. 30 at 11 a.m. at the Regimental Memorial Chapel, Bldg. 923, Lee Blvd. Light refreshments will be served. For more information, call 878-3887 or 878-3963.

Technology Exhibit and Fair The Joint Base Langley-Eustis community is invited to attend the Government Technology Exhibit and Educational Fair on Oct. 3 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Fort Eustis Club, Bldg. 2123, Pershing Ave. More than 35 exhibitors are expected to attend this free event. For more information, call 878-5700.

Disney on Ice Tickets

MCAHC Public Flu Fair

The Fort Eustis Tickets and Travel Office has tickets available for the Disney on Ice “Rockin’ Ever After” shows scheduled for Sept. 27-30 at the Hampton Coliseum. Tickets are $16 for select performances. The office is located at Bldg. 671, Lee Blvd. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Monday-

McDonald Army Health Center will host a Public Flu Fair in October at Jacobs Theater for all eligible military beneficiaries. The vaccination schedule is: Oct. 3, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Oct. 11, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; and Oct. 25, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. For more information, contact Sgt. 1st

Jacobs Theater Schedule

Marriage Enrichment Program

Free Sitter Web Site The Department of Defense provides a free Internet sitter service for military families. The website finds in-home child care, nannies, tutors, elder care providers, pet sitters and other services in local communities. Active-duty members of all military branches, including activated National Guard and reserve members and their families, can receive a free membership to the service, saving an average of $120 a year. The program provides military families with instant access to caregiver profiles, background checks, pictures, references, reviews, a four-step screening process, and a specialized matching technology to select the right caregiver. For more information, visit www.sittercity.com/dod.

Range Schedule Ranges, training areas and associated facilities are off limits to personnel not engaged in scheduled firing, operations or inspections unless clearance is obtained from the Range Control Fire Desk or a designated Range Control Technician. The Range Control office telephone number is 878-4412, ext. 226 or 878-3834, ext 234. The range operations schedule through Wednesday is: ■ Today, Ranges RD, 1, 2, 3, 5 (7 a.m. to 5 p.m.); ■ Saturday, No Scheduled Ranges; ■ Sunday, No Scheduled Ranges; ■ Monday, Ranges 1, 2, 3 (7 a.m. to 5 p.m.); ■ Tuesday, Ranges 1, 2, 3 (7 a.m. to 5 p.m.); ■ Wednesday, Ranges 1, 2, 3 (7 a.m. to 5 p.m.). All personnel are required to check in and out with Range Control before going into or departing from any range or training area.

Courtesy photo

Friday, 7 p.m. NO SHOW Saturday, 4 p.m. The Campaign (R) When long-time congressman Cam Brady (Will Ferrell) commits a major public gaffe before an upcoming election, a pair of ultra-wealthy CEOs plot to put up a rival candidate and gain influence over their North Carolina district. Their man -- naïve Marty Huggins (Zach Galifianakis), director of the local Tourism Center. Marty appears to be the unlikeliest possible choice but, with the help of his new benefactors, a cutthroat campaign manager and his family’s political connections, he soon becomes a contender who gives the charismatic Cam plenty to worry about. As election day closes in, the two are locked in a dead heat, with insults quickly escalating to injury until all they care about is burying each other, in this mud-slinging and back-stabbing comedy that takes today’s political circus to its logical next level. Because even when you think campaign ethics have hit rock bottom, there’s room to dig a whole lot deeper. Saturday, 7 p.m. NO SHOW Sunday, 2 p.m. NO SHOW Movie synopsis and show time information is available online at www. shopmyexchange.com/ReelTimeTheaters/Movies-Eustis.htm.


SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

LAFBCommunity Memorial golf tournament The Langley Air Force Base Chiefs Group is hosting the Chief Master Sgt. Denise E. Mikolajezyk Memorial Golf Tournament Oct. 5, beginning 1 p.m. at the Eaglewood Golf Course. The cost to register is $50 per golfer, with all proceeds directly supporting Joint Base Langley-Eustis Force Support programs. Additionally, registration includes green fees and a golf cart, beverage cart service, hot dog and soda before play and smoked pork barbecue for 19th hole awards. Teams of four players should be registered with Chief Master Sgt. Paul Hughes at (757) 764-1178, or Staff Sgt. Ryan Lee at (757) 764-7751. A collared shirt, mock turtleneck, soft spikes or sneakers are required to play. No outside food or beverages are permitted. For more info, visit www.facebook.com/ pages/Langley-Chiefs-Group-Annual-CMSgt-Mik-Golf-Tournament/200117933394076.

Hispanic Heritage Month Sept. 15 to Oct. 15 has been designated as Hispanic Heritage Month. The following is a list of events for the occasion: ■ Sept. 15 to Oct. 15 – The Bateman Library Hispanic related books on display ■ Sept. 25 at 10 a.m. – Reading at the child development center ■ Sept. 27 at 2 p.m. – Hispanic Heritage Committee meeting at Langley Lanes activity room ■ Sept. 28 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. – Hispanic Heritage Taster’s Choice ■ Oct. 2, 9 and 15 at 10 a.m. – Reading at child development center ■ Oct. 4 and 11 at 2 p.m. – Hispanic Heritage Committee meeting at Langley Lanes activity room ■ Oct. 6 at 8 p.m. – Latin Night at the Bayview Commonwealth Center ■ Oct. 12 from 11 a.m. to noon – Hispanic Heritage Month luncheon at the Langley Club

NASA Langley open house NASA Langley is hosting an open house Sept. 22 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The open house celebrates Langley’s 95th anniversary as the nation’s first civilian aeronautics lab and later the birthplace of the U.S. space program. Meet an astronaut, watch a space capsule’s splash-test, check out more than a dozen NASA labs and more. Admission is free to the public.Wear comfortable, closed-toe walking shoes. Vehicles and people entering are subject to search. Weapons, shoulder bags (except for wom-

19

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Submit LAFB Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com en’s purses) and infant diaper bags, coolers, alcoholic beverages or computers are not allowed.The cafeteria will be open. For more information, visit www.nasa. gov/langley.

be 30 categories featuring Corvettes, Mustangs, Jeeps and more. Participation is $20 for pre-registration and $25 on the event day. For more information, e-mail starsandstripescarshow@yahoo.com.

Adult membership appreciation

MCAHC Public Flu Fair

The Langley Club will feature comedian Derrick Tennant for Adult Membership Appreciation Night at the Langley Club, Sept. 27 from 7 to 9 p.m.

The McDonald Army Health Center is hosting a public flu fair in October for all eligible military beneficiaries. This event will be held at Jacobs Theater. Flu vaccinations will be administered on the following dates: Oct. 3 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Oct. 11 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and Oct. 25 from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. For more information, call Sgt. 1st Class Jeffery Bowers at (757) 314-7526.

AGF club championship The A.G.F. Club is hosting a championship for all AGF members in good standing Sept. 29-30 at the Eaglewood Golf Course. There is a $25 entrance fee, and sign up ends Sept. 26. For more information, contact the Eaglewood Golf Course at (757) 764-4547.

Rampart Winds performance The American Theatre will be presenting a performance by Rampart Winds on Oct. 9 at 7:30 p.m. Rampart Winds is the traditional woodwind quintet of the United States Air Force Academy Band. This is a general admission event. Tickets are available at The American Theatre box office and will be available at the box office before the performance. For more information, call (757) 7222787 or visit www.hamptonarts.net/artist-info/?products_id=5638.

Marriage enrichment program The Regimental Memorial Chapel is hosting a marriage-enrichment program Thursdays through Oct. 25, 6 to 8 p.m. The program is opened to married and pre-married couples. For more information, call Mike and Carole Carkhuff at (757) 218-1034.

Govtech: Air Force Exhibit All government personnel are invited to the Government Technology Exhibit, Oct. 4 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the Langley Club. This technology and educational exhibit is open to all government employees and contract workers at no cost. Over 35 high-tech organizations from across the United States and Canada will be exhibiting and demonstrating their latest products and services.

Stars & Stripes Car Show The Maintenance Professional of the Year Committee is hosting the Stars & Stripes Car Show, Oct. 13 at the Langley Speedway. Register from 8 to 10:30 p.m.There will

Discounted tuition available Hampton University College of Continuing Education is offering discount tuition and no application fees for military and their dependents. Registration for the Fall I Session is until Oct. 5, and Fall II Session is between Oct. 15 and Dec. 14 for on-base, distantlearning and online courses. All courses are transferrable to the Community College of the Air Force degree. For more information, speak with a Hampton University representative in Room 120 at the Langley Education Center, or call (757) 766-1369 or (757) 727-5773.

Street Smart Come learn how to be street smart Nov. 8 at the Base Theater from 7 to 8 a.m.; 10 to 11 a.m.; and 1 to 2 p.m. Street Smart is

a program presented by experienced firefighters and paramedics dramatically demonstrating the consequences of poor decisions such as drunk driving and drug abuse. For more information call Tech. Sgt. Oliver Missick at 764-5058 or oliver.missick@ langley.af.mil.

African American Heritage The Langley African American Heritage Council hosts its monthly meetings at The Langley Club on the third Thursday of each month from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. For more information, contact Staff Sgt. Chloe Rainey at chloe.rainey@langley.af.mil or call 225-6554.

Junior Achievement volunteers Junior Achievement of Greater Hampton Roads is looking for more volunteers. JA volunteers teach students about money and financial literacy using the JA Program Kit. Volunteers dedicate roughly 45 minutes a session to teaching children these concepts. For more information, call Nikita Rodrigues at (757) 455-9501 or Rachel Belote at (757) 455-9504, or visit www.jahamptonroads.com.

Tax Center Volunteers Needed The Langey Air Force Base Tax Center is looking for any retired Service members interested in volunteering with the program. Training will take place in late Fall or early Winter. Interested applicants should call the Legal Office at (757) 764-3277 and ask for theTax Center Volunteer Coordinator.

Langley Theater Schedule Friday, 7 p.m. NO SHOW Saturday, 2 p.m. NO SHOW Saturday, 7 p.m. The Campaign (R) When long-time congressman Cam Brady (Will Ferrell) commits a major public gaffe before an upcoming election, a pair of ultra-wealthy CEOs plot to put up a rival candidate and gain influence over their North Carolina district. Their man -- naïve

Marty Huggins (Zach Galifianakis), director of the local Tourism Center. Marty appears to be the unlikeliest possible choice but, with the help of his new benefactors, a cutthroat campaign manager and his family’s political connections, he soon becomes a contender who gives the charismatic Cam plenty to worry about. As election day closes in, the two are locked in a dead heat, with insults quickly escalating to injury until all they care about is bury-

ing each other, in this mudslinging and back-stabbing comedy that takes today’s political circus to its logical next level. Because even when you think campaign ethics have hit rock bottom, there’s room to dig a whole lot deeper. Sunday, 2 p.m. NO SHOW Movie synopsis and show time information is available online at www.shopmyexchange.com/ReelTimeTheaters/Movies-Langley.htm.


20

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

OutsideTheGate

•

SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

Submit Outside The Gate announcements to pw1@militarynews.com

Go Green Expo 2012 The Newport News Master Gardeners Association and Virginia Cooperative Extension are sponsoring a Go Green Expo on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Brittingham Midtown Community Center, 570 McLawhorne Drive, Newport News. Admission is free. More than 70 vendors are expected to attend. This event will feature earth-friendly lectures, a farmer’s market, children’s activities, live music and entertainment, and ďŹ tness and health demonstrations. “Dirt the Movieâ€? will be shown at 10:45 a.m., 12:45 p.m., and 2:25 p.m.The 86-minute ďŹ lm brings to life the environ-

Rhythms on the Riverwalk York County is sponsoring the eighth annual Rhythms on the Riverwalk concert series Fridays from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Riverwalk Landing in historic Yorktown. The concerts, featuring jazz, big band and country music, are free and open to the public. Guests are encouraged to bring blankets and/or lawn chairs. Food will be available for purchase. Free parking is available at the Riverwalk Landing parking terrace, York Hall, York-Poquoson Courthouse, County Administration Building and other designated public parking lots throughoutYorktown. The schedule is: ■Today – Charles Darden Band ■ Sept. 28 – Doug Dunn and the Steel River Band ■ Oct. 5 – Tailgate Down For more information, call 890-3500 or visit www.visityorktown.org.

NASA Langley Open House

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Meet an astronaut, watch a space capsule splash-tested, and see where the original astronauts practiced landing on the moon at the NASA Langley Research Center’s Open House on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. This event is free and open to the public. The open house is being held in celebration of Langley’s 95th anniversary as the nation’s ďŹ rst civilian aeronautics lab, opened in 1917, and later the birthplace of the U.S. Space Program. Visitors will see the latest Langley science and technology, talk with researchers, tour labs and take part in hands-on activities. Buses will be provided to take visitors to tour stops. Please wear comfortable, closed-toe walking shoes. Visitors should enter the main gate on Commander Shepard Boulevard in Hampton.Vehicles and people entering are subject to search. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov.

Armed Forces Chess Tournament

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The Armed Forces Open Chess Tournament will take place Oct. 6-8 aboard the USS Wasp at Naval Station Norfolk. This free event is open to active-duty and retired military, reservists, cadets, midshipmen and ROTC who are members of the U.S. Chess Federation. Not a member? Join at www.uschess.org. Membership assistance is available by contacting Col. (Ret.) Michael Hoffpauir at 846-4805 or email michael.e.hoffpauir.ctr@mail.mil.

mental, economic, social, and political importance of soil. A Rain Barrel Workshop will take place at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Attendees will be able to assemble a 55-gallon rain barrel to take home. The cost is $40. Pre-register by calling 591-4838. For more information about the expo, visit www. nnmastergardeners.org.

Game times are 9 a.m., 12:30 p.m., and 4 p.m. on Oct. 6; 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. on Oct. 7; and 9 a.m. on Oct. 8. Awards will be presented to individual players by Service and to the overall “Best Service Team.�

Free admission to Virginia Zoo Come out and join the USO for Military Appreciation Day at the Virginia Zoo on Oct. 14 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission will be free for active-duty and retired military, DoD civilians, Reserves/National Guard, and eligible family members. This event will feature children’s games, inatable rides, face painting, clowns and military static displays. The Virginia Zoo is located at 3500 Granby St., Norfolk. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. For more information, visit www.usohrcv.com.

Skate, Rattle, and Roll in Yorktown York County Parks and Recreation is sponsoring Skate, Rattle and Roll on Fridays at the Dare Elementary School Gym, 300 Dare Road, Yorktown. Beginners and pros can enjoy skating under sparkling colored lights on more than 7,000 square feet of skating rink. Admission is $5 per session (includes skates) or $3 with rollerblade rental. The schedule is: Session One – 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., families and elementary school students (up to grade ďŹ ve); Session Two – 9 to 11 p.m., middle school students in grades six through eight. A Halloween Glow Skate is scheduled for Oct. 26 (ďŹ rst session).This event will feature a costume parade and judging, music, games and contests. For more info or to book a private party, call 890-3500.

Military Education Summit The Joint Military Services School Liaison Committee is hosting a free Education Summit on Nov. 1 from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Old Dominion University Ted Constant Convocation Center, 4320 Hampton Blvd., Norfolk. This event is open to parents, school professionals and anyone who works with military children. Breakout sessions and panel discussions will include Resiliency in Action, Military Families on the Move, Special Education IEP/504’s, and Effects of Bullying on Education. A box lunch will be provided. Please register by Oct. 15 at www.discovermwr.com/ educationsummit. For more information, call 322-2679 (Southside) or 887-4912 (Peninsula).


SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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FALL KICK-OFF Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Kelly Jo Bridgwater

Maj. Gen. Mark MacCarley, Deputy Chief of Staff, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, meets with Gordon Bates, a World War II veteran who served with the 503rd Parachute Regimental CombatTeam, during the team's reunion breakfast Sept. 13 in Richmond, Va. The reunion included a day-trip to Washington, D.C., to visit the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, and the World War II and Korean War Veterans Memorials. Members of the Honor Flight Historic Triangle Virginia, a nonprofit organization, were the veteran's escorts for the day.

WHEN: Saturday, Sept. 22, 2012 WHERE: City Center at Oyster Point in Newport Ne News WHE ew TIME: 11:00am – 3:00pm • Join us ffor Christian fellowship, music, prayer, crafts & games for children en of aall ages. • This event is free to the public. • There will be food vendors on site. • We hope to see you there!

WE A ARE REACHING OUT TO OUR LOCAL COMMUNITY AND SHARING GOD’S WORD

-%/( SUHSDUHV IRU IOX VHDVRQ Sergeant 1st Class Jeffery S. Bowers, MCAHC's Senior Clinical NCO, administers a flu vaccination to Lt. Gen. David D. Halverson, deputy commanding general,TRADOC, at the U.S. Army TRADOC headquarters on Fort Eustis.

The McDonald Army Health Center is hosting a public flu fair at the JacobsTheater on Fort Eustis Oct. 3 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Oct. 11 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Oct. 25 from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Personnel who need the flu vaccine after the open period can schedule an appointment with either MCAHC or USAF Hospital Langley.

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

Don’t Miss CareerConnection’s

Largest & Last Career Fair of 2012!

FALL

CAREER DAY Wednesday, October 10 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Constant Convocation Center 4320 Hampton Blvd., Norfolk, Virginia

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ABOVE: U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Timothy Deardorff (left), 1st Maintenance Squadron egress operator, and Airman 1st Class Jeremiah Garfoyle, 633rd Logistic Readiness Squadron refueling operator, attach a fuel hose to an F-22 Raptor during a Hydrant Mobile Refueler procedure at Langley Air Force Base, Sept. 13.The new procedure, which could save the Air Force millions of dollars, saves time by allowing fuel to be pumped directly from a hydrant system instead of several R-11 fuel trucks. LEFT: Garfoyle prepares to attach a hose to an F-22 Raptor. After months of testing, this is the first time the HYMORE system has been used as a certified fueling operation at Langley Air Force Base.


SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

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For active-duty, retired military, their eligible family members and active or retired civil service employees If you are retired military or retired DOD civilian, include current employer and work phone number on the application.

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24

www.peninsulawarrior.com

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

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Peninsula Warrior Sept. 21, 2012 Army Edition  

Fort Eustis edition of the Sept. 21, 2012 issue of Peninsula Warrior