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:DUULRU J O I N T September 7, 2012 Vol. 3, No. 35

B A S E

ARMY EDITION

L A N G L E Y - E U S T I S

P u b l i s h e d i n t h e i n t e re s t o f p e r s o n n e l a t J o i n t B a s e L a n g l e y - E u s t i s

w w w. p e n i n s u l a w a r r i o r. c o m

CASING

‘Doer’s Battalion’ inactivates after decades of service — Page 3

TRIBUTE

Salute Battery brings out the big guns — Page 10

For more online content, check out JBLE.af.mil

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Patients come first MCAHC introduces new model of patient-centered healthcare – Page 13 FITNESS ACC Fitness Center opens new Warrior Zone — Page 8


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

SEPTEMBER 7, 2012


SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

/HJHQGDU\ µ'RHU¶V %DWWDOLRQ¶ LQDFWLYDWHV DIWHU GHFDGHV RI VHUYLFH DW )RUW (XVWLV By Senior Airman Jason J. Brown 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Beneath a brilliant azure sky, flags and campaign streamers rippled in the breeze off the James River, as the 6th Transportation Battalion cased its colors in a waterfront ceremony at Fort Eustis’ 3rd Port Aug. 28. The battalion, a subordinate unit of the 7th Sustainment Brigade, inactivated after 33 years of consecutive service at Fort Eustis, having been most recently activated March 16, 1979. The unit first activated at Fort Eustis 60 years ago, standing up Aug. 15, 1952. The unit, nicknamed the “Doers,” boasts a storied history, tracing its roots to World War II, where it served on the famed “Red Ball Express,” the massive truck-convoy system built to supply Allied forces in their advance across Europe following D-Day. According to Col. Lawrence Kominiak, the 7th Sus. Bde. commander, the 6th Trans. Bn. has activated and inactivated several times, meeting the operational needs of the Army when called upon. In addition to WWII, the unit’s service record includes campaigns in Vietnam, Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, Operation Restore Hope in Somalia, Operation Uphold Democracy in Haiti, and Operation Iraqi Freedom. Most recently, the battalion returned from a one-year deployment in Kuwait in support of Operation New Dawn. “This unit is truly great, with a long history and legacy at Fort Eustis. The battalion lineage mirrors the history of our great nation,” Kominiak said. “Undoubtedly in the future, the great 6th Transportation Battalion will once again answer the call and be brought back into our nation’s service.” “Each time the unit was called upon, the battalion call answered, the battalion made another deposit into the trust fund of American liberty, because freedom isn’t

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“This unit is truly great, with a long history and legacy at Fort Eustis. The battalion lineage mirrors the history of our great nation. Undoubtedly in the future, the great 6th Transportation Battalion will once again answer the call, and be brought back into our nation’s service.” — Col. Lawrence Kominiak 7th Sustainment Brigade commander

“Each time the unit was called upon, the battalion call answered, the battalion made another deposit into the trust fund of American liberty, because freedom isn’t free.” Photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Hawkins

U.S. Army Lt. Col. Curt L. Stewart (left), 6th Transportation Battalion, 7th Sustainment Brigade commander, assists Command Sgt. Maj. Anthony Bargaineer of the 6th Transportation Battalion as he furls the colors during an inactivation ceremony at Fort Eustis, Aug. 28.The unit first activated at Fort Eustis 60 years ago, standing up Aug. 15, 1952, serving inWorldWar II,Vietnam, and Operations Restore Hope and New Dawn.

free,” said Lt. Col. Curt Stewart, the 6th Trans. Bn. commander. In his remarks, Stewart said he was proud to have led the unit, and while he was sad to see the battalion case its colors, it was “one of the most memorable assignments” in his career. “I stand before you today honored to have had the privilege of leading this superior truck battalion for the last year and a half,” Stewart said. “I know that having been a “Doer” will stay with me longer than today.” “While I hold no certainty that the ‘Doer’s Battalion’ will be stood back up in my

— Lt. Col. Curt Stewart 6th Transportation Battalion commander

time, it is something of a comfort that the ‘Doer’ spirit remains, [and] to know that the memory of those Soldiers who have given their lives under this guidon, writing with their blood, sweat and a lot of diesel fuel the first half-century of the battalion’s history, will not be relegated to a dusty warehouse in the Institute of Heraldry, but instead inspire us to all move out smartly, get those trucks out on the road, and perpetuate the legacy of the ‘Doers’ in our future endeavors,” the commander said, closing the ceremony and placing his unit back on the shelf until the Army calls upon them again.

The 6thTransportation Battalion, a subordinate unit of the 7th Sustainment Brigade, recently inactivated after 33 years of consecutive service at Fort Eustis, having been most recently activated March 16, 1979. The unit first activated at Fort Eustis 60 years ago, standing up Aug. 15, 1952. The unit, nicknamed the “Doers,” boasts a storied history, tracing its roots to World War II, where it served on the famed “Red Ball Express,” the massive, truck-convoy system built to supply Allied forces in their advance across Europe following D-Day.


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SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

ABOVE:The U.S. Army Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps from Fort Myer, Va., pause for a moment of recognition Aug. 30, before the ďŹ nal event of the 2012 Music Under the Stars summer concert series at Fort Eustis. An audience of 800 enjoyed the United States ArmyTraining and Doctrine Command Band’s season ďŹ nale of its annual Music Under the Stars concert series.

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75$'2& %DQG ZUDSV XS VXPPHU VHULHV By Anna Leverenz and Gregory Mueller UNITED STATES ARMY TRAINING AND DOCTRINE COMMAND

An audience of 800 enjoyed the United States Army Training and Doctrine Command Band’s season ďŹ nale of its annual Music Under the Stars concert series. The Aug. 30 concert featured a rendition of Tchaikovsky’s Overture: 1812 with live cannon ďŹ re. The band also performed traditional and popular music selections including John Williams’ “Hymn to the Fallenâ€? from Saving Private Ryan, “Fanfare for the Common Man,â€? by Aaron Copland and “Get Here if You Can,â€? made famous by gospel singer Oleta Adams. The audience was also treated to the sights and sounds of the U.S. Army Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps from Fort Myer, Va. For 80 years, the TRADOC Band has presented its Music Under the Stars concert series. This season marked the ďŹ rst time the band played at its new outdoor concert venue at scenic Magnolia Park on Fort Eustis, VA. For a schedule of upcoming performances, visit the TRADOC Band’s website at www.tradocband.com.

Photos by Staff Sgt. Jose Pomales

ABOVE: Sgt. Daniel Puls (left) and Staff Sgt. Patricia Conyers, U.S. ArmyTraining and Doctrine Command Band vocalists, perform “Rolling in the Deepâ€? by Adele during the 1812 Overture concert at Fort Eustis, Aug. 30.This performance was the ďŹ nal event of the 2012 Music Under the Stars summer concert series.


SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

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61&2V PDNH FDUHHUV IDPLO\ ZRUN By Senior Airman Stephanie Rubi 633D AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Airmen and Soldiers are expected to be ready to deploy at any moment. Service members who are parents must complete a child-care plan when they deploy, which means leaving their children in the care of a spouse or guardian. For Master Sgts. Casey and Dawn Moninger, a Joint Base Langley-Eustis senior non-commissioned ofďŹ cer couple, dealing with the details of being married military members only strengthens their commitment to each other. “At one point in our careers, I was returning from a deployment and Casey was on his way to deploy,â€? said Dawn. “We were able to see each other for a few hours in transition, which was nice because it ended up being another several months before we saw each other again.â€? Casey is the superintendent of Distributed Ground Systems-Experimental for Warner Robins Air Logistics Center Detachment 1, and Dawn is the 633rd Air Base Wing superintendent of ground safety. They share the same family values and have four loving children from previous marriages. They both struggled through unsuccessful marriages. What now seems like a picture-perfect life came from a long and difďŹ cult past dealing with deployments, temporaryduty assignments and separate permanent-duty stations. They recalled how difďŹ cult it was to be apart during those times, but now, exchanging smiles and laughs with each other, Casey and Dawn seem like teenagers in love. Looking back, they feel their relationship is the culmination of a long chain of events. Casey joined the Air Force May 1, 1992, with an original plan to serve four years and separate at the end of his enlistment. After a few years serving on active duty, he met his ďŹ rst wife; they married and had two children. Dawn joined the Air Force Oct. 13, 1992. She was already married, and joined to help her ex-husband pay

Courtesy photo

U.S Air Force Master Sgts. Casey and Dawn Moninger, shown here on a family cruise, are both active-duty Service members.Throughout their marriage, they have been apart a total of four years due to service commitments.

“The key is learning how to say ‘sorry’ even if you think you’re right. Because to some extent, everybody is wrong at some point.â€? — Master Sgt. Casey Moninger Distributed Ground Systems-Experimental superintendent for college while earning a degree of her own. They also had two children during their nine years of marriage. The Moningers met at Langley Air Force Base, Va., in 1998, while attending Airmen Leadership School, the ďŹ rst step for non-commissioned ofďŹ cers in professional military education. They became friends and remained close throughout the years that followed. “After a while he became the person I could not imagine my life without,â€? said Dawn, while smiling at her husband. “That’s when I knew we were meant to be.â€? In 2001, Casey and Dawn decided to get married. With children from previous marriages, they had their hands full, swapping responsibilities

while living an active-duty lifestyle. “The key is learning how to say ‘sorry’ even if you think you’re right,� said Casey, with a grin. “Because to some extent, everybody is wrong at some point.� “Though my life and career was not an informed decision, I feel like it has been the best decision I’ve made,� said Dawn. “I have had the most amazing career, and it afforded my children the ability to see life in a similar perspective as we do. That’s where Casey comes in as well, because we are both military.� With one child in college, two in high school and one in middle school, the Moningers learned to work together well, even though they all have unique personalities. “Our kids are all very different, but they pair up and get along great,� said Casey. “We have an 18-year-old, two 17-year-olds, and the youngest is about to turn 15 years old.� The Moningers both had separate plans and separate lives when they enlisted, but when those goals changed, they focused their attention on creating better lives for themselves and their children. Despite their challenges, they have shown how other Air Force families can make it work.


SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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0HQWRUVKLS SURJUDP RIIHUV VXSSRUW WR UHFRYHULQJ $LUPHQ By Tammy Cournoyer AIR FORCE PERSONNEL CENTER WARRIOR AND FAMILY OPERATIONS CENTER

The Recovering Airmen Mentorship Program connects wounded, injured or ill Airmen who are well along in their recovery with those who are just beginning the journey. The program is one of several implemented to help care for wounded warriors during their recovery, said Air Force Wounded Warrior Operations Manager Brian Churchill. “Assisting wounded warriors in recovery requires a team effort involving the medical and non-medical community, all operating together to provide the best possible quality and support to our wounded warriors and their families,” Churchill said. “RAMP helps our Airmen mentally and emotionally deal with their situation and that’s as critical to recovery as physical medicine.” RAMP mentors are not care providers, but are the voice of experience for

“Assisting wounded warriors in recovery requires a team effort involving the medical and non-medical community, all operating together to provide the best possible quality and support to our wounded warriors and their families.” — Brian Churchill Air Force Wounded Warrior Operations Manager Airmen in situations where many doctors, nurses, and other care managers cannot truly understand what they are going through. “A mentor is a listening ear, someone who understands and provides straight answers to some very personal and penetrating questions,” said Senior Airman Michael Malarsie, program administrator and RAMP mentor. The RAMP provides each recovering Airman with a personal wingman they can reach out to for help and understanding, and can also benefit spouses by pairing them with spouse mentors

who know the loneliness and frustration of dealing with various issues during the recovery process. Recovering Airmen interested in getting involved as a mentor and Airmen on the road to recovery who just want to talk to someone who has been there can contact their regional care coordinator or the Air Force Warrior and Survivor Care office at 210-395-7121or DSN 969-7121. For more information about wounded warrior programs and other personnel issues, visit the myPers website at https://mypers.af.mil. File photo

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

FeatureStory

1HHG H[WUHPH ¿WQHVV" *HW LQ WKH :DUULRU =RQH By Senior Airman Stephanie Rubi 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Photos by Senior Airman Stephanie Rubi

ABOVE: U.S. Air Force Senior Master Sgt. Robert Disney, Air Combat Command pararescue team leader, lifts 440 pounds during his workout inside the “Warrior Zone,” at Langley Air Force Base, Aug. 29. The room is designed for athletes who perform advanced tactical fitness, using high-intensity training. RIGHT: Master Sgt. Lafonza Spencer, Air Combat Command manpower management analyst, performs hand-stand pushups. Spencer visits the Warrior Zone several times throughout the week as part of his workout routine.

The Air Combat Command Fitness Center recently opened its newest roomthe Warrior Zone. It was designed for individuals interested in advanced tactical fitness using high-intensity training and popular workout programs. The interest in high-intensity workouts has risen among Joint Base Langley-Eustis Airmen and Soldiers. Service members seeking that combative edge in their daily workouts found it difficult to perform without the proper space and equipment. The Warrior Zone has a large open space, rubber mats, various standing machines and weight-training equipment. “It fills the need for different types of lifting and workouts,” said John Hicock, 633rd Force Support Squadron fitness center director. “We have seen a positive response to the room and its equipment.” Hicock saw the need for a room that could support such activities. He knew that old ACC Fitness Center pool room could be the perfect place. In 2003, Hurricane Isabel caused unrepairable damage to the indoor pool. Over the years, ideas were circulated but no projects were approved. “It was just an empty space in our building, but it had so much potential,” said Hicock. In 2011, the idea of creating a room solely for tactical fitness was approved and budgeted. With help from the 633rd Civil Engineering Squadron and the 633rd Contracting Squadron, construction was ready to begin in January 2012. Construction crews began by filling the pool with concrete, creating the prop-

“With proper training, anyone can benefit from this room. We try to offer different things for different athletes, to include the high-intensity workouts unfit for regular equipment rooms.” — John Hicock 633rd Force Support Squadron fitness center director

er floor for these workouts. The Warrior Zone’s floor and mats make damage extremely unlikely. “With proper training, anyone can benefit from this room,” said Hicock. “We try to offer different things for different athletes, to include the highintensity workouts unfit for regular equipment rooms.” Just a few weeks after opening, the room is already filled with happy and healthy JBLE Airmen and Soldiers. “I enjoy the equipment here; my favorites are the different types of medicine balls,” said Capt. Greyson Leftwich, 633rd Dental Squadron surgical doctor. Greyson, new to Joint Base LangleyEustis, has already made use of the Warrior Zone since his arrival. “I already told a guy I work with what a great room it is,” said Greyson. With new equipment still arriving, Hicock has high hopes for increased interest in the Warrior Zone. “I’d really like to see it used to its fullest potential, and for the individuals that use it to improve physically, pass their PT tests and improve their quality of life,” said Hicock.

The newly-opened Warrior Zone, located inside the Air Combat Command Fitness Center, has a large open space, rubber mats, various standing equipment and weight training equipment. It was created to help Joint Base Langley-Eustis Airmen and Soldiers in their quest for high intensity workouts.


SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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New DOD policy for TDY, PCS cancellations Beginning Oct. 1, any travel authorization that includes air travel must be approved and ticketed at least 72 hours in advance of the scheduled flight departure to avoid airline reservations being cancelled. This is due to a new policy being instituted by the airlines under the Fiscal Year 2013 GSA City Pair contract. Under the new policy, if an Authorizing Official does not approve an authorization within 72 hours of departure, the airline reservation will be cancelled, and the traveler will arrive at the airport without a ticket or a reservation in the airline’s system. This applies to all City Pair and noncontract government flights that are either booked through the Defense Travel Service or through a Commercial Travel Office. Those travelers making travel plans within 72 hours of departure must have their authorization approved and tickets issued within 24 hours of creation to avoid cancellation. If making plans within 24 hours of departure, authorizations must be approved and ticketed at least six hours prior to flight departure time to avoid cancellation. If airline reservations are cancelled, a traveler will be notified via email or phone by their Commercial Travel Office. Arriving at the airport without a ticket can impact the mission and travel funds, and put unnecessary stress on the traveler. If this occurs, travelers are not advised to rebook at the airline counter. Often, counter agents are not familiar with GSA’s City Pair Program and may book the traveler on a full-priced fare at a much higher cost. To rebook a flight, travelers should follow their normal ticketing process. Travelers should take their travel itinerary with them to the airport. If your reservation has been cancelled, the itinerary will provide contact information for your CTO, as well as reservation details to help you re-book. In the current fiscal environment where it is necessary to be conservative with trav-

el budgets, monitoring the status of travel documents, and ensuring travel authorizations are approved, is the best way to avoid unnecessary costs and stress associated with re-booking travel.

Tips forTravelers ■ Monitor the status of your travel authorization. If your trip is approaching and your authorization has not been approved, contract your Authorizing Official immediately. If your AO is unavailable, contact your Defense Travel Administrator. ■ Ensure your DTS profile is current. Often, travelers forget to update their profile with the Government Travel Charge Card expiration date if they received a new card. Without a current card in your profile, a reservation cannot be purchased. ■ Take your travel itinerary with you to the airport. If your reservation has been cancelled, the itinerary will provide contact information for your CTO as well as reservation details to help you re-book.

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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Soldiers from the 7th Sustainment Brigade Salute Battery fire 35-millimeter cannons during the Independence Day celebration at Seay Plaza at Fort Eustis, July 4.The Salute Battery is staffed in 90-day rotations by Soldiers from the subordinate companies in the 7th Sus. Bde. to perform ceremonies across the installation, including memorials, retirements, changes of command and the daily flag-raising at “Reveille.”

7KH VRXQG RI IUHHGRP 6DOXWH %DWWHU\ EULQJV RXW WKH ELJ JXQV By Senior Airman Jason J. Brown 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

If you have ever attended or witnessed a ceremony at Fort Eustis, chances are you have felt the concussion of cannon fire. Whether in memoriam of the fallen, in honor of the nation or simply in celebration of a retirement, the Soldiers of the 7th Sustainment Brigade Salute Battery stand ready to deliver the volleys of tribute. The Salute Battery features a rotation of Soldiers assigned to the subordinate companies of the 7th Sus. Bde. Troops spend 90 days on the detail, and participate by unit. Most recently, the 155th Inland Cargo Transfer Company provided personnel to man the battery’s 35-millimeter cannons. Retirement ceremonies, changes of command for senior officers, and national tributes, such as the annual Independence Day 50-gun salute, are common occasions for the Salute Battery to man the cannons at the post. Staff Sgt. Junior Oto, noncommissioned officer in charge of the Salute Battery, said the detail performs approximately 50 ceremonies each year. The team can use anywhere from one to 50 rounds in a single performance, depending on the circumstances of the event. Most routine, however, is the time-honored tradition of “Reveille,” the daily ceremony in which the colors are raised over the garrison, signaling the beginning of the duty day. Seven days a week, the Salute Battery raises the flag, and fires a lone

shot from the cannon at Seay Plaza. Spc. Ernesto Arenas, a 155th ICTC Soldier currently serving in the Salute Battery, said serving on “cannon detail” is a “great experience,” as it provides Soldiers a rare opportunity to operate the cannons. “In our normal job, we’re in transportation, where we spend most of the time driving around. On this detail, we get to fire the cannon every day, seven days a week,” Arenas said. “Not everyone gets to go out and fire a cannon every morning. It’s cool.” Arenas said companies spend a week training with the unit they are replacing on cannon mechanics, maintenance and cleaning techniques prior to firing. As expected, the battery does not use live ammunition, opting for “blanks,” which present the muzzle blast and sound of live rounds without the projectile. Oto and Arenas agreed that teamwork is the most critical skill applied while serving in the battery. The daily duty in the early morning requires individual and group accountability to ensure the ritual occurs on time and in proper military form. For ceremonies, Soldiers need to know their role, and be able to execute their maneuvers safely and cleanly to maintain the pomp and circumstance of the event. “We have to be prepared every day to wake up early and fire the cannon for the entire base,” Arenas said. “The most important thing is being where you’re supposed to be. The whole team makes the ceremony happen. If one person’s missing, it throws off the entire team.”


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

MCDONALD ARMY HEALTH CENTER PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Patient Centered Medical Home is the new model of healthcare being adopted throughout the military healthcare system. By 2014, the McDonald Army Health Center will establish six medical homes, with Troop Medical Clinic 2 being the first to seek national recognition by the National Committee for Quality Assurance – a certifying body for primary care practices. The remaining medical homes will be located within the primary care clinics of Family Health, Pediatrics, and Internal Medicine. “The staff at TMC2 is excited to implement this model. We always look for new ways to improve the quality of care we provide, and this model will definitely take us to the next higher level,” said Sgt. 1st Class Cassandra Alam, the noncommissioned officer of TMC2. Army Patient Centered Medical Homes increase access to primary care, expand the definition of healthcare quality, and reinvigorate MCAHC’s commitment to customer service. As soon as a patient enrolls in one of the primary care clinics, the MCAHC team will proactively engage the patient as a “partner in care.” The Patient Centered Medical Home starts with this face-to-face encounter and expands from there. Patients are assigned to a team of healthcare providers, i.e., physicians, nurses, behavioral health professionals, pharmacists, etc., to develop a comprehensive, personal healthcare plan. This includes ensuring delivery of prevention screening and services, managing chronic conditions, and promoting a spirit of health, wellness and trust. At this point, patients become the center of their healthcare team. Collectively, patients and healthcare teams can take advantage of telephone and web-based communication to follow-up on health issues and concerns, share and update information, and coordinate care delivery. “With the reinvention of Patient-Centered Medical Home, our enrolled patients have the opportunity to partner with their entire Primary Care Manager team. This translates to superior access and healthier patients,” said Samara W. Walker, MCAHC’s PCMH champion/project manager. “Each PCM team is led by a physician, physician assistant or nurse practitioner, who is supported by registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, Soldier medics, nursing assistants/medical assistants and medical receptionists. The PCM team approach for delivering a sys-

IDES makes Veterans Affairs process more efficient, faster By Dr. Jose E. Nieves MCDONALD ARMY HEALTH CENTER

Now, in its final phase of implementation, IDES has expanded to Fort Eustis, and Soldiers will now only have “one stop” to make when undergoing their medical evaluation board process. In essence, the IDES system replaced the legacy system. report found that processing times under the new IDES system averaged between 274 and 296 days, a considerable improvement over the estimated 540 days the old legacy system would take. Service members expressed an overall general satisfaction with the change. The report also underlined some remaining implementation challenges. The logistics of having both VA and DOD IDES fully staffed and the colocation of DOD and VA evaluation teams. At Fort Eustis, both of these conditions have been met. The Fort Eustis IDES team is fully staffed under the supervision of Dr. Paul Duch IDES Medical Director, and Margarete J. Bailey, Disability Evaluation Service chief. The team is located on the first floor of the McDonald Army Health Center, opposite the command hall. The VA IDES team recently moved to the same location, with their offices located at the end of the hall. Including MCAHC, IDES is currently operational at 16 of 35 military treatment facilities.

13

By Marlon Martin

Photo by Marlon J. Martin

benefit process. The strategic aim of IDES is to avoid any delays in the claim process, with Service members beginning their VA claim while simultaneously undergoing the DOD evaluation process. This system also assures the armed services will maintain a “ready force.” The process is meant to be “Soldier-centered,” and reduce the period of time it would take for Soldiers to receive their benefits (or the benefit gap). In addition, it helps Service members avoid the need to navigate the VAsystem on their own. Under the IDES system, Service members would enter both the DOD and VA claim process at the same time. This approach makes for a concurrent rather than a sequential process. Once a Soldier is referred to the medical evaluation board, a Physical Evaluation Board Liaison Officer, or “PEBLO,” will initiate a VA claim referral, as well. The PEBLO will act as a “case manager” overseeing the Service member’s claim across both the DOD and VA systems. An initial General Accounting Office

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Dr. Paul Duch, left, Integrated Disability Examination System medical director, oversees the benefits processing for wounded, ill and injured Service members. He recently met with Brig. Gen. Joseph Caravalho, Jr., right, commanding general, Northern Regional Medical Command, Fort Belvoir, Va., and explained how Soldiers benefit from using IDES.

The Department of Defense Integrated Disability Evaluation System was first introduced in November 2007 as a means to integrate the way the DOD and Veterans Affairs manage processing benefits for wounded, ill and injured Service members. Now, in its final phase of implementation, IDES has expanded to Fort Eustis, and Soldiers will now only have “one stop” to make when undergoing their medical evaluation board process. In essence, the IDES system replaced the legacy system which was the administrative process formerly used in processing Army and VA benefits claims. Under the legacy system, the medical disability process began at the local medical treatment facility when a medical examiner determined that a medical condition interferes with a Service member’s ability to perform his or her duties. The case would be referred to the Physical Evaluation Board for a determination of fitness for duty. If a Service member was found unfit, the PEB would assign a percentage/ combined percentage rating for the unfit condition(s), and the Service member would be discharged from duty. The Service member would then enter the VA service connection disability-

Photo by Marlon Martin

During a recent visit to the McDonald Army Health Centter, Sabrina O’Kane, back, steadies her son, Soren, at the Pediatrics Clinic during a routine check-up. Pediatrics is one of fou ur primary care clinics offering Patient Centered Medical Home services – a new model of healthcare that has been adopte ed throughout the military healthcare system.

Photo by Marlon Martin

Dr. Khalid A. Khan, Internal Medicine staff internist, speaks to a patient during her recent visit to the McDonald Army Health Center at Fort Eustis. Internal Medicine is one of four primary care clinics that will offer Patient Centered Medical Home services.

tem of health becomes more personalized.” Patient Centered Medical Home services are easy to access, patient-centered, team-based, and quality-focused. As patients interact with their healthcare teams, they will immediately realize they have more flexibility managing their own healthcare. According to Dr. Ronald Mack, the chief of Pediatric Services, PCMH will address all healthcare needs. “It’s healthcare’s ‘total package!’ It is team-driven with the patient and family in the driver’s seat,” Mack explained. “Their healthcare needs drive the bus. The healthcare team is responsible for improving outcomes from acute and chronic disease of the patients and their family. Wellness and preventive care are the pillars of our medical home.”

To learn more about this patient-centered system of healthcare, individuals are encouraged to follow McDonald on Facebook at www.facebook.com/mcdonaldahc, or visit the Health Center’s website at http://mcdonald.narmc.amedd.army.mil.


14

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

•

SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

Photo by Senior Airman Jason J. Brown

A vehicle parked at the Langley Marina becomes inundated with oodwaters as Hurricane Irene approaches Langley Air Force Base,Va., Aug. 27, 2011.

You are invited to attend AUSA’s 2012 Annual Meeting and Exposition in Washington, D.C. 22-24 October 2012

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With September designated as National Preparedness Month, Air Force Emergency Management experts are emphasizing the tools available to help Airmen and their families “Be Ready.â€? National Preparedness Month is an annual campaign to raise awareness on the importance of disaster preparedness. The event was instituted by the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Department of Homeland Security a year after the devastating events of 9/ll. With a theme of “Pledge to Prepare: Awareness to Action,â€? the goal of this year’s commemoration is to encourage all Americans to take speciďŹ c steps to be prepared for all kinds of disasters and emergencies. The message of personal readiness is one that Airmen should heed year round, according to Air Force emergency managers. “National Preparedness Month is a FEMA-sponsored event,â€? said Mike Connors, the Air Force emergency manager. “The Air Force has its ‘Be Ready’ initiative, which is a year-round campaign that dovetails nicely into that. Between the two campaigns, it helps raise awareness and prompts people to take action to be prepared for whatever the threat.â€? Air Force emergency managers are trained to support base communities by preventing, preparing for, responding to and recovering from emergencies. This includes educating base members on what to

do if they encounter a hazard, whether it’s a natural disaster or man-made incident such as a major accident or terrorist attack. “One of the ďŹ rst things Airmen should know is where their installation’s emergency management ofďŹ ce is,â€? Connors said. “The installation emergency management ofďŹ ce is the place to go for emergency information. The EM staff has the expertise to provide you the knowledge and materials you need to be prepared.â€? Emergency managers recommend some basic steps Airmen should take now that could make a big difference in the event of a disaster. “Three things that we constantly stress to our Airmen is (to) get a kit, make a plan and be prepared,â€? said Master Sgt. Ernie Rude, NCO in charge for Air Force emergency management integration. “If every Airman will take these steps, effects from disasters can be minimized and lives can be saved.â€? Rude said there is a comprehensive set of resources available on the Air Force’s “Be Readyâ€? website. “This site is available to the public and offers checklists that can assist users in properly planning for whatever contingency arises. There is even a ‘Be Ready Kids’ section where you can download activity sheets to help educate younger family members,â€? he said. For more information and resources to help prepare for any disaster, Air Force members should contact their installation emergency management ofďŹ ce or visit http://www.BeReady.af.mil.


SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

www.peninsulawarrior.com

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A U.S. Army Reserve team can officially call itself the top “Water Dawgs” in the Department of Defense. The 753rd Quartermaster Company, based in Green Bay, Wis., beat 16 other active-duty and reserve-component teams from around the country to claim the top prize in the 2012 Sgt. Maj. John C. Marigliano Award of Excellence Water Purification Rodeo, which took place at Joint Expeditionary Base East (Fort Story, Va.) and Fort Lee, Va., Aug. 17-24. Maj. Gen. John R. “Jack” O’Connor, U.S. Army Forces Command, G-4, deputy chief of staff, was on hand to present the award during a ceremony at the Regimental Club Friday. He was accompanied by Brig. Gen. Gwen Bingham and Command Sgt. Maj. James Sims, Quartermaster School commandant and regimental CSM, respectively. Staff Sgt. Jason Parmer, 753rd QM Co. noncommissioned officer in charge, said he thought his team was among the top three competitively, especially during the second-phase events held at Fort Lee. Still, he said he was flabbergasted the moment the 753rd were declared the winners. “It was surreal,” he said. “It was really, really, really tough to take in. I did tear up a bit.” Parmer added that fist pumps and back slaps followed as team members walked up to the center of the club room for the trophy presentation.

U.S. Army Spc. Donald Hunter (left) and Pfc. Beau Howell work in tandem to attach hoses from theTacticalWater Purification System during testing for that event at Training Area 19, Aug. 22. Fort Lee and Fort Story hosted the 2012 Water Purification Rodeo, held Aug. 17-24. Photo byT. Anthony Bell

“It was awesome,” he said. The 14th QM Co. of Greensburg, Pa., captured second place and a team from the 10th Special Forces Group of Fort Carson, Colo., finished third. Seventeen four-Soldier teams took part in the tenth water purification event called the Reverse Osmosis Water Purification Unit (ROWPU) Rodeo. It was conceived in 1997 as a way to train and educate water purification specialists, as well as to foster confidence and camaraderie in the water treatment community. Units from the Marine Corps, U.S. Army Reserve and Army National Guard have competed in past events. The 753rd team shared in that camara-

derie and competitive spirit for the first time last year. Parmer said they benefited considerably from the experience, learning to work better as a team, in addition to developing individual skills. “Each Soldier brought a particular specialty to the table, and we utilized those strengths,” he said. During the first phase of the rodeo at Fort Story, team representatives were quizzed on their technical knowledge, and teams were challenged to operate a 3K Reverse Osmosis Water Purification Unit as efficiently as possible. Parmer said he figured his team was not in first place after the first phase, and

a few events of the final phase, but was not far behind the leaders. “Going into the last event of the competition, we knew that in order to catch the leaders, we had to be flawless,” he said. The 753rd became the second U.S. Army Reserve unit in three years to win the competition. Parmer said his team’s performance is further validation that reserve units are as competitive and well-trained as active-duty units. “I think we train a little harder because we’re a little bit paranoid that when we get into a serious [operational or training] environment that we might not succeed,” he said. “So we’re always motivated to do better, and I think it’s a staple for all reserve units to follow... we’re not here to be pushed around. We’re the real deal, and if we’re challenged, we’re going to bring it just like any other component.” Parmer said the 753rd team will lose two members soon, but he is looking to replace them as soon as possible in preparation for next year’s competition. “We’ll look at what we already have in the unit, and how Soldiers are being evaluated during [advanced individual training] to determine what we need to do to replace them,” he said. The Quartermaster School’s Petroleum and Water Department hosted and supported the Water Purification Rodeo at Fort Lee. The Forces Command Training Cluster, Saltwater Annex, hosted the event at Fort Story.

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A gang of U.S. Service members in Europe inducts its new members by beating them, and one of the initiations results in a death. In Korea, a staff sergeant initiates new Soldiers by hitting them on the upper legs as they perform pushups. In Iraq, a Soldier suspected of trying to kill himself is found in the latrine and ordered to stand at parade rest for two hours in the sun. At yet another base, a Soldier is chided with racial slurs, and decides to take his own life. Though extreme cases like these may make the headlines, there are other instances that constitute hazing, which continues to occur in the Army despite being against Army and Department of Defense policy. Though many Soldiers do not realize it, hazing includes striking a newly promoted NCO’s rank insignia repeatedly, “blood pinningsâ€? and retaliatory “smoke sessions.â€? AR 600-20, Army Command Policy, includes a deďŹ nition of hazing. By Army standards, hazing is cruel, abusive, oppressive or harmful behavior that may or may not include physical, emotional or psychological acts and can occur at any function where Soldiers are present. Sgt. Maj. of the Army Raymond F. Chandler III said the Army has to move away from all forms of hazing, including those that are recognized as traditions during a promotion or pinning ceremony. “When you do blood stripes or blood wings, those are in fact examples of hazing,â€? Chandler said. “A way to recognize that professionalism or accomplishment that is not hazing would be to have a ceremony that recognizes that accomplishment and recognizes the individual’s professionalism by that speciďŹ c event. “Things like a spur ride, which are intended to show camaraderie, enhance the profession and recognize the history of the organization – those are not hazing events,â€? Chandler said. “The difference is that you aren’t doing cruel, abusive, oppressive or harmful activities. That’s a very signiďŹ cant difference. When you pierce someone’s skin, in any manner, that is without a doubt an example of hazing.â€?

Chandler acknowledged that, in the past, hazing was condoned by commanders and NCOs. But he said the Army is moving away from that. Secretary of the Army Leon Panetta and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin E. Dempsey developed a task force earlier this year to take a look at the policy, training and culture in order to make recommendations about any needed changes, Chandler said. “There was a time and place where what we now consider hazing was accepted in our Army,â€? Chandler said. “We need to learn from that, and part of our responsibility now is to treat everybody with dignity and respect and to be professionals.â€? Hazing, in all of its forms, needs to be eradicated from the Army, as it is incompatible with Army values, tradition and leadership, Chandler said. “Hazing can be something as simple as a gantlet, where you may have a Soldier who has been recognized for something outstanding or been promoted,â€? Chandler said. “His platoon would line up on either side of him, and then he would walk down the middle and be punched in the shoulder as hard as they could. That’s an example of hazing. “It could be anything as simple as that, to forcing someone to lie on the ground doing utter kicks until whoever has ordered him to do that tells him to recover. Minor forms of correction are acceptable. But when it’s excessive, that’s when it becomes hazing.â€? Sgt. Maj. Ralph L. Phillips wrote an ethics paper on hazing in the Army in 2008 while a Sergeants Major Course student at the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy at Fort Bliss, Texas. In the paper, he discussed some of the ethical implications of having to stop certain types of hazing. “Before a promotion ceremony and advancing a Soldier to the next grade, the ďŹ rst sergeant should state that striking or punching the new rank of the Soldier is, by deďŹ nition, hazing,â€? Phillips wrote. “If Soldiers hear this at every monthly promotion ceremony, then we are using effective leadership, enforcing standards and teaching what right looks like.â€? All NCOs need to understand Army policy and uphold it as their standard in their units, Phillips said.

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

EustisCommunity Commissary case-lot sale

The ArmyTransportation Museum Foundation is hosting the 33rd annual Colonel Joe Botts Memorial GolfTournament on Saturday at the Pines Golf Course, Bldg. 3518, Mulberry Island Rd. The tournament will kick off with a Shotgun Start at 9 a.m. The museum foundation is also seeking players and event sponsors. Come out and support the world’s finest transportation museum by sponsoring a hole, tree, sand trap or hole-in-one. All contributions are welcome. For more information, contact Col. (Ret.) Jim Rockey or Anne Jenkins at 878-1180, or email www.atmfoundation@netzero.net.

The Fort Eustis Commissary’s annual Case-Lot Sale is scheduled for Thursday through Sept. 15 from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at Bldg. 1382, Lee Blvd. For more information, call 878-5608.

Free oil and filter changes are available to spouses of deployed Service members Saturday, 10 a.m. to noon, at the Auto Craft Shop, Bldg. 660, Jackson Ave. Participants must bring their own oil and filter. This event is sponsored by the Transportation Corps Regimental Memorial Chapel. For more information, contact Don Hood at 890-3186.

Home buying and selling seminars The Fort Eustis Housing Referral Office is sponsoring a Home Buying Seminar, Tuesday, 6 to 8:30 p.m., and a Home Selling Seminar, Thursday, 6 to 8:30 p.m. Both seminars will take place at the Civil Engineer Division conference room at Bldg. 1407, Washington Blvd. They are free and open to the public. Industry experts will include a realtor, mortgage lender, attorney and home inspector. Please RSVP at least three business days prior to attending the seminar of your choice. To register, call 878-2977/5687/5579.

Dinner for families of deployed Military families experiencing deployment or other duty-related separation are invited to attend a free monthly dinner sponsored by the Fort Eustis Chapel Community on Tuesday from 5:15 to 7 p.m. at the Regimental Memorial Chapel, Bldg. 923, Lee Blvd. ■ 5:15 p.m. –Welcome and dinner is served. ■ 6 to 7 p.m. – Craft and game time for children 3 and a half years and older. ■ 6:10 to 7 p.m. – Adult fellowship time (across the hall). Free child-watch care is available after dinner for kids 3 and a half years and younger. For more information about the event, contact Carole Carkhuff at 218-0871, e-mail carkhuffs2@verizon.net, or call the chapel at 878-1304/1316.

SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

Submit Eustis Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com

Memorial golf tournament

Free oil and filter changes

Get Golf Ready classes Get Golf Ready classes will be held at the Pines Golf Course today, Sept. 15, 22, 29, and Oct. 6. Hours are: 10 to 11:30 a.m. (morning) and 1 to 2:30 p.m. (afternoon). The “All in One Week” class is scheduled for Monday through Sept. 14 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. The cost for five lessons is $99. Golf clubs, balls and other equipment will be provided. To register, visit GetGolfReady.com. For more information, call 878-2252.

Marriage Enrichment Program The Regimental Memorial Chapel will host a Marriage Enrichment program from 6 to 8 p.m. beginning Thursday through Oct. 25 at the chapel, Bldg. 923, Lee Blvd. This program is open to all married and engaged couples, and spouses of service members who are deployed or training elsewhere. Free child watchcare will be provided for children up to age 11 years old. For more information, contact Mike and Carole Carkhuff at 218-1034 or email carkhuffs2@verizon.net.

Boys and Girls Club Day Boys and Girls Club Day for Kids will be held on Sept. 15 from 1 to 4 p.m. at Youth Services, Bldg. 1102, Pershing Ave. This event will feature inflatable rides, games, crafts, face painting, food, beverages, door raffles and more. Open to all DoD ID cardholders. For more information, call 878-4448.

JBLE Job Fair The Army Career and Alumni Program, Army Community Services and the Virginia Employment Commission will host the Joint Base Langley-Eustis Job Fair on Sept. 20 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Fort Eustis Club, Bldg. 2123 Pershing Ave. More than 45 employers are expected to attend. This event is open to all; no children please. Non-DoD ID cardholders must use the Fort Eustis main gate to secure a pass. Valid vehicle registration, proof of insurance and a photo ID are required for access. For more information, call 878-0906.

Summary Court Officer Capt. Kevin Tate, 597th Transportation

Brigade, is detailed as the Summary Court Officer to secure and make proper disposition of the personal effects of Spc. Seth A. Hicks. Anyone having knowledge of money or property due to the deceased or claims against the deceased estate, contact Tate at (757) 878-9020.

Balfour Beatty Communities ■ Post-Wide Yard Sale – Residents can set up items for sale in their front yards Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Trash and other discarded items must not be left by the curbside. This is the last yard sale of the year. ■ Community Huddle – Residents are invited to attend a “town hall” meeting on Wednesday from 5 to 6 p.m. at the Community Center. This is your opportunity to bring your questions, comments, and concerns to the table and have them addressed. ■ Car Buying Tips – BBC will host a Car Buying Tips seminar on Sept. 18 from 4:40 to 5:30 p.m. at the Community Center. This is an RSVP-only event that will include a raffle and light refreshments. To RSVP, call 328-0691. ■ TerraCycle Donation Bash – Join BBC staff for the TerraCycle Donation Bash on Sept. 21 from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the Community Center. Don’t forget your donations of used oral care, personal beauty product packages, and used paired shoes. Come out and listen to the DJ and enjoy the Splash Park. There will be snacks, crafts and prizes for the largest donation. ■ Family Bingo Night – Residents can enjoy an evening of pizza and bingo with family and friends Sept. 26 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the Community Center. Due to limited space, please call 328-0691 to make your reservations by Sept. 24. The Community Center is located at Bldg. 126, Madison Ave. For more information, call 328-0691.

Retiree Health Extravaganza The Retiree Health Extravaganza will be held Sept. 29 from 9 a.m. to noon at McDonald Army Health Center, Bldg. 576, Jefferson Ave. Health topics will include immunizations, orthopedic injury prevention, breast and cervical health, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, asthma, healthy eating, medication safety and more. For more information, call Army Public Health Nursing at 314-8037.

Jacobs Theater Schedule Friday, 7 p.m. NO SHOW Saturday, 4 p.m. Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days (PG) During his summer vacation, “Wimpy Kid,” the hero of the phenomenally successful book series, hatches a plan to pretend he has a job at a ritzy country club, which fails to keep him away from the season’s dog days, including embarrassing mishaps at a public pool, and a camping trip that goes horribly wrong.

Saturday, 7 p.m. Total Recall 2012 (PG-13) Welcome to Rekall, the company that can turn your dreams into real memories. For factory worker Douglas Quaid (Colin Farrell), even though he’s got a beautiful wife who he loves, the mind-trip sounds like the perfect vacation from his frustrating life – real memories of life as a super-spy might be just what he needs. But when the procedure goes horribly wrong, Quaid becomes a hunted man. Finding himself on the run from the police controlled by Chancellor Cohaagen, the leader of the free world, Quaid teams up with a rebel fighter to find the head of the underground resistance and stop Cohaagen. Sunday, 2 p.m. NO SHOW Movie synopsis and show time information is available online at www. shopmyexchange.com/ReelTimeTheaters/Movies-Eustis.htm.


SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

LAFBCommunity LaSalle Gate closed for six months The LaSalle Avenue Gate closed for roughly six months beginning Aug. 13 due to the construction of a new Visitor Center and guardhouse. Any traffic approaching from the downtown Hampton/Interstate-64 area will be diverted to the Durand, West (Armistead) or King Street gates. Non-identification card holders should go to the temporary Visitor Center near the entrance of the West Gate to get a temporary pass. For more information, call Police Services at (757) 764-7766.

Youth bowling league The Langley Air Force Base Youth Bowling League is now accepting registration for participants ages 5 through 19 for the upcoming season scheduled to start Sept. 15. A sign-up sheet is available at the Langley Lanes during business hours. For more information contact Langley Lanes at (757) 764-2433 or contact coach Joe Sirois at (757) 846-8479 or joe.sirois@langley.af.mil

Suicide Awareness Walk The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention is holding the seventh annual Out Of Darkness Suicide Prevention Walk at Mount Trashmore in Virginia Beach, Sept. 8 at 8:30 a.m. This is the community’s walk to promote good mental health, awarenness of the disease of depression; prevent the tragedy of suicide; and for some, it’s also an opportunity to remember loved ones lost. In case of severe weather, the walk will be held on Sept. 15. For more information about the walk, visit www.sos-walk.org.

48th Squadron reunion The 48th Squadron Associate is hosting a reunion for Airmen who served with the 48th Aero Squadron, 48th School Squadron, 48th Pursuit Squadron, 48th Fighter Squadron, 48th Fighter Interceptor Squadron or 48th Flying Training Squadron, Sept. 19-23. Registration begins Sept. 19, 4 p.m. at the Point Plaza Suites at City Center, Newport News. For more information about the reunion, contact Bob Maurice at BigBob880@aol.com, or visit http://48thsquadronassociation.com/.

Adult membership appreciation The Langley Club will feature comedian Andy Hendrickson for Adult Membership Appreciation Night at the Langley Club on Sept. 27 from 7 to 9 p.m.

Eaglewood AGF Club Championship The A.G.F. Club is hosting a championship for

19

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Submit LAFB Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com all AGF members in good standing Sept. 29-30 at the Eaglewood Golf Course. There is a $25 entrance fee, and sign up ends Sept. 26. For more information, contact the Eaglewood Golf Course at (757) 764-4547.

Star & Stripes Car Show The Maintenance Professional of the Year Committee is hosting the Stars & Stripes Car Show on Oct. 13 at the Langley Speedway. Register from 8 to 10:30 p.m. There will be 30 categories featuring Corvettes, Mustangs, Jeeps and more. Participation is $20 for preregistration and $25 on the event day. For more information, e-mail starsandstripescarshow@yahoo.com.

Discounted tuition available Hampton University College of Continuing Education is offering discount tuition and no application fees for military and their dependents. Registration for the Fall I Session is untill Oct. 5, and Fall II Session is between Oct. 15 and Dec. 14 for on-base, distantlearning and online courses. All courses are transferrable to the Community College of the Air Force degree. For more information, speak with a Hampton University representative in Room 120 at the Langley Education Center, or call (757) 7661369 or (757) 727-5773.

Tax Center volunteers needed The Langey Air Force Base Tax Center is looking for any retired Service members interested in volunteering with the program. Training will take place in late Fall or early Winter. Interested applicants should call the Legal Office at 757-764-3277 and ask for the Tax Center Volunteer Coordinator.

TroopsToTeachers briefing Are you Retiring/Separating from the military and interested in becoming a teacher?The Troops toTeachers program offers a $5,000 stipend to pay for any approved teacher licensure program; in any state, at any accredited college, to military personnel with Bachelor’s Degrees. Participants may also be eligible for a $10,000 bonus. TTT also provides information on teacher licensure requirements in Virginia. For more information, please call the TTT office at (757) 683-3327.

POW-MIA Run,Walk and Vigil The 2012 JBLE POW-MIA run, walk and vigil is scheduled to begin Sept. 20 at 10 a.m. and end Sept. 21 at 10 a.m. The continuous event kicks off at the Shellbank Fitness Center, then travels with the POW-MIA flag along the JBLE

perimeter before ending at the POW-MIA Memorial, on base. Conservative attire is encouraged for all participants. The designated time for walkers to carry the POW-MIA flag is from 6 to 8 p.m. Both individuals and squadrons are welcome to run, walk and volunteer. To register, follow the e-invite link at https://einvitations.afit.edu/inv/anim.cfm?i=123449&k= 0363410D7F5E.

Mary Matthews Scholarship The Langley Chiefs Group manages the Mary Matthews Scholarship Fund. Four $300 scholarships will be presented to Airmen (E1E8) this fall. Any LCG member will provide applications. Applications must be received or postmarked by Oct. 15. Scholarships will be presented at the November 8 Chiefs Group meeting. For more information, contact CMSgt John Sanders at john.sanders@langley.af.mil or call 764-0686.

Military Educators Scholarship The Council of College and Military Educators is offering 15 $1000 scholarships to all Service members, veterans and their spouses who are working towards the completion of higher education degrees.The scholarships are divided between Service members (including National Guard and Reserve) military spouses and military veterans. Eligibility requirements, instructions and applications are available on the CCME website at http://www.ccmeonline. org/scholarships. The application will be available through Oct. 1. Finalists will be required to provide documentation of service. For more information, contact Senior Master Sgt. David W. Umlang, Council of College and Military Educators, Armed Services Liaison, at david.unlang@us.af.mil.

Bateman Library updates Audio books, eBooks, videos and a music collection of more than 20,000 items are available at the Bateman Library, as well as online and on-the-shelf language learning tools. The library also offers online classes through Universal Class. For more information, go to www.langleylibrary.org.

Young Adults’ Bible study A bible study intended for college-age participants is held each Wednesday from 10:30 a.m. until noon at the religious center in Bethel Housing. Our current study is on the book of Proverbs. There will be refreshments. For more information, contact David Rasbold, 764-0992/7847.

Langley Theater Schedule Friday, 7 p.m. NO SHOW Saturday, 2 p.m. Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days (PG-13) During his summer vacation, “Wimpy Kid”, the hero of the phenomenally successful book series, hatches a plan to pretend he has a job at a ritzy country club, which fails to keep him away from the season dog days, including embarrassing mishaps at a public pool, and a camping trip that goes horribly wrong. Saturday, 7 p.m. Total Recall (PG-13) Welcome to Rekall, the company that can turn your dreams into real memories. For factory worker Douglas Quaid, even though he’s got a beautiful wife who he loves, the mind-trip sounds like the perfect vacation from his frustrating life – real memories of life as a superspy might be just what he needs. But when the procedure goes horribly wrong, Quaid finds himself on the run from the police controlled by Chancellor Cohaagen, the leader of the free world. Quaid teams up with a rebel fighter to find the head of the underground resistance and stop Cahaagen. Sunday, 2 p.m. NO SHOW Movie synopsis and show time information is available online at www.shopmyexchange.com/ReelTimeTheaters/Movies-Langley.htm.


20

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

OutsideTheGate

SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

Submit Outside The Gate announcements to pw1@militarynews.com

Hampton Bay Days 2012 The 30th annual Hampton Bay Days will take place today through Sunday at Mill Point Park in downtown Hampton.The festival will include merchandise, craft, and food vendors, musical entertainment, a 25-minute fireworks show, and the Chesapeake Bay Education and Children’s Area at Carousel Park. Admission to the festival and musical entertainment is free; however, fees will be charged for crafts, games, and food and beverages. Hours are: today, noon to 11 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 11 p.m.; and Sunday, noon to 6 p.m. Parking will be available in the downtown area for $5 per vehicle, but is very limited. Special events will include: ■ Free Admission to Hampton History Museum – The Hampton History Museum is offering free admission during Bay Days. The museum showcases Hampton’s heritage as the nation’s oldest continuous English-speaking settlement. Hours are: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (today and Saturday); and 1 to 5 p.m. (Sunday). The museum is located at 120 Old Hampton Lane, Hampton. For more information, call 727-1610 or visit www.hampton.gov/history_museum. ■ Tidewater Dock Dogs Inaugural Summer Splashdown – This event is scheduled for the entire weekend in front of the Virginia Air and Space Center on King Street. Spectators will have a chance to cheer on all team levels as canines splash down into a 28,000 gallon pool. On-line preregistration is $25 per wave and is available at www.tidewaterdockdogs.com. On-site registration is $30 per wave and will be available on a first-come, first-serve basis.

■ Bay Days 8K – The race will begin at 8 a.m. on Sunday at the Virginia Air and Space Center. All 8K runners will receive a t-shirt, souvenir finisher’s medal, personalized bib and a goody bag. A postrace party will take place at the conclusion of the race. The registration fee is $40. Course details and registration information are available at www.baydays8k. com. For more information, call 727-1641 or visit www.baydays.com.

Video Production Course Newport News Public Schools’Telecommunications Center is offering a 10-week Video Production Course in partnership with the New Horizons Center for Apprenticeship and Adult Training. The course begins onTuesday and will end Dec. 4. Classes will be held on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. at the Telecommunications Center, 4 Minton Dr., Newport News. The cost is $425. Participants will learn how to use professional broadcast cameras, utilize computers and the latest industry editing software, and learn lighting and audio techniques. From pre-production to post-production, students will be engaged in learning how to properly write scripts and rundowns, and the proper use of video production equipment and non-linear editing systems. On-site registration is available at 520 Butler Farm Road, Hampton. For more information, call 591-4687 or 766-1101.

Day of Hope in Hampton The City of Hampton will host a Day of Hope at 8 a.m. on Tuesday at Gosnold’s Hope Park, 901 E. Little Back River Rd., Hampton.The public is invited to join in this special time of reflection. Following the ceremony, the names of those who were lost on Sept. 11, 2001 and service members who have died in the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq will be read aloud in the vicinity of the Trees of Hope. For more information about the event, visit www.hampton.gov.

Hermitage Museum and Gardens

Courtesy photo

■ Sunsets on the River – The Hermitage Museum and Gardens’ Sunsets on the River continues this fall with four concerts on the Hermitage back lawn. All concerts will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. Admission is $7 for the general public and free for museum members and children ages 12 and under. Guests are invited to bring blankets, lawn chairs, and a picnic din-

ner. Non-members who join the museum at each concert will receive a discounted membership, free admission to the concert, and beverage tickets. The concert schedule is: • Thursday – The Michael Clark Band • Sept. 20 – Big Red Tree • Sept. 27 – The Bartones • Oct. 4 – Esoteric Ramblers ■ Fall Heirloom Plant Sale – The annual Fall Heirloom Plant Sale will be held Sept. 21 and 28 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fall planting allows roots to establish and strengthen before winter dormancy and also helps to create a frame of your garden design. The sale will feature heirlooms, annuals, perennials, shrubs and native and wetlands plants that grow well in the Tidewater area. Museum members will receive a 10 percent discount. For more information, contact Yolima Carr at 423-2052, ext. 202 or email ycarr@thehermitagemuseum.org. The museum is located at 7637 North Shore Rd., Norfolk. Forty-five minute guided tours are offered, on the hour, of 15 galleries filled with art, furniture and more. The Visual Arts Studio houses classrooms, a complete ceramics studio, and darkroom photography facilities. Admission is free for museum members, children under 6 and active-duty military. Regular admission is $5 (adults); $2 (ages 6-18); and $3 (students). Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily; 1 to 5 p.m. Sundays; and closed Wednesdays andThursdays. For more information, call 423-2052, ext. 208 or visit www.thehermitagemuseum.org.

Symphony Under the Stars Christopher Newport University is hosting a Symphony Under the Stars concert featuring the Virginia Symphony Orchestra on Sept. 14 at 7:30 p.m. on the Great Lawn (near the intersection of Warwick Boulevard and Avenue of the Arts in Newport News). The concert is free and open to the public. Bring your family, friends, blankets and coolers and enjoy light classics, pop favorites and more. For more information, visit www.virginiasymphony.org.

Free legal clinic for veterans The Old Dominion University Student Veterans Association is sponsoring a free Legal Clinic to assist military veterans on Sept. 15 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the ODU Virginia Beach Higher Education Center, 1881 University Drive. Separate presentations will focus on three areas of law: De-

partment of Veterans Affairs disability compensation claims; the basics of starting a small business; and wills, trusts and estate planning. The clinic will also include free individual legal consultations. Please bring your DD Form 214, recent rating decisions and any other documentation that will help in evaluating your situation. Breakfast and lunch will be served; snacks will be available throughout the day. For more information, visit http://vavetslegalclinic.wordpress.com. To register, email Sarah Schauerte at scs@legalmeetspractical.com.

Mid-Autumn Moon Festival The seventh annual Mid-Autumn Moon Festival will be held on Sept. 16 from noon to 4 p.m. at Town Point Park in downtown Norfolk. This event will feature food, storytelling, authentic Asian ceremonial fashion shows, ribbon and dragon dancing, martial arts demonstrations, family activities, musical and dance performances, and a children’s lantern parade. The festival is free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.festevents.org.

Hampton Library Used Book Sale The Friends of the Hampton Public Library will host a Used Book Sale on Sept. 21-23 at the main library, 4207 Victoria Blvd., Hampton. The preview sale for members will take place on Sept. 20 from 7 to 9 p.m. Children’s books will cost 25 cents; paperbacks, 50 cents to $1; and hard back books, $1. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Sept. 21-22); and 1 to 4 p.m. (Sept. 23). Attendees will be able to join at the event. For more information, call 727-1154.

Virginia Fall Travel Planning Site The Virginia Tourism Corporation has launched a new fall travel web site to put the best of the season at visitors fingertips. At www.virginia.org/fall, travelers will find trip ideas, special events, and an interactive map to locate wineries, orchards, festivals and more. Suggested multi-day regional itineraries pull it all together and help travelers plan the perfect trip. A listing of fall travel packages provides savings at some of Virginia’s best inns and hotels. A free “Virginia is for Lovers” travel guide is also available by calling 1-800-VISITVA (847-4882). Travelers can stay connected at www.facebook.com/VirginiaisforLovers or follow on Twitter at www. twitter.com/VisitVirginia.


SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

21

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&RQVWUXFWLRQ FRQWLQXHV DW /D6DOOH $YHQXH JDWH Construction continues on the LaSalle Avenue gate at Langley Air Force Base, Aug. 31. Improvements to the gate will include more traffic lanes and a new Visitor Center. The gate is expected to be closed for approximately six months.

Photo by Airman 1st Class Teresa Aber

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Shortly after the nation witnessed the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, Hampton honored those who lost their lives by holding a Day of Remembrance and Hope. The city has marked the date every year since. “A Day of Remembrance and Hope” will direct attention to the events of September 11th, 2001, and the acts of sacrifice and service by first responders then, and of Service members who have since made the supreme sacrifice for our country in support of combat operations. Although this year marks the 11th anniversary of the September 11th attacks, this 2012 observance actually continues an annual tradition which began three months after the attacks. Former City Councilwoman Angela Leary helped plan that first Hampton commemo-

ration. As she was watching the national memorial of the attacks, she wrote to herself, “Plant trees of hope in the soils of justice.” That Dec. 11, 2001, a ceremony involved planting 11 evergreens – the Trees of Hope – at Gosnold’s Hope Park, one for each of the 10 Hampton neighborhood zones, and a larger one in the middle for those who protect and serve. Soil from each of the three terrorist attack sites – the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and the Pennsylvania field where Flight 93 crashed – were imported and mixed in. Since that date, Hampton citizens have gathered annually at the Trees of Hope to keep the memory of that fateful day alive, and to read aloud the names of those who were lost that day. Accordingly, fire and rescue teams, police officers and our local military will be recognized for their continuing sacrifices on our behalf.

As in prior years, during the ceremony, representatives of each service will be asked to come forward to receive an expression of the city’s appreciation for the service and sacrifice of all members of that uniformed service, past and present. This year’s ceremony will begin on Sept. 11 at 8 a.m. at Gosnold’s Hope Park, 901 E. Little Back River Road. It will include speakers, a presentation of the colors and special music, including the playing of Taps. Following the ceremony, the names of those who were lost on September 11, 2001, and Service members who have died in the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq will be read aloud. As in past years, the reading will take place around the Trees of Hope, and Service members from the local area are invited to participate. Questions on this event can by addressed to Mr. John Gately at (757) 851-3085.

Image by David Paranteau

In this “Remember 9-11” illustration, the “11” is designed to resemble the twin towers of the World Trade Center, while the five-sided border represents the Pentagon. Both of these landmarks were attacked on Sept. 11, 2001.


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For active-duty, retired military, their eligible family members and active or retired civil service employees If you are retired military or retired DOD civilian, include current employer and work phone number on the application.

Restrictions: â&#x20AC;˘ Only 5 ads per week, per household â&#x20AC;˘ Renewals, corrections and cancellations cannot be taken by phone and must be resubmitted â&#x20AC;˘ Illegible, too long or otherwise do not conform to instructions will not be published and must be resubmitted for the next issue â&#x20AC;˘ Automotive ads must begin with make, model and year â&#x20AC;˘ Real estate ads must begin with name of city, neighborhood and must be your primary residence. â&#x20AC;˘ Ads will not be accepted via official mailing channels such as guard mail or postage and fees paid indicia. â&#x20AC;˘ Free ads cannot be of a commercial nature (i. e., business opportunities, help wanted, etc) and must be personal property of the eligible member. Should not represent a sustained income or business or listed through agents or representatives. â&#x20AC;˘ When advertising a home for rent or home for sale, the home must be THE PRIMARY RESIDENCE. (All rental properties are considered paid ads.) WE DO NOT ACCEPT CALLS FOR FREE CLASSIFIED ADS Deadline Thursday, 5 p.m. for the following weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s publications


24

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SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

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Peninsula Warrior Sept. 7, 2012 Army Edition