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:DUULRU J O I N T July 5, 2013 Vol. 4, No. 26

B A S E

ARMY EDITION

L A N G L E Y - E U S T I S

P u b l i s h e d i n t h e i n t e re s t o f p e r s o n n e l a t J o i n t B a s e L a n g l e y - E u s t i s

w w w. p e n i n s u l a w a r r i o r. c o m

HEALTHCARE

Client-centered clinics are medical ‘homes’ for Soldiers — Page 3

ANNIVERSARY

TRADOC celebrates its 40th birthday — Page 6

For more online content, check out JBLE.af.mil

$LU )RUFH 1HZV

Langley Speedway hosts Military Appreciation Night – Page 12

FEATURE Cerebral palsy patient finds ‘brother he never had’

— Page 8


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HealthCare

Langley ICU provides patient ‘care done right’ By Airman 1st Class R. Alex Durbin 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

The doctor was shocked when the patient stopped breathing. Shortly after, a set of double doors burst open and a whirlwind of doctors, nurses and technicians moved around the bed being rolled down the white hallway. As the patient was wheeled to the nearest room and transferred to a bed, the emergency medical providers attached sensors and monitors to the patient’s arms and chest. The commotion was over almost as soon as it began. Soft, rhythmic beeps from various monitors were all that could be heard in the patient’s room in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) at Langley Air Force Base, Va. The 633rd Inpatient Operations Squadron motto, “care done right, day or night,” holds true as the Langley ICU is a 24-hour unit that offers care for patients suffering

from life-threatening illnesses or injuries, including respiratory failure, complications from diabetes, non-surgical cardiac anomalies or post-surgical complications. The unit’s staff is a team of criticalcare physicians, nurses and technicians who manage and treat patients with serious illnesses. “The Langley ICU is a 6-bed unit that offers comprehensive care for Service members, dependents and retirees,” said U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. Steven Woods, 633rd IPTS clinical nurse. “We offer a variety of services for patients suffering from a wide range of severe issues.” In a hospital-wide effort to provide top-notch patient care, the unit recently underwent changes as part of the hospital’s expansion and renovation. The expansion added upgraded monitors and ventilators to help the ICU staff effectively improve patient care. SEE ICU PAGE 4

Photo by Airman 1st Class R. Alex Durbin

U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. Steven Woods (left), 633rd Inpatient Operations Squadron clinical nurse, checks the vital signs of U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Portia Les’Pere, 633rd IPTS aerospace medical technician, during a simulation at the Intensive Care Unit at Langley Air Force Base, June 26. As a testament to the squadron’s motto, “care done right, day or night,” the Langley ICU and its staff ensures care when a patient needs them most.

&OLHQWFHQWHUHG FOLQLFV 0HGLFDO µKRPHV¶ IRU 6ROGLHUV By Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Photo by Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill

U.S. Army Maj. Ryan McGill, Troop Medical Center 2 physician, annotates prescription drugs on a chart for U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Danny Weatherly, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command training programs writer, June 19, at Fort Eustis.TMC2 is the first Patient-Centered Medical Home at Fort Eustis.

A Soldier walks into Troop Medical Clinic 2’s doors. Recently returned from a long deployment, it seems his allergies have struck yet again. Due to his sensitivity to common medication and latex, he prepares himself for a long visit. He hears his name called, and is surprised to see the exact same medic he saw downrange. The Soldier is out the door in less than 45 minutes, never once having to mention his medical history. Without the implementation of the Patient Centered Medical Home project at Fort Eustis, Va., this Soldier might still be waiting for his doctor to look through his medical records. “The whole purpose behind PCMH is

to improve quality of care,” said Samara Walker, McDonald Army Health Center PCMH project manager. “I consider continuity of care fundamental to that purpose.” The PCMH project, implemented in January 2013, was created to give Soldiers a steady line of medical treatment from doctors and staff who know their patients, not just their records. As the first clinic implementing the PCMH approach, TMC2 at Fort Eustis has already met several of their goals. “Before TMC2, only 30 to 40 percent of patients saw the same doctor consistently,” said U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Cassandra Alam, TMC2 noncommissioned officer in charge. “Now, more than 60 percent of our patients see their own provider.” SEE CLINICS PAGE 4


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ICU FROM PAGE 3

CLINIC FROM PAGE 3

“We’ve expanded resources and the scope of services offered by our hospital to enhance the level of care we can provide our community,” said U.S. Air Force Dr. (Col.) David Blake, 633rd Medical Group senior surgeon. “These tools are an excellent addition to supplement patient care and help our staff perform more efficiently.” Along with the unit’s upgraded tools, the hospital added a clinical nurse specialist to the staff. This nurse is trained in master’s-degree level critical care and provides the ICU team with a wealth of intensive-care knowledge. “We are constantly looking to find ways to be better suited to meet patient needs,” said Woods. “Bringing in an advanced-practice nurse allows the staff to have access to the most recent evidence-based research, giving us a greater knowledge base to treat patients.” The unit not only benefits from using the newly-upgraded tools and up-to-date clinical knowledge, but they also take full advantage of the hospital’s unique environment. The expansion allows medical providers to work closely with professionals in other subspecialties to ensure the patients’ needs are met when they need it most. “Intensive care is a complex area of medicine and requires quick, critical thinking and antic-

This continuity of care also expands into the deployed environment. Medics from around the base work in the clinic, so often when units deploy, they will see the same medics they worked with at Fort Eustis. To maintain quality of care, TMC2 only services permanent party, active-duty Soldiers stationed at Fort Eustis. However, there are plans to expand the PCMH program to other clinics. “TMC2 was the first clinic to adopt the PCMH style of care, but it won’t be the only one,” said Walker. “We plan to add five more clinics to the PCMH list.” Walker continually stressed the importance of patient satisfaction through the patient’s stay at TMC2. U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Danny Weatherly, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command training programs writer, expressed those same sentiments. “I have been going to the main [health center] for the past four years,” said Weatherly. “This was my first visit [here], and I am happy with the change.” Weatherly explained the convenience of the in-house pharmacy and location, but he also felt the care was different. “It is fantastic to put a face to who is working with me on my own health,” said Weatherly. “More importantly, I am confident my doctor knows what he is talking about.” Anyone looking to be seen at TMC2 should schedule an appointment through their normal channels, and from there, the health center staff will decide where a patient will go. Non-permanent party Soldiers will not be seen at the clinic, though that can change if they become permanent party. From the front lines to the front desk, the PCMH approach to care is on the rise. In the future, Walker and Alam hope to hear more stories like Weatherly’s, and continue quality of care at Fort Eustis.

At ease.

Photo by Airman 1st Class R. Alex Durbin

U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. Steven Woods, 633rd Inpatient Operations Squadron clinical nurse, inspects information on a monitor at the Intensive Care Unit at Langley Air Force Base, June 26. In a hospital-wide effort to provide top-notch patient care, the unit recently underwent changes as part of the hospital’s expansion and renovation, and added upgraded monitors and ventilators to help the ICU staff effectively improve patient care.

ipation,” said Woods. “When dealing with patients on the verge of life or death, decisions have to be made, and we rely on a multidisciplinary approach to provide ‘holistic’ care.” As a testament to the squadron’s motto, the Langley ICU and its staff will be there when a patient needs them most, day or night.

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7KHQ DQG QRZ 75$'2& FHOHEUDWHV LWV WK ELUWKGD\ By Bethani A. Edwards U.S. ARMY TRAINING AND DOCTRINE COMMAND

On July 1, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command celebrated its 40th year of developing, educating and adapting Soldiers and leaders into the force that we know today. TRADOC was established in 1973 with a simple mission: to ready Army Soldiers for war. Like today, the goals were to recruit, train and shape the Army into a force that dominates the battlefield. As a way to celebrate the occasion, TRADOC is reflecting on its heritage as “TRADOC then and now.”

Training According to the recently published 40-year history of TRADOC, what we now know as the Training and Doctrine Command began as a small part of a much larger organization – the Continental Army Command, or CONARC. CONARC was responsible for all Army training centers, schools and doctrine until it was decided that its span was too large for a single headquarters. Under the initiation of Operation STEADFAST and the leadership of Gen. William DePuy, TRADOC was born. Jim Rose, who currently works as an initial entry training analyst at TRADOC’s Initial Military Training, has a unique perspective on the changes in training new Soldiers. He joined the Army in 1978 and became a drill sergeant in the mid-’80s. “Back then, basic training was [simply] teaching a Soldier how to be a Soldier ... how to walk, how to march, how to clean, how to fire a weapon ... to adapt to their new assignments,” Rose said. “It was nothing more than you have to take that civilian and get them into a military type of mind. They had to learn to crawl, then walk, then run. “But when we went to war [in the Middle East], we had to start teaching them more combat skills,” he continued. That’s when we added Warrior Task and Battle Drills.” Although TRADOC has made advances in basic training throughout the years, according to Rose, one thing that has remained the same is the role of the drill sergeant. “I don’t really see too much of a difference,” he said. “The hours are still the same;

“I don’t really see too much of a difference. The hours are still the same; the training is still the same. The requirements have increased, but the job is still teaching Soldiers how to be Soldiers.” — Jim Rose initial entry training analyst at TRADOC’s Initial Military Training; joined Army in 1978 and became a drill sergeant in the mid-’80s the training is still the same. The requirements have increased, but the job is still teaching Soldiers how to be Soldiers.”

Fashion In 1973, Army uniforms were wellequipped for Vietnam, fashioned in olive green shade 107 with slanted pockets across the chest and white tees underneath. Nametags and rank insignias were worn to be more subdued, and enlisted personnel wore their rank insignias on the points of their collars. The polyester and cotton durable-press utility uniform remained until it was replaced by the Battle Dress Uniform, or BDU, in the mid-1980s. Now, Soldiers wear the Army Combat Uniform, or ACU, which was established as the combat and garrison uniform in June 2004. The color scheme was changed to the

Courtesy photos from Soldier Systems Daily and David Furst

Army uniforms then and now – from olive green shade 107 combat uniforms to gray, tan and sage ACUs.

new gray, tan and sage digital pattern and the coats were designed to be single-breasted for better upper body mobility. Nametags and the U.S. Army tape went from sewn placement to Velcro, and both officers and enlisted rank insignias migrated to a hook and loop patch at the center of the coat. The Army even added a three-slot pencil pocket and more Velcro for convenience.

Technology On April 3, 1973, Motorola’s Martin Cooper made the world’s first mobile phone call to rival company, AT&T. In the 1970s, touchtone phones were the new wave, replacing the rotary phones many people used at home. It was also more common for people to slip into a phone booth to make a call. Today, cell phone manufacturers have largely removed buttons all together. U.S. Army Gen. Robert Cone (center),Training and Doctrine Command commander, cuts the Army and TRADOC birthday cake with Fort Eustis's newest Soldier, Spc. James Miller, TRADOC band member, and Nelly Herbin, TRADOC’s longest-serving civilian, June 14 at Fort Eustis. Photo by Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill

More than 80 percent of Americans use a cell phone with a touch-screen to do a lot more than just talking to each other. Smartphones and other mobile devices are helping to train and inform today’s Soldiers through interactive applications, or “apps.” Soldiers can now use their cell phones to help them with things such as a reference for uniform regulations or achieving their physical fitness goals. The 1970s also marked an important time for TRADOC and technological advancement. The Multiple Laser Engagement System, or MILES, revolutionized collective training in the Army by incorporating lasers and blank cartridges to simulate force-on-force field training exercises. Since then, TRADOC has been responsible for the development of countless training aids and devices.

Money In 1973, the monthly pay for an E-1 was $307.20. That may not sound like much, but gas prices averaged only 30 cents a gallon. In 2013, an E-1 earns $1,500 a month, but he or she may pay an average of $3.55 a gallon to fill up a gas tank.

The more things change... Although fashion and technology of the times continue to change, TRADOC’s mission will stay the same. From the leadership of Gen. William DePuy, TRADOC’s first commanding general, to Gen. Robert Cone, the command’s 14th and current leader, the command will continue to develop Army leaders and shape the future force through training and doctrine.


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FeatureStory

&HUHEUDO SDOV\ SDWLHQW ¿QGV µEURWKHU KH QHYHU KDG¶ LQ /DQJOH\ $)% $LUPDQ By Airman 1st Class Kimberly Nagle 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Editor’s note: The last name of the subject is withheld due to security reasons. Fourteen-year-old Trenton Lindhardt was enjoying a normal afternoon at his home in California when a package arrived at the door, postmarked from “Alexander” in Virginia. The boy was overcome with excitement opening up the package. Its contents included toys, movies and action figures -- a mix of all of his favorite things. “Alexander” is an airman first class in the U.S Air Force, an analyst assigned to the 45th Intelligence Squadron at Langley Air Force Base, Va. In the short time he has known Trenton, Alexander has reached out to the teen, going above and beyond the call of duty. Trenton has cerebral palsy, a disorder that adversely impacts muscle tone, movement and motor skills. The condition has left the teenager unable to walk, talk, sit up, crawl, feed himself or drink through a straw. Despite his physical limitations, Trenton is a bright, happy teenager, said his mother, Teresa Lindhardt. He communicates through a DynaVox, a device which assists users in overcoming speech, language and learning challenges. “He is very quick-witted and funny,” said Teresa. “He is a typical, trouble-making kiddo.” Trenton’s older sister Jayme, an Airman, attended technical training at Goodfellow AFB, Texas. While there, she met Alexander and told him of her younger brother’s story. Alexander learned about Trenton’s condition and the series of surgeries he underwent. More importantly, Jayme described her brother’s courage and strength in the face of his illness, and how he never complained about the rigors of treatment, in-

stead keeping a smile and a positive attitude. Even though Trenton stayed brave and strong through his troubles, his sister expressed to Alexander their family’s concerns about his next surgery to correct scoliosis, the curvature of his spine due to his bout with CP. Moved by the story, Alexander decided to step in. Because Trenton’s family is small, Alexander’s actions spoke volumes, as he became a major outside social contact. Trenton has no grandparents, uncles or father in his life. His only family consists of his mother, sister, an aunt and a few cousins living across the country in Philadelphia. “He stepped up and filled the missing piece in Trenton’s, and my, heart,” said Teresa. “He reached out to this little boy like a big brother would, or even an uncle or a father -- all the people missing from this little boy’s life.” Alexander filled a hole in Trenton’s life, effectively becoming the “big brother he never had,” said Teresa. Without knowing he’d make such a positive impact in Trenton’s life, Alexander purchased gifts, wrote a letter and sent the items in a package. In his letter, Alexander explained how much he admired Trenton’s toughness and courage. “Trenton was so happy, he wouldn’t go to sleep,” Teresa said. “He wouldn’t even let me throw away the box. It’s under his bed.” Teresa said while Trenton underwent

“With my life being so fortunate, I felt like I needed to help someone else.”

Photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Nagle

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Alexander, 45th Intelligence Squadron analyst at Langley Air Force Base reached out toTrenton Lindhardt, a teenager who suffers from cerebral palsy. (Last name withheld for security purposes.)

surgery to correct his scoliosis, he clutched the Power Ranger toys he received from Alexander. The surgery was successful, resulting in a 100 percent correction. As a sign of respect and appreciation, Alexander plans to send Trenton his “Airman’s coin,” which he received following graduation from Basic Military Training. While in BMT, Airmen learn the three Air Force core values: integrity first, service before self and excellence in all we do. Teresa expressed Alexander embodied these values, as he selflessly uplifted a young boy’s spirits without giving it a second thought.

“He stepped up and filled the missing piece in Trenton’s, and my, heart. He reached out to this little boy like a big brother would, or even an uncle or a father – all the people missing from this little boy’s life.” — Teresa Lindhardt Trenton Lindhardt’s mother talking about Langley Airman “Alexander”

“I did it just to do it,” said Alexander. “With my life being so fortunate, I felt like I needed to help someone else.” Shortly after sending the gifts, Alexander was called into his commander’s office, unsure of the reason. “[At first] I thought I was in trouble for something,” said Alexander. “It’s not always a good thing to [go to] the commander’s office.” Rather than scold him, Alexander’s leadership had learned of his act of kindness, and said the entire squadron wanted to get involved in Trenton’s life. To continue Alexander’s efforts, the squadron plans to send Trenton a group photo and a squadron coin. While Alexander may think his efforts were just a way to brighten a young teenager’s day, the impacts will have a lasting effect on Trenton and his family. “I am so proud that the United States Air Force has a man like Alexander,” said Teresa. “He has shown such leadership and compassion. I can never thank him enough for the smile he put on Trenton’s little face.”

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-%/( :RXQGHG :DUULRUV OHDUQ WR DGDSW DQG RYHUFRPH DW $QGUHZV DGDSWLYH VSRUWV FDPS By Staff Sgt. Torey Griffith 11TH WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Photo by Airman 1st Class Aaron Stout

Retired Staff Sgt. Kevin Taylor demonstrates the use of a compound bow as a mentor at anAir ForceWoundedWarriors Adaptive Sports Camp at Joint Base Andrews, Md., June 26.Taylor and the other mentors helped the class instructor provide preliminary archery instruction to participating Air Force Wounded Warriors during the two-day sports camp.

More than 30 Air Force Wounded Warriors gathered at the West Fitness Center on June 26 to kick off a two-day adaptive sports camp designed to help them overcome their challenges and enjoy a physically active lifestyle. This was the firstAir Force Wounded Warriors Adaptive Sports Camp held especially for the patients at Joint Base Andrews, Md. and Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., where Airmen are healing and learning to adapt to the new realities of their lives. “These heroes have had their lives turned upside down as a result of combat or other injuries and health issues they have encountered,” said Tony Jasso, Air Force Wounded Warrior adaptive sports program manager. “As part of the Air Force’s Wounded Warrior Program,

this sports camp is intended to introduce adaptive sports during the earliest stages of recovery for our Service members.” Sports like wheelchair basketball, sitting volleyball, archery, swimming, air rifle/ pistol shooting and track and field help keep them active; something Lt. Gen. (Dr.) Thomas Travis, Surgeon General of the Air Force, says is essential to wellness. “These activities are a way to get you back into the game, to improve your quality of life and help you get on with your recovery,” Travis told the wounded warriors during the opening ceremony. “Your attitude and self-confidence has more to do with your wellbeing than you may think.” Travis went on to stress the importance of the Wounded Warrior program as the Airmen make the sometimes complicated transition back to work in the Air Force or into civilian life. “Caring for Airmen is what we do; it’s

the reason we’re here,” he said. “Health should be a part of everybody’s mission.” The Air Force Wounded Warrior program helps with more than the physical aspect of adjustment. The program works hand-in-hand with the Air Force Survivor Assistance Program and Airman & Family Readiness Centers to ensure Airmen receive professional support and care from the point of injury, through separation or retirement, for life. Advocates from the program work with Airmen to ensure they receive face-toface, personalized services and even provide professional services such as transition assistance, employment assistance, moving assistance, financial counseling, information and referral, and emergency financial assistance. For more information on the Air Force Wounded Warrior Program, visit http:// www.woundedwarrior.af.mil.


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*THE MATTRESS FIRM CREDIT CARD IS ISSUED BY WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL NATIONAL BANK. SPECIAL TERMS OF 72 MONTHS VALID ON QUALIFYING PURCHASES OF $3099 AND ABOVE. SPECIAL TERMS APPLY TO QUALIFYING PURCHASES CHARGED WITH APPROVED CREDIT. THE SPECIAL TERMS APR OF 5.99% WILL APPLY TO THE QUALIFYING PURCHASE, AND 72 MONTHLY PAYMENTS EQUAL TO 1.6640% OF THE SPECIAL TERMS BALANCE ARE REQUIRED. THE ADVERTISED TERMS ARE AN ESTIMATE ASSUMING REQUIRED MONTHLY PAYMENTS ARE MADE ON THE PAYMENT DUE DATE; NO OTHER BALANCES ARE CURRENTLY CARRIED OR WILL BE CARRIED ON THE ACCOUNT; AND NO ADDITIONAL CHARGES ARE OR WILL BE ADDED TO THE ACCOUNT. BECAUSE YOUR ACTUAL ACCOUNT ACTIVITY MAY BE DIFFERENT THAN THE ASSUMPTIONS USED, OR BECAUSE OF ROUNDING, THE NUMBER OF PAYMENTS OR THE FINAL PAYMENT AMOUNT COULD BE DIFFERENT THAN THE ADVERTISED TERMS. ADVERTISED SET PRICES REFLECTED ARE BEFORE INTEREST IS ACCRUED. THE SPECIAL TERMS APR WILL CONTINUE TO APPLY UNTIL ALL QUALIFYING PURCHASES ARE PAID IN FULL. THE APR FOR PURCHASES WILL APPLY TO CERTAIN FEES SUCH AS A LATE PAYMENT FEE OR IF YOU USE THE CARD FOR OTHER TRANSACTIONS. FOR NEWLY OPENED ACCOUNTS, THE APR FOR PURCHASES IS 27.99%. THIS APR MAY VARY WITH THE MARKET BASED ON THE U.S. PRIME RATE AND IS GIVEN AS OF 5/1/13. IF YOU ARE CHARGED INTEREST IN ANY BILLING CYCLE, THE MINIMUM INTEREST CHARGE WILL BE $1.00. OFFER VALID 7/3/13-7/9/13. **LIMIT ONE COUPON PER ORDER. APPLIES TO ADVERTISED SET PRICE AND MUST BE PRESENTED PRIOR TO FINALIZED SALE. MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER DISCOUNT, COUPON, GROUPON OR SPECIAL OFFER, NONREFUNDABLE, MAY NOT BE USED ON PREVIOUS PURCHASES AND HAS NO CASH VALUE. NOT VALID ON TEMPUR-PEDIC®, ICOMFORT OR FURNITURE. DOUBLE COUPON SAVINGS ON SELECT MODELS. SEE STORE FOR DETAILS. OFFER EXPIRES 7/9/13. ***WHILE SUPPLIES LAST 6/26/13 THRU 7/14/13. SAVE $500 ON KINGS/CA KINGS ($250 PER UNIT), $300 ON QUEENS AND DOUBLES, $250 ON TWINS AND TWIN EXTRA LONGS ON THE TEMPUR-ERGO™ PREMIER SYSTEM, SAVE $200 OFF SRP PER UNIT ($400 ON DUAL SYSTEMS) ON REMAINING TEMPUR-ERGO™ ADVANCED BASES AND SAVE $100 OFF SRP PER UNIT ($200 ON DUAL SYSTEMS) ON THE TEMPUR-ERGO™ BASIC SYSTEM. NOT VALID ON PREVIOUS PURCHASES OR ORDERS PLACED PRIOR TO 6/26/13. SEE STORE FOR COMPLETE DETAILS. †*†TEMPUR-CLOUD® SELECT SAVINGS: SAVE UP TO $200 ON TEMPUR-CLOUD® SELECT MATTRESS SETS (MATTRESS + FOUNDATION OR MATTRESS + TEMPUR-ERGO™ ADJUSTABLE BASE) PURCHASED BEFORE 7/15/13. SEE STORE FOR DETAILS. DOLLAR SAVINGS RANGE FROM $50-$500. COMPARE AT PRICING IS DETERMINED BASED ON PRICE OF COMPARABLE MERCHANDISE OF SIMILAR QUALITY AND CIRCUMSTANCES. AS A COMPANY, WE STAND BEHIND OUR COMPARE AT PRICES, BASED ON OUR MARKET EXPERIENCE AND KNOWLEDGE. THESE PRICES REFLECT NATIONALLY COMPETITIVE MSRP, LIST PRICES AND DO NOT REFLECT INTERIM MARK-DOWNS, WHICH MAY HAVE BEEN TAKEN. WE INVITE YOU TO ASK ABOUT ANY INDIVIDUAL PRICES. PRODUCT AND SELECTION MAY VARY FROM STORE TO STORE. MATTRESS FIRM, INC. STRIVES FOR ACCURACY IN OUR ADVERTISING, BUT ERRORS IN PRICING AND/OR PHOTOGRAPHY MAY OCCUR. MATTRESS FIRM RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CORRECT ANY SUCH ERRORS. PHOTOGRAPHY IS FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY AND MAY NOT REFLECT ACTUAL PRODUCT. SOME MF23_ROP_MILITARY_PAPER_7.4 PRODUCTS ARE AT THE MANUFACTURER’S MINIMUM SELLING PRICE AND FURTHER REDUCTIONS CANNOT BE TAKEN. STORE HOURS MAY VARY BY LOCATION. OFFERS VALID 7/3/13-7/9/13 OR WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. *†SEE STORE FOR COMPLETE DETAILS.


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JULY 5, 2013

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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An evening at a the races

Photos by Airman 1st Class Victoria H. Taylor

ABOVE: Opening the evening’s events at Military Appreciation Night was a presentation of the colors by the joint-service color guard at Langley Motor Speedway in Hampton, June 29. BELOW:The U.S. Air Force Heritage of America Band performed the national anthem. The band also played each of the U.S. military branches’ songs.

Photos by Airman 1st Class Victoria H. Taylor

ABOVE/RIGHT: Military Appreciation night was held at the Langley Motor Speedway in Hampton, June 29.The event featured a special appearance from three original Tuskegee Airmen and a routine from the U.S. Coast Guard drill team. More than 4,000 people were in attendance for the races. BELOW: Greg Edwards, race car driver, picks the United States Air Force coin from the Commander’s Cup to represent which branch he will be racing for during Military Appreciation Night. The top-five racers of the evening represented each military branch in the Commander’s Race.

/DQJOH\ 6SHHGZD\ KRRVWV 0LOLWDU\ $SSUHFLDWLRQ 1LJKW By Airman 1st Class Victoria H. Taylor 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

The Virginia Peninsula Chamber of Commerce and The Daily Press hosted the second annual Military Appreciation Night at the Langley Motor Speedway in Hampton, Va., June 29. More than 4,000 people attended the event held in support of Service members and their families. Local military community members enjoyed free admission to seven races and an opening presentation from a joint-service color guard. “We host this event in appreciation of all Service members and their families,” said Mike Kuhns, the VCPP president. “We want to provide the opportunity to recognize that the community welcomes all military members not only for their service, but also as contributors to our community as neighbors and friends.” For Senior Airman Brandon Rose, Langley Air Force Base honor guard ceremonial guardsman, seeing the community come out to show support for Service members meant a lot. “I felt a sense of duty when performing at this event,” said Rose. “It helps that I really enjoy NASCAR too, so this entire event was a huge morale boost.” The event also featured a special appearance from three original Tuskegee Airmen who were presented with a certificate of appreciation by VCPP, followed by a silent routine from the U.S. Coast Guard Training Center drill team. The celebration continued with a performance of

“We host th his event in appreciation of all Service mem mbers and their families. We want to prov vide the opportunity to recognize that thee community welcomes all military membeers not only for their service, but also as co ontributors to our community as neighborss and friends.” — Mike Kuhns VCPP president

nthem by the U.S. Air Force Heritage the national an of America Ban nd, who also played each of the U.S. military branch hes’ songs. After the op pening events, the top-five racers of the evening reepresented each military branch of service in thee Commander’s Race. Jordan Matthews, U-Car class c racer and driver of the number 10 vehicle, felt honored to be a part of the event. “It’s pretty sspecial that the military has a night like tonight,” said s Matthews. “Racing for this event is an honor.” For Service m members like Rose, being recognized by the commu unity holds great significance. “Having strrong ties with the community in which you serve benefits everyone,” said Rose. “To be appreciated for the work you’re doing is extremely reward ding.”

Photo by Airman 1st Class Victoria H. Taylor

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Brandon Rose, ceremonial guardsman with the Langley Air Force Base honor guard, places a decal on the race car representing the U.S. Air Force in the Commander’s Race at Langley Motor Speedway in Hampton, June 29. The top-five racers of the evening represented each military branch in the Commander’s Race.

Photo by Airman 1st Class Victoria H. Taylor

Three of the original Tuskegee Airmen were presented with a certificate of recognition at Military Appreciation Night.The presentation was followed by a silent routine from the U.S. Coast Guard Training Center’s drill team.


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

JULY 5, 2013

&KDSHO FRXQVHOLQJ 2IIHULQJ KRSH WKURXJK FRPPXQLFDWLRQ By Senior Airman Teresa Aber 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

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“We spent almost every day together for three years. Then, after spending a year apart, it was like we were complete strangers and we needed a little assistance getting to know each other all over again.” U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Iesha Wallace, 633rd Medical Operations Squadron physical medicine technician, had trouble readjusting to life with her fiancé, Jeffrey, after he returned from spending a year in Korea. Luckily for Iesha, she was able to take advantage of resources available through the Langley Chapel. Counseling is offered in a confidential atmosphere where Service members and their families can speak with chaplains to discuss marital and pre-marital concerns, tough life decisions and other stresses that may come with a military lifestyle. Iesha and Jeffrey met while stationed at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. Subsequently, after a permanent change of station to Langley three years later, Jeffrey received a year-long assignment to Korea. When he returned, the couple found themselves arguing more than usual. “The biggest problem we had was our ability, or lack thereof, to communicate. We had to learn to work together and learn to balance each other’s strengths and weaknesses,” said Iesha. “We believed the chaplains would be able to assist us with things that were too big for us to realize on our own, so we made the decision together to go to counseling.” Marriage counseling sessions, which teach conflict resolution and communication skills, are more about education than therapy, and are often tailored to couples based on their individual needs. Most sessions focus on common problem areas for couples, such as communication and compromise, said Chaplain (Capt.) Tara Dixon, 633rd Air Base Wing chaplain. “Communication is always the first aspect of any counseling session,” said Dixon. “We always want to make sure people can effectively communicate with each other because that’s going to be critical

throughout a relationship.” All of the Joint Base Langley-Eustis chaplains provide free counseling, something many Service members may not be aware of. Information discussed with chaplains is privileged information, and is not discussed with anyone, unless written consent is given by the individual. “Having the comfort to know that whatever you discuss is confidential is very important,” said Dixon. “It’s reassuring for most individuals and allows them to open up to us more so we can get down to the issues at hand.” While most of the issues discussed are the same in all pre-marital counseling sessions, Dixon says the chaplains realize that military couples face their own unique problems, and counseling sessions are tailored to address potential stressors such as deployments, high-demand jobs and transient lifestyles. “We offer counseling sessions for all types of issues such as pre- and post-deployment, pre-marital and marital counseling, and spiritual counseling,” said Dixon. “We want members know we are here to listen and assist, no matter the situation.” Both JBLE chapels also offers marriage counseling and couples’ workshops throughout the year that focus on communication skills. “You and your partner have to set standards for what you want and what you are willing to sacrifice for the relationship,” said Dixon. “Then you have to bridge those ideas and put them together which gives you each the respect for yourselves, for each other and the relationship.” The Wallaces recently tied the knot on June 1 and plan to use what they learned in their counseling sessions to strengthen their marriage. “We were horrible at communication before, and now we are in a place where we can better recognize when we aren’t communicating effectively so we can fix it,” said Iesha. “We learned that we have to take time out to learn who the other person is so you can balance out each other’s imperfections. Relationships aren’t 50/50. You both have to give 100 percent.”

For more information regarding counseling and other services, contact the Langley Chapel at 764-7847 or the Fort Eustis Chapel at 878-1316.


JULY 5, 2013

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

JULY 5, 2013 Individuals work as entry control support personnel to aide the 633rd Security Forces Squadron during peak traffic times. Due to the nature of entry control procedures, before these Airmen head out to the gates, they receive specialized training on safehaven procedures, Department of Defense shipments coming on base, political asylum situations and gate closures due to emergency situations.

Season Begins September 14 and Ends November 9

Photo by Airman 1st Class Kayla Newman

Entry control personnel provide first line of defense THE PILOT’S

By Senior Airman Kayla Newman 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

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On any given weekday, up to 9, 000 personnel come through the gates on Langley Air Force Base, Va. Monday at 5 a.m., a group of Airmen stand in formation ready to find out what gate they will be assigned. At 6 a.m., those same Airmen don yellow reflective vests and begin to process vehicles through the main gates. These Airmen do not wear the berets or police badges of security forces members. They are Service members from different squadrons across Langley who are posted at the West and King Street Gates, serving as entry control support personnel to ensure morning weekday traffic is processed in a timely manner. With the amount of traffic that has to be processed through the gate in the morning, these Airmen are an important part of

making sure the 633rd SFS can accomplish its mission. “These [personnel] are very vital to us at [SFS],” explained Abraham Smith, 633rd Security Forces Squadron trainer. “The morning is when the bulk of the people come onto base, so they are critical to our manning.” Due to the nature of entry control procedures, before these Airmen head out to the gates, they receive specialized training on identification requirements, safe-haven procedures, Department of Defense shipments coming on base, political asylum situations and gate closures due to emergency situations. “We train them on different scenarios that can happen, because if something does happen, they are going to be the ones in the middle of it,” explained Smith. SEE ENTRY PAGE 17

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JULY 5, 2013

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

$LU )RUFH DQQRXQFHV WKH SUHIHUUHG DOWHUQDWLYH IRU VHFXULW\ IRUFHV UHJLRQDO WUDLQLQJ FHQWHU FRQVROLGDWLRQ AIR FORCE NEWS SERVICE

Air Force officials announced June 27 that Fort Bliss, Texas, was chosen as the preferred alternative for the Security Forces Ground Combat Training Center while Camp Guernsey, Wyo. is a reasonable alternative. If selected as the final basing choice, Fort Bliss will host a training center, offering training courses for approximately 8,500 students per year. The Headquarters Air Force Security Forces Center conducted a 2010 study to determine a more efficient method of training security forces. The study concluded consolidation of existing training locations would improve quality of training, increase economies of scale and further improve consistency. Consolidating Security Forces Regional Training Centers will allow Security Forces to be more responsive to combatant commands and increase security forces training to adapt quickly to emerging enemy tactics, techniques and procedures. With the consolidation, regional training locations at Creech Air Force Base, Nev.; Fort Wolters, Texas; Joint Base McGuireDix-Lakehurst, N.J. and Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., will close. At this time, the Air Force expects the ground combat readiness training at those locations to transfer

ENTRY FROM PAGE 16 This training is crucial to ensuring overall base security, said Smith. Smith said their training also includes communication procedures, Langley legal jurisdiction, security forces concepts and operations, military working dog safety, bloodborne pathogens and barrier training. While Smith and his SFS team understand how vital these Airmen are in ensuring traffic flow and security, the support personnel also see their impact on the security forces mission. “Looking at it from a security forces member’s view, I know we are helping immensely with their mission,” explained Airman 1st Class Anita O’Daniel, 633rd Force Support Squadron force management technician. “From an entry control personnel perspective, I feel like we are making the traffic flow more efficiently.”

to Fort Bliss no later than October 2014. Overseas regional training center locations will remain in place and not be considered for consolidation in this strategicbasing action. Additionally, Camp Guernsey, Wyo., one of the existing regional training centers which specializes in Security Forces Nuclear Training, will continue to be the center for Nuclear Training Excellence. Site survey teams evaluated the candidate bases for feasibility, timing, cost and planning purposes to meet initial operational capability requirements. The secretary of the Air Force and chief of staff of the Air Force carefully considered the site survey results and other military judgment factors in choosing Fort Bliss as the preferred alternative. “The selection of Fort Bliss as the preferred alternative is the result of a deliberate, enterprise-wide assessment,” said Timothy Bridges, deputy assistant secretary for installations. “This consolidation will ensure standardized career field training of varying capabilities operated under centralized control and execution.” The final basing decision will be made after the completion of the Environmental Impact Analysis Process (EIAP), currently scheduled for this summer.

Although these personnel may not choose to perform this detail, O’Daniel has enjoyed the unexpected benefit of being able to network with fellow Langley Airmen. “Performing this detail is a great opportunity,” said O’Daniel. “This is a unique way to meet new people from other career fields that you may not have had the opportunity to [otherwise].” As Friday morning draws to an end and the vehicles coming onto base become more sporadic, the entry control personnel can sense their week of successfully securing the base is coming to a close. “It makes me proud to know that I had a part in training these personnel and ensuring the base’s safety at the gates,” said Smith. “To see these Airmen performing this detail and knowing what they are supposed to do is great. These Airmen are not working for us at security forces, they are working with us.”

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HHHuntHomes.com 0UMVYTH[PVU *LU[LYZ 6WLU +HPS` *$99 down offer is only available with certain loan programs and subject to credit approval/qualifications with preferred lender. Offers cannot be combined with any other offers or incentives. Actual homes as constructed may not contain the features and layouts depicted and may vary from photos, renderings and plans. Features and options may not be available on all plans or in all communities. Homes depicted may not represent the lowest-priced homes in the community and may be shown with upgraded landscaping and optional features. Prices shown may not include charges for options, upgrades and/or lot premiums. Floorplans, elevations, features, plans, amenities, specifications and related information, and information concerning the pricing, incentives and availability of our homes, are subject to change without notice. See new home sales executive for details.

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JULY 5, 2013

Submit Eustis Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com

Summary court officer The summary court officer detailed to secure and make proper disposition of the personal effects of Sgt. Justin R. Johnson is 1st Lt. Brendan Kasony, 11th Transportation Battalion, 7th Sustainment Brigade. Anyone having knowledge of money or property due to the deceased or has claims against the deceased’s estate, contact 1st Lt. Kasony at (571) 225-7596.

Summary court officer The summary court officer detailed to secure and make proper disposition of the personal effects of Sgt. Timothy Updike is Capt. Edward J. Slavik, 11th Transportation Battalion, 7th Sustainment Brigade. Anyone having knowledge of money or property due to the deceased or has claims against the deceased’s estate, contact Capt. Slavik at 422-7310 or edward.slavik@us.army.mil.

Warrant Officer Corps Birthday Celebration The Warrant Officer Corps’ 95th Birthday Celebration will kick off from 6:30 to 7:30 a.m. July 9 with a Family and Friends Fun Run at Resolute Field. A cake-cutting ceremony is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon at Jacob’s Theater. The guest speakers will be Maj. Gen. Mark MacCarley, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command deputy chief of staff and Chief Warrant Officer 5 Flor D.M. Armendariz, 128th Aviation Brigade command warrant officer. For more information, contact Warrant Officer Phillip Grant at (719) 360-4402 or Chief Warrant Officer 2 Jack Gordon at 817-0927.

Home Buying and Selling Seminars The Fort Eustis Housing Referral Office is sponsoring a Home Buying Seminar from 6 to 8:30 p.m. July 16 and a Home Selling Seminar from 6 to 8:30 p.m. July 18. Both seminars will take place at the Civil Engineer Division conference room at Bldg. 1407, Washington Blvd. Industry experts will include a realtor, mortgage lender, attorney and home inspector.The seminars are free and open to the public. Please RSVP at least three business days prior to attending the seminar of your choice. To register, call 8782977/5687/5579.

Army Career and Alumni Program Army Career and Alumni Program classes and briefings for July will include: ■ Career Expo – 1:30 to 3 p.m., July 31. Employers, college recruiters and other transition service providers are invited to come and network with transitioners and their family members. Job seekers should dress for success and bring resumes. Featured employers will include those in the areas of towing, shipbuilding, law enforcement, power and electricity, and more. Various universities will also be represented. ■ Lunchtime Workshop – 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., July 31. Workshop topics will include the USAJOBS federal resume

MCAHC change of command McDonald Army Health Center will host a change of command ceremony at 9 a.m. July 9 at Seay Plaza. Col. Michael E. Hershman will relinquish command to Col. Glenda J. Lock. For more information, call 314-7844.

597th Trans. Bde. change of command The 597th Transportation Brigade will host a change of command ceremony at 2 p.m. July 17 at McClellan Fitness Center, Bldg. 673 Monroe Ave. Col. Charles R. Brown will relinquish command to Col. Jason R. Vick. For more information, call 878-8404.

application process and “interviewing.” This monthly training will be provided by ACAP and Civilian Personnel Advisory Center staff. ■ Transition GPS (TAP Workshop) – 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., July 8-12 and 22-26. This five-day workshop provides training for transitioning Soldiers and their family members to prepare them to succeed with civilian employment and educational pursuits. Topics will include financial planning, resume writing, interviewing techniques, job search tips, VA benefits (disability ratings, filing claims, and vocational rehabilitation) and MOS Crosswalk. ■ VA ClaimsWorkshop – 9 a.m., July 15. A Department of Veterans Affairs representative will provide information on vocational rehabilitation benefits and entitlements. Unless otherwise noted, classes and briefings will take place in Bldg. 601, training room 127. For more information, call 878-4955.

Latin Night at the club Kick off your weekend with Latin Night every Friday from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. at the Fort Eustis Club’s Wheelhouse Lounge (no cover charge). For more information, call 878-5700.

School and sport physical exams School and sport physical exams are available at McDonald Army Health Center’s Pediatric and Family Health clinics by appointment only. Appointments can be scheduled for Monday through Friday. Call the Hampton Roads Appointment Center at (866) 645-4584 or use TRICARE Online to schedule an appointment (up to 28 days in advance). Appointments are also available on the following Saturdays: July 27 and Aug. 24. For more info, visit http://mcdonald.narmc.amedd.army.mil.

Soldier and Family Readiness Soldier and Family Readiness (ACS) classes and briefings for July will include: ■ Baby and Me Play Group – 10 to 11 a.m., Thursdays, Bldg. 501, Madison Ave. ■ Care Team Training – 9:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., July 17

■ Credit Reporting, Scores and Debt Management – 9 to 10 a.m., July 16 ■ DevelopingYour Financial Plan – 9 to 10 a.m., July 9, 23 ■ Effective Resume Writing – 9 a.m. to noon, July 12 ■ Federal Employment – 10 a.m. to noon, July 18 ■ Financial Readiness – 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., July 19 ■ Growing Through Change – 10 to 11:30 a.m., July 17 ■ Job Search Strategies – 10 to 11 a.m., Mondays ■ Leadership Development – 9 a.m. to 4:45 p.m., July 18-19 (registration required) ■ Lunch and Learn Effective Communication – noon to 1 p.m., July 9, 16, and 30 (bring your lunch) ■ Managing Your Checking Account, Online Banking – 8:30 to 9:30 a.m., July 18 ■ Newcomers Brief and Information Fair – 9 to 11 a.m., July 23 ■ Sponsorship Training – 2 to 3 p.m., July 18 ■ Spouse Resilience Seminar – 9 a.m. to noon, July 22-25 Unless otherwise noted, classes and briefings will take place in Bldg. 650, Monroe Ave. For more information, call 878-3638.

Music Under the Stars The U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Band’s Music Under the Stars summertime concerts will take place at 7 p.m. Thursdays at Magnolia Park on Fort Eustis (overlooking the James River). The schedule for July is: ■ July 11 – Wind Dances ■ July 18 – Stage and Screen ■ July 25 – ¡Festiva Latina! The concerts are free and open to the public. Attendees are invited to bring picnic dinners and lawn chairs. Non-DOD cardholders must use the Fort Eustis main gate to receive a pass. Valid vehicle registration, proof of insurance and a photo ID are required for access. To learn more about the concerts, to receive a pre-vetted vehicle pass or to sign up for the band’s newsletter and concert announcements, visit www.tradocband.com, or call 501-6944.

Range schedule Ranges, training areas and associated facilities are off limits to personnel not engaged in scheduled firing, operations or inspections unless clearance is obtained (in person) from the Range Control Fire Desk or a designated Range Control technician. The Range Control office telephone number is 878-4412, ext. 226 or 878-3834, ext 234. The range operations schedule through July 10 is: ■ Friday – Range 1 (7 a.m. to 5 p.m.) ■ Saturday and Sunday – No scheduled ranges ■ Monday – Range BTRACS, 1, 2 (8 a.m. to 5 p.m.) ■ Tuesday – Range BTRACS, 1 (7 a.m. to 5 p.m.) ■ Wednesday – Range BTRACS, 1, 3 (7 a.m. to 4 p.m.) All personnel are required to check in and out with Range Control before going into or departing from any range or training area.

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Armed Services Blood Program blood drive The Armed Services Blood Program blood drive will be held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. July 23 in the Langley Chapel Annex. For more information, contact Ralph Peters at Ralph.peters@med.navy.mil. Online appointments can also be scheduled at www.militaryblood.dod.mil.

New and Expecting Fathers Class There will be a New and Expecting Fathers Class from 8 a.m. to noon July 29 in the Langley Chapel Annex, classroom two. This class will provide helpful information and discussion about father-baby attachment, labor and delivery, communication with a spouse or partner, soothing your baby and managing deployments. To register or for more information, call Family Advocacy at 764-9581.

Thornell parking lot closure The Thornell parking lot near the Langley Marina will be closed from June 26 through July 31 due to the renovation of the shoreline near the marina. For more information, contact Anhthu Nguyen at 764-1446 or Joe Sirois at 846-8479.

Langley Housing road closure A section of First Street just north of the Langley Housing shoppette will be closed from July 1 to Aug. 16. The closure will allow for emergency vehicle access, but neither pedestrian nor vehicular traffic will be permitted to pass. For more information, contact the off-base Welcome Center at 865-1330.

Quarterly commander’s brief The 633rd Medical Group will host a briefing for commanders and first sergeants from 10 a.m. to noon July 10 in the base theater. The briefing will cover how the Military Command Authority allows leadership to gain access to medical information concerning their assigned Service members. Commanders and first sergeants must be briefed on health information privacy procedures within 90 days of assignment. For more information, call 225-6535.

Summary court officer

Investment (PECI) Programs, effective June 1. Procedures on submitting ideas through this new initiative can be found on the Air Force Portal. Ideas previously submitted through IDEA Program Data System (IPDS) are still being processed. For ideas still open for members who submitted while assigned to Joint Base Langley-Eustis, contact Michelle Johnson at 764-7637 or michelle.johnson.2@us.af.mil. If an idea was submitted while assigned to another base, please contact that installation’s manpower office.

The summary court officer detailed to secure and make proper disposition of the personal effects of Senior Airman Nicholas Tuttle is 2nd Lt. Heath Turley, 633rd Security Forces Squadron. Anyone having knowledge of money or property due to deceased or claims against the deceased’s estate, please contact 2nd Lt. Turley at 764-5526.

Deployed Family Members Dinner

Medical Service Corps applications

The next Heart Link event is scheduled from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Aug. 9 at the Airman and Family Readiness Center. There will be games, prizes and fun, and discussions on Air Force traditions, resources and the spouse’s role in today’s Air Force. Childcare is available on a space-available basis. To sign up, call 764-3990.

The Medical Service Corps (MSC) has more than 1,000 Air Force officers who serve as professional healthcare administrators throughout the world. For those interested in applying, accession packages are due Sept 13. For more information, contact 2nd Lt. Irene Mitchell at 764-8203.

New Moms workshop The Pediatric Clinic hosts “New Moms Tea/Weigh Day” workshops at 1 p.m. Mondays in the Pediatrics Clinic conference room. Bring your questions to share or just come to listen in. Meet in an informal setting for expert advice, education and experience from a board-certified lactation consultant on topics including breastfeeding support, infant care, getting sleep, childproofing and safety, positive parenting skills and more. To reserve a space in the class or for more information, contact the Langley Lactation Center at 764-9730.

IDEA and PECI Program suspension In an effort to support the Airmen Powered by Innovation initiative, the vice chief of staff of the Air Force has suspended the Air Force Innovative Development through Employee Awareness (IDEA) and the Productivity Enhancing Capital

19

The 633rd Force Support Squadron is hosting a free Deployed Family Members Dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. July 10 at the Crossbow Dining Facility. Register no later than July 3 by calling 764-3990.

Heart Link

Vehicle Operations Control Center closure The Vehicle Operations Control Center will be closed for normal operations from 12:01 a.m. July 3 to 5 a.m. July 8 to observe Independence Day. During this period, the VOCC will be operating on standby operations, and services will be limited to on-call emergency wrecker operations, protocol service and aircrew support. For any of these emergencies, please contact the Fuels Service Center at 764-4105 or 764-3505.

Exchange offers back-to-school sweepstakes The Army and Air Force Exchange Service will ease the burden of back-to-school shopping for 15 lucky shoppers during the Unilever “Salute to Clean” sweepstakes. Each winner will be awarded a $1,000 gift card, redeemable at any Exchange location worldwide or online at www.shopmyexchange.com. The drawing will be held on or around Aug. 22 – just

in time for students to coordinate their closets and stock up on supplies for the first day of class. Customers can fill out and drop off entry forms at any Exchange location through July 11. No purchase is required to enter. Entrants must be 18 or older with a valid driver’s license.

Langley AFB Hazmart, 90-Day CAP operations The Hazmart Pharmacy, located at 23 Sweeney Blvd., is responsible for the authorization and monitoring of all hazardous materials on Langley Air Force Base. The 90-Day Central Accumulation Point facility, located at 510 Poplar Road, is responsible for curbside pickup, preparing and processing of hazardous waste. Both facilities are open Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Before purchasing hazardous materials, you must contact the Hazmart Pharmacy. For more information concerning the Langley Hazmart Pharmacy or the 90-Day CAP, call 764-3837. For hazardous waste issues, contact 225-5808/5809.

Single Airman Ministry events A Shenandoah Valley National Park camping trip will take place from Aug. 30 to Sept. 2. The trip will cost $89 per person, which includes tents, food, a scavenger hunt and transportation. Those interested must sign up no later than Aug. 13. For more information, contact Larry Blakely at 273-1033 or 528-0455.

TRICARE hazardous weather e-alerts TRICARE is offering state-specific e-alerts for beneficiaries who want the latest information about how TRICARE has been affected during and after severe weather. To sign up for state-specific TRICARE severe weather ealerts, go to www.tricare.mil/subscriptions.

Women’s Equality Day planning committee The Women’s Equality Day planning committee will have its meetings the second and fourthThursday of each month at 1 p.m. in the Bateman Library. For more information, contact the Equal Opportunity Office at 764-5878.

Hispanic Heritage committee meetings The Hispanic Heritage committee will have its meetings the third Wednesday of each month at 2 p.m. in the Langley bowling alley activities room. For more information, contact Master Sgt. Jose Perez at 764-1735 or the Equal Opportunity Office at 764-5878.

African American Heritage Council meetings The Langley African American Heritage Council will have its meetings the third Thursday of each month at 11:30 a.m. in the Enlisted Lounge. For more information, contact Master Sgt. Alvin Harris at 764-4410.

Langley Veterinary Clinic policy change For the safety of children and pets, children under the age of 12 are no longer permitted to enter the Langley Veterinary Clinic. For more information, call 764-5678.


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

OutsideTheGate

Virginia Living Museum ■ “Bodies Revealed” Exhibition – Ongoing through Sept. 2. The “Bodies Revealed” exhibition showcases real human bodies, dissected and preserved through a revolutionary process allowing visitors to see themselves like never before. Many of the whole body specimens are dissected in vivid athletic poses, allowing the visitor to relate to everyday activities.To ensure that everyone has the best possible visit, the museum is offering timed tickets. Tickets can be purchased online at www.thevlm.org or in person at the museum.The cost is $7 (museum members); $15 (non-members); $12 (children); and free for ages 2 and under. Combination tickets for the museum and exhibition are $26 (adults); $20 (children ages 3-12); and free for ages 2 and under. The exhibition will also be open evenings from 6 to 8 p.m. July 13 and Aug. 10. ■ Mid-summer Planetarium Shows – Ongoing through July 31. Choose among four shows at the museum’s Abbitt Planetarium. A staff astronomer takes a tour of the current night sky in “Virginia Skies.” Enter the world of the extraordinarily tiny in “Microcosm” as you go deep into the body of a woman infected with a dangerous virus. “Abraham Lincoln: The Case of the Missing Moon” explores how Lincoln defended a man accused of murder using “facts” found in an almanac. “Spirit of America” celebrates America with patriotic music paired with lasers. Tickets are $4 in addition to museum admission (planetarium is open every day). ■ Story Time at the Museum – The third Saturday of the month is Story Time at the Museum. Bring the kids at 10 a.m. July 20 to hear “Crab Moon” by Ruth Horowitz and see a live horseshoe crab. Recommended for ages 2 and above (included in museum admission. The Virginia Living Museum is located at 524 J. Clyde Morris Blvd., Newport News. Museum admission is $17 (adults); $13 (children ages 3-12); and free for ages 2 and under. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Saturday; and noon to 5 p.m., Sunday. For more information, call 595-9135 or visit www. thevlm.org.

JULY 5, 2013

Submit Outside The Gate announcements to pw1@militarynews.com

Peninsula Fine Arts Center

Classic films at the Hermitage Museum

■ Hands On for Kids paint days – 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. The cost is $4 for children ages 6-12; and free for members and children ages 5 and under. The Hands On for Kids Gallery is also open to families from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and from 1 to 4 p.m. on Sunday. ■ Summer preschool art activities – 10:30 to 11:30 a.m., Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Preschool-aged children will be taught how to develop fundamental visual learning skills. Recommended for children ages 3-5; younger children will need additional assistance from a parent or guardian. New lessons will be offered each week; parents/guardians are asked to register for each week’s class by the preceding Friday. Admission is free for children ages 5 and under. RSVP to Joan Dobson at jdobson@pfac-va.org. The Peninsula Fine Arts Center is located at 101 Museum Drive, in the Mariner’s Museum Park, Newport News. The center is open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. Admission is free the first weekend of each month. Regular admission (tickets valid 7 days) is $7.50 (adults); $6 (seniors, students, active-duty military and AAA members); $4 (children ages 6-12); and free for children ages 5 and under. For more information, call 596-8175 or visit www. pfac.va.org.

The Hermitage Museum and Gardens will show classic films during its “Friday Night Films” outdoor movie series at 7637 North Shore Rd., Norfolk. Gates open at 7:30 p.m. with films beginning at 9 p.m. Admission is free for museum members and $5 for non-members. Guests are invited to bring blankets and/or chairs. A cash bar and light refreshments will be available. The movie schedule for July and August is: ■ July 12 – Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (1954) ■ July 26 – Casablanca (1942) ■ Aug. 9 – Meet Me in St. Louis (1944) ■ Aug. 23 – Roman Holiday (1953) Museum admission is free for members, children ages 5 and under, and active-duty military. Regular admission is $5 (adults); $2 (ages 6-18); and $3 (students). Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily; 1 to 5 p.m. Sundays; and closed Wednesdays and Thursdays. For more information, call 423-2052, ext. 208 or visit www.thehermitagemuseum.org.

Mariners’ Museum children’s program Come out and join us for the Mariners’ Museum’s “Maritime Mondays” children’s program from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at 100 Museum Dr., Newport News. The schedule for July is: ■ July 8 – On a Safari in Africa ■ July 15 – Titanic ■ July 22 – Pirates ■ July 29 – Powhatan Indians Children will be divided into the following age groups: “Mini Mariners” (18 months to rising pre-kindergarten); “Shipmates” (rising kindergarten to second graders); and “Daring Discoverers” (rising third to fifth graders). The cost per program is $2 per student (members); and $2 plus admission (non-members). To register, visit http://marinersmuseumm.org/maritimemondays. Walkins will be accepted as space allows. Groups will meet in the museum’s main lobby. The museum’s hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday; and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. For more information, call 591-7718 or visit www.marinersmuseum.org.

Civil War Children’s Summer Camp A Civil War Children’s Summer Camp will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 22-25 at the Endview Living History Museum, 362 Yorktown Road, Newport News. The camp is open to boys and girls between the ages of 8 and 13. Registration and pre-payment are required before attending this camp. For registration or more information, contact Tim Greene at 887-1862.

Sandy Bottom Nature Park Sandy Bottom Nature Park will host a Junior Ranger program from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. July 15-19 and 22-26 at 1255 Big Bethel Rd., Hampton. Come join the staff for a week of fun and adventure at our day camp for children ages 7-12. Educational class topics will include local wildlife, wetlands and pollution, in addition to outdoor survival skills. The cost is $50; registration deadline is one week prior at 3 p.m. For more information, call 825-4657 or visit www. hampton.gov/sandybottom.

Free admission to museums Blue Star Museums is a collaboration among the National Endowment of Arts, Blue Star Families, the Department of Defense and more than 2,000 museums across America to honor active-duty military from all services. Free admission is available through Labor Day for active-duty military, National Guard, reservists and their family members (military ID cardholder and up to five family members). Local participating museums include the Casemate Museum, U.S. Army Transportation Museum, Hampton History Museum, Chrysler Museum of Art, Hampton Roads Naval Museum, Hermitage Museum and Gardens, Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Museum, Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art, Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg and York County Historical Museum. For a complete listing and maps to help with visit planning, visit www.arts.gov/bluestarmuseums.


JULY 5, 2013

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

21

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HEALTHY TEETH

AroundTheArmy Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel addresses troops at Fort Carson, Colo., June 28. Hagel said bringing creative ideas forward during change is part of the unwinding and the unfolding of bringing force structure down.The secretary also thanked Fort Carson troops who have worked to fight fires that have blackened more than 75,000 acres in southwest Colorado since June 11.

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Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel told Soldiers of the nation’s reorganizing Army that now is the time for creative adaptation. Hagel spoke to an audience of Soldiers and civilian employees June 28 at Fort Carson, Colo., home of the Army’s 4th Infantry Division. The secretary has visited several military installations in the state over the past two days. Hagel noted that one of the Army brigade combat teams to be eliminated is based at Fort Carson, and added that after the Army finishes reorganizing, the base will see a force increase. Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno announced June 25 that the Army will cut its brigade combat teams from 45 to 33 and shrink its active-duty end strength from a wartime high of 570,000 to 490,000 Soldiers. The general told reporters that the Army will add a maneuver battalion and fire and engineer capabilities to each of its remaining armor and infantry brigade combat teams, “to make them more lethal, more flexible and more agile.” Hagel told Fort Carson troops the new Army structure is an example of gain through strain. “I think Army leadership is right on

this,” he said. “And it isn’t just a matter of being forced by constraints, law, budgets, but it’s the smart thing to do.” The nation’s military needs to adjust and change after two long wars and in the face of new threats, he said. “This is the time to be creative,” Hagel added. “This is the time to use this opportunity to make those choices. We have to prepare the institution. The next set of [privates first class] behind you, you need to help prepare them so they inherit a structure, a system that is going to give them the ability to deal with those new threats that none of us can figure out today.” Later, in response to a Soldier’s question about options for voluntary separation, Hagel said such approaches will be considered as force structure changes advance. Bringing creative ideas forward during change, he added, “is part of the unwinding and the unfolding of bringing that force structure down. Do it smartly. Do it wisely. Do it in ways that make sense.” The secretary also thanked Fort Carson troops who have worked to fight fires that have blackened more than 75,000 acres in southwest Colorado since June 11. “Your work has been spectacular, and it has gained recognition and

thanks from every corner,” Hagel said. “And I know the people of Colorado are grateful, the people of our country are grateful, and we’re very proud in the Department of Defense for what you’ve done, what you continue to do.” He said while firefighting and disaster relief aren’t in a Soldier’s job description, “it is really who you are and who we are as Americans, and I think who we are as part of the security team that defends this country in every way.” Hagel also discussed the upcoming civilian employee furloughs, under which civilian defense workers are braced for up to 11 days of unpaid leave from July through September. The secretary said while defense leaders made every effort to reduce or eliminate furloughs, “in the end, I could not cut any more into readiness. And we’ve already cut into readiness. You know that we are standing down 16 Air Force squadrons. We’re not sailing a lot of ships. No new training in the Army, and there are other consequences.” Hagel pledged to reduce the effects on the workforce as much as possible, and said he has no higher priority as secretary than maintaining programs that support troops and families.

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

JULY 5, 2013

Just ‘be fit’

Gunnery sergeant’s motivation for fitness By Tech. Sgt. April Wickes 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

More than 1,000 hours. In the last two years, that’s how much time one Marine has spent in the gym. This Marine, Gunnery Sgt. Juan C. Ospina, Joint Task Force Civil Support noncommissioned officer in charge of operations, doesn’t dedicate this time to his own workouts, but rather devotes his personal time to help students focus on fitness. He accomplishes this by teaching the Functional Fitness Program “CrossFit” class at Anderson Field House on Fort Eustis, Va. “Teaching other people is rewarding,” Ospina said. “It’s great to see the different levels of fitness and help people reach their fitness goals.” Ospina explained that the Functional Fitness Program normally consists of a light warm up for mobility, a gymnastic or weightlifting skill and then a full workout. The workout is made of three main disciplines: cardio, gymnastics and weightlifting. These disciplines are combined to create high-intensity workouts. The core concept of the class is to perform constantly-varied functional movements done at a high-intensity level, Ospina said. The ultimate goal of the class is to teach people to perform functional movements such as squatting, pushing and pulling. Ospina said fitness helps him relieve stress, and also provides a social atmosphere that he enjoys. “I can workout with my wife and children, or anyone I meet,” he said. “We can all get together with the common goal of becoming more fit.” In addition to the social aspects, Ospina said fitness health benefits are extremely important to him. “Being healthy is everyone’s responsibility,” he said. “If you’re fit, you’re prepared for anything in life – just ‘be fit.’” This concept of just “be fit” serves as Ospina’s personal motto and mo-

tivation to instruct. He hopes his coaching and fitness philosophies have a lasting impact on his students. “I workout for myself, but by coaching others, I’m able to help them become better athletes and live healthier, longer and more independent lives,” he said. Ospina said that even though the class is a high-intensity “CrossFit” workout, anyone can participate because the workouts are designed to accommodate any fitness level. “From Olympic athletes to an injured Soldier, everyone wants to be fit,” he said. “We have [people] in the class who had strokes or were in major car accidents. They may have to use a [polyvinyl chloride] pipe instead of weights or adjust their range of motion, but they still do the same workout.” Jenee Sauer, a military spouse, has attended the class for 10 months and said she’s noticed improvements without having to spend a significant amount of time at the gym. “I’m seeing results. When I go to lift a bag of grain at the barn, I can lift it easier,” she said. “I’ve learned to use proper lifting techniques and it makes things simple. This class is incredible. I love it – there are a lot of great people to workout with.” For some people, maintaining a workout regimen can be discouraging if results aren’t seen, maintained or continually gained. Ospina said the “CrossFit” class is different and provides an effective alternative form of fitness.

Photo by Tech. Sgt. April Wickes

Jenee Sauer, a military spouse, performs a push press during a Functional Fitness Program “CrossFit” class at Anderson Field House on Fort Eustis, June 24.

“Most people who practice a routine will hit a plateau. They will stop seeing gains and results,” he said. “This program is different because of its constantly varied high-intensity workouts. Because it’s varied, you will never see the same workout in a six to 12 month period.” Ospina stressed the first step in reaping these fitness benefits is attending the Functional Fitness Program. He said he loves seeing new faces and watching his students’ progress. “Whether you’re a top notch athlete or haven’t worked out in years, just come to the class,” he said. “We can give you a course introduction, but once you participate you’ll be hooked, it actually works!” Whether it’s one hour at the gym or 1,000, Ospina is motivated by his desire to help people just “be fit.” For more information on the Functional Fitness Program, call 878-2328 or visit www.eustismwr.com. U.S. Navy Petty Officer 2nd ClassWillie Fowler (left), JointTask Force Civil Support damage controlman, performs a front squat while his instructor, U.S. Marine Corps Gunnery Sgt. Juan C. Ospina, JointTask Force Civil Support noncommissioned officer in charge of operations, watches to ensure correct form.


JULY 5, 2013

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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a Warrior July 5, 2013 Army Edition  

Fort Eustis edition of the July 5, 2013 issue of Peninsula Warrior

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