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:DUULRU J O I N T June 29, 2012 Vol. 3, No. 25

B A S E

L A N G L E Y - E U S T I S

P u b l i s h e d i n t h e i n t e re s t o f p e r s o n n e l a t J o i n t B a s e L a n g l e y - E u s t i s

ARMY EDITION

w w w. p e n i n s u l a w a r r i o r. c o m

Battle of the Best CAREERS

Get your ACT together with IDP — Page 4

DEPLOYED

Army Major experiences life in Australia — Page 8

For more online content, check out JBLE.af.mil

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SHOOT, MOVE, COMMUNICATE 633rd SFS targets training — Page 12

Fort Eustis hosts Drill Sergeant of theYear Competition – Page 3


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JUNE 29, 2012


JUNE 29, 2012

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)ROORZ WKH  'ULOO 6HUJHDQW RI WKH <HDU &RPSHWLWLRQ By Stephanie Slater U.S. ARMY TRAINING AND DOCTRINE COMMAND PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Six of the U.S. Army's best drill sergeants began vying for the title of 2012 Army Drill Sergeant of the Year at Fort Eustis, Va, June 25. Four competitors from the active component and two competitors from the reserve component will endure physical and mental challenges during the four-day competition, which tests their knowledge of warrior tasks and battle drills and their ability to teach these tasks to new Soldiers. The competition is hosted by Initial

Military Training, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command. On their ďŹ rst day, the drill sergeants were initially assessed on their ability to demonstrate and instruct urban orienteering, such as clinches in combatives and correct actions to take in response to a role-playing Soldier suspected as suicidal. A second round of assessments included tests on drill and ceremony movements and providing care under ďŹ re. The active and reserve Drill Sergeants of the Year will be announced during a ceremony June 29. Continue to check www.jble.af.mil for updated coverage of the weeklong event.

Interested in learning more? Use a barcode reader application on a cell phone to scan the code on the left. It will open a browser and navigate to the associated link.

$) VHOHFWV  IRU SURPRWLRQ WR WHFKQLFDO VHUJHDQW AIR FORCE PERSONNEL CENTER PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Air Force ofďŹ cials released the technical sergeant promotion list June 21. In total, 8,515 staff sergeants earned their next stripe. To see the full promotion list, go to http://www.afpc.af.mil/promotions/tech.asp. Selections are tentative until the data veriďŹ cation process is complete, which is no later than 10 days after the promotion release date. Air Force Personnel Center ofďŹ cials will notify Airmen through their military personnel sections if their selection is in question. For more information about promotions and other personnel issues, visit the myPers website at https://mypers.af.mil.

Photo by Senior Airman Wesley Farnsworth

U.S.Army Sergeant 1st ClassAdam McQuiston, Fort LeonardWood, Mo., drill instructor, directs two Soldiers on the proper way to perform a combative move, June 25, during the annual Drill Sergeant of the Year competition at Fort Eustis. McQuiston is one of six drill sergeants competing in this weeklong competition for the title.

COMMENTARY FROM PAGE 2 I was fortunate to earn a BTZ promotion, and round out the ďŹ nal credits toward my bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree. So I considered giving up and waiting for ALS. However, a little voice in my head stopped me from quitting. I had come this far without giving up, why would I stop now? With newfound determination, I decided to take my problem straight to the source â&#x20AC;&#x201C; CCAF itself. It took a few tries to get in touch with someone who understood my unique situation. They agreed that not being able to earn a CCAF as an Airman, simply because an individual attended a joint-base tech school, put that Airmen on unequal footing when it came to career development and progression. After making a few calls on my behalf and coordinating with other people at CCAF, my contact came back to me with a solution. She introduced me to Air University, an Air Force program which provides in-residence or distance-learning courses designed to educated Airmen on emerging â&#x20AC;&#x153;geo-political challenges faced by the United Statesâ&#x20AC;? and its international partners. If I took a course through Air Universi-

ty, it would net me three residency hours. From there, CCAF could transfer an existing credit from my apprentice-skill-level internship to my residency hours, giving my all the credits I would need to graduate. The only reason this happened, as I was told, was because I came to CCAF after completing all possible credits toward my degree. So, without hesitation, I signed up for Introduction to Cross-Cultural Communication. Passing the course proved to be much more satisfying than I had imagined. As soon as I received the notiďŹ cation of my grade, I called CCAF, who worked their magic on my degree progress report. Once the tiny, residency-hour box, which had been the bane of my existence for more than two years, was checked, I immediately called my education ofďŹ ce to register for graduation. As luck would have it, I happened to be deployed when the graduation ceremony took place. However, when I returned home, I was told my education ofďŹ ce held my degree for me. Having already earned my bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree, earning my CCAF degree

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caused another swelling of personal pride. For the people out there pursuing a higher education, I can say from personal experience that there are few things better than hearing someone congratulate you for joining the 30 percent of Americans with a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree, as well as the roughly 40 percent of Americans with an associate degree. It makes me smile to look back at the past three years of my military career, and realize my drive and passion for education came from someone telling me I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do something. And as I look ahead to September 2012, when I will graduate with a Master of Business Administration degree, I also realize that none of this would have been possible without the support and opportunities provided to me by the Air Force. Earning my degrees, despite the roadblocks placed in front of me, solidiďŹ ed something my father told me the day I left for BMT. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Air Force can change you for the better,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you let it.â&#x20AC;? And it has.


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Sgt. 1st Class Kenneth Williams, a career management noncommissioned officer for the chief of transportation office at Fort Lee says that with the availability of new resources on the Army Career tracker, creating his individual development plan has been a simple and easy process.

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Throughout its 237-year history, the U.S. Army has trained and developed premier warfighters and leaders. Now, thanks to the Army Career Tracker, Soldiers have the opportunity to take complete ownership of their individual development plan, and subsequently – their careers. “The ACT provides an easy-to-use interface that assists the user and supervisor with the creation, approval and tracking of the IDP,” said Khadijah Sellers, Training and Doctrine Command’s Institute for Noncommissioned Officer Professional Development, who primarily focuses on streamlining the IDP process within ACT. Sellers said the plan is focused through the lens of lifelong learning, and provides a cross-functional approach to integrating a Soldier’s personal and professional development. Sgt. 1st Class Kenneth Williams, career management noncommissioned officer for the Chief of Transportation Office at Fort Lee, Va. said it’s important for leaders to motivate their Soldiers to use the ACT and develop their IDPs. “It’s not enough to dream about promotions, schools and desired positions, you have to plan a course of action to achieve those goals,” Williams said. “I tell Soldiers the ACT can help them succeed, and their IDP will give them the necessary steps to excel.” Not only does Williams encourage his Soldiers to develop their IDPs, he also uses the ACT for his personal development. “One of the best things about my IDP is that it is tailored to my personal goals,” he said. “I can always refer back to my IDP to learn and develop new ways to be more effective in my job.” Williams said creating a plan is simple. “I used resources that are available on the ACT site for career development such as the Professional Devel-

Courtesy photo

opment Model, the Army Training Requirements and Resources System, and Credentialing Opportunities OnLine,” he said. “If I had a question about a school or a position, the answers are hyperlinked and the site gives thorough explanations.” IDPs are formed by setting longand short-term goals in ACT where the information is automatically populated by selecting recommendations based upon the Professional Development Model. These goals can be populated from recommendations for assignment, institutional training, structured self-development, guided self-development, certifications, credentialing and a host of other training resources provided within ACT. “IDPs can be win-win strategies because they benefit both the Soldier and the organization,” Sellers said. “Soldiers benefit because implementing an IDP helps them to enhance their knowledge, skills and experiences. Improved competencies help them achieve personal and career goals both inside and outside the organization, and the organization benefits from developing improved Soldier knowledge and abilities.” Sellers said the most significant impact for Soldiers is the access to the wealth of information. For new Soldiers, the process allows

them to outline their career from their first permanent duty station and chart a course establishing the qualifications needed for careers in the civilian sector. Individuals are able to select degree programs and certifications to add to their IDPs. A Soldier who would like to start their own business when transitioning to civilian life can select a bachelor’s degree program for management studies offered by a university. So, where can a Soldier start creating an IDP? Here are a couple of steps to success provided by the Institute for Noncommissioned Officer Professional Development: 1. Visit theArmy Career Tracker website, https://actnow.army.mil and click on the IDP tab. 2. To create a new IDP, click on the “Create New IDP” button located under the IDP portlet. 3. To set the IDP time frame, select a “Start Date” for the IDP and the end date will automatically populate. 4. The IDP will automatically be populated with some established goals; however a Soldier can create more by visiting the “IDP Goals” section in ACT. Their IDP will also include “Institutional Training” and “Civilian Education History” data. 5. Finally, submit the IDP for approval, and print a copy for the Soldier and their supervisor to sign.


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633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

The summer moving season is here. Changes of command, farewell picnics and moving trucks mark this transitional time of year. Do not fret however; the Airmen at the TrafďŹ c Management OfďŹ ce are available to ease the stress from Service members and their families in the process of moving. Staff Sgt. Eva Simmons, 633rd Logistics Readiness Squadron trafďŹ c management specialist, explained the process of moving, both do-ityourself and otherwise, June 12 at Langley Air Force Base, Va. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are essentially three types of moves: permanent change of station, home-of-record move and home-ofselection move,â&#x20AC;? said Simmons. Airmen who need to move household goods from their residence prior to enlistment to their ďŹ rst duty station qualify for a home-of-record move. Retiring Airmen may move from their ďŹ nal duty station to any location in the continental U.S. with a home-of-selection move. Both of these moves share the same process as a normal PCS. After getting paperwork for a PCS, ďŹ rst-time movers will be briefed along with those separating, retirees and individuals with a power of attorney. Once completed, movers must estimate the weight of their household goods. Simmons suggested 1,000 pounds per room as an estimate. Afterwards, a moving contractor will be sent to the house on a pre-determined date. For those with fewer goods and more manpower, a do-it-yourself move, also known as a personal property or â&#x20AC;&#x153;DITYâ&#x20AC;? move, may be more worthwhile.

Photo by Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill

Movers should plan for their permanent change of station as soon as they receive orders.The TrafďŹ c Management OfďŹ ce suggests making an appointment three weeks in advance and up to three months in advance if moving in peak season during May through July.

Much of the paperwork needed for a PPM is identical to that used in a normal PCS; however applicants must also ďŹ ll out a do-it-yourself and counseling checklist and obtain a travel voucher. Movers must weigh their vehicles empty and full for the trafďŹ c management ofďŹ ce. As a rule of thumb, Simmons suggests keeping all receipts from travel expense as they may be tax exempt. Simmons also suggested that prospective movers make an appointment with TMO three weeks ahead of the move, and she pointed out that those wishing to move during the peak season should make an ap-

pointment two to three months in advance instead of three weeks. It sounds simple on paper, but stories abound on troubled moves. Airman 1st Class Alexis Pearson, 439th Supply Chain and Operations Squadron grounds support specialist, had to navigate around a dualservice marriage and an infant while she processed out of Langley. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was deďŹ nitely unique,â&#x20AC;? said Pearson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The dual-service made the process a little slower.â&#x20AC;? Pearsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s husband, a multi-launch rocket system driver at Fort Eustis, Va., was given orders in April to Fort Lewis, Wash. Pearson applied for orders and proceeded to process through TMO as much as possible. Pearson is scheduled to leave Langley July 16. This is the ďŹ rst move for the whole family. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Without orders, a lot of the paperwork couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be completed,â&#x20AC;? said Pearson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My husband also needed to provide paperwork for me, and that took some time.â&#x20AC;? Pearson has all of the necessary paperwork almost completed, and is still waiting for orders to ďŹ nish the necessary steps. As for her child and her items, Pearson isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worried. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My son wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have his baby bouncer or his toys, and he loves those things,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But I am conďŹ dent that all of my items will be safe, so he can have them later.â&#x20AC;? Pearson suggests to other movers that they ďŹ ll out as much of the paperwork as possible as soon as possible to expedite the process once orders have arrived, especially with a spouse in the military as well. For more information, or to get started on a move, contact the inbound TMO at 757-764-2045 or outbound at 757-764-7868.

Airmen who need to move household goods from their residence prior to enlistment to their ďŹ rst duty station qualify for a home-of-record move. Retiring Airmen may move from their ďŹ nal duty station to any location in the continental U.S. with a home-of-selection move. Both of these moves share the same process as a normal PCS.


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633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

2011

“The hardest thing for me was the questions from my kids. They would see a story on the news about dangerous things happening in Iraq and wonder if he was safe.” — Staff Sgt. Aundrea Jones on her husband, Tech. Sgt. Collin Jones, being deployed

call at the same time every week. Those calls always came Sunday evening, which led to the Jones’ implementing a family dinner – which is still in effect. And while Tech. Sgt. Jones did have to leave his family for six months, he is the first to admit that his wife had the more difficult job. “I had a job to do over there,” he said. “But, afterwards I had time to myself. I didn’t have accountability to my family over there.” Tech. Sgt. Jones said while he could wake up, go to work, eat, study and go to the gym like clockwork, every day, his wife had to do all of those things in addition to being a full-time mother. However, he also said he would trade all the nights he got a full eight hours of sleep, for time back with his family. “Losing sleep is a small price to pay when you’re with your family again,” he said. Staff Sgt. Jones smiled and agreed with her husband. “Since the deployment he has spent a lot more time with the family,” she said. “I think being so far away actually brought him closer to us.” The Jones’ have both deployed twice during their careers in the U.S. Air Force, so even though the experience was nothing new, the challenges kept both parents on their toes. “The hardest thing for me was the questions from my kids,” Staff Sgt. Jones said. “They would see a story on the news about dangerous things happening in Iraq and wonder if he was safe.” SEE JONES PAGE 11

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In one of his first messages since arriving at Al Asad Air Base, Iraq, during the final months of the U.S. military drawdown, Tech. Sgt. Collin Jones asked his wife, Staff Sgt. Aundrea Jones for one thing. Send soap. Looking back, both Airmen, who work for the 1st Operations Support Squadron at Langley Air Force Base, Va., laugh at the request. When Tech. Sgt. Jones arrived in country, he discovered the shop on base was sold out of soap – a useful commodity when dealing with the environmental conditions of Iraq. But, he said, his problems paled in comparison to the challenges his wife was facing back home. “This deployment was a little more difficult,” Staff Sgt. Jones said. “We had just had a baby.” The transition was also initially difficult for their other children. “In the beginning they were really upset,” she said. “But they are military kids – so they got used to it after a while.” Staff Sgt. Jones attributed some of the adjustment to a program her children utilize at their school. During lunch, children of deployed Service members will gather together with a teacher or counselor and discuss how they are coping with the deployment. They will also find support in the program, as well as with other students who are experiencing a similar situation in their lives. However, even though the children were able to adapt to the deployment, Tech. Sgt. Jones said he still felt the weight of the distance from his family, during every significant life event. “It was frustrating,” he said. “Not being able to see all the firsts from my new baby.” The Jones’ both said they had to set a routine in order to ensure both they and their children maintained stability during such an unstable time. “I had to set a schedule, because every day was hectic,” said Staff. Sgt. Jones. “Every day I would set aside time to talk to my kids, and see how they were coping.” She said her husband made sure to

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/LYLQJ GRZQ XQGHU 

U.S Army Major experiences life in Australia By Tatjana Christian U.S. ARMY TRAINING AND DOCTRINE COMMAND PUBLIC AFFAIRS

“For me, it’s kind of an experience of a lifetime. I’ve wanted to go to Australia ever since I was a little kid. I’ve seen things here that, at times, make me have to pinch myself – ‘like wow, I’m really here.”

NOT as the songs of other lands Her song shall be Where dim Her purple shore-line stands Above the sea! As erst she stood, she stands alone; Her inspiration is her own. From sunlit plains to mangrove strands Not as the songs of other lands Her song shall be. – An Australian Symphony by George Essex Evans Australia has long been known for its beautiful landscapes, diverse wildlife and rich history. While the opportunity to travel abroad and experience foreign cultures may only be a dream for some, it was a lifechanging reality for Maj. Trent Upton, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command’s liaison officer to the Australian Army’s Forces Command Headquarters. For the last eight months, he and his family were able to live and work in Paddington, Australia. “My wife and I jumped at the chance to give our children the experience of living in another country,” said Upton. “It’s something some may take for granted, but not something the average American gets the chance to do.” Upton admits he enjoys life overseas, but also understands he has an important mission. As a liaison officer, he works closely with his Australian counterparts to build dynamic relationships which provide the familiarity paramount during joint missions and training. His mission currently includes initiatives such as brigade redesign, force generation cycle refinement, and Human Dimension. These topics are not only important to TRADOC’s efforts to design the “Army of 2020”, but also to aid Australia’s modernization missions. “It’s all about establishing and main-

— Maj. Trent Upton U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command’s liaison officer to the Australian Army’s Forces Command Headquarters

Courtesy photo

U.S. Army Maj. Trent Upton at the Battle of the Coral Sea Memorial in Townsville, Australia.The Battle of the Coral Sea was fought from May 4-8, 1942, and was a major naval battle in the Pacific Theater of World War II between the Imperial Japanese Navy and Allied naval and air forces from the United States and Australia.

taining trust. Trust is the underlying strength of any Army, from the buddy team to the strategic level. It’s the same with our allies and partners,” said Upton. “We have to understand each other and be confident in each other’s capabilities. Building and maintaining trust is critically fundamental to what we do as members of the Army profession” According to the 2012 Army Posture Statement, Building Partnerships Capacity is a concept for developing future forces while creating stronger relationships with foreign armies. BPC contributes to strengthening international security capacities to deter potential adversaries and prepare for wartime efforts.

“One of the great things about my job is I get to observe how a different organizations approach problem solving,” said Upton. “I get to see different perspectives on how to tackle the same problem across its subordinate units and other governmental agencies.” Upton, a career Infantry officer, is no stranger to living abroad. His previous duty assignments include a tour in South Korea and four combat tours in Iraq. Upton’s experience as a career Infantry officer made him an ideal choice to represent the U.S. Army. Randy Heitman, chief of the Liaison and Exchange Division for the International Army Programs Directorate, said that combat and operational experience plays a large role when selecting an individual for an LNO position. “In the case of Australia, we wanted to fill the position with a combat arms officer who has had two or three deployments with operational experience,” said Heitman. “This helps build credibility with the host nation.” Upton said as an laison officer, establishing and maintaining credibility is key. “You have to make it a point to demonstrate [relevancy and credibility] on a regular basis,” he said. “My combat experience helped establish initial credibility with the Australian Army. I’ve since expanded it through active engagement across a wide variety of activities, such as battle rhythm events, training events and

unit functions.” As an American Soldier working alongside Australian forces, Upton shared his surprise at discovering the shared challenges each country faces regarding future operations. As an LNO, it is critical to impart the current initiatives and guidance as directed by TRADOC. Attending a TRADOC sponsored LNO conference June 11 through 16 at Fort Eustis, Va. provided Upton the most recent initiatives and the chance to talk with other LNO’s about their challenges and experiences. Upton said that living in Australia is better than he thought it would be, and he and his family have taken trips to explore Sydney, Cairns in Queensland, the Great Barrier Reef, and even toured one of its many rain forests. “The kids really get a kick out of it,” said Upton. “My kids love to see the wildlife there. Some areas you can go to where the animals are out in the wild running around.” Upton has also been forever changed by his experiences on the “sunlit plains and mangrove strands.” “For me, it’s kind of an experience of a lifetime. I’ve wanted to go to Australia ever since I was a little kid,” said Upton as he described what he likes most about living in Australia. “I’ve seen things here that, at times, make me have to pinch myself – ‘like wow, I’m really here.’”

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JBLE prepares to celebrate Independence Day By Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill

July 4, at Seay Plaza, Va. The Fort Eustis Honor Guard will also be present during the Yorktown parade. Pink Floyd fans and Sci-Fi enthusiasts alike will revel in the joy of the Virginia Living Museum’s Spirit of America Laser Display at the Abbitt Planetarium July 4. The show will rock the patriotism of attendees; mixing together classic patriotic tunes with the sound of rock ‘n’ roll. July is characterized by not only the festivities, but often the number of accidents caused by fireworks and heat exhaustion. Anybody looking to go on the run in Yorktown or take their kids to the 4th of July Stars in the Sky event should be aware of the heat, said Bob Longworth, chief of safety for Langley AFB, and his staff. Make sure water is included among all of the sodas and Slurpies, and get out of the sun and into a cooler location when the signs of heat exhaustion arise. Heat from the sun is dangerous, but heat from an exploding entertainment device is equally, if not more, dangerous. “Fireworks are a large attraction, but they are still explosives,” said Joe Novack, senior safety specialist 633rd Air

633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

The smell of burgers and sun-block lotion have quickly become common scents around Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., as the summer season sets in. Mix in the distinctive sound of fireworks, and the thought of Independence Day comes to mind. Although most offices around the base are scheduled to close, the community is far from inactive this year. Newport News Parks, Recreation & Tourism will celebrate Independence Day with its 4th of July Stars in the Sky event, July 4, at Victory Landing Park, Va. The celebration begins at 7 p.m., with free children’s rides, including giant slides, moon bounces and obstacle courses.

Williamsburg For those yearning to feel the excitement of the nation’s birth, Yorktown and Williamsburg, Va. are scheduled to hold events to honor American history. Colonial Williamsburg’s Independence Day celebration will begin with a morning militia muster at 10 a.m., July 4, in

the Revolutionary City. A dramatic reading of the Declaration of Independence is scheduled for noon on the west side of the Capitol. The U.S. Air Force Heritage of America Band will perform at 6 p.m. in Market Square and a fireworks display will take place at 9:30 p.m.

Yorktown In Historical Yorktown, people of all ages can enjoy the 33rd annual Fourth of July Celebration. The festivities include a parade, 8K run and 5K walk, bell-ringing ceremony, orchestral music and, of course, a fireworks display over the York River. Fort Eustis is scheduled to hold a 50-cannon Salute to the Nation at noon,

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Tom Peterson thought he was getting a bargain when he bought a used Mazda RX-7. For the price of $6,000, he was able to leave a used car dealership with a fairly new sports car. However, within a few days, Tom noticed several problems: the thermostat was missing, the radiator was filled with rust and the car was prone to overheating. In short, what originally looked like the perfect deal turned into a used car dealership horror story. Unfortunately, these stories are common, and instances of auto dealer fraud are on the rise in Virginia. Scams can be difficult to identify, so here are seven tips to purchasing a used vehicle while identifying and avoiding auto dealer fraud: Research the dealership and the vehicle ahead of time. Always research potential dealerships for reported scams or deceptive dealings. Previous buyers will typically alert other consumers, and an online search should only take a few minutes. They should be cautious when approaching any dealership, but especially vigilant when approaching smaller, lesser-known ones. While researching dealers, buyers should also obtain information about the car they wish to purchase. By using an online database, such as “Kelly Blue Book” or a credit union’s car buying database, a buyer can quickly identify the typical price for their vehicle and reduce the risk of being overcharged. They can also use services such as “Carfax” or “Autocheck” to ensure there aren’t undisclosed defects that may arise after purchasing the vehicle. Be skeptical of “as is.” Purchasing a vehicle “as is” means the buyer agree to purchase the vehicle in its current condition, regardless of any defects. If a dealership is selling a used car “as is,” they like-

Purchasing a vehicle “as is” means the buyer agree to purchase the vehicle in its current condition, regardless of any defects. If a dealership is selling a used car “as is,” they likely bought the car at auction and cannot warranty against defects. Graphic by Senior Airman Jarad A. Denton

ly bought the car at auction and cannot warranty against defects. Therefore, while buyers may be saving money upfront, they may face significant repair costs later. If a buyer must purchase a car “as is,” it should be through a private sale where the individual wouldn’t be able to offer them a warranty anyway. Never agree to additional, unwanted services or warranties. Extended warranties can be useful, but these warranties aren’t required when purchasing a used car. Dealerships sometimes claim extended warranties are mandatory to qualify for a loan, especially when the buyer has a low credit score. Be cautious of statements by car salesmen that require buyers to purchase additional services that are ordinarily optional, and never agree to additional services or fees unless the buyer agrees they are necessary to enjoy the use of the new vehicle. Beware of GAP insurance. Guaranteed Auto Protection (GAP) insurance covers the excess amount on a loan when an insurance company won’t cover the entire loan if a buyer were to total their car. However, GAP insurance is completely voluntary and it’s illegal for a dealership to force a buyer to purchase GAP insurance.

Ensuredocumentsoftitlearesigned over to the buyer when purchasing a car and keep copies of all signed sales and financing documents. Buyers should never purchase a car without first reviewing the vehicle’s title. Title is essential to maintaining legal ownership of the vehicle, and a dealer will never have a good reason for withholding title documents from a buyer. In some instances, buyers have discovered the dealership didn’t have true title and later lost the vehicle to its rightful owner. Dealerships have also reportedly changed financing terms in a contract by increasing the interest rate or the down payment amount between the purchase and the time the buyer received title documents. If a buyer doesn’t agree to the new terms, the dealership may illegally attempt to report the vehicle stolen. Therefore, make sure to properly verify the authenticity of the vehicle’s title and watch the dealership sign the title over to the buyer before leaving the dealership with their vehicle. Further, no matter how long it takes, it’s extremely important to complete all sales and financing paperwork before leaving the dealership with a vehicle. Buyers shouldn’t let a dealer slow-roll the paperwork, or pressure them into making bad decisions. SEE SCAM PAGE 11


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SCAM FROM PAGE 10 Finally, make sure to request copies of all paperwork signed at the dealership and keep copies of all paperwork in case it’s needed later. Minimize disclosing sensitive financial information to car dealerships. Credit checks can be essential to purchasing a vehicle if a buyer decides to finance through a dealership. However, a salesman has no right to run a credit check if they decide to finance through another lender. By allowing a car dealership to run a credit check, buyers increase the chances that someone may steal their identity or take an additional loan out in their name. They should only divulge sensitive financial information when it is necessary to complete the purchase. Further, there are very few times when a dealership can offer a buyer a better rate than a credit union or bank. Depending on their credit, interest rates start at 1.99 percent for vehicle loans. The average interest rate for used cars is less than 8 percent. Keep that in mind if the dealership attempts to sell a car at 20 percent interest. Buyers should talk to friends, and more than one lending institution before signing up for a loan.

MILITARY VETERANS LIKE DOMINION LINEMAN DEVON MCFADDEN ARE REMOVING ONE PROUDLY WORN UNIFORM FOR ANOTHER. Supporting our military—when they’re abroad and when they come home—is an important part of who we are. That’s one of the reasons we’ve helped pilot the national Troops to Energy Jobs program, which links military veterans to jobs inthe energy sector. We’re proud that ourcompany’s commitment to service members and their families was recognized when we received the Secretary of Defense Employer Support Freedom Award—the highest honor given tocompanies employing military veterans. It’s also led to Dominion being named a “Top 100 Military Friendly Employer” three years in a row. But what we’re most proud of are the dedicated men and women who’ve served our country so bravely. We’re honored to stand behind them—and work beside them.

Don’t be afraid to say “No” and to leave the dealership. Remember, buyers always have the right to say “no” and walk away – or say, “maybe” and walk away. By using this simple tactic, a salesman may drop the price or include incentives to close the deal rather than watch them leave. Regardless of the salesman’s pitch, be wary of “today only,” specials. The deal will probably still be there when they return after having a night to research whether the deal is a good one. If the vehicle has been sold to someone else before the buyer returns, there are plenty of other vehicles out there. Buyers can find more tips as well as common dealer ploys, with a simple web search. Between these, and using a wingman, buying a used car need not be a stressful ordeal.

JONES FROM PAGE 7 Thankfully, Staff Sgt. Jones was able to devote the time to addressing those questions because of the planning she and her husband did prior to his deployment. They made sure the power of attorney letter was complete, their finances were in order, and their work centers and first sergeant knew how to contact them. These steps helped bring the “worry factor” to a minimum. The Jones’ both encourage Airmen tasked for a deployment to take the time to ensure their family situation is covered; it helps avoid the dread some families feel when a deployment order is generated. “I don’t dread deployments,” Staff Sgt. Jones said. “I’m military – it’s my duty to deploy. I know it happens. When a deployment comes down, I automatically know I have to get everything set up, both for myself and my family.” With the preparations made and the home front in good hands, Tech. Sgt. Jones was able to deploy with confidence that his family was taken care of. He discovered he didn’t miss the creature comforts of America. “When I was over there the only thing I needed was my wife and family,” he said, with a smile and a pause. “And soap.”

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The soaked sand-colored T-shirt stuck to the skin under the ceramic plate. A shift of the sling put the loaded M4 carbine on the left side, primed to ďŹ re around the wall with maximum cover. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Move up!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cover!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ready!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Moving up!â&#x20AC;? The four commands rang out, the Defender rushed to the barricade ready to take down any adversary. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alright, next group,â&#x20AC;? said the instructor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Good job, get some water.â&#x20AC;? The squad moved back to the truck to hydrate, and the next group of security personnel moved up to the starting block, as the 633rd Security Forces Squadron practiced the basics of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shoot, move, communicateâ&#x20AC;? training at Fort Eustis, Va., June 21. Before going to Fort Eustis for the live exercise, 633rd SFS members refreshed their memory on proper and efďŹ cient methods to ďŹ x a weapon jam, reload and transition between weapons, at Langley Air Force Base, Va., June 20. The controlled environment allowed instructors to work with each individual and their varied methods. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are a lot of ways to work with your weapon,â&#x20AC;? said Staff Sgt.

Patrick Gargan, 633rd SFS training instructor, in a brief to the participants. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We all do everything a little different, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ ne.â&#x20AC;? Once class was ďŹ nished, every member tried his or her hand at ďŹ xing the most common weapon jams and practiced the basic movements they learned during technical training. After familiarizing themselves with training, the participants went to Fort Eustis to put the skills to the test. Implementing a â&#x20AC;&#x153;crawl, walk, runâ&#x20AC;? mentality allowed both the instructors and Security Forces members to evaluate progress and training requirements throughout the entire exercise. Training at Fort Eustis included moving from cover to cover and practicing the four basic commands that are second nature to all Security Forces personnel, said Gargan. For each exercise, participants were given â&#x20AC;&#x153;simunitionâ&#x20AC;?; aluminum-cased plastic rounds with a colored detergent to determine where a target, or person, was hit. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These rounds allow force-on-force exercises,â&#x20AC;? said Gargan. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We can evaluate our troops on how they react under ďŹ re.â&#x20AC;? Also, the modiďŹ ed ammunition is cheaper than using real rounds but still allows realistic recoil. The rounds themselves are small bits of plastic, allowing for easier clean up and a small-

er economic footprint, said Gargan. Beyond the deployment aspects, there are additional purposes for the training. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It builds camaraderie;â&#x20AC;? said Timothy Northcutt, 633rd SFS supervisory police ofďŹ cer, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and anytime we get trigger time is a good time.â&#x20AC;? Solidarity of the force is important, Northcutt continued. Having the ability to communicate with any other individual with this training can prove invaluable in multiple incidents, such as in the event of an active shooter. One the most infamous examples of an active shooter scenario occurred in 1999 at Columbine High School, Jefferson County, Colorado. It forced law enforcement to re-evaluate how they handle active shooter scenarios. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We all remember Columbine,â&#x20AC;? said Northcutt. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Before we set up a perimeter; now ďŹ rst on scene is ďŹ rst to engage.â&#x20AC;? In every case, the basics allow security ofďŹ cials to react immediately. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s muscle memory,â&#x20AC;? said Senior Airman Stephanie Cardwell, 633rd SFS commanderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s executive. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have time to think, just to react.â&#x20AC;? In the end, Northcutt said, this training only further improved the skill of Langley defenders. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These are high-speed, highly trained people that are responsible for base security,â&#x20AC;? said Northcutt.

LEFT: Staff Sgt. Brandon Kelly, 633rd Security Forces Squadron desk sergeant, loads his magazine with plastic, training rounds at Fort Eustis June 21.These plastic rounds are an innovative way to save money and allow familiarization with the weapon while staying safe.

For related a related video, folow the QR code.

RIGHT: Members of the 633rd Security Forces Squadron move forward in a line while ďŹ ring at stationary targets. During this training, participants had to ďŹ re, reload and transition to their sidearm, if necessary, while advancing in a straight line. Photos by Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill


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Air Force ofďŹ cials announced a change to transportation and travel allowances for Airmen tasked with 365-day extended deployments, commonly referred to as an indeterminate TDY. Effective July 1, the Air Force will no longer refer to a 365-day extended deployment as an ITDY since there are deďŹ nitive TDY tour lengths, ofďŹ cials explained. The policy change will better align the Air Force with the Joint Federal Travel Regulation guidelines regarding ITDYs. Previously, Airmen tasked for 365-day extended deployments received entitlements for dependent travel and transportation allowances. These allowances included dependent and household goods movement during the deployed period. Those entitlements will no longer be available effective July 1. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The use of the term â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;indeterminateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; when Airmen are tasked for a pre-determined maximum deployment does not meet the

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intent of the JFTR,â&#x20AC;? said Col. Ken Sersun, the Air Force Military Force Policy Division chief. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We understand discontinuing dependent travel and transportation allowances may be perceived as the removal of entitlements; however, the Air Force must comply with existing JFTR guidelines.â&#x20AC;? Airmen tasked before July 1 for future 365-day extended deployments will not be affected by the policy change. Other programs associated with 365day extended deployments are not affected at this time, Sersun said. These programs include the â&#x20AC;&#x153;three-day optionâ&#x20AC;? that gives Airmen the option to either separate or retire in lieu of the deployment, as long as they make the decision within three days of assignment notiďŹ cation; â&#x20AC;&#x153;advanced assignment consideration,â&#x20AC;? which gives deployingAirmen an opportunity to request advance assignment consideration upon selection; and â&#x20AC;&#x153;24-month assignment deferment,â&#x20AC;? which gives deploying Airmen the option of requesting a 24-month assignment hold, following their return from deployment.

Effective July 1, the Air Force will no longer refer to a 365-day extended deployment as an ITDY For more information about assignments, deployments and other personnel issues, visit the myPers website at https://mypers.af.mil


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The Langley open house, “AirPower over Hampton Roads,” has been scheduled for May 3 through 5, 2013 at Langley Air Force Base, Va. The air show is slated to host a mix of military and civilian performances and static displays, and in previous years, has hosted demonstrations by numerous national performers, such the Air Force premier demonstration team, the Thunderbirds, said A.J. Gross, depuThe 2013 AirPower ty air show director. over Hampton All air-show performers atRoads airshow has tend the International Convention of Air Shows, hosted been scheduled for by the International council of May 3-5 at Langley Air Shows, to set schedule for Air Force Base the 2013 season. The International Council of Air Shows held its first convention in 1967, and since then has gathered the air show community every year to exchange ideas, conduct business and begin the process of planning the upcoming season. The 2012 ICAS Convention will be held December 10 through 13 at the Paris Hotel in Las Vegas. Once the convention has concluded and the 2013 schedules are set, Langley AFB will be able to formulate an itinerary of the 2013 show. Like previous open houses, the 2013 air show will kick off the Friday, May 3. The gates are scheduled to open at 5 p.m., and will include a concert, a night air show and a fireworks display. Saturday and Sunday the gates will open at 9 a.m. and the show is slated to start at 11 a.m. The performances will last all day, concluding at 5 p.m. To the Air Force, AirPower over Hampton Roads is a way to give back to the local community for their continued support of Langley’s missions and operations, said Gross. “The air show provides a great opportunity to give the surrounding community a chance to show the capabilities of the world’s greatest air force,” said Gross. “It’s important to see what we do here at Langley AFB.”

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EustisCommunity MCAHC CT services Computed Tomography Services at McDonald Army Health Center will be closed until further notice. As dedicated healthcare providers for the community, we will be making improvements in the Radiology Department that are necessary to improve the quality of healthcare. We apologize for this interruption in services. CT appointments can still be made at Langley Air Force Base, (757) 764-6942 or Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, (757) 953-9729. For more information, call (757) 314-7749.

Scam alert Service members are advised to be on the lookout for checks being mailed to individuals with the official TRICARE logo and directions from American Mega Lottery Payment to activate and cash-in. This is an attempt to obtain personal and financial information; TRICARE is aware of the scam. All service members are highly encouraged to destroy the fraudulent check and do not deposit it into a bank account. Do not call the claims agent on the notice to activate the check. Also, do not complete the form, sign it or mail it back to American Mega Lottery.

Soldier and Family Readiness Soldier and Family Readiness (ACS) classes and briefings for July will include: ■ Job Information Briefing – Monday, and July 9, 16, 23, 30; 10 to 11 a.m. Attendees will learn job search strategies including employer websites, online job boards and vacancy announcements. ■ Credit Reporting, Scores and Debt Management – Tuesday, and July 17; 9 to 10 a.m. Are you looking to improve your credit score prior to making that big purchase? Need a starting point?This class covers everything that you need to know about credit reports and FICO scores. All attendees will receive a free FICO score and credit analysis. ■ Newcomers Briefing –Tuesday, 10 to 11:30 a.m. Come and learn essential information about installation and community resources. Soldiers are highly encouraged to attend; spouses and civilians are cordially invited.This event will include prizes, an information fair and optional windshield tour (when available). ■ DevelopingYour Financial Plan – July 10 and 24; 9 to 10 a.m. Are you tired of living paycheck to paycheck? Need a financial “checkup?” We will teach you the basics of developing a written plan while setting goals for a successful financial future. ■ SponsorshipTraining – July 17; 2 to 3 p.m. Do you need information on how to become an effective unit sponsor?This training can be com-

JUNE 29, 2012

Submit Eustis Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com pleted in the classroom or online at www.apps. mhf.dod.mil/esat. ■ CareTeamTraining – July 18; 9:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.The CareTeam offers short-term care and support to families of deceased and seriously wounded Soldiers and civilians until the family’s own support structure is in place. It is important to note that the Care Team will only be utilized at the request of the family. Care teams are not mandatory but are an additional way for organizations to provide valuable support to families. ■ Family Readiness Groups and Leadership – July 18; 9 a.m. to noon. Learn the FRG structure and how it plays an important role in the Army. We will help you to develop leadership skills and discover the importance of volunteers and members. This training is offered through the Mornings with Army FamilyTeam Building series. ■ Effective ResumeWriting – July 20; 9 a.m. to noon. Attendees will learn the skills necessary to assess work experience and job accomplishments. Assistance will be provided for preparation of a chronological resume. ■ Exceptional Family Member Program Empowerment Hour – July 24; 10 to 11 a.m. Come out and get an overview of the Hampton Roads Medical Needs Registry. ■ Couponing Strategies – July 30; 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Learn ways to stretch your grocery dollars. We will teach you the proper use of coupons and how to organize your coupons for sales. All classes and briefings will take place in Bldg. 650, Monroe Ave. For more information, call 878-3638.

instant access to caregiver profiles, background checks, pictures, references, reviews, a four-step screening process, and a specialized matching technology to select the right caregiver. For more information, visit www.sittercity. com/dod.

School and sport physical exams School and sport physical exams are available at McDonald Army Health Center’s Pediatric and Family Health clinics by appointment only. Appointments may be scheduled for Monday-Saturday through Sept. 15. Please call the Hampton Roads Appointment Center at (866) 645-4584 to schedule an appointment (up to 28 days in advance). For more information, visit http://mcdonald. narmc.amedd.army.mil.

Emergency preparation Soldier and Family Readiness will host an Emergency PreparationTraining class on July 24 from 10 to 11 a.m. at Bldg. 650, Monroe Ave. The training is open to Soldiers, spouses, civilians, family readiness support assistants, family readiness group leaders, and families with special needs dependents. For more information, call 878-1954.

Range schedule

Joint Base Langley-Eustis will host an outdoor concert starring country music artist Sara Evans, July 13, at 7 p.m. at the Murphy Field Sports Complex. The concert is part of the USO Hampton Roads Military Concert Series. It is free and open to the public. Gates will open at 4 p.m. and free children’s activities will be offered until 7 p.m. Food and beverages will be available for purchase until closing. For more information, call 878-2602 or visit www.eustismwr.com.

Ranges, training areas and associated facilities are off limits to personnel not engaged in scheduled firing, operations or inspections unless clearance is obtained from the Range Control Fire Desk or a designated Range Control Technician.The Range Control office telephone number is 878-4412, ext. 226 or 878-3834, ext 234. The range operations schedule until Wednesday is: ■ Today – Ranges RD, 2, 5 (7 a.m. to 4 p.m.) ■ Saturday – No Scheduled Ranges ■ Sunday – No Scheduled Ranges ■ Monday – No Scheduled Ranges ■ Tuesday – Ranges 2 (7 a.m. to 3 p.m.) ■ Wednesday – No Scheduled Ranges All personnel are required to check in and out with Range Control before going into or departing from any range or training area.

Free sitter website

Kiwanis Club of Fort Eustis

The Department of Defense provides a free Internet sitter service for military families. The website finds in-home child care, nannies, tutors, elder care providers, pet sitters and other services in local communities. Active-duty members of all military branches, including activated National Guard and reserve members and their families, can receive a free membership to the service, saving an average of $120 a year. The program provides military families with

The Kiwanis Club of Fort Eustis meets at noon on the 2nd and 4th Thursday of each month at the Fort Eustis Club. All interested parties are invited and welcome to attend the meetings. Kiwanis International is a global organization of members of every age who are dedicated to changing the world, one child and one community at a time. For more information, call Lance Musser at 713-1399 or email lance@lennysgolf.com.

JBLE summer concert

Jacobs Theater Schedule

Friday, 7 p.m. No show Saturday, 4 p.m. Battleship (PG-13) In summer 2012, the battle for Earth begins at sea. “Battleship” is an epic-scale action adventure that unfolds across the seas, in the skies, and over land as our planet fights for survival against a superior force. A fleet of ships is forced to do battle with an armada of unknown origins in order to discover and thwart their destructive goals. Saturday, 7 p.m. The Dictator (R) Haffaz Alladeen is the bizarre dictator of the oilrich nation of Wadiya. He is as egotistical and ruthless as dictators come, executing anyone who disagrees with him by using his signature “head chop” signal. Alladeen is summoned by the United Nations to address their concerns about his nuclear program. Sunday, 2 p.m. No show Movie synopsis and show time information is available online at www.shopmyexchange.com/ReelTimeTheaters/Movies-Eustis.htm.


JUNE 29, 2012

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

LAFBCommunity Thrift Shop closure The Langley Thrift Shop will be closed July 4. The shop is regularly open Wednesdays and Fridays from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m.

SNCO medallion ceremony, banquet An induction medallion ceremony and banquet for 2012 master sergeant-selects is scheduled for July 27. The medallion ceremony will be held inside the Static Display Hanger at 10 a.m., and the banquet will be held at the Bayview Commonwealth Center at 6 p.m. For more information, contact Master Sgt. LaTrise Russell at 764-4108, or Senior Master Sgt. Katrina McIntosh at 764-2700.

Pool openings ■ The Langley Club Outdoor Pool is currently open. Its hours of operations are from 1 to 6 p.m., Thursday through Tuesday. The pool will be closed Wednesday. ■ The Shellbank Fitness Center Outdoor Pool, located next to the Community Center, is currently open through Aug. 24.The hours of operation are noon to 6 p.m., Friday to Wednesday. The pool is closedThursday. Additionally, the Shellbank Fitness Center Outdoor Pool hours will change Aug. 25-27. It will be open noon until 6 p.m., Friday through Sunday. From Aug. 31 until Sept. 3, the Shellbank Fitness Center Outdoor Pool will be open noon until 6 p.m., Friday through Monday. Due to maintenance, the Shellbank Fitness Center Indoor Pool will be closed June 25 through July 4. It is scheduled to reopen July 5.

Scam Alert: American Mega Lottery Service members are advised to be on the lookout for checks being mailed to individuals with the official TRICARE logo and directions from American Mega Lottery Payment to activate and cash-in and attempt to obtain personal and financial information. TRICARE is aware of the scam. All Service members are highly encouraged to: ■ Destroy the fraudulent check. ■ Do not call the claims agent on the notice to activate the check. ■ Do not deposit the fraudulent check into a bank account. ■ Do not complete the form, sign it or mail it back to American Mega Lottery.

Military wife singers sought C*A*M*M*O,The Center For Military Music Opportunities is casting military wife singers (post 9/11, active-duty wives only) for a choir recording. If you are interested in participating, contact CAMMO Artistic Director Victor Hurtado at casting@cammomusic.org or call 1-800-

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Submit LAFB Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com 517-5261 for information about requirements and audition/rehearsal schedules.

Langley Chapel job opening The Langley Air Force Base, Va., Chapel has a contract vacancy for a Director, Family Life Ministries. The contractor will be responsible for a full range of family style ministry initiatives (i.e. family-focused events & retreats, care for families of deployed, mission outreach, VBS/AWANA, etc) within the Protestant community. Applicants should provide evidence of appropriate competence in the form of a resume, demonstrating a four-year undergraduate degree, and experience in working with people of all ages within a Christian setting. Applicant must be able to lead and manage a multi-faceted ministry that appeals to all ages. Applicant must be willing to work within all Protestant faith groups, nationalities, and spiritual levels in a pluralistic military environment. The applicant must have a minimum of five years involvement with the Langley Chapel community. A contract will be awarded based on “best value” to the government. To review the Basis of Award, Statement of Work, and other contract requirements, please contact Chaplain David Barns, Senior Protestant Chaplain, at 764-7847. Applications must be received by close of business June 25, 2012.

Marriage seminar Whether you have a good marriage you want to make better, or you are hanging on by a thread, the Building a Strong Marriage Team seminar can transform your marriage. The Chapel is sponsoring this one-day event at no cost Service members at Joint Base LangleyEustis and their families. Come with or without your spouse. Lunch is provided, and the event is open to everyone. (Alternate Duty Location authorized for GS civilians.) Join us for a fun-filled one-day event to connect with your spouse and learn effective ways to have a thrilling marriage. You’ll leave with a fresh perspective and step by step details on how to Build a Strong MarriageTeam. Sign-up early to reserve your seat by calling 764-7847 or online: https://einvitations.afit. edu/inv/anim.cfm?i=50963&k=07614B0F78

Eaglewood Junior Golf Academy Eaglewood Golf Course is offering junior golf lessons now until Aug. 3. Ages five and up may attend. For more information, call 764-4547.

CEA recruiting event There are several career fields for enlisted aviators, and right now those career fields are hiring any Airman or noncommissioned officer who can retrain. Anyone interested in incen-

tive pay, and an amazing career, should be at the Base Theater June 29 at 2 p.m. For more information, contact Master Sgt. Richard Sennett at 764-7668, or email Richard. sennett@langley.af.mil.

Bethel Manor Block Party Langley Protestant Chapel, in conjunction with Northside Christian Church, is hosting a block party July 13 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Bethel Manor Chapel.There will be free food, live music and games for kids. Come and join the fun! For more information, contact Capt. David Barns at 757-764-8543 or 757-764-7847.

Summer youth volunteer program The American Red Cross is hosting a summer youth volunteer program for children between ages 13 and 17. The program takes place from June 25 to Aug. 17. Space is limited. All youth must be accompanied by a guardian and bring a completed application packet to one orientation. For more information or to request a volunteer packet, call the Fort Eustis office at 757878-3339 or call the Langley Air Force Base office at 757-225-4060.

Education Assistance Gala The Tidewater Chapter of Tuskegee Airmen is holding the 29th Annual Lawrence E. Anderson Education Assistance Gala at the Bayside Commonwealth Center, July 21 at 7 p.m. The semiformal event will feature guest speaker Brig. Gen. Stayce Harris, U.S. Africa Command mobilization assistant to the commander. The event cost is $50 and includes a meal and entertainment. For more information, please contact Capt. Williams at tatanya.williams@langley.af.mil or at (757)764-6314, or Mrs. Robinson at Lanise.robinson@langley.af.mil or (757)764-8594, or TSgt George-Packer at Zandria.George-Packer@langley.af.mil or 757-764-5254.

Young Adults’ Bible Study A bible study intended for college-age participants is held each Wednesday from 10:30 a.m. until noon at the Religious Center, 1792 1st St. in Bethel Housing. Our current series is titled; “Basic” by Francis Chan.There will be refreshments. For more information, contact David Rasbold at 764-0992 or 764-7847.

WAPS Catalog information Technical sergeants testing for master sergeant this year; did you know both Chapters 1 & 17 of the Professional Development Guide are not testable? Find out what you need to study in the Enlisted Promotions References and Requirements online at https://www. omsq.af.mil/TE/EPRRC.PDF.

Langley Theater Schedule Friday, 7 p.m. Battleship (PG-13) In summer 2012, the battle for Earth begins at sea. “Battleship” is an epic-scale action adventure that unfolds across the seas, in the skies, and over land as our planet fights for survival against a superior force. Saturday, 2 p.m. The Dictator (R) Haffaz Alladeen is the bizarre dictator of the oil-rich African nation of Wadiya. Alladeen is as egotistical and ruthless as dictators come, executing anyone who disagrees with him by using his signature “head chop” signal. Alladeen is summoned by the UN to address their concerns about his nuclear program. Saturday, 7 p.m. Chernobyl Diaries (R) Six young tourists, looking to go off the beaten path, hire an “extreme tour” guide. Ignoring warnings, he takes them into the city of Pripyat, the former home to the workers of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, but a deserted town since the disaster more than 25 years ago. After a brief exploration of the abandoned city, however, the group soon finds themselves stranded, only to discover that they are not alone. Sunday, 2 p.m. No show Movie synopsis and show time information is available online at www.shopmyexchange.com/ReelTimeTheaters/Movies-Langley.htm.


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

OutsideTheGate

4th of July Stars in the Sky Newport News Parks, Recreation &Tourism will celebrate Independence Day with its 4th of July Stars in the Sky event Wednesday at Victory Landing Park (end of 23rd Street at the James River).The celebration begins at 7 p.m. with free children’s rides including giant slides, moon bounces and obstacle courses. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. Entertainment will be provided by Cheap Thrills from 7 to 8 p.m.; Carbon Leaf will perform from 8:15 to 9:30 p.m. Fireworks will light up over the James River at 9:30 p.m. Admission and parking are free. Parking will be available at the Newport News City Hall parking lot and designated non-restricted public parking spaces in the downtown area. No pets, bicycles, alcohol, skateboards or radios will be permitted in the event area. For more information, call 926-1400.

Colonial Williamsburg Colonial Williamsburg’s Independence Day celebration will begin with a Wednesday morning militia muster at 10 a.m. in the Revolutionary City. A dramatic reading of the Declaration of Independence is scheduled for noon on the west side of the Capitol. The U.S. Air Force Heritage of America Band will perform at 6 p.m. in Market Square and a fireworks display will take place at 9:30 p.m. Free parking is available at the Visitor Center where visitors can purchase tickets and utilize the shuttle bus service (available every half hour to all regular stops). All daytime events in the Revolutionary City are included with Colonial Williamsburg admission tickets. The pedestrian bridge to the Revolutionary City will be closed to traffic from 9:15 to 10 p.m. For more information, call (757) 229-1000. To purchase tickets online, visit www.colonialwilliamsburg.com.

Historic Yorktown celebration The 33rd annual Historic Yorktown Fourth of July Celebration will include: ■ 8k Run and 5K Walk – 8 a.m., York High School (registration begins at 6:30 a.m.). ■ Parade on Water Street – 9 a.m., Riverwalk Landing (music by the U.S. Coast Guard Band). ■ Event Parking Opens – 4 p.m., Corner of Cook Road and Ballard Street. ■ Sounds of Liberty Bell Ringing Ceremony – 7 p.m., Riverwalk Landing Stage. ■ Glen Boswick and the Sounds of Swing Orchestra – 8 p.m., Riverwalk Landing Stage. ■ Fireworks Display – 9:15 p.m., Over the York River.

JUNE 29, 2012

Submit Outside The Gate announcements to pw1@militarynews.com

■ Glen Boswick and the Sounds of Swing Orchestra – 9:45 p.m., Riverwalk Landing Stage. To pre-register for the 8K Run and 5K Walk, visit info@ happypaceraces.com. For additional event information, call 890-3500 or visit www.yorkcounty.gov/fourth.

Picnic and fireworks show The 30th annual AT&T Fourth of July Great American Picnic and Fireworks Show takes place on Wednesday from 5 to 10 p.m. in Town Point Park (downtown Norfolk). The event is free and open to the public. Come out and enjoy patriotic sounds by the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Band. A fireworks display is scheduled for 9:30 p.m. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. For more information, visit www.festevents.org.

Virginia Living Museum ■ Spirit of America Laser Display – Come celebrate Independence Day and enjoy an amazing Spirit of America laser display Wednesday at the Abbitt Planetarium.The show mixes great patriotic music with America-inspired rock & roll songs. Show times will be at 3:30, 6, 7, 8 and 9 p.m. Recommended for ages 6 and up. Tickets are $3 (members) and $6 (non-members). ■ Star Party Laser Shows – Free observing begins at sunset on July 14. Visitors can choose from five shows: Laser Spirit, 6:30 p.m.; Virginia Skies, 7:30 p.m.; Laser retro, 8:30 p.m.; Laser Metallica, 10 p.m.; and Dark Side of the Moon, 11:30 p.m. All shows are $6.The Wild Side Café will be open from 6 to 9 p.m. ■ Blue Ridge Butterfly Safari – Help count and identify butterflies during the museum’s 21st annual Butterfly Watch Safari to the Blue Ridge Mountains on July 14 from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.This trip is a great way to enjoy the scenery and share nature with your family.The cost is $35 for members and $50 for non-members. Minimum age is 8 years old; 16 years old without an adult.To register, call 595-9135 or visit www.thevlm.org. The Virginia Living Museum is located at 524 J. Clyde Morris Blvd. in Newport News. Museum admission: $17 adults/$13 children (3-12), ages 2 and under free. Planetarium is $4 in addition to museum admission. Group rates are available for groups of 10 or more. Hours are Monday thru Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. For more info, call 595-9135 or visit www.thevlm.org.

Homeownership workshop Are you thinking about purchasing a home? Not sure

where to start? Fleet and Family Services Center Yorktown is hosting a Virginia Housing Development Authority Homeownership Workshop on July 10 from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Bldg. 1949, Yorktown Naval Weapons Station. The workshop is designed to take the mystery out of buying a home. Attendees will learn about managing personal finances and credit, working with a lender and real estate agent, completing the loan process and home inspection procedures. It is open to all active duty members, retirees, family members and DoD personnel. To register, call 887-4606 or visit www.cnic.navy.mil/ navyifema.

Air Force Heritage Band Concerts The United States Air Force Heritage Concert Band will be playing shows around the local area on the days leading up to July 4. Below are details of the upcoming concerts. ■ July 1– Merchant’s Square, Williamsburg at 6:30 p.m. ■ July 2 – Town Park, Irvington at 7 p.m. ■ July 3 – Genworth Financial Park, Richmond at 7:30 p.m. ■ July 4 – Market Square in Williamsburg at 6:00 p.m. For more information, go to www.facebook.com/heritageofamericaband.

Summer Breeze Concert Series The annual Merchants Square Summer Breeze Concert Series returns for the 21st year in the shopping and dining district adjacent to Colonial Williamsburg. Beginning with the July 11 concert, Merchant’s Square will also offer children’s entertainment at 6:30 p.m. featuring face painting, bubble-making and clowns. The outdoor concerts are free. The schedule is: ■ Sunday – U.S. Air Force Heritage of America Band, 6:30 to 7:45 p.m. ■ July 11 – Central Virginia Jazz Orchestra, 7 to 9 p.m. ■ July 18 – Kings of Swing, 7 to 9 p.m. ■ July 25 – Slapwater, 7 to 9 p.m. ■ Aug. 1 – U.S. Air Force Heritage Brass Ensemble, 7 to 8:30 p.m. ■ Aug. 8 – U.S. Air Force Heritage Ramblers Ensemble, 7 to 8:30 p.m. ■ Aug. 15 – U.S. Air Force Blue Aces Ensemble, 7 to 8:30 p.m. ■ Aug. 22 – U.S. Army TRADOC Band, 7 to 8:30 p.m. ■ Aug. 29 – U.S. Air Force Rhythm in Blue Ensemble, 7 to 8:30 p.m. For more information, call (757) 565-8889 or visit www. merchantssquare.org.


JUNE 29, 2012

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

www.peninsulawarrior.com

21

Army, TRADOC set Soldiers up for success with job credentialing By Sgt. 1st Class Kelly Jo Bridgwater

Pvt. Kayle Witzman, an Army food service specialist, Military Occupational Specialty 92G, prepares hot rolls as part of her Advanced Individual Training at Fort Lee.

U.S. ARMYTRAINING AND DOCTRINE COMMAND

The Army’s Training and Doctrine Command is working to increase opportunities for Soldiers to receive civilian accreditation for attending military schools. Training and Doctrine Command, known as TRADOC, is responsible for teaching roughly 150 military occupational specialties to enlisted Soldiers using 15 schools across eight locations, providing nearly 200,000 Army professionals each year with opportunities to become experts in their field. TRADOC and the Army are increasing their efforts to help Soldiers take those skills with them, through credentials, earned with their military training and experience, when they leave the Army and compete for jobs in the civilian sector. “The knowledge, skills and abilities Soldiers possess are very valuable and marketable to civilian employers,” said Brig. Gen. Pete Utley, TRADOC’s deputy chief of staff for operations and training. “What we are trying to do is work with civilian credentialing agencies and TRADOC schools to identify credentialing opportunities for more MOSs.” At a June 12 roundtable meeting in Washington, D.C., hosted by the American Legion, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civilian Personnel and Quality of Life Tony Stamilio, along with representatives from TRADOC and civilian credentialing agencies, gathered to discuss how to achieve appropriate recognition of military training and experience through credentialing programs. During the meeting, Stamilio stated each year between 80,000 and 100,000 Soldiers leave the Army after earning skills provided by Army schools. “We need to make sure we do all we can to support our Soldiers who have served and fought in war,” said Stamilio, who believes another benefit of credentialing is to “further professionalize the force” while helping the Army to “fill gaps and improve training.” In particular the Army is looking at 10 Military Occupation Specialties, or MOSs, that have a high volume and high unemployment rate.

Photos by Sgt. 1st Class Kelly Jo Bridgwater

“The guidance is to consider all MOSs, but we need to look closely at providing proper credentialing opportunities for the highly unemployed MOSs such as infantrymen, combat engineers, military police, medics, human resources specialists, motor transport operators, wheeled vehicle mechanics, logistics specialists, and food service specialists,” said Stamilio. According to Maj. Neil Wahab, TRADOC training, plans and operations, the enlisted Soldier is the primary focus; however, the Army is also looking at initiatives for warrant and commissioned officers. Credentials can be provided from government agencies like a commercial truck driver’s license and from non-government agencies such as the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence that provides credentials for mechanics. “Soldiers are able to chart the necessary training that will assist them in obtaining professional credentialing and certification by using the Army’s Career Tracker, or ACT, said Khadijah Sellers from TRADOC’s Institute for NCO Professional Development. “What is important is for Soldiers to understand that ACT will assist them to find MOS-related credentialing and certification that maximizes the training they received. ACT provides an integrated approach to a Soldier’s personal and professional development which capitalizes on a mutual need for lifelong learning,” said Sellers. “Soldiers can leverage the training

and experience they acquired throughout their career to obtain MOS-related credentialing and certifications,” said Sellers. “These technical certifications and credentials are valuable whether you remain in the Army or leave and work in the civilian sector.” In addition, Soldiers may visit the Army Credentialing Opportunities On-Line, or COOL, website for information on how they can fulfill the requirements for civilian certifications and licenses that are related to their MOS. The COOL website also allows Soldiers to see what jobs are potentially available to them based on the skills inherent in their MOS. “The Army’s Transition Assistance Program workshop uses the COOL website to help in the employment process,” said Sherman Watkins, a counselor with the Soldier Family Assistance Center and Army Career and Alumni Program on Fort Eustis. “Soldiers are having success in their job search as a direct result of using COOL.” “In the next five years, roughly a million people will leave military service and the Army spends one-half billion dollars per year on unemployment compensation,” said Wahab. “Initiatives to assist Soldiers with job credentialing will enhance Soldier skills while serving and increase employability prior to separation.” “The acquired skills of the professional Soldier are viable in the civilian market and the credentialing and certification program is key in providing our veterans a smooth transition from warrior to civilian,” said Stamilio.

ABOVE: Pfc. MiguelTelles hones his skills as a Utility Helicopter repairer during his Initial MilitaryTraining at the 128th Aviation Brigade, Fort Eustis. BELOW: Students of the Army’s Training and Doctrine Command’s Initial Military Training attend the Utility Helicopter Repairer’s Course run by the 128th Aviation Brigade the morning of June 20. (from left) Pvt.Tuyen Phan from Columbus, Ohio, Pvt. 1st Class MiguelTelles from Dallas, and Airman Donald Sweeney from Fayetteville, N.C.


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

JUNE 29, 2012 Veterans attend at a memorial ceremony for the Battle of Chipyong-ni, South Korea, June 26, at the site of the pivotal battle.

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22

Photo by Cpl. Cho Nakyoung, Eighth Army Public Affairs

25o years later, freedom is still worth fighting for. The next time you need a little inspiration, bring your family and experience Colonial Williamsburg. For it is here, as much as anywhere, that America was born. So come see firsthand the passion of our Nation Builders. Relive the proclamation of the Declaration of Independence from the courthouse steps. Come witness the spark that ignited a revolution. You just might come away with a whole new appreciation for the country you hold so dear. To plan your trip or get more information, call 1~800~361~6971, email groupsales@cwf.org, or visit colonialwilliamsburg.com Stop by your local MWR or ITT office to obtain a special military discount.

.RUHDQ :DU YHWHUDQV UHPHPEHU FULWLFDO %DWWOH RI &KLS\RQJQL By Walter T. Ham IV EIGHTH ARMY PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Be part of the story.

INSTEAD OF JUST HANGING OUT ON SATURDAYS

I HELP KIDS HANG IN THERE

AT SCHOOL BECAUSE I DON’T JUST WEAR THE SHIRT, I LIVE IT. ®

GIVE. ADVOCATE. VOLUNTEER. LIVE UNITED Michael Cleveland is part of United Way’s ongoing work to improve the education, income, and health of our communities. To find out how you can help create opportunities for a better life for all, visit LIVEUNITED.ORG.

Chipyong-ni was a little known mountain village until a battle there changed the momentum of the Korean War and made an indelible mark in military history. A day after the 62nd anniversary of the start of the Korean War, American, South Korean and French officials and Korean War veterans gathered here June 26, to mark one of the pivotal battles of the brutal three-year conflict. During a ceremony hosted by the Republic of Korea, or ROK, Army’s 20th Mechanized Infantry Division, officials and veterans laid wreaths and flowers at a memorial in the modern day city of Jipyeong-ni, formerly spelled Chipyong-ni during the Korean War. In late 1950, the large-scale Communist Chinese intervention in the Korean War dramatically changed the complexity of the conflict and increased the number of enemy troops that United Nations forces faced. Occupying a critical junction about 40 miles southwest of then-Communist occupied Seoul in February 1951, Chipyong-ni was a crossroads village less than a mile long and a few blocks wide. The 2nd Infantry Division’s 23rd Infantry Regimental Combat Team, augmented by a French infantry battalion, held the village and took on an entire Communist Chinese Army element during three days of heated battle Feb 13-15, 1950. Enveloped by enemy forces and fighting around the clock in near freezing temperatures, around 5,000 American and French

troops repelled and defeated 25,000 Communist Chinese forces and effectively shattered what historians called the myth of the “magical millions of Chinese in Korea.” Commanded by Col. Paul L. Freeman Jr., the 23rd Infantry Regiment had previously clashed with Chinese forces at the nearby Twin Towers and at Kunu-ri during the previous winter retreat from North Korea. Eighth Army Historian Ron Miller said the battle changed the momentum of the war because it was the first time Communist Chinese troops had been stopped in ground combat and forced to retreat. “This success invigorated Eighth Army with a heightened sense of morale and a renewed fighting spirit,” said Miller. “The successful defense of an isolated regimental combat team without grievous losses against a numerically superior force symbolized a turning point.” According to Miller, by early April 1951, United Nations forces had ejected the Communist Chinese from Seoul and pushed them north of the 38th parallel to the approximate area of the Military Demarcation Line that continues to divide the Korean Peninsula today. During the ceremony, ROK Army Maj. Gen. Na Sang-woong, commander of the 20th Mechanized Infantry Division, paid tribute to the “noble sacrifice of the UN Soldiers who fought bravely in the mountains, valleys and fields of the Republic of Korea defending freedom and democracy.” The ROK Army 20th ID commander said the veterans of the Battle of Chipyongi-ni “sowed the seeds of democracy and prosperity” in South Korea.


JUNE 29, 2012

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Articles For Sale

2 cttw Engagement Ring - Gorgeous Princess Composite & Round Diamond 14k YG, size 7. Store warranty incl. w/purchase - $1500. Call 757-270-7988

For sale Br Jeep 86 Grandwagoneer in good condition. 757-877-7927

kitchen Table w, 4 chairs expandable for 2 addt'l chairs. excellent condition $ 325.00. Call 757-877-2843

For Rent-House (All)

Entertainment Center, 54"H X53" W X20"D glass doors, storage, accommdates 32"TV & stero equipment. $70.00 757-877-2843 Martha Stewart patio furniture 5pc dining set 120.00OBO 3053324083heimrio@yahoo.com

Sharp Projector 200.00 OBO Will include extra bulb.305-332-4083 heimrio@yahoo.com Washer/Dryer for sale $400 for pair. Washer 3 yrs old/Dryer 1yr old. 757-598-1551

Hampton, , 3BD, 1 bath, detached garage/carport, $1200 Call 850-624-432 Newport News, 4br/2ba,2300,2-car,granite, call(707)474-7672.

Kiln

Creek, $1700/mo

BY MAIL:

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Campers/RVs

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2007 Challenger, 5th wheel RV 3-slides, slps-7 w/ Wash&Dryer, $20K obo, 910-723-0989 2009 Toy Hauler Raptor RV. Divorce forcing sale...In excellent condition, sleeps 8 adults and 4 children. Stereo/DVD player, 2 Slide outs, Generator, tie down tracks, washer/dryer combo. 39,000K OBO 830-734-1783, Newport News area.

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army





86 0LOLWDU\ ,QFHQWLYH* CAN BE COMBINED WITH TOYOTA SPECIAL CASH BACK OR SPECIAL FINANCING OR SPECIAL LEASES!

New 2012 TUNDRA

New 2012 VENZA

New 2012 COROLLA

0

%

JUNE 29, 2012

APR financing

seven

on models!

New 2012 SIENNA

New 2012 AVALON

New 2012 HIGHLANDER

New 2012 RAV4

(excludes hybrids)

EveryNewToyotaComesWith Featuring a complimentary maintenance plan with roadside assistance**

Smartphone users scan here for more incentive information. Go to gettag.mobi to download the free application.

Buyatoyota.com

*HOW TO QUALIFY: 1.BE IN CURRENT ACTIVE DUTY STATUS IN THE U.S. MILITARY (NAVY, ARMY, AIR FORCE, MARINES, NATIONAL GUARD, COAST GUARD AND ACTIVE RESERVE) OR A U.S. MILITARY INACTIVE RESERVE (I.E., READY RESERVE) THAT IS PART OF THE INDIVIDUAL READY RESERVE, SELECTED RESERVE AND INACTIVE NATIONAL GUARD. RETIRED MILITARY PERSONNEL ARE NOT ELIGIBLE. 2.PROVIDE VERIFIABLE PROOF OF MILITARY STATUS OR ACTIVE SERVICE AT THE TIME OF PURCHASE: LEAVE AND EARNING STATEMENT OR MILITARY IDENTIFICATION CARD. 3.RECEIVE A SALARY SUFFICIENT TO COVER ORDINARY LIVING EXPENSES AND PAYMENTS FOR YOUR TOYOTA. 4.RECEIVE CREDIT APPROVAL THROUGH A TOYOTA DEALER AND TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. INCENTIVE OFFERED BY TOYOTA MOTOR SALES, U.S.A., INC. ON FINANCE CONTRACTS INCENTIVE WILL BE APPLIED TOWARD DOWN PAYMENT. ON LEASE CONTRACTS, INCENTIVE WILL BE APPLIED TOWARD THE AMOUNTS DUE AT LEASE SIGNING OR DELIVERY, WITH ANY REMAINDER APPLIED TO THE CAPITALIZED COST REDUCTION. ONE INCENTIVE PER TRANSACTION. NOT AVAILABLE TOGETHER WITH TOYOTA COLLEGE INCENTIVE PROGRAM. FINANCE AND LEASE CONTRACTS MUST BE DATED BY JANUARY 1, 2013. THE MILITARY INCENTIVE PROGRAM IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE OR TERMINATION AT ANY TIME. TOYOTA MILITARY INCENTIVE PROGRAM IS AVAILABLE ON APPROVED CREDIT TO WELL QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS FINANCING OR LEASING NEW UNTITLED TOYOTA MODELS THROUGH PARTICIPATING DEALERS AND TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. SOME RESTRICTIONS APPLY. PROGRAM MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE IN ALL STATES. NOT ALL APPLICANTS WILL QUALIFY. TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES IS A SERVICE MARK OF TOYOTA MOTOR CREDIT CORPORATION AND TOYOTA MOTOR INSURANCE SERVICES, INC. SEE PARTICIPATING DEALER FOR DETAILS. †ALL APR OFFERS: 0% APR FINANCING TERMS VARY BY MODEL. NOT ALL BUYERS WILL QUALIFY. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. **COVERS NORMAL FACTORY SCHEDULED SERVICE FOR 2 YEARS OR 25K MILES, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. THE NEW VEHICLE CANNOT BE PART OF A RENTAL OR COMMERCIAL FLEET. SEE PARTICIPATING DEALER FOR COMPLETE PLAN DETAILS. VALID ONLY IN THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES AND ALASKA. OFFERS END 7/09/12.

Peninsula Warrior June 29, 2012 Army Edition  

Fort Eustis edition of the June 29, 2012 issue of Peninsula Warrior

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