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:DUULRU J O I N T May 24, 2013 Vol. 4, No. 20

B A S E

L A N G L E Y - E U S T I S

P u b l i s h e d i n t h e i n t e re s t o f p e r s o n n e l a t J o i n t B a s e L a n g l e y - E u s t i s

Norfolk Tides salute Service members at Armed Forces Night – Page 8

SPECIAL EVENTS

‘Spouse Field Exercise’ fosters empowerment — Page 6

HURRICANE SEASON

What you need to know to stay ahead of the storm — Page 16

For more online content, check out JBLE.af.mil

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WARRIOR GAMES Langley Airman crowned ‘Ultimate Champion’ — Page 20

ARMY EDITION

w w w. p e n i n s u l a w a r r i o r. c o m


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MAY 24, 2013

 &ULWLFDO 'D\V RI 6XPPHU NLFNV RII VHDVRQ RI VDIHW\

Joint Base Langley-Eustis Editorial Staff Joint Base Langley-Eustis Commander Col. John J. Allen Jr.

By Airman 1st Class R. Alex Durbin

Joint Base Langley-Eustis Public Affairs Officer Capt. Matthew Miller • matthew.miller9@langley.af.mil

633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Joint Base Langley-Eustis Editor Staff Sgt. Katie Gar Ward • katherine.ward@langley.af.mil Fort Eustis Managing Editor Tech Sgt. April Wickes • pw1@militarynews.com Per Air Force Instruction 35-101/Army Regulation 360-1, only stories and photos submitted by members of the Department of Defense community and DOD news services may be printed in The Peninsula Warrior. Any stories, photos or announcements must be submitted eight days prior to publication. Stories and photos should be submitted to the editor and/or assistant editor at 633abw.paedit@langley.af.mil or Public Affairs Office, 601 Hines Cir., Fort Eustis, VA 23604. Announcements for the Community Section should be submitted to pw@militarynews.com. Announcements for the Outside the Gate Section should be submitted to pw1@militarynews.com. For more information call 757-878-4920. Authors’ names may be withheld, but all letters must include the authors’ signatures and telephone number. The Peninsula Warrior is an authorized publication for all the members of the U.S. military. Contents of The Peninsula Warrior are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, Department of the Air Force or the Department of the Army. The PeninsulaWarrior is printed every Friday by offset as a civilian enterprise newspaper for the Public Affairs Office, U.S. Air Force by Military Newspapers of Virginia at 150 W. Brambleton Ave. Norfolk, VA 23510 under exclusive written contract with the commander, Joint Base Langley-Eustis. MNV is a private firm in no way connected with the Department of the Air Force or Department of the Army. Printed circulation: 25,000. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. A confirmed violation or rejection of this policy of equal opportunity by any advertiser will result in refusal to print advertising from that source. All editorial content of The Peninsula Warrior is prepared, edited, provided and approved by the Public Affairs Office Joint Base LangleyEustis. All photographs are Air Force or Army photographs unless otherwise stated. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts and supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense or MNV of the products or services advertised.

MILITARY NEWSPAPERS OF VIRGINIA • HOME OFFICE: 150 W. Brambleton Ave., Norfolk, VA 23510 (757) 222-3990 • ADVERTISING SALES: 728 Blue Crab Road, Suite C, Newport News, VA 23606; (757) 596-0853; fax (757) 596-1473

With summer almost here, it will soon be time to uncover boats, dust off motorcycles, take a dip in the pool, go for a hike or just lie in the sun enjoying the outdoors with the smell of barbeque in the air. Unfortunately these beautiful summer days come with increased hazards and risks. According to the National Safety council, more than 400 fatal vehicle crashes and 43,500 medically-consulted injuries are estimated to take place on Memorial Day weekend alone. To combat these staggering statistics, the U.S. Army and Air Force designate May 25 through Sept. 4 of every year as the 101 Critical Days of Summer, a campaign dedicated to ensuring Soldiers and Airmen have an injury-free summer. The safety campaign is intended to increase Service members’ knowledge and understanding of dangers involved with recreational activities, as well as common summer endeavors. “The summer months are when Service members tend to travel, vacation or partake in other activities that inherently come with a higher risk for danger,” said Master Sgt. Harold V. Joe, 633rd Air Base Wing Safety superintendent. “While the [Services] have a year-round safety campaign, there is a bigger push during the summer months because of the increase of outdoor activities.”

Arguably one of the most dangerous hazards, impaired driving is common during summer months marked with holidays, vacations and cook-outs. In 2010, one third of vehicle fatalities were attributed to drivers with a blood-alcohol content of .08 or higher, averaging to a death every 51 minutes. Although impaired driving is a serious risk, there are other safety concerns associated with driving that are prevalent during the summer months, such as motorcycle, bicycle and pedestrian safety. While driving mishaps are severe, they are far from the sole focus of the summer safety campaign. In an area directly adjacent to the ocean, water safety is a topic all Joint Base Langley-Eustis Service members must be familiar with. According to the NSC, more than 3,800 people died in water and watercraft-related incidents in 2008, and the trend has continued to been on the rise. To reduce the risk of mishaps while swimming, ensure a life guard is on duty at pools or beaches, have a swimming buddy and wear proper gear when participating in water sports. Sunshine and warm weather are the most appealing aspects of summer, but it is important to know the risks associated with them and practice safe outdoor routines. Two sunburns before the age of 18 can double the risk of melanoma, according to the NSC. During the overly hot, humid days, make sure to stay hydrated and limit

intense, outdoor exercise. Focus on replacing lost salt and minerals with water and sports drinks and avoid alcohol and caffeinated drinks. It is also important to recognize the signs of heatstroke and heat exhaustion. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, fatigue, heavy sweating, confusion, extreme thirst, dizziness, cramps and nausea are all symptoms and must be taken seriously. Joe said no matter the activity, practicing safety and responsibility has a direct effect on mission requirements. “What we want to communicate most is to just have a plan, even if you’re doing something as simple as barbequing,” he said. “Think before you do anything – and most importantly, look out for each other. [Service members] are the most important part of our mission and without them, nothing can get done.”

Correction: In last week’s issue, we published an incorrect phone number for the Langley Chapel on page 16 in our story titled, “Dimensions of wellness: Spiritual fitness critical to readiness.” The correct number for the Langley Chapel is 764-7847.

HeritageSpotlight Memorial Day, an American holiday observed on the last Monday of May, honors men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military. Originally known as Decoration Day, it originated in the years following the Civil War and became an official federal holiday in 1971. The Civil War claimed more lives than any conflict in U.S. history, requiring the establishment of the country’s first national cemeteries. By the late 1860s, Americans in various towns

According to the National Safety council, more than 400 fatal vehicle crashes and 43,500 medically-consulted injuries are estimated to take place on Memorial Day weekend alone.

Memorial Day and cities had begun holding springtime tributes to these countless fallen soldiers, decorating their graves with flowers and reciting prayers. On May 5, 1862, General John A. Logan, leader of an organization for Northern Civil War veterans, called for a nationwide day of remembrance later that month. “The 30th of May, 1868, is designated for the purpose of strewing with flowers, or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in de-

fense of their country during the late rebellion,” he proclaimed. The date of Decoration Day, as he called it, was chosen because it wasn’t the anniversary of any particular battle. Although Memorial Day originally honored only those lost while fighting in the Civil War, during World War I the United States found itself embroiled in another major conflict, and the holiday evolved to commemorate American military personnel who died in all wars.

File photo by Senior Airman Zachary Wolf

Headstones mark the burial sites of the fallen at Hampton National Cemetery.

We want to hear from you. Contact us at pw1@militarynews.com, 633abw.paedit@langley.af.mil, 757-878-4920 or 757-764-2144.


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SpecialEvent

6HQLRU HQOLVWHG DGYLVRUV PDUN $UPHG )RUFHV 'D\ By Cheryl Pellerin AMERICAN FORCES PRESS SERVICE

To mark Armed Forces Day, the services’ senior enlisted advisors joined the senior enlisted advisor to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in an inaugural wreath-laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknowns in Arlington National Cemetery May 18. On a gray afternoon between spells of light rain, Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Bryan B. Battaglia and his fellow enlisted advisors hung the logos of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force and Coast Guard on a wreath wrapped with purple ribbon just steps away from the gravesite. Joining Battaglia in the ceremony were Sgt. Maj. of the Army Raymond F. Chandler III, Sgt. Maj. of the Marine Corps Michael P. Barrett, Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Michael D. Stevens, Chief Master Sgt. of the Air Force James A. Cody and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Coast Guard Michael P. Leavitt. Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Denise Jelinski-Hall represented the National Guard Bureau. Battaglia found the ceremony bittersweet, he told American Forces Press Service, “as it should be for everyone.” On Armed Forces Day “we recognize and celebrate the service and sacrifice of all of our serving men and women past and present, and to have an event here at Arlington National Cemetery means that, on a sadder note, we also honor those who went before us,” he said. “They celebrate the day with us in spirit only.” He added, “We’re hoping this will be an annual event and this is the right place to do it.” Battaglia said he and the other enlisted advisors have the full cooperation from Arlington National Cemetery officials to hold the ceremony every year and display the wreath representing the armed forces and all five service branches for everyone who visits the Tomb of the Unknowns on Armed Forces Day. On May 17, President Barack Obama issued a proclamation that continues the precedent set by his predecessors in declaring the third Saturday of each May as Armed Forces Day. “Whenever our nation has come under attack, courageous men and women in uniform have risen to her defense. Whenever our liberties have come under

Photo by Senior Airman Andrew Lee

ABOVE: Chief Master Sgt. of theAir Force James A. Cody places a service crest on a wreath in honor of Airmen’s sacrifices during the inaugural Armed Forces Day wreath-laying ceremony May 18, at theTomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery.

Photo by Sooney Vega

assault, our Service members have responded with resolve,” the president said in his proclamation. “Time and again these heroes have sacrificed to sustain that powerful promise that we hold so dear – life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. And on Armed Forces Day, we honor those who serve bravely and sacrifice selflessly in our name,” he said. On that Saturday, the commander in chief added, the nation thanks those in uniform and the families who serve alongside them. “We are bound by a sacred obligation to ensure our Service members and their loved ones have the resources and benefits they have earned and deserve,” Obama said, “and only when we uphold this trust do we truly show our appreciation for our armed forces.” In his own statement to the men and women in uniform, Defense Secretary

LEFT: U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Bryan B. Battaglia, senior enlisted advisor to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, joins the services’ senior enlisted advisors in paying respects.

Chuck Hagel called Armed Forces Day an opportunity for all Americans to express their gratitude to Service members, military families and veterans who keep the nation strong and safe. “In 2013 we mark the 12th consecutive Armed Forces Day with our nation at war – the longest period of sustained combat in our history, fought entirely by volunteers who made the courageous choice to answer the nation’s call,” the secretary said, and quoted President Harry S. Truman, who, in proclaiming the first Armed Forces Day, said, “America was not built on fear. America was built on courage, on imagination and an unbeatable determination to do the job at hand.” Such courage, imagination and determination come from ordinary citizens who stepped forward to do extraordinary things throughout the nation’s history, Hagel said.

“[On Armed Forces Day] we recognize and celebrate the service and sacrifice of all of our serving men and women past and present, and to have an event here at Arlington National Cemetery means that, on a sadder note, we also honor those who went before us. They celebrate the day with us in spirit only.” — Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Bryan B. Battaglia senior enlisted advisor to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff

“To all our Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen: take pride – not only on Armed Forces Day, but every day – in the uniform that you wear and the patriotic duty you perform. You are striving to make a difference and leading purposeful lives. You are part of a force that is admired and respected both at home and abroad. Remember that there is no challenge that cannot be met through the shared determination of the world’s greatest military. “To the husbands, wives, sons, daughters and loved ones of our Service members: Armed Forces Day is also a day to recognize the considerable sacrifices you make every day, and for this nation to reaffirm its commitments to you. You, too, have made our nation stronger and safer. “To our nation’s veterans,” Hagel concluded, “thank you for the service you gave to this country and for the support that you give our men and women carrying on your legacy today.” As the ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknowns came to a close, Battaglia recalled those who rest in all veterans’ cemeteries across the nation. “They still serve, and we use them as inspiration,” he said. “They’re still part of the team. Recognizing and celebrating Armed Forces Day is not just for those who witness it in person, but for those who have fallen.”


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Photo by Air Force Airman Areca T. Wilson

Photos of 2nd Lt. Robert Shaw, along with a collection of photos of his family and the island where he passed away, are made into a collage. Shaw, a U.S. Army Air Forces weatherman, died in World War II after sacrificing his life to protect his fellow soldiers.

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Captivated by a story he read, Chief Master Sgt. Craig Kirwin set out to find a photograph of a hero he knew by name, but not by sight. The story of U.S. Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Robert Shaw, 7th Weather Squadron Detachment weatherman, stood out among the pages of an Air Force Weather history book. During World War II, 74 Army Air Forces weathermen were lost; Shaw was killed in action when he sacrificed himself to save the lives of his fellow Soldiers. “I came upon this story a number of years ago about this gentleman, Robert Shaw,” said Kirwin, enlisted functional manager of the Air Combat Command Weather Operations Division, and history buff. “I was always struck by his story because it was very heroic and amazing, but there was no picture of him.” Kirwin set out to put a face to the hero after reading about the events that occurred in the early hours of Oct. 25, 1944. Although organized resistance had ended a month earlier, remaining Japanese soldiers rushed the lines of an American

camp set up on the island of Angaur in the Palau islands on the evening of Oct. 24, 1944. The Marines pushed the Japanese soldiers back. Despite their efforts, a few of them made it through the lines. Shaw slept in his tent, unaware of the approaching danger. He was awakened by the sound of a firing gun, followed by his commander running into their tent, shadowed by a Japanese soldier with a pistol, hand grenade and a mine strapped to his chest. The 21-year-old weatherman jumped out of his bed, grabbing the enemy from behind. Shaw and the Japanese soldier wrestled for control of the weapons. Sadly, the Japanese soldier managed to set off the mine, killing both himself and Shaw and wounding ten other weathermen. Shaw had given his life to protect his fellow weathermen. Kirwin contacted the Air Force Weather Agency historian but came to find there were no photos in their archives of this young man who had unselfishly given up his life. Kirwin became curious, feeling a strong desire to see what this hero looked like. SEE WEATHER PAGE 10


MAY 24, 2013

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MAY 24, 2013

‘Spouse Field Exercise’ fosters empowerment By Airman 1st Class R. Alex Durbin 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

According to a 2011 U.S. Department of Defense demographics report, there are more family members in the military community than Service members. Nearly half of Service members DoDwide are married to civilian spouses with no prior-military experience. The unique challenges military families face can sometimes make coping with the rigors of military life difficult. In an effort to support and empower local spouses, the Army Wife Network held two “Spouse Field Exercises” at the Fort Eustis Club, May 16 and 17 at Fort Eustis, Va. The field exercises were designed to aid military families by offering militarylife survival tips, practical military family resources, information booths, resource bags and even a professional financial advisor to share tips to take charge of family finances and set goals. The four-hour seminars were open to all members of the military community,

and were led by AWN co-founders Tara Crooks and Star Henderson. “Less than 1 percent of our U.S. population serves in the military, and their families have taken the brunt of the sacrifice of war,” said Henderson. “This event was aimed to rejuvenate military families and celebrate the military lifestyle.” Both speakers can identify with the challenges of military families. After leaving U.S. Army active-duty service, Henderson wanted to continue serving in another capacity. After deploying as a Soldier and earning a counseling degree, she is uniquely qualified to help military families with the trials they face. Crooks, a military spouse of more than 15 years, founded Army Wife Talk Radio in 2005 to reach out to fellow spouses during her husband’s first deployment, and has since garnered a following. Crooks was also named the Fort Sill, Okla. 2013 Army Spouse of the Year for her work through AWN, Facebook, podcasts and blogs. SEE SPOUSE PAGE 10

Photo by Airman 1st Class R. Alex Durbin

Spouses participating in the Army Wife Network's "Spouse Field Exercise" work together during a social exercise, testing their knowledge of the location of military installations during the event at the post club at Fort Eustis, May 17.The two four-hour seminars, led by AWN co-foundersTara Crooks and Star Henderson, were open to all members of the military community.

SOMETIMES MY HUMAN DOESN’T WEAR PANTS AT HOME. IT’S A RIOT. —COLBY adopted 06-18-11


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FeatureStory

Photos by Senior Airman Kayla Newman

The Norfolk Tides hosted an Armed Forces Night game at Harbor Park in Norfolk, May 17.The evening included the narrator for the NorfolkTides (left) introducing the senior military representatives from each branch of service as theTides paid tribute to the men and women of the U.S. Army, Air Force, Coast Guard, Navy and Marines for their service to the nation.

7LGHV VDOXWH 6HUYLFH PHPEHUV DW $UPHG )RUFHV 1LJKW By Senior Airman Kayla Newman 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

In honor of the armed forces, the Norfolk Tides changed their home jerseys to a blue, digital-camouflage print for Armed Forces Night, May 17. The Tides hosted the Lehigh Valley Ironpigs at Harbor Park in Norfolk, Va. The Norfolk Tides celebrated the U.S. military with their 18th annual Armed Forces Night, paying tribute to the men and women of the U.S. Army, Air Force, Coast Guard, Navy and Marines for their dedication and service to the nation. “It is refreshing to see the community supporting service men and women,” said John Griffin, a retired U.S. Navy

chief petty officer. A moment of silence was observed prior to the start of the game in honor of fallen U.S. Service members, as well as those currently deployed across the world. A group of young men and women in the Delayed Entry Program volunteered to serve the U.S. military by taking the Oath of Enlistment, with U.S. Army Maj. Gen. Bryan Watson, Joint Staff J7 Joint Force Development vice director, administering the oath. The U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Band also participated in the ceremony by performing a medley consisting of each service’s official song, followed by the national anthem. Six superior performers from each branch

of the military threw the first pitch of the game. U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Sussie Sarah Nu’uvali, 128th Aviation Brigade noncommissioned officer of the year for 2012, represented the Army. Representing the U.S. Air Force was Senior Airman Jessica Kettering, 633rd Air Base Wing bioenvironmental engineer. Kettering was named the 633rd ABW 2012 Junior Enlisted Airman of the Year. Kettering said it was a privilege to stand beside the other superior performers from every other branch of service and feel the support from the community. “It took a lot of hard work and dedication to get here,” said Kettering. “It is definitely an honor to be representing the Air Force on Armed Forces Night.”

Other Service members also shared Kettering’s sentiment. “Not only did I feel a sense of duty, but I felt others were recognizing that service men and women put the needs of the country and others above their own,” said U.S. Navy Seaman Michael Costello, an aviation boatswain’s mate assigned to the USS Abraham Lincoln. The 8,285 fans in attendance cheered the Tides on throughout the game. Despite a late rally, the Tides fell to the Ironpigs, 8-7. Although the Tides did not win, they still ended the night on a high note with the presentation of fireworks, giving one last salute to the men and women of the U.S. Armed Forces.

Photos by Senior Airman Kayla Newman

Photo by Senior Airman Kayla Newman

Superior performers from each branch of the military threw the first pitch of the game during the Norfolk Tides Armed Forces Night at Harbor Park. U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Sussie Sarah Nu’uvali, 128th Aviation Brigade noncommissioned officer of the year for 2012, represented the Army and U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jessica Kettering, 633rd Air Base Wing bioenvironmental engineer, represented the Air Force.

A group of young men and women in the Delayed Entry Program volunteer to serve the U.S. military by taking the Oath of Enlistment. U.S. Army Maj. Gen. Bryan Watson, Joint Staff J7 Joint Force Development vice director, administered the oath.


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WEATHER FROM PAGE 4 Trying to find a photo of someone who died in World War II, who didn’t have a wife or children, was difficult for Kirwin. Despite challenges, the history buff searched on-and-off for two years, eventually building Shaw’s family tree. After countless ancestry and internet searches, Kirwin finally caught a break when he found the last name of one of Shaw’s nieces – Carol Brown, who lives in Pennsylvania. Kirwin soon started sending letters and making phone calls to different Carol Browns, hoping to reach the correct one. He was successful and Brown, now Carol Durrwachter, eventually contacted him. “Carol contacted her sister Sandy and she sent me an incredible collection of photographs, letters, personal items and medals that were saved by Robert Shaw’s father, including pictures of the island and tent compound where [Shaw] was killed and the notification of his death from the government,” said Kirwin. “All I set out to do was find a photograph of the man, and now I have so much more.” Kirwin cataloged, copied and scanned all the memorabilia and sent the original items back to the family. He is sending the entire collection to the Air Force weather history archives. He hopes to send a copy of the collection to the 7th Weather Squadron, the unit Shaw was a part

SPOUSE FROM PAGE 6 Henderson and Crooks founded AWN in April 2009 when Army Wife Talk Radio combined with Field Problems, an online military spouse assistance forum. The resulting website features events, live-chat features, columns, links, resource databases, installation directories, and social media resources in one convenient place. Along with Holly Scherer and Kathie Hightower, the pair wrote a book on things to love about military life to inspire and comfort military spouses dealing with the same experiences each of the four authors faced themselves. “During uncertain times, it’s easy to become overwhelmed with worry and doubt about this military journey and forget why we love this life,” said Scherer, who was also in attendance at the event. “We want to empower military spouses through knowledge, as well as thank them for everything they do.”

Photo by Air Force Airman Areca T. Wilson

U.S. Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Robert Shaw was awarded the Purple Heart and Silver Star, among several other medals. Shaw, a weatherman, died in World War II after sacrificing his life to protect his fellow Soldiers.

of during the war. Kirwin also aspires to build a heritage display to honor Shaw at the weather school house located at Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. According to Kirwin, Robert Shaw’s history will never be lost now that there is a great collection of memorabilia to go along with his story of heroism. Through the hard work of Kirwin, Shaw’s face will not only be seen, but what started with a search for a photo will now give Shaw the due honor he deserved.

In addition to offering gift bags and prize giveaways, the event also focused on networking opportunities and morale, showing participants they are not alone. Kattie Johnson, a local U.S. Navy spouse and event planner for a local military-related charity, attended the event, and knows the importance of reaching out first hand. While her husband was deployed, Johnson suffered a stroke and was able to rely on her fellow spouses to help in her time of need. “The friends I made were able to help me get [my husband] home,” she said. “Without them I would have been lost, with no idea what to do or whom to call.” Johnson feels this event not only helps spouses meet, but reminds participants there is a support system for them. “It’s important to put yourself out there,” she said. “These events show that you’re not the only one, there are people out there that understand what you’re going through.”


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MAY 24, 2013

Army supports president’s request for 2015 BRAC round By C. Todd Lopez ARMY NEWS SERVICE

As the Army cuts the number of Soldiers in its ranks, there will be an excess of infrastructure in place that used to support those Soldiers. Maintaining that extra unused infrastructure could mean other critical Army programs will suffer, said a senior ofďŹ cial. “A future round of base realignment and closure, or BRAC, in the U.S. is essential to identify and reduce excess Army infrastructure, and prudently align our civilian staffing with reduced uniform force structure,â€? said Katherine Hammack, the assistant secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and Environment. She spoke May 15 before the Senate Appropriations Committee, subcommittee on military construction, veterans affairs and related agencies. “If Army force structure declines but facilities, overhead and civilian staffs remain constant, our ability to invest in equipment, training and maintenance will be reduced,â€? she said. “The Army fully supports the president’s request for authority from Congress to conduct a BRAC round in 2015.â€? The Army expects to cut some 80,000 Soldiers by ďŹ scal year 2017. The force is expected to be reduced to 490,000 Soldiers by then. With those cuts, force structure will also be reduced. In Europe, two brigade combat teams have already been cut.

Photo courtesy Senate Appropriations Committee

The Army needs another round of Base Realignment and Closure, said Katherine Hammack, the assistant secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and Environment, speaking May 15, before the Senate Appropriations Committee, subcommittee on military construction, veterans affairs and related agencies.

Hammack told lawmakers the Army is reducing force structure in Europe by 45 percent, reducing infrastructure by 51 percent, reducing civilian stafďŹ ng by 58 percent, and reducing base operations costs by 57 percent. She also said the Army is working with the OfďŹ ce of the Secretary of Defense to see if there are additional opportunities in Europe

HOT SARDINES Foot-stomping New Orleans’ Jazz

MAY 26

for multi-service or joint consolidation. Stateside, she said, the Army will cut at least eight brigade combat teams, or BCTs, and “maybe moreâ€? with continued sequestration. No decisions have been announced yet about what BCTs will be cut in the U.S. The Army has conducted studies and surveys to make that determination, and underway now is a “total Army analysis,â€? the results of which are expected before the end of June, that will determine which BCTs will be cut. Before the announcement of which BCTs will be cut and from where, the Army has changed its budgeting priorities. Hammack told lawmakers that the Army is not focused on building BCT headquarters or permanent party barracks, for instance, but is instead focused on training ranges, training barracks and infrastructure improvements. Hammack also touched on energy security with lawmakers, who were interested in solar facilities at places like Fort Bliss, Texas. The assistant secretary told senators that the Army’s focus is on improving energy security. Between ďŹ scal year 2011 and 2012, she said, the Army has seen a fourfold increase in power disruptions at bases. “That means we are required to provide more generation on our bases to continue our missions,â€? Hammack said. SEE BRAC PAGE 13

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By Jim Garamone AMERICAN FORCES PRESS SERVICE

Defense Department ofďŹ cials have submitted two funding-related requests to Congress, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said May 20. OfďŹ cials are seeking $79.4 billion in overseas contingency operations funding for ďŹ scal year 2014 and are asking Congress to allow Pentagon ofďŹ cials to reprogram $9.6 billion in ďŹ scal 2013 funding, Little said. The reprogramming actions “are not meant to offset the effects of sequestration,â€? he added. The $9.6 billion request looks to ďŹ x large shortfalls in overseas contingency operations funding and larger than expected fuel bills, Little explained in a meeting with reporters. “There are some wartime bills inside that reprogramming request,â€? he said. “The main goal we’re trying to achieve is limit the impact of sequestration on military readiness, particularly operations, training and maintenance accounts.â€? Little stressed the department is “trying to scrape for every penny, dime and nickel so we can achieve an additional $37 billion in cuts by the end of September.â€? The reprogrammed money comes from some investment accounts and some military personnel accounts. They would shift to operations and maintenance accounts. DOD would like to see Congress act on the reprogramming request in the next three weeks. The overseas contingency operations request usually is submitted at the same time the base budget is delivered to Congress. This year – due to the ďŹ scal uncertainty – the base budget went to Congress in early April, and the overseas contingency funding request went to Congress on May 17. Fiscal 2013’s overseas contingency operations funding was $86.5 billion. This year’s $79.4 billion reects that the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan went from 68,000 to 34,000, and there has been a drop in the amount needed, Little said. Still, he added, “this is not about cost per troop.â€? Funding for troops in Afghanistan will continue, the press secretary said, and training the Afghan army and police remain a priority. The retrograde movement of materiel, supplies and equipment out of Afghanistan as U.S. forces draw down also costs money, he noted.

BRAC FROM PAGE 12 Renewable energy projects, such as the 20-megawatt solar farm at Fort Bliss, Texas, deemed the largest in the DOD, or the four-megawatt facility at White Sands Missile Range, N.M., help that process along, she said. Hammack said the Army continues to look for ways to leverage public and private partnerships, such as what was done at Fort Bliss, to fund renewable energy projects. The Army will depend on the private sector to install and maintain such facilities, and will then buy energy from them at market or lower-than-market price.

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MAY 24, 2013

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In the event of an approaching storm, residents may or may not be ordered to evacuate. Whether riding the storm out or evacuating, having an emergency kit can be the difference between life and death, especially when hunkering down through the storm. Essential items in an emergency kit include: ■ Water – one gallon per person per day for a minimum of three days ■ Food – at least a three day supply of non-perishable goods ■ Battery-powered or hand-crank radio, and a NOAA weather radio with tone alerts and extra batteries ■ Flashlight ■ First aid kit ■ Whistle to signal for help ■ Dust mask, plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter-in-place ■ Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for sanitation ■ Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities ■ Can opener for food ■ Local map When building an emergency kit and emergency action plan, consider the needs of family members who may not be as capable, such as the elderly, disabled, children and family pets. Be sure to include all necessary medications and the name of the doctor who prescribed the medications in the emergency kit.

Tax Holiday To help build your emergency kit, the Virginia Department of Taxation’s Hurricane Preparedness Sales Tax Holiday will take place May 25 through 31. During this week, you can stock up on supplies for protecting your home and business during hurricane and flooding season. Many everyday items are exempt from sales tax, such as batteries, first aid kits, radios, cell phone chargers and more. Guidelines and frequently asked questions are available at www.tax. virginia.gov/salestaxholiday.

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Riding it out

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A hurricane is a tropical storm with winds that have reached a constant speed of 74 miles per hour or more. Winds rotate around a relatively calm center, known as the “eye” of the storm. The eye is generally 20 to 30 miles wide, and the storm may extend outward 400 miles. Hurricanes can last for more than two weeks over open water. In addition to the wind speed, rainfall and lightning, tropical storm systems bring the threat of storm surge, a huge dome of water pushed on shore. When coupled with high tide, the storm surge will be the tide and surge combined. Storm surge is especially dangerous in tidal regions; for example, both Langley Air Force Base and Fort Eustis are situated along rivers that feed into the Chesapeake Bay. Hurricanes are categorized into five areas according to their sustained winds, storm surge and damage assessments. This is known as the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane scale: ■ Category 1 – Winds of 74-95 mph; minimal damage; 4-5 foot storm surge ■ Category 2 – Winds of 96-111 mph; extensive damage; 6-8 foot storm surge ■ Category 3 – Winds of 111-129 mph; devastating damage; 9-12 foot storm surge ■ Category 4 – Winds of 130-156 mph; catastrophic damage; 13-18 foot storm surge ■ Category 5 – Winds in excess of 157 mph; catastrophic damage; 18 foot or higher storm surge While hurricanes represent the most severe of tropical storm systems, less powerful weather may still represent a threat to the area in the form of wind, rain and flooding. Tropical depressions are the weakest form of system, and feature circular clouds with winds up to 38 miles per hour and moderate rainfall. More powerful tropical storms feature circular clouds with winds between 39 and 73 miles per hour with heavy rainfall.

When monitoring severe weather through meteorological or news media outlets, viewers are alerted to watches and warnings. A tropical storm or hurricane watch alerts residents to the threat of a storm arriving within 36 hours. Tropical storm or hurricane warnings are more urgent, warning of a storm’s arrival within 24 hours.

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

Graphic by Staff Sgt. Katie Gar Ward

What you nee ed to know to stay ahead d of the storm By Senior Airman Jason J. Brown and Airman 1st Class R. A Alex Durbin 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

June 1 marks the beginning of the 2013 hurricane seaso on in the U.S., kicking off six months of the threat of tropical weather affecting the Hampton Roads area. Meteorologists from the National Oceanic and Atmosph heric Administration predict 16 named storms during this season. O Of these, nine are projected to strengthen to hurricane status, with fivee of these becoming major hurricanes. Based on the period from 1950--2012, the average season boasts 12 named storms, with seven beco oming hurricanes and three becoming major hurricanes. Hampton Roads most recently experienced severe trop pical weather in the form of Hurricane Sandy in October 2012. The sto orm forecasted 52-63 miles per hour winds, and high tides that fluctuaated between six and seven feet. While the storm shifted paths and wen nt north along the east coast saving the region from the brunt of the storrm, it still left widespread damage and flooding across the Hampton R Roads region. According to the Virginia Department of Emergency M Management, more than 450 people died and nearly 2,600 were injureed in the U.S. last year as a result of severe weather. The effects of Hurrricane Sandy caused more than 280 of those deaths, and the storm has ssince become the second costliest hurricane in U.S. history. Throughout this year’s hurricane season, it is imperativee for members of the JBLE community to be prepared in case of severe weaather. Whether riding out the storm at home or evacuating to safe haven, th he information on this page can help prepare the community for the worst.. Editor’s Note: Staff Sgt. Wesley Farnsworth contributed too this report.

Depending on the severity of the storm, officials may not order mandatory evacuations, in which case you may decide to remain and shelter-in-place. You can shelter at home or in a public shelter. If sheltering at home, be sure to accomplish the following: ■ Identify how your property location is affected by storm surge and tidal flooding ■ Know the hurricane evacuation routes ■ Secure your outside property, i.e. lawn chairs, lawn ornaments and anything not anchored to the ground ■ If your home does not have permanent storm shutters, board windows with 5/8-inch plywood. Tape does not offer protection ■ Ensure you have flood insurance, if recommended If you decide to seek refuge in a public shelter, you must take your emergency kit. While public shelters provide basic necessities, most do not provide cots, bedding, infant items or items for those with special needs. Most shelters will only accept service animals. Talk to your vet hospital or kennel in advance to get your pet sheltered. Personnel and families living in base housing may seek shelter in the provided emergency evacuation centers on the installation or in the base housing area. Note that personnel living at the Landings at Langley at Bethel Manor may also use York County’s shelters. The base housing shelters are provided exclusively for personnel residing in base housing. Personnel and families living in community housing should use public shelters. For a listing of available shelters, space availability and pet policies, contact the American Red Cross.

Protecting your pets JBLE operates a severe weather information line. In the case of a tropical storm or hurricane, information about installation closures or evacuations will be available via recordings by calling (800) 553-3302. For more information, contact the Langley AFB Emergency Management Flight at 7644840, or visit the following websites: • • • • • • • •

www.ready.gov www.fema.gov www.redcross.org www.vaemergency.com www.floodsmart.gov www.ReadyVirginia.gov www.VirginiaDOT.org/hurricanes www.fema.gov/kids

Pets are family members too, and should have an emergency kit to keep them safe in the event of a storm. Your pet’s emergency kit should include food, water and medications. It is imperative to keep a copy of your pet’s vaccination records in a waterproof bag. Pets should wear a collar with a tag that displays the pet’s name and owner contact information. Micro chipping is a

great way to identify your pet if they get lost or separated. A photo of you with your pet can also help identify them if separated. A pet carrier or crate is recommended for evacuation, and a favorite chew toy can make their ordeal a lot easier. For JBLE personnel with pets who live in base housing, seeking shelter at an EEC, the installation’s pet-friendly EEC is located at the U.S. Army Reserve Center on Fort Eustis. This shelter will be open to all JBLE personnel and dependents, including Langley AFB personnel. Note that the shelter will only facilitate dogs and cats, and pets without a shot record will receive vaccinations from an on-site veterinarian.

‘Getting out of dodge’ In the event that you are ordered to evacuate, be sure to know the evacuation routes. Hampton Roads has established evacuation routes, and has posted blue signs around the area identifying them. The following routes are designated by the Commonwealth: ■ U.S. Route 460 West ■ U.S. Route 58 West ■ State Route 10 West ■ U.S. Route 17 North ■ U.S. Route 60 West ■ U.S. Route 13 North, north of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel. ■ Interstate 64 Note: Commonwealth officials may implement I-64 lane reversal to expedite the flow of traffic out of the area. Be alert and pay attention to news broadcasts, police officials and roadway signage. If you are evacuating, follow these tips: ■ 1. Leave early – Avoid traffic delays. If you are evacuating, many others likely are as well. ■ 2. Stay Local – Stay with nearby family who live outside of storm surge areas. Hotels are also available outside of storm surge areas, but must be booked as early as possible. Public shelters should be a last resort. ■ 3. Listen to local weather reports – Stay updated on current and developing conditions. U.S. Air Force Airman Nahom Tumalisan, 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron electrical systems technician, wades through water while checking electrical systems during Hurricane Sandy at Langley Air Force Base, Oct. 29, 2012. File photo by Airman 1st Class Teresa Aber


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

•

MAY 24, 2013

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The Integrated Disability Evaluation System was created after ofďŹ cials in Washington decided to examine the healthcare system that looked after the nation’s veterans in the wake of neglect allegations at the Army’s Walter Reed Medical Center in 2007. The current system is an integrated effort between the Department of Defense and the U.S. Department of Veterans’ Affairs and is designed to streamline the process of treatment and transitioning for wounded or injured veterans. Now, Soldiers who are on active duty, but have been determined to be medically incapable of continuing their service, have begun using a revised system, and their reviews have been favorable. “From the beginning, when I ďŹ rst found out that I was being [evaluated by a medical board], the process was really slow,â€? explained Sgt. Ronald Eaddy, a former Fort Bragg Soldier, who is currently medically retired from active duty. “Once I got into the ‘fast track’ program, which is supposed the expedite the process and when I got with my physical evaluation board liaison ofďŹ cer, or PEBLO, everything he lined out for me was spot on.

“From the beginning, when I ďŹ rst found out that I was being med boarded, the process was really slow.â€? — Sgt. Ronald Eaddy former Fort Bragg Soldier currently medically retired from active duty “From the moment that I met with him in February until April, everything that he outlined for me went really smoothly. I didn’t have to call him for anything,â€? he added. According to Lt. Col. Arthur I. Campbell, chief, Department of Deployment Health at Womack Army Medical Center, and director of IDES at Fort Bragg, the program that Eaddy referred to is actually called the Complexitybased Medical Evaluation Program, or CBMP. Campbell said the program was developed at Fort Bragg to expedite the medical evaluation board, or MEB, process for Soldiers who were being evaluated. Campbell said the CBMP is in the process of being implemented across the Army. “We kind of laid out the process. We had everybody

Courtesy photo

The Integrated Disability Evaluation System was created after ofďŹ cials in Washington decided to examine the healthcare system that looked after the nation’s veterans in the wake of neglect allegations at the Army’sWalter Reed Medical Center in 2007.

involved, including DOD and the VA. We went through and painstakingly looked at every single step, from the handoff of the packet. Everything that occurs in the process. The goal was to take this MEB phase, which is the ďŹ rst 100 days of the IDES process and see if we can’t condense that,â€? Campbell explained. He pointed out that the process for undergoing the medical board had to remain the same, but ofďŹ cials wanted to ensure that it was done in a shorter amount of time. SEE DISABILITY PAGE 19

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DISABILITY FROM PAGE 18 The first step was deciding which Soldiers were qualified to go through the process. “Obviously a [sergeant first class] with 15 years in the Army couldn’t be expected to transition out that quickly,” Campbell said. “So, the criteria we set was that it needs to be a Soldier with less than 10 years of service with no more than two service-disqualifying conditions. “It’s basically on a five-point scale – they get points for the years of service; they get points for however many service-disqualifying conditions. There are additional points if they’re assigned to the Warrior Transition Battalion and whether they are Guard or Reserve, they also get additional points. If they score three or less on that five-point scale, they are candidates for the program,” Campbell explained. Eaddy said he was very satisfied with the program, once he began the CBMP process. “Everything that my PEBLO said was going to happen occurred as planned,” he said. He pointed out that once he was assigned to the CBMP program, he wasn’t required to take the same path as others who were trying to leave the service, but were not assigned to the program. “We were separated, based on the reason that we were being medically boarded,” explained Eaddy, who departed service because of reactive airway disease. He said they were individuals within a group, based on the severity of their ailment, but despite being the first group to participate in the program, his group still

made a smooth transition. “Before I went through the med board, I had a Soldier who went through the med board, but he never went through the process that I went through, and it took him almost a year to get his paperwork together,” Eaddy said. “I started my board in August 2012 and I was finished and on transitional leave by the end of February.” Eaddy said the biggest advantage of the IDES program is the organization. He found the process to be lengthy and cumbersome when trying to do everything alone with no guidance. “Before I was enrolled into the CBMP, I was doing everything on my own, but once I enrolled and met my PEBLO, everything went smoothly,” he said. Eaddy suggested that the IDES could improve by adding more PEBLOs to deal with the needs of the increasing number of Soldiers who will soon exit the service via medical board. According to Campbell, that request has already been addressed and the IDES program now has a total of 30 PEBLOs. Campbell added that the CBMP streamlines the first 100 days of the MEB process to less than 30 days. However, it is not for all cases. Soldiers with complex injuries or multiple medical problems would not be best served by this program, so they continue in the routine IDES process. The CBMP was specifically designed to preserve every step and all due process for Soldiers. It simply condenses appointments into a very short period of time.

LaSalle Avenue gate to reopen by July 25 By Airman 1st Class Kimberly Nagle 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

The LaSalle Avenue Gate is scheduled to reopen no later than July 25. Since approximately 25 percent of all base traffic uses the LaSalle Gate, reopening the gate is a top priority, said Jim Wampler, 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron Programs flight chief. “We have been working closely with the Norfolk Corps of Engineers, who are the project managers, in an effort to get the gate open as soon as possible,” said Wampler. Completion of the project was delayed due to weather and design changes. While some delays are an often occurrence in major construction contracts, Wampler said the improvements will be a great benefit to the base and enhance its major visitor entrance. The gate closed in August 2012 to facilitate construction of a new visitor control center, pass and identification office and an expanded guardhouse, all of which will allow for better service for the Langley community. More information on the gate’s opening will be released as it becomes available.


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U.S. Air Force Capt. Mitchell Kieffer sprints at the U.S. Air Force Academy indoor track during theWoundedWarrior GamesTraining Camp held in Colorado Springs, Colo.,April 17. Kieffer, an operations research analyst from Joint Base Langley-Eustis, won the “Ultimate Champion” award, becoming the first Air Force athlete inWarrior Games history to earn the title.

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By looking at him, you would never be able to tell he is a battle-tested, combat-injured Airman. He is a testament to invisible wounds and just how their effects can become visible in everyday life. He is an “Ultimate Champion.” Capt. Mitchell Kieffer, an operations research analyst from Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., represented the Air Force in the 2013 Warrior Games in Colorado Springs, Colo., where he was crowned “Ultimate Champion” on May 16 by taking first place in a five-event competitive track-and-field crucible. The Ultimate Champion is a pentathlon-style event that pits warriors from each branch of service, including Special Operations Command, against each other for the title of Ultimate Champion. Kieffer became the first Air Force athlete in Warrior Games history to earn the title – an accomplishment made even more incredible by what he endured to get there. The three-time Air Force Triathlon Team member and personal trainer was stationed at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., working for the 46th Test Wing when he got the

opportunity he had been waiting for – a deployment. He transferred from the Air Force Research Laboratory to fill an engineering position at the 780th Test Squadron in order to increase his chances of deploying. He got his wish in 2010, and left for Iraq to work for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. “I was an Air Force guy in an Army uniform,” Kieffer said. “I was attached to the Baghdad Resident Office, and volunteered to be an operations officer for them. I planned and executed a lot of movements to the different project sites. We were there to build police stations, hospitals, telecommunications centers, tank facilities for their Army.” Kieffer said for the most part, the deployment went smoothly. He had been there for five of the six months of his deployment and travelled “outside the wire” more than 40 times without incident. Typically, he and his team would use lightly-armored sport-utility vehicles when they were going downtown and mine-resistant, ambushprotected vehicles on the outskirts of town. SEE WARRIOR PAGE 21


WARRIOR FROM PAGE 20 But on this particular day, things were different. “We were going to a place that was a one-way-in, one-way-out type of a place, so that’s really not the best case scenario,” Kieffer said. “And this time instead of taking MRAPs, we were in the lightlyarmored SUVs because the MRAPs were in the shop that day.” Other factors that day led to a situation that would soon lead to a tragic chain of events. According to Kieffer, there was no close air support available, and the team was going out later in the day than normal. “Basically we got ambushed,” he said. “The first out of the four vehicles got hit by a conventional [improvised explosive device]. Our vehicle, the third vehicle, almost simultaneously got hit by an explosivelyformed penetrating IED, which is basically a copper plate that has the munition behind it, and forms a slug and punches through anything. That went through our vehicle like butter about two feet in front of my forehead, and I was sitting on the blast side.” Three of the four vehicles in the convoy were hit. In addition to the EFPIED, the attackers sprayed the vehicles with automatic weapons fire and rocket-propelled grenades. “I was knocked out for a few seconds. I can’t really remember,” Kieffer said. “Then I woke up inside [the vehicle] and the major, my boss, was next to me screaming and I was just like, ‘What the heck is going on here?’ All of the lights and displays were dislodged. They were hanging by the wires. The entire inside was [riddled] with the copper fragments, the interior was all ripped; smoke was inside. “I thought, ‘What do I do?’ Since he was higher ranking than me, I basically just laid on top of him and let the contractors do what they needed to do to break contact and get out.” The British contractors were able to subdue the attackers and all four vehicles in the convoy managed to make it back to the base. The team changed their flat tires and fixed whatever damages they could before making the two-hour drive back to base with three busted vehicles. “It was an act of God that we all made it out, especially with our vehicle being ‘fragged,’” Kieffer said. “Before I left, my cousin Chris gave me this four-way medal that St. Christopher is part of, and he’s the guardian of travelers. That was the main reason Chris gave me this, so I never took

Courtesty photo

Photo by Desiree N. Palacios

LEFT: Capt. Mitchell Kieffer, an operations research analyst from Joint Base Langley-Eustis, accepts the “Ultimate Champion” award with his daughters, Ana Paula and Ana Cristina, at the 2013 Warrior Games in Colorado Springs, Colo., May 16. RIGHT: Kieffer gears up for a bike ride at the U.S. Air Force Academy during the Wounded Warrior Games training camp held in Colorado Springs, Colo., April 15.

it off from the day he gave it to me. And I have yet to take it off, except when I have X-rays or when I wear my blues and what not. I feel like that had a great deal to do with me getting out alive.” Once they arrived back at the base, each person on the team was examined by the doctors. It seemed everyone was fine - until it was Kieffer’s turn. He wasn’t able to pass a preliminary traumatic brain injury test. He was sent to the hospital in Baghdad for doctors there to observe his condition. “While I was there, things weren’t getting better,” Kieffer said. “I used to joke around with the British contractors, and we would make fun of each other and banter back and forth. It felt like English was a second language because my processing speed was so slow. They would ask me how I’m doing and it would take a

The Ultimate Champion is a pentathlon-style event that pits warriors from each branch of service, including Special Operations Command, against each other for the title of Ultimate Champion. Capt. Mitchell Kieffer became the first Air Force athlete in Warrior Games history to earn the title.

bunch of time to figure out what they said, to hear it, to break down the message, to figure out what they’re trying to get across and how I would respond. That’s a long time to say, ‘I’m good.’ So the bantering back and forth stopped.” Besides not being able to keep up with the quick-witted conversations with his comrades, Kieffer said he was worried he wouldn’t be able to do the things he really enjoyed. “I was pretty darn scared because I always felt like school was pretty easy,” Kieffer said. “I was a math guy and I enjoyed intellectual kinds of things. It scared me quite a bit. It actually brought me to tears one time thinking I was going to be that slow forever.” Kieffer spent a week in the hospital in Baghdad and then returned to the United States to be treated. He said after a month, he began healing but still faced some huge challenges. His TBI not only affected his cognitive thinking skills, physically it left him to deal with excruciating headaches that nothing could soothe. He tried to keep his injury under wraps but an upcoming assignment would put him to the test. Prior to being wounded, the Purple Heart medal receipient was accepted into the Air Force Institute of Technology’s engineering graduate school program. Just six months after returning home from his deployment, he was scheduled to start school.

“The first assignment I did there took me seven hours of straight sitting at a computer,” Kieffer said. “I had to get it done. I had to figure everything out, and it was so frustrating because I knew it shouldn’t be [this hard]. It was a probabilities and statistics course, and this was stuff I had known for a long time and had mastered before.” As Kieffer pushed himself to keep up with his studies, he stumbled upon a treatment for his TBI. “As time went on in the program, that seven-hour assignment became five hours, and then four hours, and after a year and a half in school, those assignments were taking an hour and a half, two hours tops,” he said. “I think that has been my best therapy for improving my cognitive capabilities after the traumatic brain injury. It’s been basically just doing mental workouts. “I thank God that I was able to do that assignment because I don’t know if I would’ve had the motivation to do all that learning on my own,” he continued. He also used his time in school to research the issues he and other injured, ill and wounded Airmen were facing and used it as the subject of his thesis. These days, Kieffer continues to exercise his mind and his body. Since his injury, Kieffer married his wife, Ana Maria, and inherited two daughters, Ana Paula and Ana Cristina. The couple was married in his wife’s native Peru and her family only speaks Spanish. Kieffer said learning to speak Spanish as part of a bilingual family is something that helps him keep his cognitive skills sharpened. “I noticed that if I don’t do anything intellectually, [I’ll] start to fade again,” he said. “[It’s also] if I have lack of sleep or high stress. Now it’s just a matter of coping with it.” Kieffer, who has scored 100 points on every active-duty physical training test he’s taken, continues to work his physical muscles in his personal training business and as an athlete, having recently been selected to represent the Air Force at the 2013 Armed Forces Triathalon Champtionship, May 29 through June 2. Kieffer’s efforts and determination led to his success at the Warrior Games, and most surely will carry him through a successful competition at the upcoming triathalon. The resiliency displayed by this wounded warrior, pushing through his pain – physically and mentally – undoubtedly earns him the title of champion. Editor’s Note: Staff Sgt. Katie Gar Ward and Senior Airman Jason J. Brown contributed to this article.


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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633rd SFS honors the fallen during Police Week By Airman 1st Class Victoria H. Taylor

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Kelly Eaton, 633rd Security Forces Squadron Krav Maga instructor, watches as 4-year-old Mason Gilbert, son of Maj. Myles Gilbert, Air Combat Command program manager, tries on a security forces helmet during Langley’s Police Week, May 15.

633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

As the C-130 soared through the middle-eastern sky, soft whimpers from a military working dog could be heard as he lay next to six caskets on their way home. For Staff Sgt Kelly Eaton, 633rd Security Forces Squadron Krav Maga training instructor, this sight was something he will never forget. “My unit flew home with six guys who didn’t make it,” said Eaton. “I can remember my dog just looking up at me with such confusion; I knew he felt that they were there, but couldn’t understand.” For numerous Service members like Eaton, memories of fallen comrades are constant reminders of the sacrifices to protect our country and communities. During the week of May 13-17, the 633rd SFS paid homage to law enforcement officers who lost their lives in the line of duty. In 1963, President John F. Kennedy designated May 15th as Peace Officers Memorial Day, and the week in which the date falls under to be known as Police Week. The

Photo by Airman 1st Class Victoria H. Taylor

week honors those in the law enforcement field who died while defending others. For Langley Defenders, Police Week has great significance. “I am extremely proud to be a part of this squadron, along with all the events for national Police Week,” said Tech. Sgt. Jorge Davila, 633rd SFS trainer, who orga-

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nized the week’s events at Langley. “We come together with outside law enforcement agencies as one big family.” During Langley’s Police Week, members of the 633rd SFS paid respect through events such as the Peace Officers’ Memorial Ceremony, a golf tournament, a gear and equipment demonstration, and a

motorcycle ride. For Davila, the success of the week’s events carried a deeper meaning. “This year’s events went well due to the hard work of the security forces members,” said Davila. “Seeing everyone come together to honor all of those who have fallen in the line of duty makes me proud to be a part of it.” For Eaton, volunteering for Police Week did not feel like work. As he stood outside in the sweltering sun during the equipment demonstration, sweat trickling down the temples of his face, he remembered why he chose to be a part of one of the Air Force’s most challenging career fields as a security forces member. After serving five separate deployments, Eaton has experienced events that have left a lasting impression on him. While at a forward operating base in the Middle East, a fellow Airman went out on a routine patrol, sweeping the area ensuring it was clear for convoy work. Suddenly the unit came under fire. SEE POLICE WEEK PAGE 24

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MAY 24, 2013 Leaders from the 128th Aviation Brigade and members of retired U.S. Army Command Sgt. Maj. Richard Lee Jackson’s family unveil a plaque during the dedication of Jackson Hall at Fort Eustis, May 21.

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WK $YQ %GH GHGLFDWHV EDUUDFNV WR ÂľVHOĂ€HVV 6ROGLHU DQG FLWL]HQÂś By Staff Sgt. Dana Hill 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

The 128th Aviation Brigade honored one of its pioneers, retired Command Sgt. Maj. Richard Lee Jackson, in a barracks dedication ceremony at Fort Eustis, Va., May 21. The brigade renamed the 1st Battalion, 222nd Aviation Regiment’s C Company barracks to Jackson in honor of the command sergeant major. Jackson was instrumental in the creation of the U.S. Army Aviation Logistics School, which became the 128th Avn. Bde. in March 2012. While stationed at Fort Eustis, Jackson served as the command sergeant major for the former U.S. Army Transportation and Aviation Logistics School. He retired from active duty April 1, 1985, after completing 29 years of military service, during which he served four combat tours, receiving three Purple Hearts. Following his retirement from active duty, Jackson served

POLICE WEEK FROM PAGE 23 We expected him back by a certain time, but six hours later we learned that he had been own into the forward operating base on a helicopter,â€? said Eaton. “He had taken a bullet straight to the chest.â€? Luckily the Airman had been hit directly in the breast plate of his vest, not fatally harming him. “He’s still with us, but the entire event hit really close to home,â€? said Eaton. “It could’ve happened to any of us. We are

as a key Army civilian trainer at USAALS, leaving a legacy felt far into the future. “He had the tremendous service as a command sergeant major, and then followed on with 24 more years of civil service,â€? said Mark Jones, deputy to the commander of the 128th Avn. Bde. “When he passed away Jan. 5, 2011 at the age of 80, he was the deputy of one of the training departments.â€? Jones said it’s only ďŹ tting that at the home of enlisted aviation maintenance training, the brigade dedicates the ďŹ rst of several new barracks buildings to such a dedicated and devoted noncommissioned ofďŹ cer as an inspiration to another generation. Jackson’s family shared similar sentiments. “The Jackson family would like to thank you for honoring Dad in such a beautiful way,â€? said Penny Jackson, the command sergeant major’s daughter-in-law, to the brigade leadership. “From the bottom of our hearts, we thank you for this wonderful dedication, and we will never forget it.â€?

all a really close-knit family, and being [deployed] over there really puts it in perspective.â€? Eaton paused to clear his throat, continuing to speak about the career ďŹ eld that he enjoys so much and feels honored being a part of. “Police week is all about honoring everyone who has done this job before us,â€? said Eaton. “I greatly appreciate the men and women who have paved the way for us, especially those who have paid the ultimate price in the line of duty.â€?


MAY 24, 2013

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

MAY 24, 2013

)RUW (XVWLV KRVWV LWV DQQXDO 5HWLUHH $SSUHFLDWLRQ 'D\ By Staff Sgt. Dana Hill 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Booths and tables full of information were lined up throughout the main corridor at the Fort Eustis, Va., Exchange as retirees, active-duty supporters, volunteers and families gathered for the annual Retiree Appreciation Day event May 18. Spearheaded by the Fort Eustis Retiree Council, this annual event provides continuity between the retired and activeduty community. The council ensures the command is informed on all issues and concerns that directly apply to retirees. “We use events like this to say ‘thank you’ to all the retirees,” said Debra Stancil, Fort Eustis Retiree Council co-chairman. “Even in retirement, they display continued selfless service.” This year the Retiree Appreciation Day event had support from more than 30 different vendors who offered a variety of information, including the Wounded Warrior Project, Disabled American Veterans, and financial and medical support agencies. “I have been coming to this event for the

Photos by Staff Sgt. Dana Hill

LEFT: Retirees gather information from different vendors during the annual Retiree Appreciation Day at Fort Eustis, May 18. ABOVE: Retired U.S. Army Col. Keith Morrow, 733rd Mission Support Group deputy commander, addresses the crowd.

past nine years to gain information,” said James Walton, a retired U.S. Army master sergeant. “It’s a wonderful opportunity for the military community and the retiree community to come together.” The event also included retired U.S.

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MAY 24, 2013

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

EustisCommunity

MAY 24, 2013

Submit Eustis Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com

Cotillion Dinner Dance The Father-Daughter/Mother-Son Cotillion Dinner Dance will take place from 6 to 10 p.m. June 8 at the Fort Eustis Club. Join us for a special evening of tradition, dinner and dancing. The menu will include a fruit and cheese tray, salad bar, roast chicken, green beans, red bliss potatoes, chicken fingers, macaroni and cheese, rolls, cupcakes, cookies and assorted beverages. The cost is $35 (parent-guardian); $20 (children ages 5 and older); and $15 (children ages 4 and under). Tickets may be purchased at the club, Bldg. 2123, Pershing Ave. For more information, call 878-5700.

Technology Exposition

MCAHC holiday closure McDonald Army Health Center will be open on May 24 with limited services in the Family Health Clinic, Pediatrics, Radiology and Pharmacy. All services will be closed May 27 in observance of Memorial Day. Please call the Hampton Roads Appointment Center at 1-866-645-4584 to schedule appointments and/ or facilitate authorization to visit an Urgent Care Center during this time. In the event of an emergency patients should dial 911 or report to the closest emergency room.

The 93rd Signal Brigade will host a Technology Exposition from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 12 at the Fort Eustis Club. All military, civilian and contractor personnel are invited to attend this free event. More than 20 exhibitors will be demonstrating their latest products and services. Complimentary refreshments and giveaways will be available while supplies last. For more information, contact Katie Johnson at (443) 561-2462 or email johnson@ncsi.com.

■ Library Services –The library offers free Internet andWiFi; computers with CAC readers; fax; photocopier; printers; magazines; newspapers; best sellers; classics; audio books; movies on DVD; music on CD; storytime; arts and crafts; brown bag lunch series; free classes; and special events. The library is located at Bldg. 1313,Washington Blvd. Hours are 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday-Wednesday; noon to 9 p.m. Thursday; and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday-Sunday. For more information, call 878-5017 or visit www.groningerlibrary.com.

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Come out and meet Olympic Gold Medal winners Mia Hamm, Kristine Lilley and Tisha Venturini Hoch from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. June 16 at Anderson Field House, Bldg. 643, Dickman St. The Team First Soccer Academy trio will sign autographs, answer questions and demonstrate soccer drills. Free T-shirts will be available while supplies last. For more information, call 878-3329.

The 2013 Army Soldier Show is scheduled for 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. June 25 at JacobsTheater. Admission is free and open to all. Fort Eustis’ own Spc. Reuben Eldridge, 688th Rapid Port Opening Element, is a member of the Soldier Show cast. Come out and support Eldridge and all of the talented soldiers in this year’s show. For more information, call 878-3329.

Golf tournament

Army Career and Alumni Program

In celebration of the Army’s Birthday and TRADOC’s 40th anniversary commemoration, a nine-hole golf tournament will kick off with a 1 p.m. shotgun start June 13 at the Pines Golf Course. The format will be four-person Captain’s Choice. Any organization may create a team consisting of military, civilians, contractors and family members. Teams may consist of members of different organizations. The cost is $35, which will include greens and cart fees, range balls, two drink tickets and prizes. Payment is due at the time of registration. To sign up, email armando.j.maldonado.civ@mail.mil with the following information: name of organization; names, email addresses and phone numbers of four team members with the primary point of contact listed first; and name of a potential stand-in if a team member’s drops out at the last minute. For more information, call 878-2252.

Army Career and Alumni Program classes and briefings for May will include: ■ Career Expo – 1:30 to 3 p.m., May 29. Employers, college recruiters and other transition service providers are invited to come and network with transitioners and their family members. Job seekers should dress for success and bring resumes. ■ Lunchtime Workshop – 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., May 29. Workshop topics will include the USAJOBS federal resume application process and “Executive Interview.” This monthly training will be provided by ACAP and Civilian Personnel Advisory Center staff. Unless otherwise noted, classes and briefings will take place in Bldg. 601, training room 127. For more information, call 878-4955.

Groninger Library ■ Summer Reading Program – Registration begins June 17 for the library’s “Have Book,WillTravel!” summer reading program. Join us for fun and adventure as we travel through reading (June 17-Aug. 11). The program is open to children ages 2-17.

Vacation Bible School The Fort Eustis Regimental Memorial Chapel invites boys and girls who have completed kindergarten through sixth grade to join us at SonWest Roundup Vacation Bible School at Bldg. 923, Lee Blvd. Classes will start from 9 a.m. to noon June 17 and end June 21. Children can sing songs, watch skits, create crafts and play games. Van transportation will be available for children who live on post. Class size is limited. Register by calling 878-1455 or stop by the chapel from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday

through Friday. For more information, contact Jeanne Vaul at 878-1455 or email verna.j.vaul.civ@mail.mil.

Balfour Beatty Communities ■ “Love Your Pet” Month – In recognition of national “Love Your Pet” month, BBC will be collecting furry family friend photos (3x5 or 5x7) that best capture your pet’s personality. Prizes will be awarded and winners will be announced on June 3. ■ Scrapbooking Class – 3 to 4:30 p.m., May 28. Join us and capture those special moments in a beautiful hand-crafted scrapbook. ■ Yard of the Month – BBC will be looking for the best “Yard of the Month” from May through August. Winners will be announced at the end of each month. The activities listed above are for BBC residents only. The Community Center is located at Bldg. 126, Madison Ave. For more information, call 328-0691.

Range schedule Ranges, training areas and associated facilities are off limits to personnel not engaged in scheduled firing, operations or inspections unless clearance is obtained (in person) from the Range Control Fire Desk or a designated Range Control technician. The Range Control office telephone number is 878-4412, ext. 226 or 878-3834, ext 234. The range operations schedule through May 29 is: ■ Friday – Range BTRACS (8 a.m. to 4 p.m.) ■ Saturday-Monday – No ranges scheduled ■ Tuesday – Range BTRACS, 1, 2 (7 a.m. to 4 p.m.) ■ Wednesday – Range BTRACS, 1 (7 a.m. to 4 p.m.) All personnel are required to check in and out with Range Control before going into or departing from any range or training area.

Soldier and Family Readiness Soldier and Family Readiness (ACS) classes and briefings for June will include: ■ Credit Reporting, Scores and Debt Management – 9 to 10 a.m., June 4, 18. ■ DevelopingYour Financial Plan – 9 to 10 a.m., June 11, 25. ■ Effective Resume Writing – 9 a.m. to noon, June 21. ■ Federal Employment – 10 a.m. to noon, June 27. ■ Financial ReadinessTraining – 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., June 21. ■ Home Buying Seminar – 4:30 to 7 p.m., June 26. g Personal Relationships – 10 to 11:30 a.m., June 5. ■ Instructor FacilitatorTraining, Army FamilyTeam Building – 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., June 17-20. ■ Managing Your Checking Account, Online Banking – 8:30 to 9:30 a.m., June 20. ■ Military Ball Etiquette – 10 to 11:30 a.m., June 6. ■ Retirement Planning – 5 to 6 p.m., June 18. ■ Successful Team Dynamics – 10 to 11:30 a.m., June 12. Unless otherwise noted, classes and briefings will take place in Bldg. 650, Monroe Ave. For more information, call 878-3638.


MAY 24, 2013

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

LAFBCommunity Langley CDC parenting sessions The Langley Child Development Center will be hosting sessions on parenting young children from noon to 1 p.m. every Wednesday during the month of June. These sessions are open to all military parents: ■ June 5 – Potty Training Young Children ■ June 12 – Relief and Relaxation for Young Children ■ June 19 – Anger and Frustration in Young Children For more information or to register for one or all sessions, call the CDC at 764-3585 or Family Advocacy at 764-9581.

Designing Dynamic Stepfamilies Designing Dynamic Stepfamilies will be held from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. May 30 at the Chapel Annex, room 2. This workshop discusses the challenges of merging families and addressing possible preexisting relationship and background issues. Other workshop topics include knowing what to expect, what’s normal for stepfamilies and how to proactively reduce the pressures of

JBLE Squadron Challenge A Joint Base Langley-Eustis Squadron Challenge will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 30 at the Shellbank Fitness Center Track. Each team will consist of six members and must have at least one member of the opposite gender. For more information, contact Staff Sgt. Shamika Bryant at shamika.bryant@langley.af.mil or 764-5791, or Staff Sgt. Jonathan Upshur at jonathan.upshur@langley.af.mil or 764-4320.

“Evening Under the Stars” spouse event The 633rd Force Support Squadron is hosting “Evening Under the Stars,” a free joint military spouse appreciation event from 5 to 8 p.m. May 30 in the Hampton Roads Convention Center.The event is open to military spouses from all branches of service, and will feature approximately 95 different vendors, ranging from pampering services to nonprofit agencies. Spouses must show their Department of Defense identification card for admission. For more information or to volunteer for the event, contact Master Sgt. Dawn Chapman at 764-3990 or dawn. chapman@langley.af.mil, or Master Sgt. Dawn Moninger at dawn.moninger@langley.af.mil.

Orthodox Christian services Orthodox Christian Vespers prayer service will be held every Wednesday at 11 a.m. at Langley Chapel. For the Holy orthodox Sacraments or for pastoral and spiritual needs, contact the Langley Chapel at 764-7847.

Single Airman ministry events Please see below for upcoming events sponsored by the Langley Single Airmen Ministry: ■ Luray Caverns Trip – From 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. June 8. The trip will cost $10 per person, which includes a tour of the cave, garden maze and transportation.Those interest-

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Submit LAFB Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com

Langley Veterinary Clinic policy change unrealistic expectations. Registration is required. For more information, contact the Family Advocacy Program at 764-2427.

For the safety of children and pets, children under the age of 12 are no longer permitted to enter the Langley Veterinary Clinic. For more information, call 764-567.8.

“Let’s Stay Together” Marriage Seminar

Commercial Travel Office change

Langley Chapel will conduct a free marriage seminar entitled “Let’s StayTogether” from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 13 at the Langley Club. Those interested must register by June 11. For more information, contact Chap. (Capt.) Tara Dixon at 764-0587/7847 or tara.dixon@langley.af.mil.

Alamo Travel will no longer be the Commercial Travel Office serving JBLE, effective June 1. Implementation of this new CTO will not cause any disruptions in the Defense Travel System, nor change reservation or ticketing procedures. To facilitate the changeover, the Passenger Travel Section and Alamo Travel will be closed May 31 for transition. Emergency travel can be arranged by calling the Passenger Travel Office at 764-5071. Contact information, location and hours of operation will remain the same.

Family Advocacy Safety Education Seminar A Family Advocacy Safety Education Seminar will be held from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. June 14 at the Health and Wellness Center. This seminar reviews the dynamics and impact of domestic violence and child maltreatment, tools for healthy relationships and parenting, and available community resources on and off base. For more information or to register, contact the Family Advocacy Program at 764-2427.

Discounted tickets and passes Discounted tickets and season passes to local amusement parks are available through Langley Information, Tickets and Tours. For more information, call 764-7176.

Langley Community Center events

ed must sign up no later than June 4. ■ Camping at ShenandoahValley National Park – From Aug. 30 to Sept. 2. The trip will cost $89 per person, which includes tents, food, a scavenger hunt and transportation. Those interested must sign up no later than Aug. 13. For more information on these events, contact Larry Blakely at 273-1033 or 528-0455.

Line Dancer-cise: “Step Into Fitness” from 5:30 to 6:50 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays in the Air Combat Command Fitness Center aerobics room. Classes are $40 per month for adults and $24 per month for children 12 and under. Work up a sweat as you learn the latest and most popular line dances while dropping pounds and inches. For more information on Community Center events, email james.murrell@langley.af.mil or call the Community Center at 764-2983/2984.

Clean the Bay Day

Cinderella’s Closet

The Langley community’s Clean the Bay Day will be held from 9 a.m. to noon June 1 at Langley Eagle Park. For more information or to volunteer, call 764-1141 or e-mail Michael Mallozi at michael.malozzi@langley.af.mil.

The Langley Enlisted Spouse’s Club is sponsoring a new project, Cinderella’s Closet, which is a loan closet of formal gowns, cocktail dresses, shoes, accessories and more. The items will be signed out free of charge to those with a military identification card, and must be returned dry cleaned. The LESC is collecting gently used formal gowns, cocktail length gowns, shoes, shawls and handbags. The location, hours and details of the closet are being finalized, with a possible opening this summer. For more information on donating or volunteering, contact Amanda Bryie or Amye Pederson at 504-0746 or via e-mail at cinderellasclosetlafb@gmail.com.

Pastoral Ministries director position available The Langley Chapel has a part-time contract vacancy for a director of pastoral ministries to coordinate the spiritual programs of the three Protestant congregations. Applicants must be ordained by an approved church body. The DPM will provide leadership and oversight for all Protestant-wide ministries and programs to include volunteer management. The contract will be awarded based on “best value” to the government. Applicants can pick up the Statement of Work and the Basis of Award from the Langley Chapel Annex administrative office.Three letters of recommendation are required. Applications must be submitted to the chapel by 4 p.m. May 28. Public bid opening will be in the Langley Chapel Annex conference room at 10 a.m. May 29. For more information, contact Chap. (Capt.) Cornelius Johnson at 764-6709.

Airmen’s Attic accepting donations The Airmen’s Attic is accepting gently used donations.The following items are needed: housewares, kitchen items, linens and clothing. Items such as large couches, mattresses or box springs will not be accepted. For info, call 764-1363.

Hispanic Heritage Committee meetings The Hispanic Heritage Committee will have its meetings every third Wednesday of the month at 2 p.m. in the Langley bowling alley activities room. For more information, contact Master Sgt. Jose Perez at 764-1735.

The Exchange’s “Salad Wednesdays” The Army and Air Force Exchange Service restaurants are now offering $2 off any salad priced $4 or more every Wednesday. “Salad Wednesdays” will occur at all participating Exchange restaurants and are open to anyone on the installation, including civilians, contractors or visitors. For more information, visit http://www.shopmyexchange.com.


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

OutsideTheGate Memorial Day Concert The Virginia Arts Festival will present a Memorial Day Concert featuring the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Band at 7 p.m. May 27 at City Center at Oyster Point in Newport News. This event is free and open to the public. The fountain plaza will open at 5 p.m. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. For more information, visit www.vafest.org.

Memorial Day Ceremony The American Legion Nansemond Post 88, Suffolk Chapter, will host a Memorial Day Ceremony from 10 a.m. to noon May 27 at the Albert G. Horton Jr. Veteran’s Cemetery, 5310 Milners Rd., Suffolk. The ceremony is held to honor our local veterans, fallen heroes and community volunteers. For more information, visit http://hortonwreathsociety.

WWII Gun Barrel Ceremony The public is invited to celebrate the relocation and restoration of the Virginia National Wildlife Refuge’s newest attraction, a 68-foot World War II gun barrel, at 2 p.m. May 25 at the refuge, 5003 Hallett Circle, Cape Charles (Eastern Shore). A ribbon-cutting ceremony will be held for the 16”/50-caliber Mark VII gun barrel (#393), which was on the USS Missouri at the signing of the Japanese surrender of World War II on Sept. 2, 1945. The gun barrel is coated in Navy battleship grey and Army olive drab colors to recognize its significance to both military branches. It is similar to the barrel that was in the World War II bunker when the refuge was Fort John Custis. For more information, contact Susan Rice at 331-2760 or visit www.fws.gov/refuge/eastern_shore_of_virginia.

Peninsula Pilots Baseball The Peninsula Pilots’ season opener will take place at 7:05 p.m. May 29 at War Memorial Stadium, 1889 W. Pembroke Ave., Hampton. Join the Pilots as they begin their 14th season with a game against the Petersburg Generals. Admission is $5 (adults); $3 (Seniors and children under 12); and free for active-duty military with ID ($3, family members). For more information, call 245-2222 or visit www.peninsulapilots.com.

Blackbeard Pirate Festival The 14th annual Blackbeard Pirate Festival will take place May 31-June 2 in downtown Hampton. This event is free and open to the public.Tickets are required for the Grand Pirates Ball, which is scheduled for 7 to 11 p.m. at the Crowne Plaza Hampton Marina Hotel, 700 Settlers Landing Rd., Hampton. Admission is $35 in advance and $40 at the door. Advance tickets can be purchased at http://purchase.tickets. com/buy/TicketPurchase?organ_val=22339. Festival activities will include pirate and militia street skirmishes, sea battle re-enactments, free tall-ship tours, a children’s area, live music, craft vendors and a fireworks show (9 p.m., June 1). Food and beverages will be available for purchase. Hours are 7 to 11 p.m., May 31 (ticketed event); 10 a.m. to 11 p.m., June 1; and noon to 5 p.m., June 2.

MAY 24, 2013

Submit Outside The Gate announcements to pw1@militarynews.com

webs.com/apps/calendar or e-mail Ross Garcia at mdvgarcia@gmail.com.

Free Tickets to Colonial Williamsburg As a thank you to the men and women who bravely serve our country, Colonial Williamsburg is offering free admission through May 27 to active-duty military, reservists, National Guard, retirees, veterans and their family members. The “Honoring Service to America” program provides free admission to all Colonial Williamsburg exhibition sites, art museums, daytime programs, free parking at the Visitor Center, access to the short movie, “Williamsburg – The Story of a Patriot,” and complimentary use of the Colonial Williamsburg shuttle buses. To receive free tickets in advance, visit your installation ticket and travel office.

For more information, contact the Hampton Visitor’s Center at 727-1102 or visit www.hampton.gov/parks/blackbeard.

Steam and Gas Engine Show Chippokes Plantation State Park will host its 23rd annual Steam and Gas Engine Show from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 1-2 at 695 Chippokes Park Rd., Surry. Activities will include tractor pulls, craft booths, classic cars, children’s activities, mansion tours, an evening canoe trip along the James River and live demonstrations at the historic sawmill. Admission is $5 per person and free for children under age 12. Chippokes Plantation State Park is located on the south side of the James River. It is one of the oldest continuously farmed plantations in Virginia. The park features a campground, four historic cabins, swimming complex, visitor center, historic area and the Farm and Forestry Museum. For more information, call 294-3625 or visit www.virginia stateparks.gov.

Hampton Coliseum Spring Carnival Amusements of America will host the Hampton Coliseum Spring Carnival through June 2 in the coliseum’s parking lot, 1000 Coliseum Dr., Hampton. Bring the family and join us for rides, games, food and fun. Admission is $3 and free for children ages 5 and under. Ride tickets are $1 each. Unlimited ride hand-stamps are available for $20 on weekdays and $25 on Saturday, Sunday and Memorial Day. Gates open at 5 p.m. weekdays and noon Saturday, Sunday and Memorial Day. Parking is free. For more information, visit www.hamptoncoliseum.org.

USO Battleship Revue The USO of Hampton Roads and Central Virginia, in partnership with Nauticus and the Virginia Stage Company, will present a World War II-era song and dance show, “Swingtime Salute – The USO Battleship Review.” The show will take place on the deck of the Battleship Wisconsin, docked next to Nauticus at 1 Waterside Drive, Norfolk. For five weeks this summer, the show will “entertain the troops” with singers, dancers and a live on-stage

band. Performances are scheduled for 8 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday, June 5-July 6. Four special matinees will be performed at 2 p.m. June 26 and 29, and July 3 and 6 in the Nauticus Theater (third floor). Admission is $30-$50 (adults); $20 (children); and free for active-duty military.Tickets may be purchased by calling the VSC Box Office at 627-1234,Ticketmaster at (800) 9822787, or online at www.vastage.com.

Virginia Living Museum ■ Early Summer Planetarium Shows – May 25-June 30. Choose among four shows at the museum’s Abbitt Planetarium. A staff astronomer takes a tour of the current night sky in “Virginia Skies.” Enter the world of the extraordinarily tiny in “Microcosm” as you go deep into the body of a woman infected with a dangerous virus. “Abraham Lincoln: The Case of the Missing Moon” explores how Lincoln defended a man accused of murder using “facts” found in an almanac. “Laser Mania” combines music, movie hits and laser action. Tickets are $4 in addition to museum admission (planetarium is open every day). Museum admission is $17 (adults); $13 (children ages 3-12); and free for ages 2 and under. ■ “Bodies Revealed” Exhibition – May 25-Sept. 2. The “Bodies Revealed” exhibition showcases real human bodies, dissected and preserved through a revolutionary process allowing visitors to see themselves like never before. Many of the whole body specimens are dissected in vivid athletic poses, allowing the visitor to relate to everyday activities. To ensure that everyone has the best possible visit, the museum is offering timed tickets. Tickets can be purchased online at www.thevlm.org or in person at the museum. The cost is $7 (museum members); $15 (nonmembers); $12 (children); and free for ages 2 and under. Combination tickets for the museum and exhibition are $26 (adults); $20 (children ages 3-12); and free for ages 2 and under.The exhibition will also be open from 6 to 8 p.m. June 8, July 13 and Aug. 10. The Virginia Living Museum is located at 524 J. Clyde Morris Blvd., Newport News. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Saturday; and noon to 5 p.m., Sunday. For more information, call 595-9135 or visit www.thevlm.org.


MAY 24, 2013

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

MAY 24, 2013

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*HOW TO QUALIFY: 1.BE IN CURRENT ACTIVE DUTY STATUS IN THE U.S. MILITARY (NAVY, ARMY, AIR FORCE, MARINES, NATIONAL GUARD, COAST GUARD AND ACTIVE RESERVE) OR A U.S. MILITARY INACTIVE RESERVE (I.E., READY RESERVE) THAT IS PART OF THE INDIVIDUAL READY RESERVE, SELECTED RESERVE AND INACTIVE NATIONAL GUARD. RETIRED MILITARY PERSONNEL ARE NOT ELIGIBLE. 2.PROVIDE VERIFIABLE PROOF OF MILITARY STATUS OR ACTIVE SERVICE AT THE TIME OF PURCHASE: LEAVE AND EARNING STATEMENT OR MILITARY IDENTIFICATION CARD. 3.RECEIVE A SALARY SUFFICIENT TO COVER ORDINARY LIVING EXPENSES AND PAYMENTS FOR YOUR TOYOTA. 4.RECEIVE CREDIT APPROVAL THROUGH A TOYOTA DEALER AND TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. INCENTIVE OFFERED BY TOYOTA MOTOR SALES, U.S.A., INC. ON LEASE CONTRACTS INCENTIVE MUST BE APPLIED TOWARD THE AMOUNT DUE AT LEASE SIGNING OR TOWARD THE CAPITALIZED COST REDUCTION. ON FINANCE CONTRACTS, INCENTIVE MUST BE APPLIED TOWARD THE DOWN PAYMENT. ONE INCENTIVE PER FINANCE OR LEASE TRANSACTION. NOT COMPATIBLE WITH THE TOYOTA COLLEGE GRADUATE INCENTIVE PROGRAM. FINANCE OR LEASE CONTRACT MUST BE DATED BY JULY 8, 2013 FOR INCENTIVE OFFER. THE MILITARY INCENTIVE PROGRAM IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE OR TERMINATION AT ANY TIME. OFFERS ON APPROVED CREDIT TO QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS THROUGH A PARTICIPATING TOYOTA DEALERSHIP AND TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. TERMS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS APPLY, INCLUDING A MAXIMUM TERM OF 60 MONTHS ON FINANCE CONTRACTS. PROGRAM IS AVAILABLE AT PARTICIPATING DEALERS IN MARYLAND, VIRGINIA, WEST VIRGINIA, PENNSYLVANIA, AND DELAWARE; AND MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE IN ALL STATES. NOT ALL APPLICANTS WILL QUALIFY. SEE PARTICIPATING DEALER FOR DETAILS.**0% APR FINANCING UP TO 60 MONTHS AVAILABLE TO QUALIFIED BUYERS THRU TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. TOTAL FINANCED CANNOT EXCEED MSRP PLUS OPTIONS, TAX AND LICENSE FEES. 60 MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF $16.67 FOR EACH $1000 BORROWED. NOT ALL BUYERS WILL QUALIFY. †PURCHASERS CAN RECEIVE $500 BONUS CASH BACK FROM TOYOTA OR CAN APPLY CASH BACK TO DOWN PAYMENT. INCENTIVE FROM TOYOTA IS IN ADDITION TO 0% APR FINANCING. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.††CAMRY DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $2300 DOWN, FIRST $199 PAYMENT, AND NO SECURITY DEPOSIT. 2013 CAMRY LE 4 CYLINDER AUTOMATIC MODEL 2532, MSRP $23,915. CUSTOMER IS RESPONSIBLE FOR EXCESSIVE WEAR AND EXCESS MILEAGE CHARGES OF $.15 PER MILE IN EXCESS OF 24,000 ON CAMRY 24 MONTH LEASE. YOUR PAYMENT MAY VARY BASED ON DEALER PARTICIPATION AND FINAL NEGOTIATED PRICE. NOT ALL CUSTOMERS WILL QUALIFY. †††PURCHASERS CAN RECEIVE $500 CASH BACK FROM TOYOTA ON GAS MODEL CAMRYS ONLY OR CAN APPLY CASH BACK TO DOWN PAYMENT. •FINANCE INCENTIVE FROM TOYOTA ON SIENNA AND TUNDRA IN ADDITION TO 0% APR FINANCING WHEN VEHICLE IS PURCHASED AND FINANCED THROUGH TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. ON FINANCE CONTRACTS, INCENTIVE WILL FIRST BE APPLIED TO THE DOWN PAYMENT. ONE INCENTIVE PER FINANCE TRANSACTION. FINANCE INCENTIVE IS AVAILABLE ON APPROVED CREDIT TO QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS THROUGH TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. ***TOYOTACARE COVERS NORMAL FACTORY SCHEDULED SERVICE FOR 2 YEARS OR 25K MILES, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. THE NEW TOYOTA VEHICLE CANNOT BE PART OF A RENTAL OR COMMERCIAL FLEET OR A LIVERY OR TAXI VEHICLE. SEE PARTICIPATING DEALER FOR COMPLETE PLAN DETAILS. VALID ONLY IN THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES AND ALASKA. OFFERS DO NOT INCLUDE DEALER FEES. CAMRY BONUS CASH OFFER AND 0% APR ON CAMRY HYBRIDS ENDS 5/28/13; OTHER OFFERS END 6/3/13.


Peninsula Warrior May 24, 2013 Army Edition