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:DUULRU J O I N T April 13, 2012 Vol. 3, No. 15

B A S E

L A N G L E Y - E U S T I S

P u b l i s h e d i n t h e i n t e re s t o f p e r s o n n e l a t J o i n t B a s e L a n g l e y - E u s t i s

ASSISTANCE

AER program helps Army ‘take care of its own’ — Page 5

EASTER

Eustis chaplains recognize ‘Resurrection Sunday’ — Page 13

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TRAINING Langley hosts week-long Krav Maga course — Page 16

Army undersecretary visits TRADOC – Page 3

ARMY EDITION

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633rd changes to hours of operation during April ORE 633RD FORCE SUPPORT SQUADRON

The 633rd Force Support Squadron will feature modified hours of operation during the upcoming Langley Air Force Base Operational Readiness Exercise, April 16-20.

Dining Facilities

Photo by Sgt. Steven Schneider

Joseph W. Westphal, undersecretary of the Army, walks with Gen. Robert W. Cone, commanding general of U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, after his arrival to Joint Base Langley-Eustis, April 4. During Westphal's visit, he met with TRADOC senior leaders at Fort Eustis to learn more about the command's top initiatives and how the initiatives are prioritized to shape the future force – the Army of 2020.

$UP\ XQGHUVHFUHWDU\ YLVLWV 75$'2& By Amy L. Robinson ARMY NEWS SERVICE

U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command welcomed another special guest to its new home on Joint Base Langley-Eustis when the undersecretary of the Army made his initial visit to the headquarters on Fort Eustis, Va., April 4. During his visit Joseph Westphal met with TRADOC senior leaders to learn more about the command’s top initiatives and how the initiatives are prioritized to shape the future force -the Army of 2020. Gen. Robert W. Cone, TRADOC commanding general, welcomed Westphal and began the visit with a tour of the new headquarters building. The tour ended at the Morelli Auditorium, where Cone expressed his appreciation for the opportunity to discuss TRADOC’s role in the Army and the Joint Force. “We’re excited to share with you some of our ideas about the future and get your feedback on the direc-

tion we’re headed,” the general said. Lt. Gen. John Sterling, TRADOC deputy commanding general, talked about TRADOC in transition, beginning with the most basic question: What does TRADOC do for the Army? “We write the concepts for how we believe the Army will need to operate in 2020,” Sterling explained. “And from those concepts, we determine what capabilities are required to execute those concepts, and then, we develop our leaders and train our Soldiers in those concepts.” Sterling also discussed the command’s scope of responsibility, organizational structure, funding and how the TRADOC determines strategic and operational requirements for the Army, through the Army Force Management Model. Westphal acknowledged the complexity of the requirements process and noted that communicating the right requirements to Army senior leaders is essential. The undersecretary also received presentations on how TRADOC is

shaping the Army of 2020, which included Cone’s vision and intent, as well as information from the Army Capabilities Integration Center on how TRADOC is moving forward to the Army of 2020. Lt. Gen. David Perkins, Combined Arms Center commander, provided an update on Doctrine 2015, discussed some of the findings from the Army Profession report, which was released April 2, and stressed the importance of leader development. “You train people how to learn,” Perkins said, explaining the importance of both learning and training. “When you go out to the unit, you’ve got to take what you have, you’ve got to train others and you’ve got to stay connected.” Perkins said leader development is critical to the Army’s future. He noted the importance of a “strategic reserve” force in uncertain battlefield conditions, and then linked that to leader development by saying that within the context of the Army’s uncertain future, “Our strategic reserve will be our well-trained leaders.”

The Raptor Café Dining Facility will maintain normal hours for lunch and dinner. The cost of meals is based on individual menu items. Once the Phase II portion of the exercise begins April 19, the Raptor Café will open to sell "midnight MREs," or Meals, Ready to Eat, for flightline personnel. Each MRE will cost $4.55. ■ Lunch: April 16-20,10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ■ Dinner: April 16-20, 4:30 to 7 p.m. ■ Midnight MRE: April 19-20, midnight to 1 a.m. The Crossbow Dining Room will maintain normal hours for breakfast, lunch, dinner and midnight meal. Cost for meals is based on individual menu items. ■ Breakfast: April 16-20, 5:30 to 7:30 a.m. ■ Lunch: April 16-20, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. ■ Dinner: April 16-20, 3 to 7 p.m. ■ Midnight: April 16-20, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Child Development Center The Shellbank Child Development Center will be open April 16-20 from 6:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Extended hours are available for enrollees participating in the exercise. Parents without reservations should call 764-3585.

Fitness Centers The Shellbank Fitness Center will be open April 16-20 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. The Air Combat Command Fitness Center will be closed April 16-20.

Additional Services The 633rd FSS Military Personnel Section will be closed April 16-20. However, the Common Access Card customer service section will maintain normal business hours. The Community Center will be closed through April 25 for recreation and leisure activities. However, the help desk will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. for all other services. All instructional classes will be held at the ShellbankYouth Center. For more information, call the Community Center at 764-2983/2984.

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Perception is reality. This mantra is drilled into trainees’ heads at Basic Military Training from the moment of their first clothing issue, and it is emphasized through technical training. Dress and appearance is fundamental to Air Force personnel and key to our core value of “excellence in all we do.” However, some Airmen become complacent and let these high standards slip into mediocrity once out of the training environment. “Uniforms are just the foundation, and you have to correct the little things before you can correct the big things,” said Master Sgt. April Brittain, the 633rd Communications Squadron first sergeant. “The easiest things to let slide are the basics.” Brittain explained the most common issues are not where the policies may have recently changed, but where the policies have remained constant. Personal grooming and make-up are among the most common to follow this trend. Wearing multicolored sunglasses or hair ties to match the color of running shoes is not allowed. While dressed in any uniform, Airmen must make sure accessories and their overall look complement the uniform, not the current styles or fashions. “An Airman’s appearance in uniform should be timeless,” said Brittain. With the summer months fast approaching, Airmen have a tendency to become increasingly lax with uniform standards, said Master Sgt. Steven Mathews, the 633rd Civ-

il Engineer Squadron first sergeant. The warmer weather brings a new set of uniform standards to remember. Tattoos can be a difficult issue to tackle, especially during warmer months. Air Force Instruction 36-2903 states that only 25 percent of an Airman’s exposed body part can show tattoos. “With the weather getting nicer, options to comfortably cover up tattoos are limited,” said Mathews. Physical training is essential to the Air Force way of life, but it is often easy to forget that even while wearing the more casual PT uniform, each Airman is still representing the Air Force. “The PT uniform is still a uniform, and it needs to present a military image,” said Mathews. Ensuring that PT gear fits properly, choosing running shoes with a subdued color palate, and carrying your gym bag in your left hand, instead of slung across your chest, are easy ways to promote the military image, said Master Sgt. Ryan McCauley, 633rd Air Base Wing Staff Agencies first sergeant. While first sergeants will often correct uniform infractions, it is every Airman’s role to educate their wingmen and ensure they are adhering to the high Air Force standards. “It’s not the responsibility of the first sergeants to police uniform infractions,” said McCauley. “We do that because we’re Airmen, and that’s what all Airmen need to do. It can take a certain degree of courage to address a uniform infraction to a senior ranking member, and it shouldn’t.”


APRIL 13, 2012

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By Staff Sgt. Krystie Martinez AIR COMBAT COMMAND PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Air Combat Command held the 2012 Outstanding Airmen of the Year banquet at Langley Air Force Base, Va., April 4 to honor the Command's top performers of the year. Congratulations to the following OAY winners: Airman Senior Airman Cory T. Branham, Mountain Home AFB, Idaho

First Sergeant Master Sgt. Jennifer R. Wampler, Holloman AFB, N.M.

Noncommissioned Officer Staff Sgt. Shawn O'Day, Combined Air and Space Operations Center, Southwest Asia

Honor Guard Senior Airman Kurtis A. Brown, Mountain Home AFB, Idaho

Senior NCO Master Sgt. Tiffany R. Bettisworth, Nellis AFB, Nev.

Honor Guard Program Manager Tech. Sgt. Eric G. Lawlor, Nellis AFB, Nev.

Photo by Staff Sgt. Dana Hill

Air Combat Command leadership and the six outstanding ACC Airmen of the Year pose for a group photo at Langley Air Force Base, April 4. Each nominee met with a formal selection board of up to six chief master sergeants who evaluated their award packages, communication skills and military image. From left: U.S. Air Force Gen. Mike Hostage, commander of ACC; Staff Sgt. Cory T. Branham, Airman category; Master Sgt.Tiffany Bettisworth, Senior NCO category; Master Sgt. Jennifer R. Wample, First Sergeant category; Staff Sgt. Shawn D. O’Day, Noncommissioned officer category; SeniorAirman KurtisA. Brown, Honor Guard member;Tech. Sgt. Eric G. Lawlor, Honor Guard Program manager, and Chief Master Sgt. Richard Parsons, ACC command chief.

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(XVWLV $(5 DVVLVWDQFH SURJUDP GHGLFDWHG WR µKHOSLQJ WKH $UP\ WDNH FDUH RI LWV RZQ¶ By Tetaun Moffett 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

The Fort Eustis Army Emergency Relief assistance program recently launched their 2012 campaign. All campaign events run through May 15. This year’s theme is: “A Strong Tradition of Soldiers Helping Soldiers.” For the last 70 years, the campaign objectives have remained the same: To create greater awareness of AER assistance programs and benefits; and to give Soldiers the opportunity to help their fellow Soldiers. “This is absolutely an incredible program that supports our Soldiers, families and retirees. A lot of folks don’t necessarily understand what it’s designed to do and how it actually operates,” said U.S. Army Col. Thomas R. Wetherington, 733rd Mission Support Group commander. “This program applies to these individuals who may fall upon financial crisis or have an urgent need. The process also allows no interest loans and grants. It promotes the overall sense that we as an Army will take care of our own internally. “ AER interest-free loans up to $1,000 for terms of between 12 and 24 months; in the case of larger loans, extensions may be granted on a case-by-case basis. Last year alone, $77 million was distributed to over 64,000 Soldiers. According to Wetherington, Eustis received a distribution just under a million dollars that supported close

Photo by Tetaun Moffett

U.S. Army Col.Thomas R.Wetherington, 733rd Mission Support Group commander, gives opening remarks during the Army Emergency Relief assistance campaign at the Fort Eustis Club at Fort Eustis, March 21. The program offers interest-free loans up to $1,000 for terms of between 12 and 24 months.

to 800 Soldiers and families. “They key to our success is to ensure commanders and senior leadership have effective and passionate personnel who are not afraid to engage individuals and get the kind of support we need to make this program a great success,” said Sgt. 1st Class Toya King, 89th Transportation Company and AER installation coordinator. “You never know when you’re going to need some type of assistance and a lot of Soldiers really don’t understand how important the AER assistance program is.”

The Army Emergency Relief helps the following personnel: • Soldiers on extended active-duty and their dependents • Members of the Reserve components of the Army (Army National Guard and U.S. Army Reserve) on continuous active-duty for more than 30 days, and their dependents • Soldiers retired from active-duty because of longevity or physical disability, or retired upon reaching age 60, and their dependents • Widows/Widowers and orphans of Soldiers who died while on active-duty or after they retired Emergency Services helps with emergency financial needs for: • Food, rent or utilities

• • • •

There are also scholarships that are readily available and accessible to family members whether activeduty or retiree. Beverly Wyche-Reid, ASA program analysis and Army retiree said the AER scholarship program is a best-kept secret. This is her daughters second scholarship. “A lot of people don’t take advantage of it because they don’t believe they can benefit from it. But if you meet the basic requirements it’s a wonderful opportunity to curve college tuition.”

Emergency transportation and vehicle repair Funeral expenses Medical/dental expenses Personal needs when pay is delayed or stolen

AER does not offer the following: • Help pay for nonessentials • Finance ordinary leave or vacation • Pay fines or legal expenses • Help liquidate or consolidate debt • Assist with house purchase or home improvements • Help purchase, rent or lease vehicle • Cover bad checks or pay credit card bills For more information on the AER assistance program, contact Sgt. 1st Class Toya King at 878-2137.


APRIL 13, 2012

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6HQWLQHO)RFXVEHJLQV LWVVL[WKHYDOXDWLRQ H[DPLQDWLRQ$SULO By Marge McGlinn and Dan McConnell 480TH ISR WING

The Air Force’s Distributed Common Ground System undergoes its sixth detailed examination into its operations April 15. The DCGS is the Air Force’s globally networked intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance weapon system, and its advancement requires continuous detailed evaluations of its processes. The evaluation, called Sentinel Focus, ends April 19 and enables members of the 480th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Wing to observe their processes and operations during real missions to identify improvement areas. The wing held its first Sentinel Focus in August 2009 and has been holding them twice a year since. “Our goal is to enhance cooperation between various intelligence entities, enhance a culture of collaboration and share best practices and lessons learned,” said Col. Paul Nelson, 480th ISR Wing commander. Each of the eight sites will have a team of experts evaluating how the weapon system functions during the five-day study. The sites include active duty, Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve Command partners in California, Georgia, Hawaii, Virginia, Georgia, Maryland, Indiana and Germany. This year’s evaluation enables members of the Air Force DCGS enterprise to observe existing processes as well as tackle new procedures to identify issues, performance gaps and best practices. This event is the first of two scheduled for 2012 geared toward standardizing processes and determining the best crew configurations to be the most efficient while integrating new sensors, capabilities and missions. The teams will also work with coalition counterparts to build partnerships and reap the benefits of shared intelligence to improve and streamline processes to meet a theater commander’s intelligence requirements more effectively. According to Nelson, the wing is always open to new ways of doing business to support the warfighter and the nation. “To meet our nation’s requirements, from war to humanitarian missions, it’s imperative we ceaselessly change and remake our ISR operations,” Nelson said. “Our intent is to unleash what American’s do best: innovate and embrace creativity.” The 480th ISR Wing’s mission is to execute nonstop ISR operations for the Air Force, joint commanders, the intelligence community and the nation’s allies.

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FeatureStory

7KDW RWKHUV PD\ OLYH “McMullen was guiding a combat search and rescue mission when his team came under fire from insurgents in a village nearby. Despite miscommunication and the threat of rocket propelled grenade attacks, McMullen led his four-ship task force to the successful extraction of two wounded British soldiers”

+HOR SLORW DZDUGHG 6LOYHU 6WDU IRU UHVFXH PLVVLRQ By Senior Airman Jason J. Brown 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

With chaos erupting around him, rounds narrowly missing his aircraft, frantic crew members barking directions and a pair of wounded troops waiting for salvation in a sequestered landing zone below, thenCapt. Charles McMullen did what he was trained to do – adapt, lead and overcome. McMullen, a rescue pilot deployed to Afghanistan from the 41st Rescue Squadron at Moody Air Force Base, Ga., was guiding a combat search and rescue mission Dec. 28, 2009, when his team came under fire from insurgents in a village nearby. Despite miscommunication and the threat of rocket propelled grenade attacks, McMullen led his four-ship task force to the successful extraction of two wounded British soldiers. As a result of his gallantry and bravery under fire, McMullen, now a major, received the Silver Star from Gen. Mike Hostage, the commander of Air Combat Command, in a ceremony at Langley AFB, Va., April 3. The nighttime recovery mission came as a group of 160 British Special Forces troops began to sweep a village near Nad E Ali, Afghanistan. An injury to one soldier put the lives of the entire unit in jeopardy, and McMullen’s team, which consisted of two U.S. HH-60 Pave Hawks and two British WAH-60 Apache attack helicopters, was dispatched in to complete the urgent CSAR mission. After the British cleared a landing zone for the HH-60s, McMullen directed his wingman to ascend and recover the injured soldier while he and the Apaches provided cover. As the Pave Hawk began its final approach, insurgents ambushed using small arms, heavy machine gun and anti-aircraft artillery fire from 200 meters away. In response, McMullen cleared his aerial gunner to engage the enemies, allowing his wingman to withdraw. The British Apache crews notified McMullen that the landing zone was again

Photo by Airman 1st Class Kayla Newman

U.S. Air Force Gen. Mike Hostage, commander of Air Combat Command, presents the Silver Star to Maj. Charles McMullen, 41st Rescue Squadron helicopter pilot, at Langley Air Force Base, April 3. McMullen received the Silver Star after leading an aerial combat rescue mission in Afghanistan Dec. 28, 2009, during which his team came under fire from insurgents from a nearby village.

clear, and McMullen ordered the second attempt at recovery. However, insurgents were waiting beyond the tree line to strike again. As the aircraft descended, enemies armed with RPGs encroached on the landing zone, and the anti-aircraft and small arms fire resumed. The rounds came within 15 feet of the helicopter. “They can’t take off because they’re boxed in, rounds are coming over the top of their aircraft. I was ready to turn hot to-

ward them, and all I saw was three guns. I was convinced they were being shot,” McMullen recalled. “We were coming over the trees beginning our ascent into the LZ, and really intense fire came from the left side,” said Capt. Evan Roth, the co-pilot of the HH60 attempting the rescue. “As soon as we dropped below the trees, we got engaged. [McMullen] saw it and directed us to egress. It was then I saw the rounds above us and below his helicopter.”

“This isn’t a one-time event unfortunately. This is what every in Rescue does, day in, day out. When we were there, we did seven or eight missions a day, every day, with no days off. You’re on your alert for 12 hours. You fly a mission, get out to use the bathroom, then jump back in and do it again.” — Maj. Charles McMullen 41st Rescue Squadron helicopter pilot

“I remember thinking how I was on my seventh deployment, and I hadn’t lost anybody yet ... hadn’t lost a patient, hadn’t lost a crew member,” McMullen said. Running out of options, McMullen made his decision. He accelerated his HH-60 into the line of fire between his wingman and the incoming rounds, drawing enemy fire away from the pinned-down aircraft and providing a means for escape. “I called for my flight engineer to engage the targets, and he replied that they were out of range and couldn’t get a shot. At that point, the only thing I could think to do was dive through the tracer fire,” he explained. “I figured if they started shooting at me, they weren’t going to take out my wingman, who had no way to defend himself.” According to Roth, it was just enough for them to get away. “I don’t know how we didn’t get hit with fire that night,” he said. “I’ve been in a couple engagements and that was probably the most scared I’d ever been. We were able to evade because Chuck made a great call.” McMullen continued dodging rounds from three gun positions. With fire coming in from both sides, his crew members gave conflicting directions to strafe left and right. “Had it not been for my co-pilot, we probably would have gotten shot, as both guys in the back both yelling to break a different direction – ‘break right, break left,’” McMullen recalled. “We were flying with the doors off, and my co-pilot said he could almost feel the rounds coming up. [The rounds] were so close on our left side tracking toward the helicopter, they almost hit the rotor disk. “I called out, ‘Hey guys, give me a way to go!’ My co-pilot was the calmest he ever was during the deployment. He said ‘go right,’ put his hand on the stick and pushed it to the right a little bit. Immediately, we broke away and continued going through the maneuvers,” he continued. “It felt like the longest engagement I’ve ever been in.” SEE STAR PAGE 9


APRIL 13, 2012

Photo by Airman 1st Class Kayla Newman

U.S. Air Force Gen. Mike Hostage, right, commander of Air Combat Command, speaks with Maj. Charles McMullen, left, 41st Rescue Squadron helicopter pilot, plus his friends and family, before presenting him the Silver Star at Langley Air Force Base, April 3. McMullen received the Silver Star for leading an aerial combat mission to rescue two wounded British soldiers in Afghanistan.

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STAR FROM PAGE 8 After escaping the threat, McMullen learned of a second soldier in need of extraction at the landing zone. The British Apaches did another run, eliminating several insurgents. On the third attempt, McMullen ordered his wingman to ascend and attempt casualty evacuation. This time, the operation went without incident, and the formation evacuated with the wounded soldiers aboard. In retrospect, McMullen attributed the mission’s success to training and communication. He thanked his British allies for their support, and honored the Air Force pararescue jumpers who worked so closely and diligently with his flight crews. “The communication with our wingmen was rehearsed – there were no questions about what needed to be done. Even during training at Red Flag, when we’d go out to the range on Moody, I would push them, telling them “This is what you gotta do. When the time comes, you can’t think about - you just gotta do it.” Roth said while training ensured everyone knew their role in the heat of battle, McMullen’s leadership and bravery saved the mission – and their lives. “He made the right call, and got our mission done. He got put in a very tough situation as the flight lead. There wasn’t a point where he called and said, ‘I don’t think we do this,’” Roth said. “With all the risks, he did his best to mitigate them to the best of his ability for us to accomplish our mission.” Even with one of the nation’s highest military honors bestowed upon him, McMullen, who is currently training as a test pilot, said his actions are indicative of what any rescue Airman would do. “This isn’t a one-time event unfortunately. This is what every in Rescue does, day in, day out,” he said. “When we were there, we did seven or eight missions a day, every day, with no days off. You’re on your alert for 12 hours. You fly a mission, get out to use the bathroom, then jump back in and do it again.” “It’s what we do as Combat Rescue,” added Roth. “These things we do that others may live.”

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

APRIL 13, 2012

ChildCare

To spank or not to spank your child, that is the question By Julie Couture JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS FAMILY ADVOCACY

There has been endless debate and controversy regarding the effectiveness of spanking. Some say “Spare the rod, spoil the child.” Others are convinced that spanking can have harmful, detrimental effects on children. To assist you with this age-old debate, we in Family Advocacy consulted the guru of all information: Google. We reviewed several articles for the purpose of provoking thought and encouraging the reader to consider potential impacts of physical punishment. One Time article from February 2012, titled “Why Spanking Doesn’t Work,” cited a study that was conducted over the course of twenty years and investigated the effects of physical punishment. The article noted that spanking does in fact stop behaviors in the short term. For example, if your child tries to touch a hot stove and you slap his hand to prevent him from doing so, the child will most likely not keep reaching for the stove. Alas, according to this study, this may be the only positive outcome of spanking. Other outcomes suggested physical punishment tends to increase physically aggressive behaviors in children. Additionally, spanking can lead to other undesirable behaviors, such as lying. After all, how many of us twisted the truth when we were younger to avoid repercussions? Because the study followed the lives of 80 children for 20 years, the researchers were able to observe differences in children who were regularly spanked and those who were not. Researchers found that children who were physically punished were at higher risk for developing depression, anxiety and substance abuse when they got older. Another article, which cited two studies, presented interesting results. In 1997, the New York Times published an article titled “2 Spanking Studies Indicate Parents should be Cautious.” One of the studies by Dr. Marjorie Lindner Gunnoe demon-

strated that for some, spanking resulted in fewer fights in school. This same study also showed that rates of antisocial behavior increased in children. Dr. Murray Strauss, who conducted the second study, also found that rates of antisocial behavior increased among children who were spanked. In their studies, antisocial does not indicate shyness or withdrawn behavior, but rather feeling no remorse when hurting others. This suggests that while spanking can have shortterm benefits, it can potentially have undesired negative implications. In addition to encouraging the reader to consider the type of punishment, these studies also consider whether punishment is truly needed or beneficial in some circumstances. When most children hit the beautiful age of two, they find their inner “No!” – and express it repeatedly. The meltdowns and strong-willed behavior can drive the most patient of saints to consider raising their hand in anger. Depending on the child’s age, the behavior that is observed may not actually be oppositional but a result of the child’s development. A Time article cited Dr. Durrant’s interaction with her child as an example. When her son was 3 years old, he dropped his father’s

The only definitive conclusion we can draw is that even though spanking works in the short term, the long term effects don’t seem so positive.

toothbrush in the toilet. Dr. Durrant realized that he was experimenting – he wanted to see what would happen when the toothbrush is in the water.After all, he had dropped other things in other bodies of water – why would a toilet and toothbrush be any different from a toy dropped in the bathtub? Where some of us might have conniptions and hide all toothbrushes (not to mention gargling with mouthwash for good measure), she took a different approach. When she explained to him what the toilet and toothbrush were used for and had him consider whether or not his father would want to use the toothbrush, her son put two and two together and came up with four. Sometimes, understanding what developmental stage a child is in can help a parent see that the child’s actions aren’t personal, even though they feel personal. So; to spank or not to spank? That may still be the question. The only definitive conclusion we can draw is that even though spanking works in the short term, the long term effects don’t seem so positive. The reality is that using corporal punishment on one’s child is legal in Virginia. However, it is illegal for physical punishment to leave marks. To learn about alternatives to spanking, contact your military branch’s Family Advocacy Program. As the toddler years can be challenging, all branches of the Armed Forces have a new parent support program. Nurses and social workers can visit your home to offer education on your child’s developmental stage and helpful ways to get through challenging times. The program is available to those expecting or who have a child up to 3 years old. Family Advocacy Strength-based Treatment services are available for those with children older than three. With FAST, social workers provide education and information regarding parenting. Both programs are free and voluntary. For more information at Langley Air Force Base, call 7642427; at Ft. Eustis, call 878-0807.


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

APRIL 13, 2012

THERE IS NO BETTER TIME TO GET YOUR REAL ESTATE LICENSE THAN RIGHT NOW! Why? The housing market is starting to climb and we just reduced our Pre-Licensing Course to $199* We offer: ✔ Convenient classroom locations in Virginia Beach, Newport News & Williamsburg. ✔ Faculty members who have “real world” real estate experience.

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Photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Hawkins

Jonathan Butner, assistant manager of the Department of MotorVehicles Richmond mobile unit, assists U.S. Army Sgt. Hilton Hunter, a Soldier assigned to Fort Eustis’ Warrior Transition Unit, in renewing his motorcycle registration inside the DMV 2 Go at Fort Eustis, April 10.The office-on-wheels is equipped to process all DMV transactions, such as applying for or renewing your driver's license and ordering disabled parking placards or plates.

9LUJLQLD '09 EULQJV VHUYLFHV WR 6ROGLHUV ZLWK '09  *R XQLWV By Staff Sgt. Ashley Hawkins 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

The Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles is reaching out to Fort Eustis personnel through their innovative DMV 2 Go, a mobile customer service center that provides DMV services at convenient locations. The office-on-wheels is handicappedaccessible and equipped to process all DMV transactions, such as applying for or renewing driver’s licenses, ordering disabled parking placards or plates and ordering driving records. For many military personnel, particularly those transferring to Fort Eustis from other states, the mobile offices provide ease of access to important licensing and administrative functions right on the installation, preventing Soldiers from taking time away from the mission. “It provides a way of DMV needs to reach out to people,” said Jonathan Butner, assistant manager of the Richmond DMV mobile unit. “We reach out to the service members of the military. It’s a way of taking pressure off the DMV office, bringing DMV service to the locations that are helping the public.”

The DMV 2 Go office-on-wheels is handicapped-accessible and equipped to process all DMV transactions, such as applying for or renewing driver’s licenses, ordering disabled parking placards or plates and ordering driving records.

In addition to military bases, DMV 2 Go visits businesses, university and college campuses, assisted living facilities and retirement communities. The department uses mobile units in the Northern Virginia, Richmond, Tidewater and Roanoke areas, with a fifth visiting small town offices that only handle vehicle transactions. While each vehicle stays on location for one day at a time, the mobile unit will stay in the area throughout the week. The DMV 2 Go’s customer service hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, visit dmvnow.com, click on “Resources,” then “DMV 2 Go.”


APRIL 13, 2012

â&#x20AC;˘ The Peninsula Warrior - Army

â&#x20AC;˘

www.peninsulawarrior.com

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)RUW (XVWLV FKDSODLQV UHFRJQL]H Âľ5HVXUUHFWLRQ 6XQGD\Âś By Staff Sgt. Ashley Hawkins 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The gospel without resurrection is powerless. If Christ didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t rise, the gospel would be invalid, if he had not risen, the gospel would be meaningless.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chap. (Col.) Kenneth Bush (right) 633rd Air Base Wing deputy chaplain

valid, if he had not risen, the gospel would be meaningless.â&#x20AC;? After the Easter message, the U.S. Army Training Doctrine and Command brass quintet performed while the crowd sang hymns, and the benediction was given. Military personnel, dependents and civilians who attended the service enjoyed not only the message, but also the atmosphere. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I enjoyed the service immensely. It was exhilarating to hear the message that can carry you throughout the week,â&#x20AC;? said Thell Jackson-Earls, a RMC chaplain. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The surprise was it

was outdoors, and it was such a blessing to see the sun actually rise.â&#x20AC;? According to Chap. (Lt. Col.) Joseph Ko, 633rd ABW deputy operations chaplain, the traditional service dates back to 1732, when Christians held a sunrise service to celebrate at the time followers of Jesus witnessed the empty tomb and met the risen Lord very early on the ďŹ rst day of the week, just after sunrise. Today, believers continue the tradition worldwide to worship and celebrate the risen Lord Jesus at sunrise services every year on the Resurrection Sunday.

Photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Hawkins

U.S. Army Chaplains from various units hosted an Easter Sunrise Service at the Fort Eustis Regimental Memorial Chapel in the early morning, March 8. The event celebrated the Easter holiday and the resurrection of Christ. The service was timed so attendees could see the sun rise as the service progressed. The chaplains began their Easter morning with a welcome from Capt. Lisa Williamson, 53rd Transportation Battalion chaplain. Staff Sgt. Guillermo Bellver, 633rd Air Base Wing Chapel religious support operations NCOIC, read a scripture from 1 Corinthians 15:1-11. Chap. (Col.) Kenneth Bush, 633rd ABW deputy chaplain, delivered a sermon about the resurrection of Christ. Bush spoke on the subject of the preachings of Paul, a disciple of Jesus. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The gospel without resurrection is powerless,â&#x20AC;? he preached. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If Christ didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t rise, the gospel would be in-

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

The Virginian-Pilot invites you to

CareerConnection’s

SPRING CAREER DAY Wednesday April 25th 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Constant Convocation Center 4320 Hampton Blvd., Norfolk, Virginia Meet face-to-face with representatives from Hampton Roads top companies as CareerConnection presents great opportunities with this career event. Polish up that resume and don’t miss this chance to give your career the boost it deserves!

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APRIL 13, 2012

HealthCare

0HW/LIH WR EHFRPH GHQWDO FDUULHU IRU 75,&$5( 'HQWDO 3URJUDP Effective May 1, 2012, MetLife will become the dental carrier for the TRICARE Dental Program (TDP). MetLife will begin providing dental coverage to over 2 million family members of uniformed service active duty personnel, members of the Selected Reserve and Individual Ready Reserve, their eligible family members, and Survivors. Beneficiaries will have access to MetLife’s network with over 164,000 providers, and this number continues to grow. Additional information about the contract is available at www.tricare.mil/TDPcontract and benefit updates are available at www.tricare.mil. Please note that the change to MetLife is for the TDP program only. The Active Duty Dental Program will still be administered by United Concordia and the Retiree Dental Program will still be administered by Delta Dental of California. All current TDP enrollees are being notified about the transition to MetLife and will receive a welcome packet with a new TRICARE Dental Program Benefit Booklet in March 2012. To avoid a potential break in coverage, beneficiaries should contact MetLife to reauthorize their recurring premium payments between now and April 20, 2012. If you pay premiums by automatic deduction from your military payroll account, you do not have to take any action. You can contact MetLife by: ■ Calling MetLife Customer Service at 1-855-638-8371 ■ Completing the Credit Card/EFT Authorization at http://www.tricare.mil/TDPcontract/CreditCardEFT.pdf and mail it to MetLife at the following address: MetLife TRICARE Dental Program Enrollment and Billing Services P.O. Box 14185 Lexington, KY 40512 Changes to the TDP will include enhanced dental coverage at a lower premium share than before. MetLife will distribute program information, provider

network details beginning in first quarter 2012. Highlights to the benefits and enhancements are listed below: ■ Coverage of posterior resin (tooth colored/white) fillings ■ Increase in the annual maximum to $1,300 per enrollee (formerly this was $1,200) ■ Increase in the lifetime orthodontic maximum to $1,750 ■ $1,200 per year for services related to dental treatment due to an accident as defined in the TDP handbook ■ No cost shares for scaling and root planing (deep cleaning) for diabetics ■ Coverage of an additional (3rd) cleaning for women during pregnancy ■ Expansion of the survivor benefits to surviving spouse and child(ren) If you would like to check if your dentist is already part of the MetLife network, please go to https://mybenefits.metlife. com/tricare and click "Find a Dentist" on the right and search for a DPPO provider. If the dentist is not a member, dentists can easily request an application on our website for dentists, http://www.metdental. com/. Please note, claims will continue to be processed as they are now and changes in the mailing address, claims processing, etc. will be provided in early 2012. The TDP plan year will be from May 1, 2012 to April 30, 2013 when MetLife assumes the program. MetLife customer service numbers and the new website for the TRICARE Dental Program are operational. ■ CONUS Service Area: 1-855-638-8371 ■ OCONUS Service Area: 1-855-638-8372 ■ TDD/TTY: 1-855-638-8373 ■ https://mybenefits.metlife.com/tricare

Check us out online at www.peninsulawarrior.com


APRIL 13, 2012

â&#x20AC;˘ The Peninsula Warrior - Army

Early retirement offered to select enlisted Airmen Air Force ofďŹ cials announced an application window for targeted early retirements for enlisted Airmen. Eligible Airmen will have 15-19 years of service in ďŹ scal 2012 and be in the grades of staff sergeant through master sergeant in overmanned career ďŹ elds. The Temporary Early Retirement Authority application window will be open April 10-30 in order to shape the force to meet current and future mission requirements. Approvals will occur after the application window is closed. Approximately 250 Airmen will be approved under TERA based on grade, years of service, eligible Air Force specialty code, and other objective criteria based on the needs of the Air Force. Those who apply and are approved for early retirement will have a Sept. 1 retirement date. Airmen approved for TERA will have their retired pay reduced by 1/12th of 1 percent for each full month by which the number of months of active service are less than 240 as of the date of the member's retirement. The Air Force Personnel Center's ďŹ scal 2012 enlisted TERA program page, located at https://gum-crm. csd.disa.mil/app/answers/detail/a_ id/21836, will contain additional information on retirement eligibility.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;As we continue to size and shape our force, we must have the right balance of skills to meet Air Force missions,â&#x20AC;? said Maj. Gen. Sharon Dunbar, the director of Force Management Policy, Deputy Chief of Staff for Manpower, Personnel and Services, Headquarters U. S. Air Force. â&#x20AC;&#x153;TERA allows us to use a voluntary program to shape the force where we have overages in Air Force specialties.â&#x20AC;? The Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve do not plan on conducting force management actions in ďŹ scal 2012. However, all components are working together to ensure the total force is prepared for manpower reductions in ďŹ scal 2013.

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â&#x20AC;˘ The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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APRIL 13, 2012

APRIL 13, 2012

â&#x20AC;˘ The Peninsula Warrior - Army

â&#x20AC;˘

www.peninsulawarrior.com

/DQJOH\ KRVWV .UDY 0DJD WUDLQLQJ IRU PLOLWDUU\ FLYLOLDQ SROLFH RIÂżFHUV By Senior Airman Jason J. Brown 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Photos by Airman 1st Class Teresa Cleveland

U.S. Marine Corps Capt. Ronald Blaze (left), Norfolk Naval Station Security Forces Unit executive ofďŹ cer, warms up with U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Corie Flores (right), 633rd Security Forces Squadron patrolman, during a Krav Maga course at Langley Air Force Base, April 7. During the course students are taught to respond to attacks in the quickest and most efďŹ cient way.

Flores (right) practices taking a weapon away from Marvin Smith, left, Department of the Air Force police ofďŹ cer. Students learn to defend themselves against a variety of potential attacks.

More than 20 military and civilian po olice ofďŹ cers from the Hampton Roads com mmunity participated in a Krav Maga train ning course at Langley Air Force Base, Va., A April 2-8. The class, held in the base static disp play hangar, trained participants in the arrt of Krav Maga, a form of noncompetitive selfdefense focusing on striking, wrestling and grappling techniques. Krav Maga was created in the late 1930s by Imre Lichtenfeld, an Israeli martial artist who developed the practice to defend d his Jewish neighborhood against anti-Sem mitic gang violence in Bratislava. Currently, a all Is-

raeli soldiers, including Special Forces units, learn Krav Maga as part of their basic military training. U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Corie Flores, a 633rd Security Forces Squadron patrolman, said the training gave students an advantage in close-quarters combat situations against untrained or under-trained enemies. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It (provides) a lot of practical applications for law enforcement and troops deployed downrange,â&#x20AC;? Flores said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(The training) is very natural and free ďŹ&#x201A;owing. If thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do right, you can keep going and still accomplish the end result rather than over think the maneuvers.â&#x20AC;? According to Flores, the students can take the skills back to their units and train other service members in the art, as all graduates

of the 7-day course are qualiďŹ ed to instruct Krav Maga at a basic level. U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Cody Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill, assigned to the Marine Corps Security Force Regiment in Norfolk, highlighted Krav Magaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s emphasis on hand-to-hand combat, which he said can be a critical skill set in urban combat environments often encountered during deployments. U.S. Army Spc. Korvin Jameson, assigned to Fort Eustisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 221st Military Police Detachment, echoed Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sentiments. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This will help us most in combat situations. Say for instance you go into a house and you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on, then someone comes at you tries to stab you,â&#x20AC;? he explained. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Krav Maga) keeps you quick on your feet and ready.â&#x20AC;?

Flores (left) and Senior Airman Webster Gadison, 633rd Security Forces Squadron patrolmen, practice Krav Maga during the 7-day joint forces course. Krav Maga is a noncompetitive eclectic self-defense system developed in Israel that involves striking techniques, wrestling and grappling.

17


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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Total Force Integration allows us to leverage Air Reserve Component experience, improve access to aircraft, encourage retention, and increase total force effectiveness,â&#x20AC;? said Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Norton Schwartz during opening remarks at the 18th Air Force TFI Summit at Joint Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility Washington, Md., April 3-4. The two-day summit brought together more than 100 enlisted and ofďŹ cer leaders from the Total Force to discuss ways of improving the effectiveness and efďŹ ciency of active duty and ARC associate units through increased integration. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are all Airmen,â&#x20AC;? said Lt. Gen. Mark Ramsay, 18th Air Force commander and the eventâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s host. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our goal here is to tackle issues that will make our Air Force even better. Nothing we will discuss is easy, but we are here to address those issues that affect our ability to remain a superb Air Force. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The key is that we have meaningful dialogue to put key issues on the table for resolution.â&#x20AC;? Built on three models â&#x20AC;&#x201C; classic associate, active associate, and ARC associate â&#x20AC;&#x201C; TFI enhances the Air Forceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to conduct its mission through the sharing of resources between active duty and ARC components, including aircraft, crews, maintenance, and support. In the classic associate model, an active duty unit retains principal responsibility for a weapon system which it shares with one or more ARC units. In the active asso-

ciate model, an ARC unit has that responsibility. In an ARC associate model, one ARC component has responsibility for the system that it shares with another ARC unit. Among the issues which underpinned discussion at the summit were the challenges of shifting operational focus to align with the Defense Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new strategic guidance, and the effects of increasingly constrained budgets and reduced force structure. Ramsay said that in an environment where â&#x20AC;&#x153;we will have more capability but less capacity,â&#x20AC;? TFI is foundational to ensuring the Air Force continues to become even more efďŹ cient and effective. That point was echoed by many of the Air Mobility Command and Air Staff briefers at the summit, who discussed a variety of subjects including services transformation, Air and Space Expeditionary Force Next, rating chain and personnel issues, unit inspections, and Title 10/32 issues. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[TFI] associations have grown from something unique to the way we have to operate for the future,â&#x20AC;? said Lt. Gen. Christopher Miller, the Air Forceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Deputy Chief of Staff for Strategic Plans and Programs, and one of the summit briefers. Schwartz said he saw the summit as providing attendees the opportunity for extensive, face-to-face interaction with peers, where they could share ideas from varying perspectives. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We do not always agree in complete unanimity,â&#x20AC;? Schwartz said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But I believe that different viewpoints ultimately strengthen us, as long as we stay focused on our common goal of a ready and viable total force.â&#x20AC;?


APRIL 13, 2012

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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Civilian AMSC instructor named TRADOC’s best By Melissa Bower FORT LEAVENWORTH LAMP

Erika Brooks is the first member of the Army Management Staff College faculty to receive “Civilian Educator of the Year” award for Training and Doctrine Command. Brooks, who teaches the Civilian Education System Basic Course at Fort Leavenworth’s AMSC campus, won the award for fiscal year 2011 against other nominated educators from across TRADOC – including the Command and General Staff College, the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy and the many other TRADOC centers and schools. Bob Kiser, director of the Basic Course, nominated Brooks and said her award was well deserved. Brooks also was named “Educator of the Year” for AMSC. “She’s just outstanding,” Kiser said. “Her repertoire with students is just excellent. Her classroom demeanor and presence is what led me to nominate her. I just thought that this is one of the best instructors I’ve seen and I’ve been here for 10 years.” The Basic Course is a Department of the Army civilian’s first resident education experience in the Civilian Education System. Kiser said the course lays the foundation for the students’ ability to understand complex and ill-structured problems. Kiser said the leadership development and education taught in the course is designed to encourage students to become lifelong learners. He said the AMSC course has been called a “bright spot” among TRADOC course offerings for its student-centered method of instruction. It’s also the first time some of the civilian students learn about leadership, Kiser said, and take a look into their interpersonal skills, which can be an emotional lesson for some people. Kiser said it’s difficult for some leaders and managers to hear that they don’t treat others kindly. “We’re teaching people how to treat people, and sometimes that can be difficult … we sort of expose that part of them in our class, we ask them to reflect on how they treat people,” Kiser said. “A lot of people just don’t know they’re doing it, and it all comes to them right here. There’s tears and emotions, and Erika handles that because she’s just a good person.” Brooks has taught at AMSC since 2005. She had no military background, but had a

25o years later, freedom is still worth fighting for. The next time you need a little inspiration, bring your family and experience Colonial Williamsburg. For it is here, as much as anywhere, that America was born. So come see firsthand the passion of our Nation Builders. Relive the proclamation of the Declaration of Independence from the courthouse steps. Come witness the spark that ignited a revolution. You just might come away with a whole new appreciation for the country you hold so dear. Photo by Prudence Siebert

Army Management Staff College’s Educator of theYear Erika Brooks.

career as a chemical engineer. Brooks said she had some experience in teaching and training adults as part of her previous career. She also has a master’s degree in industrial organizational psychology. She came to Fort Leavenworth for a temporary assignment, and when that ended, a position became available to her at what is now the Army Management Staff College. Brooks said her philosophy of teaching is the student-led, learner-centric environment mirrored in the Army Learning Concept 2015. Brooks said she wants to create a place where people feel comfortable to engage in discussions and find real-life applications. “I definitely see myself more of a facilitator than an instructor. I’d rather be the person not just issuing information to the participant students, but I’m the one using open-ended questions and incorporating real-life applications.” Brooks said she wants her students to be able to affect the people around them in a positive way, both by taking care of those people and getting the mission done. “Truly, I really just want them to go be better leaders for the Army,” she said. “The Army has been wonderful to me. I am surrounded by leaders who are products of their military experience, time and education. We work as a team and really try to help one another out, both inside and outside the classroom. We have inherited a tradition here at Fort Leavenworth of really being like a family and it inspires me to do the very best I can.”

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

APRIL 13, 2012

6HQLRU OHDGHUV KRQRU 0LOLWDU\ &KLOGUHQ RI WKH <HDU By Elaine Sanchez AMERICAN FORCES PRESS SERVICE

From a 9-year-old blogger to a 17-yearold community-service volunteer, children from military families took center stage here last night during Operation Homefront’s 2012 Military Child of the Year awards gala. The military’s top brass heaped praise on five of these children – one from each service plus the Coast Guard – for their resilience, strength of character and leadership. Operation Homefront, a nonprofit organization that provides emergency assistance to military families, annually gives the award to a child from each service to honor military kids’ service and sacrifice. These children are the “best of the best,” Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey told an audience of military and family members. Joining the chairman was his wife, Deanie, top military leaders from each service, and special guest speaker, Medal of Honor recipient Army Sgt. 1st

Class Sammy L. Davis. “If I had to be identified as the best of the best among any group in America today, I’d actually like to be known as the best of the best among military kids,” Dempsey told the audience, “because of what we ask them to do, and what they do.” The honorees included a 9-year-old who started a blog to support other children dealing with deployment to a 17-year-old who dealt with her Army father’s illness, then the loss of her soldier brother in Afghanistan. Though people have said military children are tough and resilient despite their hardships, the chairman said, he takes an opposite view. “I think that our military kids are who they are because of the hardships,” he said, citing their adaptability, strength and ability to embrace diversity. “Kids become who they are because of what we ask them to do and because of what they see us do [and] see their moms and dads do.” These children are the nation’s future

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leaders, Dempsey noted. He said Nathaniel Richards, the Navy’s Military Child of the Year, put it best when he wrote this on his blog site: “Even though we are young, we still have great ideas. We can help. We can make a difference.” Dempsey thanked Operation Homefront for its efforts to honor military children. “Let me tell you how proud we are of America’s military kids,” he said. “And let me tell you how very proud we are of the five that have been identified tonight as the best of the best.” Following Dempsey’s remarks, senior service leaders presented the awards to their service’s honoree – first citing their exceptional qualities and accomplishments and passing on their personal gratitude for their service and strength. Gen. Lloyd J. Austin III, the Army’s vice chief of staff, acknowledged military children’s challenges, particularly after a decade of war. Yet, he said, “it is remarkable to see these young people routinely rise to the challenges of military life and excel under what are very

difficult circumstances.” Through their unyielding support, military children increase not only their military parents’ strength, but also their resilience, Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Norton A. Schwartz added. Amelia McConnell, the Army’s Military Child of the Year, said she was “honored and humbled” by the honor and the opportunity to represent thousands of other military children. “I love being a military kid,” she said with a smile. Each award recipient will receive $5,000 from Operation Homefront, along with additional gifts from nonprofit organizations such as Soldiers’ Angels and Veterans United Foundation. Jim Knotts, Operation Homefront’s president and CEO, called the honorees examples for thousands of other military children. “I know you will all do us proud,” he told them. A committee of active duty service members, family readiness support assistants, teachers, military mothers and community members selected the children from a pool of more than 1,000 nominees.

The recipients of this year’s Military Child of the Year award are: ■ James Nathaniel Richards, of Jamul, Calif., for the Navy. This 9-year-old’s three brothers and father all were deployed at the same time. To share his lessons learned, he started a blog for other military children called “Nate the Great: A Military Brat.” He leads the antibullying committee at his school and volunteers at the USO -- clocking more than 200 hours last year collecting Christmas toys for children in need and wrapping hundreds of stockings to send to troops in Afghanistan. ■ Amelia McConnell, of Carlisle Barracks, Pa., for the Army. At 17, McConnell is the youngest of six children. She’s moved with her family nine times, and her father has deployed three times. In 2006, after her father returned from Iraq, he was diagnosed with leukemia. After six months of treatments, the disease appeared to be in remission. He returned to Iraq in 2007. Two years later, her only brother, Army Sgt. Andrew McConnell, was killed in Afghanistan. A year later, her father deployed to Afghanistan shortly after the family moved to Pennsylvania from overseas. While helping her mother at home, McConnell also served as the vice president as the National Art Honor Society, and she is a member of the Germany National Honor Society. ■ Chelsea Rutherford, 17, of Panama City, Fla., for the Air Force. She has two parents in the military and has attended five different schools. Still, she’s an honor roll student with a 3.6 grade point average and serves as the vice president of the Student-to-Student Club, which introduces

new students to the campus and helps to ease their transition. She’s also an avid volunteer who clocked nearly 180 hours with nonprofit organizations in 2011, and is a member in the Society of Leadership and Success and the National Society of High School Scholars. ■ Erika Booth, 16, of Jacksonville, N.C., for the Marine Corps. She was an avid softball player until she was diagnosed with lupus, an autoimmune disease that affects her blood and requires painful monthly kidney checks. While dealing with her own health issues, Booth also helps to care for her 13-year-old brother, who has autism. Despite these challenges, Booth is ranked first in her class academically, serves as the junior class president and vice president of her local Health Occupations Students of America chapter, and volunteers as a mentor with the Drug Education for Youth program. She also works with other military children and adults to help them cope with the challenges of military life, and has traveled abroad with the People to People Ambassador Program. ■ Alena Deveau, 17, of Fairfax, Va., for the Coast Guard. She has visited 40 states during her father’s career. When she was in the seventh grade, Deveau’s father was diagnosed with lung cancer, followed by hip cancer. He underwent multiple surgeries before being diagnosed with brain cancer. Her father, who now is medically retired, was hospitalized for nearly three months. Deveau’s mother spent her time by her husband’s bedside, and Deveau held up the home front, helping to care for her 15-yearold sister. Still, she found time to volunteer as an organizer of the local Veterans Day dinner.


APRIL 13, 2012

â&#x20AC;˘ The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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A FANTASTIC FREE EVENT FOR ALL AGES!

Saturday, April 21 10am-5pm I Mill Point Park

U.S. Army graphic

Three different concepts for the next-generation vertical-lift aircraft are among those being developed under the Joint Multi-Role program.

)XWXUH YHUWLFDO OLIW DLUFUDIW IDVWHU KDV VPDOOHU IRRWSULQW By C. Todd Lopez ARMY NEWS SERVICE

The Armyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s aircraft of the future will be faster than what the service has now, it will carry more weight, it will require less of a logistical footprint, and ofďŹ cials said it will better do what Army aviation is meant to do: serve the ground commander. While what is now being called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Future Vertical Lift,â&#x20AC;? or FVL, by the Army is still a concept, its capabilities are already known. The FVL concept will be â&#x20AC;&#x153;able to support the Army and the ground commanders better than we can do it today,â&#x20AC;? said Maj. Gen. Anthony G. CrutchďŹ eld, commander, U.S. Army Aviation Center of Excellence.â&#x20AC;? I see this aircraft being able to do all the missions that we currently do. I see the aircraft that can do it because it can be scaled. It may be a medium variant, something that is the size of maybe a Black Hawk or an Apache is today, that can do the attack mission, or the assault/ lift mission. I see the same aircraft scaled smaller that will be able to do the reconnaissance mission, similar to what a Kiowa Warrior does today.â&#x20AC;? CrutchďŹ eld said itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not known if the FVL concept will end up producing a rotary-wing aircraft, like the Army AH-64 Apache, or a tilt-rotor aircraft like the Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey. What the FVL will do is perform missions the Army does today with its aviation assets, missions that will not change. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The vision is that we can have an aircraft that can do all the missions that we

currently have,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our missions will not change. We still will do attack and reconnaissance, we still will do sustainment and troop movements. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an enduring mission that will not change. I just want to do it better.â&#x20AC;? The FVL aircraft will perform multiple roles, CrutchďŹ eld said, and that means that the end result is that there will be fewer types of aircraft in the Armyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ&#x201A;eet. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also possible that there will be fewer aircraft overall, because a more capable aircraft means that fewer aircraft will be needed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Today there are concepts where there are aircraft that we consider rotary wing, that can ďŹ&#x201A;y in excess of 300 knots,â&#x20AC;? CrutchďŹ eld said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No other aircraft we have today can ďŹ&#x201A;y 300 knots. If you have an aircraft that can ďŹ&#x201A;y 300 knots, it can cover more terrain faster, and if you can cover more terrain faster, theoretically, you would need less airframes to do the same type mission.â&#x20AC;? And because CrutchďŹ eld said the idea behind the FVL concept is to have the same aircraft be able to perform multiple missions, the Army will need fewer types of aircraft. That means a smaller number of parts will be needed to sustain the ďŹ&#x201A;eet, and a shared pool of maintainers and maintenance equipment. That will result in a reduced cost for logistics. CrutchďŹ eld said that the FVL could come in different sizes, depending on the mission it will perform, but things like engine, drive train, and cockpit components would be the same, common between the two, and swappable.

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FOR MORE INFORMATION: www.hampton.gov/parks 727-8311


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

APRIL 13, 2012

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U.S Army photo

Maj. Gen. Stephen J. Bowes, commander of Land Force Doctrine and Training Systems, Canada, meets with Gen. Robert W. Cone, commanding general of U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, as they exchange coins during Bowes' visit to TRADOC headquarters at Fort Eustis, April 3.

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APRIL 13, 2012

â&#x20AC;˘ The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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-%/( ELNHUV ULGH RXW VSHDN RXW DJDLQVW VH[XDO DVVDXOW By Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

On a cool Friday morning, the sound of more than 20 motorcycles starting their engines ďŹ ll the air around the Langley Air Force Base Community Center parking lot. This is not merely a day off for these bikers. Some have daughters they want to protect, while some may have a painful history with the issue. Others simply respect their fellow Airmen and want to show they care. This ride of solidarity is one to promote sexual assault awareness.

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, and motorcycle enthusiast Angie Woods, a Langley AFB Sexual Assault Prevention Readiness trainer, planned an event April 6 for those who have a yearning for the wind on their face. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love riding motorcycles,â&#x20AC;? said Woods. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wanted to bring awareness to a diverse group of people.â&#x20AC;? While the thrill of the ride is fun, the message is most important, said Woods. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Sexual assault is) not just happening on base,â&#x20AC;? said Woods. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So be a good wingman. We canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford to lose an Airman.â&#x20AC;? To accentuate the importance of sexual assault awareness, U.S. Army Col. Reggie Austin, 633rd Air Base Wing vice commander, made an appearance and shared his insight at the event. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to reiterate that we all need to be cognizant of the impact to the individual families and community when some-

one is sexually assaulted,â&#x20AC;? Austin said. An advocate for sexual assault awareness, Austin said he plans participate in a variety of the baseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SAAM events, including in the Walk a Mile in Her Shoes later this month, where men don ladiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; shoes for a walk to impart the signiďŹ cance of battling sexual assault and abuse. Prior to the ride-out, a few riders shared their insight on why they chose to join the event. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I get to ride for something,â&#x20AC;? said Staff Sgt. Toron Hines, a 1st Maintenance Squadron fuel systems technician. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I do it for the esprit de corps as well.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m doing it to promote awareness,â&#x20AC;? said Master Sgt. Nakisha Turner-Brown, an Air Combat Command Communication Support Squadron section chief. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sexual assault affects all.â&#x20AC;? The bikers took a scenic route to the James River ferry and back, totaling 80 miles.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The ride-out itself went better than expected,â&#x20AC;? said Master Sgt. Robert Mediavilla, the 633rd Medical Group ďŹ rst sergeant and lead road captain for the event. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Overall, it was a big success.â&#x20AC;? Mediavilla said he was motivated to participate by the thought of his 3-yearold daughter and how detrimental sexual assault is to the mission. Just as important to the promoting the message of protecting others from sexual assault was the emphasis on motorcycle safety. Senior Airman Andrew Hill, an ACC CSS support technician ensured riders wore appropriate protective gear, practiced safe riding techniques and made corrections when appropriate. Woods said she plans on making the ride-out an annual event. She thinks if the chilly weather didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t deter riders, it is very probable to get even more riders out next year.

Photos by Senior Airman John D. Strong II

ABOVE: U.S. Army Col. Reggie Austin, 633rd Air Base Wing vice commander, speaks to motorcycle riders before the Sexual Assault Prevention Response Awareness Month road rally April 6 at the Langley Air Force Base Community Activity Center. The rally was held to raise awareness about sexual assault prevention. LEFT:Two motorcyclists drive out during the rally. More than 20 members of the Joint Base Langley-Eustis community participated in the event.


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APRIL 13, 2012

0HGLFDO &RPSDQ\ 0F'RQDOG $UP\ +HDOWK &HQWHU H[SHULHQFHV FKDQJH RI FRPPDQG

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www.cambridgecollege.edu/accomplish â&#x20AC;˘ ď&#x2122;&#x20AC;ď&#x2DC;˝ď&#x2DC;˝.ď&#x2122; ď&#x2122; ď&#x2DC;ş.ď&#x2DC;şď&#x2DC;žď&#x2DC;şď&#x2DC;ż x ď&#x2DC;žď&#x2DC;şď&#x2DC;šď&#x2DC;ş Cambridge College is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC) and is certiďŹ ed to operate by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV) . Applicants are responsible for reading the academic catalog and getting all the information needed to make informed decisions.

Photo by Marlon Martin

U.S. Army Capt. Ross V. Montfort, left, assumed command of Medical Company, McDonald Army Health Center, in a change of command ceremony at Fort Eustis, March 30. Montfort, a native of the Washington D.C., replaced Capt. Nykeba L. Jackson as the company commander.

Fort Eustis has two Installation Status hotline numbers up and running: 878-6181 and 878-6182


APRIL 13, 2012

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

www.peninsulawarrior.com

FLETA grants accreditation to Air Force security forces officer, enlisted courses The Federal Law Enforcement TrainingAccreditation Board granted initial program accreditation status to the 343rd Training Squadron’s Security Forces Basic Officer and Apprentice Courses at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland recently. Air Force Director of Security Forces Brig. Gen. James McMillian said, “This has been a long time coming for our career field to be recognized and accepted as professional federal training programs. The 343rd is one of only 24 federal agencies nationwide to join the prestigious ranks of FLETA which includes the FBI Agent Training Program, U.S. Secret Service Special Agent Training, and the U.S. Marshals Deputy Training Program to name a few.” FLETAis an independent accreditation process that gives law enforcement training agencies the opportunity to demonstrate their adherence to an established set of professional standards. The goal of accreditation is to improve training quality and support organizational and operational success. To accomplish this goal, trainers in the same discipline, working through a professional accrediting body, assist each other in evaluating and improving their professionalism. The overall accreditation provides assurance to community citizens that local law enforcement agencies have voluntarily submitted to a process of self-regulation, and have successfully achieved compliance standards. To achieve accreditation, the 343rd TRS had to submit to an independent review of its training programs to ensure compliance with FLETA’s standards and procedures in the areas of

Photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Hawkins

Members of the 633rd Security Forces Squadron salute the flag during the Police Officers' Memorial ceremony at Langley Air Force Base, May 16, 2011.The Federal Law EnforcementTraining Accreditation Board granted initial program accreditation status to the 343rdTraining Squadron's Security Forces Basic Officer and Apprentice Courses at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland recently.

program administration, training staff, training development and training delivery. The officer and apprentice courses were assessed in December 2011 as two FLETA teams took a detailed look at the courses. After successfully completing the process with no deficiencies or suggested areas for improvement, squadron officials presented attributes of the courses to the FLETA board, which met in Hilton Head March 21. Lt. Col. Chris Echols, 343rd TRS command-

er, led a team of three in the presentation to the board. Echols emphasized the security forces mission to “Protect, Defend and Fight to enable Air Force, Joint and Coalition Missions.” He also described the magnitude of responsibility the 343rd TRS has in producing more than 5,000 graduates annually between the two accreditation candidate courses. The FLETA board voted unanimously to welcome the Security Forces Basic Officer and Apprentice Courses into the FLETA community.

25

FLETA is an independent accreditation process that gives law enforcement training agencies the opportunity to demonstrate their adherence to an established set of professional standards. The goal of accreditation is to improve training quality and support organizational and operational success. To accomplish this goal, trainers in the same discipline, working through a professional accrediting body, assist each other in evaluating and improving their professionalism.


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

EustisCommunity Summary Court Officer Maj. Matthew Ruff, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, Norfolk, is detailed as the summary court officer to secure and make proper disposition of the personal effects of Staff Sgt. Dectrick Beverly. Anyone having knowledge of money or property due to the deceased or claims against the deceased estate, contact Maj. Ruff at (757) 604-4448.

Earth Day events

30 percent off select golf clubs. Take advantage of bundle packages that include free golf; members will receive an additional 10 percent off all sale merchandise. ■ Get Golf Ready – Join the Get Golf Ready Program and be ready to play in 5 days. The Pines offers classes all year for beginners, families, ladies, and advanced golfers. The cost is $99. For more information, call 878-2252.

Family Advocacy Program

Home buying and selling seminars

The Soldier and Family Readiness Center is hosting a Resume Writing Workshop on April 20 from 9 a.m. to noon in Bldg. 650, Monroe Ave. Come and create or transform your resume to make the most of your work experience, learn relevant strategies, select proper formats and overcome gaps. The workshop is free and open to the military community. To register, call 878-3638/3042.

Pre-retirement briefing The 733rd Force Support Division Retirement Services Office will host a Pre-retirement Briefing on Wednesday from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Lakeside Sports Bar, Bldg. 828, Kells Dr. Information will be provided by Retirement Services, Finance, Housing,Transportation, Army Career and Alumni Program, TRICARE, Veterans Administration and more. To register, call 878-3648 or 878-2227.

Pines Golf Course ■ Golf Shop Sale – Celebrate spring during the Golf Shop Sale on Wednesday. Enjoy 15 percent off all golf shirts and bags and

APRIL 13, 2012

Submit Eustis Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com

Earth Day, April 22, is a time to celebrate gains that we have made and to create new visions to accelerate environmental progress. The community is invited to take action and join us in the following Earth Day volunteer events taking place on Joint Base Langley-Eustis: ■ Monday – Storm Drain Medallion Installation (throughout post), 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. and Nature Trail Clean-up, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. ■ Tuesday – Retention Pond Plantings (Bldg. 887), 9 to 11 a.m. ■ Thursday – BoxTurtle Survey (Training Areas 1 and 2), 9 to 11:30 a.m. ■ April 20 – Warwick Pier Restoration, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. For more information, call 878-4123, ext. 227 or 308.

The Fort Eustis Housing Referral Office will sponsor a Home Buying Seminar on Tuesday, 6 to 8:30 p.m., and a Home Selling Seminar on Thursday, 6 to 8:30 p.m. Both seminars will take place at the Civil Engineer Division conference room in Bldg. 1407, Washington Blvd. They are free and open to the public. Industry experts will include a realtor, mortgage lender, attorney and home inspector. Please RSVP at least 3 business days prior to attending the seminar of your choice. To register, call 878-2977/5687/5579.

■ The Family Advocacy Safety Education Seminar is a 90-minute seminar that describes the dynamics of domestic violence and child abuse, who is at risk and what resources are available. The seminar takes place Thursday from 9 to 10:30 a.m. at Bldg. 213, Calhoun St. FASES is open to anyone on post who is interested in learning more about these topics. Register by calling 878-0807. No children please. ■ “Raising Resilient Children” is scheduled for April 23 from 10 to 11 a.m. Learn tips on how to keep your children safe from predators and bullies during the “Children and Internet Safety” class April 27 from 9 to 10 a.m. Both classes will be in Bldg. 213, Calhoun St. To register, call 878-0807.

Resume writing workshop

Water Safety Day The Fort Eustis Aquatic Center will host Water Safety Day on April 21 from 2:30 to 5 p.m. at Bldg. 641, Tyler Ave. Water safety stations will be available to increase public awareness about aquatic safety techniques and drowning prevention. This event will also feature classroom and pool activities. Admission is free for all CAC holders. For more information, call 878-1090.

Army technology exhibit The Fort Eustis community is invited to attend the GovTech: Army Technology Exhibit on April 27 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Fort Eustis Club. More than 40 high-tech organizations from across the U.S. and Canada will be exhibiting and demonstrating their latest products and services at this free event. For more information, call 878-5700.

5K run/walk and 10K run The Spouses’ Club of Fort Eustis is sponsoring a 5K Run/Walk and 10K Run on April 28 at 8 a.m. to benefit local Wounded Warriors. This event will begin in the Anderson Field House area and continue around Fort Eustis and the James River (10K only). The course is flat and very scenic. Registrations received through April 27 are $25 (5K run/walk); $30 (10K run); and $50 (both). Race day registrations are $30 (5K run/ walk); $35 (10K run); and $55 (both). Pre-registration packet pick-ups will take place April 27 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. at Anderson Field House, Bldg. 643, Dickman St. Register online at www.active.com or download a race/walk form at www.spousesclubofforteustis.com. If you would like to volunteer, sponsor or contribute, please email spousesclubofforteustis@yahoo.com or call Dawn Stewart at 369-1994 or Kate Dunbar at (910) 257-0027.

Marriage Enrichment “Managing Pressure in Your Marriage,” a Marriage Enrichment Program, is scheduled for 6 to 8 p.m. Thursdays through May 31 at the Regimental Memorial Chapel, Bldg. 923 Lee Blvd. This program is for all married and engaged couples. Sessions will include “Making Plans and Decisions Together,” “Recognizing When and How to Relax” and “Looking Out for Each Other.” Free child watch-care will be provided for children up to age 11 years old. For more information, contact Mike and Carole Carkhuff at 218-1034 or email carkhuffs2@ verizon.net.

Range schedule Ranges, training areas and associated facilities are off limits to personnel not engaged in scheduled firing, operations or inspections unless clearance is obtained from the Range Control Fire Desk or a designated Range Control Technician. The Range Control office telephone number is 878-4412, ext. 226 or 878-3834, ext 234. The range operations schedule untilWednesday is: ■ Today – Ranges RD, 1 (7 a.m. to 10 p.m.); ■ Saturday – Ranges 5 (7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.); ■ Sunday – Ranges 2 (8 a.m. to 4 p.m.); ■ Monday – Ranges RD, 1 (7 a.m. to 10 p.m.); ■ Tuesday – Ranges RD, 1, 2, 3 (7 a.m. to 10 p.m.); ■ Wednesday, Ranges RD, 1, 2, 3 (7 a.m. to 10 p.m.). All personnel are required to check in and out with Range Control before going into or departing any training area.

JacobsTheater Schedule Friday, 7 p.m. Gone (PG-13) Jill (Amanda Seyfried) lives a quiet life, yet one marked by a severe anxiety that the man who once threw her in a ditch to die was going to come back and finish the job. When her sister, Molly (Emily Wickersham), goes missing, Jill heads to the police, but no one will listen to her, save for Detective Hood (Wes Bentley), who might or might not have his own reasons for lending a hand. As time runs out, Jill becomes more frantic and takes to desperate measures, putting the police on her trail as she tries to put an end to her nightmare once and for all. Saturday, 2 p.m. Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax (PG) The animated adventure follows the journey of a 12-yearold as he searches for a real TruffulaTree, the one thing that will enable him to win the affection of the girl of his dreams. To get it he must find the story of the Lorax, the acerbic yet charming character who fights to protect his world. Saturday, 7 p.m. Project X (R) “Project X” is an out-ofcontrol comedy that follows a group of buddies who set out to throw the most epic 17th birthday party ever. The film documents a high school party that gets completely out of control, shot from the perspective of the digital cameras that the kids have with them. Sunday, 2 p.m. No show

Movie synopsis and show time information is available online at www.shopmyexchange. com/ReelTimeTheaters/MoviesEustis.htm.


APRIL 13, 2012

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

LAFBCommunity Limited legal assistance hours Due to limited manning, an upcoming Operational Readiness Exercise and an Air Force level inspection, the Langley Law Center’s legal assistance hours through May 14 are as follows: ■ Monday – April 20: Notaries and powers of attorney ONLY: Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., for walk-in service. For faster service, pre-fill your information at https://aflegalassistance.law.af.mil. You MUST have your ticket number to retrieve the information during your visit. ■ April 23 – May 4: Notaries and powers of attorney: Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., for walk-in service. Limited attorney appointments will be available during this two-week period. To see an attorney at Langley, JBLE personnel and their dependents may call 764-3277 to make an appointment. ■ May 7–11: Notaries and powers of attorney ONLY: Limited service for personnel stationed at JBLE and their dependents. Call 764-3277 to check availability. Important Note: These hours are only for active-duty JBLE personnel and their dependents. In case of emergency or a short-notice deployment issues, call the Legal Center immediately. We apologize for any inconvenience, and appreciate your understanding and cooperation. Call 764-3277 for more information.

Summary court officer for deceased Effective April 3, 2012, Summary Court Officer 2nd Lt. Chance E. English, 1st Maintenance Group, is detailed as the Summary Court Officer to secure and make proper disposition of the personal effects of Tech. Sgt. Aaron D. Ciccocioppo. Anyone having knowledge of money or personal property due to deceased or claims against the deceased estate, contact English at 764 -2181.

Victim advocate hotline Effective immediately, the new hotline number for the JBLE Family Advocacy Program’s Victim Advocate is 637-4035. This hotline is available 24/7, providing services for adult victims of domestic violence.

Red-Tails Bowl-A-Thon The Tuskegee Airmen, Red Tails, are hosting a bowling event at Langley Lanes today from 1 to 5 p.m. in support of their annual scholarship fund and youth aviation program. Sponsors and bowlers are needed. Original Tuskegee Airmen will attend briefly.

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Submit LAFB Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com For more information, contact Capt. Jasmine Bobbitt at 225-5329.

Outdoor Worship Service The Langley Chapel will host a Protestant Community Outdoor Worship Service April 29 at10:30 a.m., at Langley AFB’s Eagle Park, next to the dental clinic. Bring a lawn chair and enjoy great music, great worship, and great fellowship. Lunch and family activities will follow the worship service. Open to everyone. For more information, call the Langley Chapel at 764-7847.

Chiefs Group 5K Fun Run/Walk The Langley Chiefs Group is hosting their annual 5K Fun Run/Walk fundraiser April 27. All military, dependents, and civilian employees are invited to participate. Race day package pickup and registration begins at 7 a.m. at the Bayside Commonwealth Center, and the race begins at 8 a.m. There is a $20 pre-registration fee due by noon April 26; registration is $25 race day. All funds raised will go to support Airmen and their families. For more info contact any chief at Langley AFB or call Chief Master Sgt. Tony Hatcher at 764-4816 or Chief Master Sgt. Barbara Miller at 225-3278.

Spring Awareness Fashion Show There will be a spring fashion show at 11 a.m. April 28 at the Langley Air Force Base Exchange to raise awareness for Sexual Assault Awareness month. Come see the latest fashions and win prizes!

Wiccan study group The Langley Chapel will host a Wiccan Study Group every first and third Saturday of each month from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the Bethel Chapel Annex. All are welcome to attend. For more information, contact Staff Sgt. Catherine Quinlan at 764-6785 or email catherine.quinlan@langley.af.mil.

Young Adults’ Bible Study A bible study intended for college-age participants is held each Wednesday from 10:30 a.m. until noon at the Religious Center, 1792 1st St. in Bethel Housing. Our current series is titled; “Basic” by Francis Chan. There will be refreshments. For more information, contact David Rasbold at 764-0992 or 764-7847.

AFAS after-hours coverage The American Red Cross will provide emer-

gency Air Force Aid Society (AFAS) after-hours coverage. Note that this is for after-hour emergencies only, and not routine daily financial assistance. The A&FRC will continue to cover AFAS cases during their normal duty hours, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Servicemembers seeking emergency financial assistance after duty hours are required to call toll-free 1-877-272-7337, and will be assisted by an American Red Cross representative. Calls for assistance can be made by the requesting service member or first sergeant/commander. After-hours AFAS services are limited to urgent situations that cannot wait for normal duty hours such as electronic-tickets for emergency travel. For more information, call the Airman & Family Readiness Center at 764-3990.

Exceptional Family Member Program Air Force Services introduces the Exceptional Family Member Respite Care Program, designed to provide parents with short-term, specialized child care to help reduce the stresses associated with caring for a moderate to severe EFM child. This program allows eligible Air Force active duty EFMP families to receive up to 20 hours per month of free respite care per EFM child depending on their EFMP category and the sponsor’s deployment status. The Air Force has partnered with The National Association of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies (NACCRRA) to recruit, screen and train providers to care for children with special needs. To be eligible, active duty Airmen stationed at Joint Base Langley-Eustis must be enrolled in the Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) and have a child up to 18 years of age identified with moderate or severe special needs living with them. For more information, call National Association of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies child Care Aware at 1-800-424-2246 or Ursula Santiago at 764-3990, or visit NACCRRA online at http://www.naccrra.org/militaryprograms/air-force/EFMP.

Combatives program A Mixed Military Combatives Training class is available Mondays and Wednesdays from 3:30 to 4:30 and 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the ACC Fitness Center Combatives Room at Langley AFB. Come out and enjoy a fun way to stay fit and learn battlefield self-defense skills. For more info, contact Staff Sgt. Adam Negron at adam.negron@langley.af.mil.

Langley Theater Schedule Friday, 7 p.m. Project X (R) “Project X” is an out-of-control comedy that follows a group of buddies who set out to throw the most epic 17th birthday party ever. The film documents a high school party that gets completely out of control, shot from the perspective of the digital cameras that the kids have with them. Saturday, 4 p.m. Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax (PG) The animated adventure follows the journey of a 12-yearold as he searches for a real Truffula Tree, the one thing that will enable him to win the affection of the girl of his dreams. To get it he must find the story of the Lorax, the acerbic yet charming character who fights to protect his world. Saturday, 7 p.m. Gone (PG-13) Jill (Amanda Seyfried) lives a quiet life, yet one marked by a severe anxiety that the man who once threw her in a ditch to die was going to come back and finish the job. When her sister Molly (Emily Wickersham) goes missing, Jill heads to the police, but no one will listen to her, save for Detective Hood (Wes Bentley), who might or might not have his own reasons for lending a hand. As time runs out, Jill becomes more frantic and takes to desperate measures, putting the police on her trail as she tries to put an end to her nightmare once and for all. Sunday, 2 p.m. No show

Movie synopsis and show time information is available online at www.shopmyexchange. com/ReelTimeTheaters/MoviesLangley.htm.


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

OutsideTheGate

APRIL 13, 2012

Submit Outside The Gate announcements to pw1@militarynews.com

Veterans Benefits Clinic Project Salute, a nationwide initiative of the American Bar Association Young Lawyers Division, will host a free clinic to help veterans apply for federal benefits on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Old Dominion University Virginia Beach Higher Education Center, 1881 University Dr. If you are a veteran with a service-connected disability or a disability that was made worse by service, you may be entitled to disability compensation or other federal benefits. The clinic, sponsored by the ODU Student Veterans Association, will also include a free individual legal consultation. Please bring your DD Form 214, recent rating decisions and any other documentation that will help in evaluating your situation. To RSVP, contact Sarah Schauerte at projectsaluteva@gmail.com; walk-ins are welcome. For more information, visit http:// projectsaluteva.wordpress.com.

Langley Yacht Club picnic The Langley Yacht Club will host a Sock Burning, blessing of the fleet and covered dish picnic Sunday at 5 p.m. at 417 Shoreline Dr., Hampton. Ceremonial sock burnings are a Chesapeake Bay tradition that celebrates the return of warm weather and the start of the boating season. This event is open to all who enjoy boating, sailing, racing or just being on the water. For more information, call Gary Herbert at 846-4166 or RSVP to gpherbert@cox.net.

Civil War Re-enactment Visit the Endview Plantation April 21 and 22 from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and see the sights and sounds of Civil War battles as hundreds of reenactors converge to recreate battles fought 150 years ago during the Peninsula Campaign. Featured battles will include “Assault of the Red Redoubt,” “Seven Pines” and the “Battle of Williamsburg.” Civil War-era music will be performed by the Liberty Hall Fifes and Drums. Gates open at 10 a.m. each day. The cost is $7 per person; free for children under 7. House tours will be available at a reduced price; tours begin at 10 a.m. and continue every half hour until 3:30 p.m. (closed during the battles). Endview Plantation is located at 362Yorktown Rd., Newport News. For more information, call 887-1862 or visit www.endview.org.

Child ID Fest The Hampton Sheriff’s Office will host the 9th Annual Child ID Fest April 21 from

Run/Walk for the Dream Registration is open for the second annual Run for the Dream Half Marathon scheduled for May 20 on the campus of the College of William & Mary. General registration is $100; active-duty military may register for $45. Proceeds from the race will benefit An Achievable Dream, the Virginia Wounded Warrior Program, the Achilles Freedom Team of Wounded Veterans and Warfighter Sports. Registration fees are tax deductible. Registration is also open for the Fit to Run, Fit to Dream 8K Run/Walk and Kids Fun Run to be held May 19, Armed Forces Day. General registration is $55; Fun Run registration is $15.The 8K will honor Wounded Warriors and our nation’s military personnel and veterans. Colonial Williamsburg is providing free single-day Historic Area passes (valid May 19-20) for the first 6,000 Run for the Dream participants and a 50 percent discount for family and friends.The first 3,000 registrants for the half marathon will also receive a free pass to Busch Gardens to be used May 18-20, plus discounts for family and friends. Online registration is available at www.RunforAchievableDream.com. For more information, call 599-9472.

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Carousel Park, 602 Settlers Landing Rd., Hampton. This event will feature child ID services, cotton candy, snocones and fun activities for children. All activities are free and open to the public. For more information, call 926-2540.

Arts and crafts show The Colonial Williamsburg Employees Arts and Crafts show is scheduled for April 21 and 22 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Historic Triangle Community Services Building, 312 Waller Mill Rd., Williamsburg. The show is open to the public and will feature jewelry, textiles, woodcrafts, photography and more. Admission and parking are free. For more information, call 945-1548.

Free national park admission The National Park Service and the National Park Foundation, the official charity of America’s national parks, invite people everywhere to enjoy, explore, learn, share and give back to America’s nearly 400 national parks during National Park Week 2012. Celebrating the theme, “Picture Yourself in a National Park,” National Park Week will run from April 21-29. Throughout the country, visitors can enjoy the beauty and

wonder of 84 million acres of the world’s most spectacular scenery, historic places and cultural treasures for free. From ranger-led hikes and kayak trips to camping and exploring, park visitors can plan their National Park Week activities at www.nationalparkweek.org. Learn about special events for visitors of all ages, how to share your park adventure with other travelers and how to support the parks.

Military Job Fair The Military Affairs Council of the Virginia Peninsula Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring a Military Job Fair from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on April 26 at the Hampton Roads Convention Center, 1610 Coliseum Dr., Hampton. The event is free and open to active-duty military, recently separated military members, retirees, reservists, veterans, DoD civilians and their dependents. Please bring properly prepared resumes and dress in business attire. The following seminars will be offered: ■ How to Work a Job Fair, 8 and 9 a.m. ■ How to Negotiate a Salary, 10 a.m. ■ Employer Panel, 11 a.m. More information is available by calling Carrice White at 325-8161 or email cwhite@ vpcc.org or visit www.MilitaryJobFair.org.

Ways to Work Program Predatory loans have caused heartache and financial ruin for many, including those in military service. Avalon, a center for women and children in collaboration with Army Community Services now offers an alternative for responsible, working individuals and families to receive low-interest auto loans that will support their financial self-sufficiency and asset development through the Ways to Work program. What could reliable transportation mean to you or your military family? Having a vehicle can help stabilize your life and transport your children to child care, school, and doctor appointments. No more waiting in the rain, cold, or heat for the bus, or spending money on cab services. To qualify for this program an applicant must: ■ Be 18 years or older. ■ Be a James City County, Yorktown, Poquoson, or Williamsburg resident or be active duty military E-6 and below, DOD personnel, or veteran in the Hampton Roads area. ■ Be employed with a moderate household income. For more information, call 258-5022, ext. 1015 or email mary@avaloncenter.org.


APRIL 13, 2012

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

www.peninsulawarrior.com

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Photos by Marlon Martin

*LUO 6FRXWV YLVLW :DUULRU 7UDQVLWLRQ 8QLW Members of Girl Scouts Troop 4047 recently visited the Warrior Transition Unit at Fort Eustis’ McDonald Army Health Center to thank Soldiers for their faithful service. Although some of the scouts seemed a bit nervous, troop leader Suzette Sapp said the girls “were very excited to make the trip to Joint Base Langley-

Eustis to meet the Soldiers and let them know how much they really appreciate them.”The Girl Scouts raised enough money to donate 156 boxes of their world-famous cookies to Soldiers assigned to theWTU, using contributions they collected from their cookie booths, door-to-door sales and community residents.

$TXDWLF &HQWHU KRVWV (DVWHU (JJ 6SODVK Winners of the inaugural Easter Egg Splash display their winnings at the Aquatic Center at Fort Eustis, March 31. Children scoured the adventure pool for in search of two golden Easter eggs, which were nestled amongst 800 plastic eggs in the water. In total, two lucky winners found the golden eggs, and eight additional contestants took home prizes. Courtesy photo


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

APRIL 13, 2012

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HHHuntHomes.com 0UMVYTH[PVU *LU[LYZ 6WLU +HPS` *$99 down offer is only available with certain loan programs and subject to credit approval/qualifications with preferred lender. Offers cannot be combined with any other offers or incentives. Actual homes as constructed may not contain the features and layouts depicted and may vary from photos, renderings and plans. Features and options may not be available on all plans or in all communities. Homes depicted may not represent the lowest-priced homes in the community and may be shown with upgraded landscaping and optional features. Prices shown may not include charges for options, upgrades and/or lot premiums. Floorplans, elevations, features, plans, amenities, specifications and related information, and information concerning the pricing, incentives and availability of our homes,are subject to change without notice.**Subject to USDA/VA eligibility requirements.Monthly payment based on VA,30 year fixed interest rate loan of 3.75,APR 3.924. Rate subject to change at anytime. Minimum income required for qualified buyers is $32,000 and 680 credit score. Taxes and insurance are estimated. Maximum seller contribution is 6% of purchase price. See new home sales executive for details. Sales by Prudential Towne Realty.

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BAVARIA MEDICAL DEPARTMENT ACTIVITY PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Dietary and performance enhancing supplements have an artificial image according to an expert who works at the Army Wellness Center here. “Fewer than 30 percent of service members discuss dietary supplements use with their health care providers,” said Kim Waller, director of Bavaria’s only Army Wellness Center here, who quoted a study she read about supplement use by active duty service members. “A lot of people don’t consider the use of supplements to affect medication.” Using both medications and supplements at the same time can increase a person’s risk of drug-supplement interactions, according to a statement on National Center for Biotechnology Information website. The use of supplements alone can produce adverse side effects and cause consumers to feel faint or dizzy, Waller said. The substances may even cause consumers to have a headache or interfere with their sexual performance. When these adverse effects happen, Waller said, who wants to raise awareness about the potential dangers of using some supplements, consumers “don’t stop taking them, they just try a different one or they decrease the dosage.” “The thing with dietary supplements is that they are not regulated by the FDA(Food and Drug Administration),” Waller said, who has a degree in clinical laboratory science. “The supplements do not have to be tested or proven effective before being sold.” Testing occurs after a problem arises, like it did with ephedra, which was banned in 2004 after being on the dietary supplement market for almost a decade. “After a careful review of the available evidence about the risks and benefits of ephedra in supplements, the FDA found that these supplements present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury to consumers,” according to a report by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services website.”The data showed little evidence of ephedra’s effectiveness, except for short-term weight loss, while confirming that the substance raises blood pressure and stresses the heart. The increased

risk of heart problems and strokes negates any benefits of weight loss. There is strong evidence that ephedra is associated with an increased risk of side effects, possibly even fatal ones.” Another supplement containing 1,3-dimethylamylamine, known as DMAA, has been temporarily removed from Army and Air Force Exchange Service shelves because it is being associated with adverse events. What consumers also need to know is that some supplements are laced with varying quantities of approved prescription drug ingredients, controlled substances, and untested and unstudied pharmaceutically active ingredients, according to the FDA’s website. “These deceptive products can harm you,” according to the website. “Hidden ingredients are increasingly becoming a problem in products promoted for bodybuilding. Remember, FDA cannot test all products on the market that contain potentially harmful hidden ingredients. Enforcement actions and consumer advisories for tainted products only cover a small fraction of the tainted over-the-counter products on the market.” There are products tested by third party entities for banned substances and receive a certification for meeting an international standard for a dietary supplement, but unknown ingredients in certified product’s proprietary blend are what concerns Waller, she said. Proprietary blends do not list ingredients by volumes and are advertised to sell the product to consumer. “It’s marketed to sound like something extreme,” Waller said. “What exactly is an Ener-Tropic Xplosion? It just sounds cool.” The total sales for dietary supplements in the U.S. are estimated to be more than $27 billion annually, according to a consumer report from 2011.


APRIL 13, 2012

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

Classifieds TO PLACE AN AD...

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Call: (757) 222-3990 Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Garage Sale - Other Cities Grafton Baptist Church on Rt. 17 & Dare Rd. Tons of baby clothes, shoes, toys, equipment, books, etc. Saturday April 14, starts at 8:00 am

Articles For Sale WWII Relics. Retired Vet seeks WWII helmets, medals, daggers, etc. 757-869-1739

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Come see information on the study of the Hampton Roads Bridge Tunnel (HRBT) corridor between I-664 in Hampton and I-564 in Norfolk (approximately 11 miles). Citizens will have the opportunity to provide input on the range of conceptual alternatives to meet theexisting and future transportation needs within the corridor.

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Can deliver. 757-706-3667 OCEANA FT EUSTIS DAM NECK FT MONROE LITTLE CREEK FT LEE LANGLEY FT STORY FT MONROE OCEANA LITTLE CREEK Jewelry & Watches OCEANA FT EUSTIS DAM NECK FT MONROE 2 cttw Engagement Ring - Gorgeous Princess Composite & Round Diamond 14k YG, size 7. Store warranty incl. w/purchase - $1500. Call 757-270-7988

We cover the bases. Call 222-3990 to advertise.

ADVERTISERS Buy 4 wks get a 5th wk FREE

$6.09/line – 3 lines min. 5 Weeks only $73.08. A Savings of $18.27 Classifieds deadline: Thursday, 5 pm, Call us for additional details and specials 75 7 - 2 2 2 - 3 9 8 2 ‫ ׀‬7 5 7 -222-3983

Give your written or oral comments at the meeting or submit them by May 25,2012 to hrbtcomments@vaprojects.com (please reference “HRBT EIS/Alternatives Meeting” in subject line) or to Tom Heil, Team Project Manager at 2901 S. Lynnhaven Road, Suite 300, Virginia Beach,VA 23452. If you are unable to attend the meeting you can download all meeting materials at: http:// www.vdot.virginia.gov/projects/hamptonroads/i-64_hrbt_study.asp VDOT ensures nondiscrimination and equal employment in all programs and activities in accordance with Title VI and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. If you have questions or concerns about your civil rights in regards to this project or require special assistance for persons with disabilities or limited English proficiency, contact VDOT’s Civil Rights Division at 800-367-7623 or TTY/TDD 711. State Project: 0064-965-004, P101; UPC 99037


32

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Peninsula Warrior April 13, 2012 Army Edition  

Fort Eustis edition of the April 13, 2012 issue of Peninsula Warrior

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