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:DUULRU J O I N T January 31, 2014 Vol. 5, No. 4

B A S E

L A N G L E Y - E U S T I S

P u b l i s h e d i n t h e i n t e re s t o f p e r s o n n e l a t J o i n t B a s e L a n g l e y - E u s t i s

ARMY EDITION

w w w. p e n i n s u l a w a r r i o r. c o m

FINANCES

Service members encouraged to take charge — Page 2

TRANSITIONING

Eustis ACAP hosts career expo — Page 12

For more online content, check out www.JBLE.af.mil

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Fort Eustis instructors recognized by Army Transportation School – Page 3

COMMUNITY COMMONS Langley holds ribbon-cutting ceremony — Page 17


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Joint Base Langley-Eustis Editorial Staff Joint Base Langley-Eustis Commander Col. John J. Allen Jr. Joint Base Langley-Eustis Public Affairs Officer Beverly Simas • beverly.simas@us.af.mil Joint Base Langley-Eustis Editor Shaun Eagan • shaun.eagan@us.af.mil Fort Eustis Managing Editor Staff Sgt. Katie Gar Ward • fteustismain@gmail.com Per Air Force Instruction 35-101/Army Regulation 360-1, only stories and photos submitted by members of the Department of Defense community and DOD news services may be printed in The Peninsula Warrior. Any stories, photos or announcements must be submitted eight days prior to publication. Stories and photos should be submitted to the editor and/or assistant editor at 633abw.paedit@langley.af.mil or Public Affairs Office, 601 Hines Cir., Fort Eustis, VA 23604. Announcements for the Community Section should be submitted to fteustismain@gmail.com. Announcements for the Outside the Gate Section should be submitted to fteustismain@gmail.com. For more information call 757-878-4920. Authors’ names may be withheld, but all letters must include the authors’ signatures and telephone number. The Peninsula Warrior is an authorized publication for all the members of the U.S. military. Contents of The Peninsula Warrior are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, Department of the Air Force or the Department of the Army. The PeninsulaWarrior is printed every Friday by offset as a civilian enterprise newspaper for the Public Affairs Office, U.S. Air Force by Military Newspapers of Virginia at 150 W. Brambleton Ave. Norfolk, VA 23510 under exclusive written contract with the commander, Joint Base Langley-Eustis. MNV is a private firm in no way connected with the Department of the Air Force or Department of the Army. Printed circulation: 25,000. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. A confirmed violation or rejection of this policy of equal opportunity by any advertiser will result in refusal to print advertising from that source. All editorial content of The Peninsula Warrior is prepared, edited, provided and approved by the Public Affairs Office Joint Base LangleyEustis. All photographs are Air Force or Army photographs unless otherwise stated. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts and supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense or MNV of the products or services advertised.

MILITARY NEWSPAPERS OF VIRGINIA • HOME OFFICE: 150 W. Brambleton Ave., Norfolk, VA 23510 (757) 222-3990 • ADVERTISING SALES: 728 Blue Crab Road, Suite C, Newport News, VA 23606; (757) 596-0853; fax (757) 596-1473

Correction In last week’s issue, the story on page 3 midsdentified the 511th Dive Detachment as deploying to Afghanistan. The detachment is deploying to Kuwait.

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

JANUARY 31, 2014

0LOLWDU\ 6DYHV :HHN 6HUYLFH PHPEHUV DUH HQFRXUDJHG WR WDNH FKDUJH RI SHUVRQDO ¿QDQFHV By Airman 1st Class Areca T. Wilson 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Military Saves Week, a campaign that seeks to motivate military families to save money, is scheduled to run from Feb. 24 to March 1. Through the Airman and Family Readiness Center at Langley Air Force Base and the Army Community Service at Fort Eustis, Service members can utilize the program and its resources to help them achieve their financial goals. “This event is a proactive approach to financial readiness designed to provide information and resources to prevent financial mismanagement and encourage saving,” said Paul Walker, ACS financial readiness program manager. “Emphasizing the importance of regular savings, living within one’s means and long-term planning can positively impact the quality of life of Service members and families.” Walker said MSW provides programs geared towards helping Service members and their families gain financial stability. One of MSW’s programs, Saver Pledge, gives the “saver” the opportunity to sign an online pledge to save money, reduce debt, and build wealth over time. “For some, taking the pledge is helpful because it forces them to think about what areas need improvement or what short and long term goals need to be addressed,” said Walker. “By requesting Service members take the Saver Pledge, MSW encourages them to commit to regular saving, set financial goals and make good financial decisions.” When savers take the pledge, they re-

Military Saves Week, a campaign that seeks to motivate military families to save money, is scheduled to run from Feb. 24 to March 1. Through the Airman and Family Readiness Center at Langley Air Force Base and the Army Community Service at Fort Eustis, service members can utilize the program and its resources to help achieve their financial goals.

Photo by Airman 1st Class Areca T. Wilson

ceive a monthly Military Saves e-newsletter with savings advice from national experts, a quarterly American Saver newsletter and they can receive a free credit report. In addition to the pledge, ACS will host Personal Finance events, which target youths in fifth to eighth grade. Held at the Child, Youth and School Services, it is open to all military and civilian dependents, and runs from 3 to 5 p.m. on Feb. 25, along with a Financial Fair, open to all Service members, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Feb. 27 and a lunch-and-learn event entitled “Saving and Investing for Your Future,” from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Feb. 27. Maureen Elam, AFRC personal financial readiness specialist, said the AFRC will host a “Thrift Savings Plan” 101 briefing Feb. 24, a “Making Money Work

Heritage Spotlight On Jan. 31, 1865, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the 13th Amendment to the Constitution, abolishing slavery in America. The amendment read, “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude... shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.” When the Civil War began four years earlier, thenPresident Abraham Lincoln’s goal was the restoration of the Union, but on September 1862, Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, freeing all

for You” workshop Feb. 25, an Identity Theft seminar Feb. 26 and a “Marriage and Money” seminar Feb. 27. All events at Langley are open to all Department of Defense identification card holders. “Achieving our financial goals requires discipline, sacrifice, and patience,” said Walker. “These programs will allow participants to gain first-hand knowledge from a variety of resources.” Walker stressed the importance of Service members and their families taking responsibility for their financial goals. “Success with personal finances requires planning,” said Walker. “Your personal financial situation does not stay the same; it either improves or worsens based on your behavior and choices.” For more information on MSW, visit the MilitarySaves.org website, or contact Walker at 878-3638 or Elam at 764-3990.

13th Amendment slaves in areas that were still in rebellion against the Union. This measure opened the issue of slavery in border states that had not seceded or in areas that had been captured by the Union before the proclamation. In 1864, an amendment abolishing slavery passed the U.S. Senate but died in the House as Democrats rallied in the name of states’ rights. The election of 1864 brought Lincoln back to the White House along with significant Republican ma-

jorities in both houses, so it appeared the amendment was headed for passage when the new Congress convened in March 1865. The amendment passed 119 to 56, seven votes above the necessary two-thirds majority. The 13th Amendment was sent to the states for ratification in December 1865. With the passage of the amendment, the institution that had indelibly shaped American history was eradicated.

We want to hear from you. Contact us at fteustismain@gmail.com and 633abw.paedit@langley.af.mil or call 878-4920 or 764-2144.


JANUARY 31, 2014

)RUW (XVWLV LQVWUXFWRUV UHFRJQL]HG E\ $UP\ 7UDQVSRUWDWLRQ 6FKRRO By Staff Sgt. Katie Gar Ward 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

In conjunction with an award ceremony recognizing transportation instructors, U.S. Army Col. John P. Sullivan, U.S. Army Transportation School chief of transportation, hosted a town hall meeting with transportation personnel at Fort Eustis, Jan. 28, to discuss the current status and future of the Army Transportation Corps. Three Fort Eustis Soldiers were presented the Military Order of Saint Christopher award, which signifies outstanding contributions to the Army Transportation Corps and recognizes individuals who demonstrate high standards of moral character and integrity, professionalism and selfless dedication to the corps. Col. Nancy J. Grandy, U.S. Army Transportation School assistant commandant, presented the awards to Sgt. 1st Class Darron Pittman, Staff Sgt. Erik Jordan and Staff Sgt. William Conroy, who are all Maritime and Intermodal Training Department instructors. “The embodiment of this award, carrying the weight of the world, [is] what the U.S. Army Transportation Corps does – we carry the weight of the Army,” said Pittman. “I’m very passionate about it. I challenge myself daily to be better. It’s a great honor to receive this award, but what I do, I don’t do alone.” Before the town hall, Sullivan presented the Maritime and Intermodal Training Department Instructor of the Year awards to Chief Warrant Officer 3 Jason M. Peruccio and Sgt. 1st Class Dean M. Farr. Grandy, and presented the Instructor of the Year award to Oscar Nadal. “Our mission is to train, educate and deliver professional transporters and sustainers. That’s why we exist,” said Sullivan. “[We prepare

“I could not be more proud of the results of this team. Thank you for what you do every day.” — U.S. Army Col. John P. Sullivan U.S. Army Transportation School chief of transportation

them for the field] so when they get there, they are ready to do their jobs. Among all the instructors at the transportation school, these gentlemen, as judged not just by their superiors, but by their peers, came out on top for 2013.” As part of the town hall, Sullivan presented current and future topics relating to Army transportation, including training, manning and equipment advances, emphasizing Army watercraft capabilities. According to Sullivan’s presentation, developers are identifying key capabilities and analyzing various vessel designs to enable responsive and expeditionary waterborne delivery of mission-tailored war fighting formation packages in support of joint-force commanders. “Army watercraft capabilities [don’t just involve] moving supplies,” said Sullivan. “We can move combat power as well, and that’s our vision. We’ll always have the capability to move sustainment, but we have to [promote] the capability of Army watercraft to move combat [power].” Before closing, Sullivan expressed thanks to the Maritime and Intermodal Training Department. “I could not be more proud of the results of this team,” he said. “And it has nothing to do with me – it’s got everything to do with individuals sitting here this morning. Thank you for what you do every day.”

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Recipients of the honorable Military Order of the Saint Christopher award stand at attention after receiving the award at Fort Eustis, Jan. 28. The recipients were recognized as transporters who signify outstanding contributions to the U.S. Army Transportation Corps.

Photos by Staff Sgt. Ciara Wymbs

U.S Army Col. John P. Sullivan, right, U.S. Army Transportation School chief of transportation, presents Chief Warrant Officer 3 Jason M. Peruccio and Staff Sgt. Jeffrey E. Littell Jr., both Maritime and Intermodal Training Department instructors, with Instructor of the Quarter awards. One other recipient of the award, not pictured, is Gregory Dufrene. U.S. Army Col. Nancy J. Grandy, left, U.S. Army Transportation School assistant commandant, presents Oscar Nadal, Maritime and Intermodal Training Department instructor, with an Instructor of the Year award.The award is given to instructors who demonstrated outstanding leadership and dedication during 2013.


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

JANUARY 31, 2014

PII violations and phishing scams on the rise By Senior Airman Brittany Paerschke-O’Brien 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

A Service member received a phone call from an unfamiliar number claiming to be an accountant with the member’s bank. The unknown caller asked for the member’s account and social security number, to “verify information.” Unfortunately for the victim, this is just one example of phishing scams designed to retrieve individuals’ personal information. Within the last few days, the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command has received calls regarding a new phishing scam, which targets U.S. Government Travel Card holders. Joint Base Langley-Eustis Service members are reminded not to provide personally identifiable information such as card numbers to any uncreditable source. “Phishing scams are carried out using email, instant messaging and phone calls to acquire sensitive information such as passwords and credit card information,” said John Swett, 633rd Communications

Squadron wing information assurance manager. “These scams can be prevented by not replying or providing [personal information] to anyone.” If Service members suspect they are being targeted for a phishing scam, they need to immediately contact their information assurance officer and follow their instructions. “PII is considered information that can be used to differentiate or trace a person’s identity,” said Timothy Lyon, 633rd Communications Squadron Freedom of Information Act and Privacy Act manager. “An individual’s name, social security number, date of birth and other information are key PII that directly identify a single person. “ While phishing scams provide criminals access to an individual’s information, PII material can also be breached by improperly transmitting emails or messages. A breach can have a significant impact to an individual or the base network system. A breach would consist of a per-

The U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command has received calls regarding a new phishing scam, targeting U.S. GovernmentTravel Card holders. Langley Air Force Base Service members are recommended not to provide personally identifiable information such as card numbers to any uncreditable source. son other than the authorized individual having access or potential access to PII through compromise, unauthorized access or unauthorized disclosure, like sending recall rosters to a personal email from a government computer. To avoid a breach, the 633rd CS suggests using the website safe.amrdec.army.mil/ safe/ to properly send PII. The site allows operators to encrypt the email, and it will give them a one-time password to access

the sent information. As of Oct. 24, 2013, if a Service member is caught improperly transmitting PII via the Air Force network, the individual’s AFNET account will be locked, said Lyon. The account may be unlocked when the first colonel in their chain of command confirms the person has finished all the necessary remedial training. “Although this new policy of locking accounts may be painful, our goal is to increase awareness to all users and prevent PII breaches,” said Lyon. “As we all know, PII violations create both a personal and operational risk for everyone.” From properly securing PII to avoiding phishing scams everyone has the power to keep Joint Base Langley- Eustis personnel and the base networks safe and secure. Editor’s note: Some of the information was used from a U.S. Army story published on Jan. 23. To read it, visit www.army.mil/article/118640/CID_warns_of_Government_ Travel_Card_phishing_scam/.


JANUARY 31, 2014

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$ KRPH DZD\ IURP KRPH By Senior Airman Brittany Paerschke-O’Brien 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Being in a hospital dealing with a terminal illness or recovering from a major surgery can be an emotional and frightening time. Zachary Fisher first established the Zachary and Elizabeth M. Fisher Armed Services Foundation in 1983 to boost the spirits of patients by providing families of military members and individuals cared for by the Department of Veterans Affairs the opportunity to be near loved ones during their stays at military treatment facilities. The Naval Medical Center Portsmouth Fisher House is one of more than 60 houses donated to the government by the Fisher House Foundation, and designed to care for the families of patients who may be injured, wounded, sick or terminally ill while in a military medical treatment facilitiy. The foundation provides grants to families, allowing them to stay in a “home-away-from-home” near the treatment center. “Family speeds the healing process,” said Jill Thompson, Portsmouth Fisher House manager. “We are here to embrace the families while they assist the healing of the patient. Everyone in the house becomes [part of] a family to support, to talk with and be there for one another.”

“Family speeds the healing process. We are here to embrace the families while they assist the healing of the patient. Everyone in the house becomes a family to support, to talk with and be there for one another.” — Jill Thompson Portsmouth Fisher House manager

To be accepted into a Fisher House, the patient must have a referral prepared either by a physician, nurse, Chaplain, social worker, the American Red Cross, a case manager or patient administration. The eligibility requirements are used to determine if the Fisher House will be able to assist a family. The Service member must be an inpatient at a nearby medical treatment facility and have a serious condition, such as cancer, require surgeries or be diagnosed with a terminal illness at the time of the family’s check-in. Also, the family’s residence must be at least 40 miles away from the hospital or treatment facility, and the families are required to stay for a minimum of three days. “Junior enlisted personnel without financial assistance will have priority over senior enlisted,” said Thompson. “Active-duty and combat-related injuries also have priority over other requesting referrals.” The Portsmouth Fisher House has six rooms that can accommodate six people per room and a handicap accessible suite for five people. Additionally, the house is equipped with a full kitchen, dining room, laundry room and seating area. “I’ve had people walk in the door and break into tears because they were already emotional and didn’t have the energy to prepare a meal,” said Thompson. “They

Courtesy photo

The Fisher House Foundation provides grants to families allowing them to stay in a “homeaway-from-home” near the treatment center.The foundation also operates other helpful programs such as the Hero Miles program, which donates frequent-flyer miles for family members to be closer to an injured service member, and the Hotels for Heroes program, which donates hotel points for families to stay at hotels near medical centers free of charge.

get tired of eating at the galley or at McDonalds and they walk in and see a meal prepared or donated; it makes all the difference in the world.” Thompson said the Portsmouth Fisher House is always in need of volunteers, whether preparing meals, donating money, time or items. Volunteers should not be discouraged from helping if they don’t have access to the base, as Thompson coordinates with base security. The Fisher House Foundation operates other helpful programs such as the Hero Miles program, which donates frequent-

flyer miles for family members to be closer to an injured service member, and the Hotels for Heroes program, which donates hotel points for families to stay at hotels near medical centers free of charge. “The house, volunteers, and donations are really what makes this a home away from home,” said Jill. “I’m honored to be here and care for the families as they care for their loved ones.” For more information or to help volunteer contact Naval Medical Center Portsmouth Fisher House manager Jill Thompson at 953-6889.

Photos by Senior Airman Brittany Paerschke-O’Brien

The Naval Medical Center Portsmouth Fisher House has six rooms, left, that have enough space for six people per room and one suite which is a handicap accessible room that can accommodate five people. It is one of more than 60 houses donated to the government, designed to house the families of injured, wounded, sick or terminally ill patients in medical treatment facilities. Zachary Fisher (above) first established the Zachary and Elizabeth M. Fisher Armed Services Foundation in 1983.


JANUARY 31, 2014

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ATTENTION BUSINESS OWNERS: Interested in giving back to the military and promoting your business? Contact us today: Southside 222-3990 • Peninsula 596-0853

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Health&Fitness

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U.S. Service members seeking help with physical fitness can find it with Joint Base Langley-Eustis’ programs. Soldiers and Airmen may attend the Functional Fitness class, a U.S. Army certified program, or the Back to Basics course, an official U.S. Air Force program. Functional Fitness uses general and inclusive fitness techniques that individuals use every day including squatting, running, jumping and lifting, to prepare trainees for physical contingencies. The program is offered to active-duty Service members, retirees, civilians and dependents. Back to Basics is designed to help Airmen and Soldiers who are having trouble meeting fitness standards by assisting with a physical training plan by focusing on performing daily fitness routines. U.S. Marine Corps Gunnery Sgt. Juan Ospina, Joint Task Force Civil Support

“Life’s physical demands are unpredictable, so we need to train that way. This (Functional Fitness) course gets away from the traditional gym routine. Athletes get the benefit of strength, body weight and cardiovascular training in different ways.” — U.S. Marine Corps Gunnery Sgt. Juan Ospina Joint Task Force Civil Support operations noncommissioned officer in charge operations noncommissioned officer in charge, is the lead trainer for the Functional Fitness program. “Life’s physical demands are unpredictable, so we need to train that way,” said Ospina. “This course gets away from the traditional gym routine. Athletes get the benefit of strength, body weight and cardiovascular training in different ways.” Other techniques members use include: tire flips, rope climbing, calisthenics, running, rowing machines, medicine balls and slam balls. For Airmen and Soldiers looking for a baseline, Back to Basics corrects and

improves individual form and teaches breathing and stretching techniques. The class focuses on three major components of the physical training test; sit-ups, pushups and the 1.5-mile run. U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Christopher Caplinger, 633rd Force Support Squadron fitness specialist, leads the Back to Basics program. “Many attendees have a lot riding on their success in the class, and I’ve been able to help them improve and achieve their [fitness] potential,” said Caplinger. “Every class people thank me for teaching and training them.”

Caplinger often reminds attendees that while the free, eight-week program will test them physically, it will also provide them an improved fitness level and knowledge necessary to make smarter everyday choices. Whether it is an improved understanding of physical fitness, or leaning towards a stronger, more conditioned physique, Soldiers and Airmen can rest assured they’ll receive what they’ve been looking for from fitness professionals at Fort Eustis or Langley AFB. For those interested in attending, Back to Basics is held five sessions a week, Monday through Friday at 7:00 a.m. at Langley Air Force Base. Functional Fitness is offered at Fort Eustis three times a day on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 6 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m. and Saturday at 9 a.m. For more information on Functional Fitness, contact the Anderson Field House at 878-2328 and for Back to Basics, contact the Shellbank Fitness Center at 225-8166.

Photo by Staff Sgt. Ciara Wymbs

U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Ana Silva, 1st Battalion, 222nd Aviation Regiment operations noncommissioned officer, completes a pull-up at Anderson Field House at Fort Eustis, Jan. 27. In addition to pull-ups, students in the class can also use techniques including tire flips, rope climbing, calisthenics, rowing machines, medicine balls and slam balls.

Photo by Staff Sgt. Stephanie R. Plichta

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Christopher Caplinger, 633rd Force Support Squadron fitness specialist, demonstrates an exercise during a Back to Basics class Jan. 14 at Langley Air Force Base. B2B focuses on three major components of the physical training test: situps, push-ups and the 1.5-mile run.


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633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Tax preparation and assistance services will be offered by appointment to all active-duty Service members, retirees and military family members who possess a valid military identiďŹ cation card at Joint Base Langley-Eustis from Feb. 3 through April 15. This tax season, more than 40 Langley Airmen have volunteered to help those seeking assistance. To ensure tax forms are properly ďŹ lled out and ďŹ led, volunteers are required to complete 60 hours of training. After completion of training, volunteers are ofďŹ cially certiďŹ ed by the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program, earning advanced and military certiďŹ cations. Although tax assistance will be made available to all members of the JBLE community, the Langley tax center staff encourages younger Airmen to take advantage of the free tax assistance. “Our focus this year is deďŹ nitely [junior-enlisted] Airmen,â€? said Staff Sgt. Shawn Field, 633rd Air Base Wing paralegal and Langley tax center noncommissioned ofďŹ cer in charge. “Although we are open for Airmen of all ranks, ofďŹ cers, and retirees.â€? When ďŹ ling taxes at the JBLE tax centers, the following documents are required: â– Social security card or another document from the social security administration with a social security number â–  A valid photo identiďŹ cation card â–  A W-2 or 1099 form â–  Proof of any claimed deductions or expenses Volunteers suggest customers ensure they have all needed documentation with them prior to their appointment to make the process run smoothly. For more information, call the Langley Tax Center at 225-5777 or the Fort Eustis Tax Center at 878-2478 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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Contemporary new home styles Durable hardie plank lap siding Distinct architectural themes Great selection of design upgrades Beautiful lakefront and lake view homesites

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Actual homes as constructed may not contain the features and layouts depicted and may vary from photos, renderings and plans. Features and options may not be available on all plans or in all communities. Homes depicted may not represent the lowest-priced homes in the community and may be shown with upgraded landscaping and optional features. Prices shown may not include charges for options, upgrades and/or lot premiums. Floorplans, elevations, features, plans, amenities, speciďŹ cations and related information, and information concerning the pricing, incentives and availability of our homes, are subject to change without notice. Sales by Rose & Womble.

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Heart healthy: JBLE pumps in new innovations can Medical Association concerning the treatment of bad cholesterol and high blood pressure. In the past, patients diagnosed with cholesterol problems had to meet a certain number based on an average of the population. While this method didn’t cause harm to patients, it did prevent them from receiving truly individualized treatment. “This new system lets the doctor build a profile of the patient based on their ancestry, diet, exercise and more,” said Hartaway. “Specifications from the American Heart Association gives doctors guidelines, which means they can treat their patients faster.” The AHA also advised doctors to use only statin-class drugs to treat cholesterol problems, which means patients take less medication. “Statins are a class of drug used as a first-line medication in cholesterol control,” said Hartaway. “Since we no longer look for an average cholesterol number, we really don’t need other medications, which lowers side effects on our patients and simplifies treatment.”

By Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Almost everyone knows a fact or two about heart disease. From school-age to old age, the American populace receives information about heart attacks, high blood pressure or any number of statistics and advice from commercials, media and health institutes. At Langley Air Force Base and Fort Eustis, community members have access to new techniques, solutions and care concerning heart health right at their fingertips thanks to U.S. Air Force Hospital Langley and McDonald Army Health Center. “Heart health isn’t rocket science,” said U.S. Army Capt. Phil Lindholm, MCAHC internal medicine chief. “A lot of people get overwhelmed by the prospect of possible heart disease, when really the answers are easy to understand, and patients have years to turn around their health.” In observance of February as National Heart Month, Lindholm and U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Mario Hartaway, 633rd Medical Squadron aerospace medical technician, showcased a number of new innovations from the Ameri-

SEE HEART PAGE 11

Graphic by Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill

February is National Heart Month, and personnel from McDonald Army Health Center and U.S. Air Force Hospital Langley are utilizing new information in the cardiology field to keep patients “heart healthy.” Changes in blood pressure and cholesterol diagnoses and management have led to fewer medications needed by patients and an emphasis on patient-driven treatment.

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HEART FROM PAGE 10 The new innovations also include a 10-years-out heart attack estimate to give patients an idea of what could happen if they don’t treat themselves right. “This estimate calculator can be a real wake-up call for people who otherwise ignore their heart health,” said Lindholm. “They see what could happen if they don’t change their diet, [or if they] neglect their medication or [fail to] exercise regularly.” According to the Centers for Disease Control, high-blood pressure is one of the three major causes of heart disease and heart attack, along with smoking and high cholesterol. Changes within the medical community have changed the core process behind prescribing treatment for patients with high blood pressure. “Previously, everyone aimed for a blood pressure lower than 140/90,” explained Lindholm. “With new research, it has been determined that individuals over 60 years of age need only aim for a blood pressure lower than 150/80, which changes the treatment process fundamentally.” Since senior patients have a different systolic goal, they also need less medicine, much like patients with a high cholesterol. When it comes to smoking, the answer is the same from Lindholm and Hartaway; just don’t do it. “Smoking kills your lungs, clogs your arteries and forces your body to work harder, which makes it deteriorate faster,” said Lindholm. “It increases blood pressure, which could mean more medication, which leads to more undesirable side effects. Just stay away from smoking.” Answers to other health questions are just as simple, said Hartaway. “A lot of people are under the impression they have to become serious gym rats to turn the table on heart disease,” explained Hartaway. “Really, light exercise and a good diet is all it take to significantly lower your chances of having heart disease.” Lindholm and Hartaway suggested at least 150 minutes a week of brisk walking to improve your health, and those who wish to workout more only improve their chances of a healthy heart. Lindholm also suggested eating a diet in line with the U.S. Department of Agriculture “MyPlate program,” which evolved from the food pyramid. “In addition to eating right, a lot of [Service members] have a tendency to indulge in energy drinks and coffee,” said Lindholm. “Even though a lot of us are still young, dousing our system with sugar and chemical cocktails leads to heart problems and poor habits down the road.” Making these diet and exercise changes does more than help the heart, it makes a difference in the whole body, said Lindholm. “People with healthy hearts suffer less from dementia, feel less pain, have a better immunity and so much more,” said Lindholm. “Your heart is the center of your health, so taking care of it inadvertently repairs your whole body, giving you more energy to do the things you love.”

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

•

JANUARY 31, 2014

JANUARY 31, 2014

633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

The Fort Eustis Army Career and Alumni Program hosted its ďŹ rst career expo of the year, Jan. 22. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics, unemployment in Virginia ranked No. 13 in the U.S., and had a 5.4 percent rate in November 2013. ACAP plans to play a part in decreasing those numbers among Service members by providing resources for educational and career opportunities. The expo, held monthly, helps transitioning Service members and their families by serving as a networking opportunity to speak with employers in the local community, college recruiters and other transitional service providers. “These expos help the transitioning Service members market themselves,â€? said Reba Gordon, ACAP transitions services manager. “It helps them reect on their skills and teach-

es the values of networking and research.â€? More than 250,000 Service members separate from active duty each year and face numerous challenges as they transition to civilian life, such as difďŹ culties obtaining and maintaining employment after the military. “Service members and employers both beneďŹ t from these expos,â€? said Gordon. “There are a variety of opportunities for Service members.â€? “Workshops like this help build conďŹ dence when speaking with prospective employers and college representatives,â€? said U.S. Army Master Sgt. Kimberly Byers, 93rd Signal Brigade information technology specialist. “It lets us know what they are looking for and how to build a resume. We beneďŹ t by being able to talk with representatives about job opportunities in the local area.â€? Shelby Simmons, Martinsburg College representative, said the opportunity to attend the expo was gratifying.

“It’s rewarding to give back,â€? said Simmons. “It’s [very important] to provide Service members with educational resources [as they prepare to go] into the civilian workforce.â€? For those heading for retirement or separation, ACAP also offers classes and workshops to help gain knowledge of what to expect in the civilian sector. Along with the career expo, ACAP teaches Service members skills in resume building, ďŹ nancial planning and interviewing techniques. Gordon said ACAP career expos help Service members develop a plan and execute it. “We want to get Service members prepared for life outside the military,â€? said Gordon. “These career expos are a start to being successful in the private sector and beyond.â€? TheACAP ofďŹ ce at Fort Eustis is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. For more information on ACAP services, visit www.acap.army.mil.

By Staff Sgt. Wesley Farnsworth 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

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Joint Base Langley-Eustis will hold workshops on resume writing and federal employment, host job fairs, and offer Service members the chance to ask questions to panels of local employers to gain the latest information on the job market, easing their transitions. Two people in charge of the initative are Robyn Wilson, Airman and Family Readiness Center community readiness consultant, and Roger Bullis, Army Community Services community readiness consultant. Wilson serves as an employment specialist for the Langley AFRC, while Bullis teaches resume-writing workshops at Fort Eustis. Both offer advice to separating Service members. Wilson and Bullis offered the following tips for Service members to transition smoothly:

By Senior Airman Teresa Aber

Resume

633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

In today’s Armed Forces, senior leaders encourage Service members to ďŹ nd ways to become well-rounded, balanced individuals both in their careers and personal lives through professional development organizations. Professional development organizations are a way for Soldiers and Airmen at Joint Base Langley-Eustis to network with fellow Service members while focusing on professional and leadership development. Many organizations are geared toward building morale and networking opportunities for speciďŹ c groups, such as the Better Opportunities for Single Soldiers organization at Ft. Eustis. BOSS supports the overall quality of life of single Soldiers, Service members who may have a deployed spouse or for single parents “BOSS provides low-cost trips and get-togethers for Soldiers, and is about young men and women getting together and coming up with solutions to difďŹ cult problems, then forward-

“These groups provide volunteer opportunities unique to their members. These opportunities teach us that it is not just about us, it is about giving back to the local community as well. I think the best way to ďŹ nd yourself is through the service and betterment of others.â€? — Senior Airman Major Powell 633rd Communication Squadron client systems technician, ACE vice president

ing them through the chain of command,â€? said U.S. Army Sgt. Maj. Jose Velazquez, Army Training and Doctrine Command Public Affairs. Some organizations focus on speciďŹ c rank tiers, such as Airmen Committed to Excellence. ACE provides an opportunity for Airmen to network and create friendships with fellow airmen in different career ďŹ elds along with improving the quality of life for all assigned personnel, in order to encourage an attitude of uniďŹ ed purpose. The Langley Club 5/6 is geared to junior noncommissioned ofďŹ cers, al-

lowing them to concentrate on issues that may be more important to them, such as education and volunteer opportunities. It also allows the members to receive mentorship from senior NCOs and to mentor junior enlisted Airmen. “Club 5/6 gives staff sergeants and technical sergeants a different outlook on the military by giving us unique opportunities to learn from senior NCOs,� said U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Ramar Sykes, 439th Supply Chain Operations Squadron grounds micap support section supervisor. “It also gives us the chance to mentor ju-

•

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Eustis ACAP hosts career expo By Staff Sgt. Ciara Wymbs

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

Photo by Staff Sgt. Ciara Wymbs

U.S. Army Master Sgt. Kimberly Byers, 93rd Signal Brigade information technology specialist, speaks with Shelby Simmons, Martinsburg College representative, during an Army Career and Alumni Program career expo at Fort Eustis, Jan. 22. Career expos are held monthly, and are aimed at preparing transitioning Service members for life in the civilian sector.

nior enlisted Airmen and aid in the growth of the future generations of the military.� Senior enlisted leaders can become involved in organizations such as the Eustis Sergeant Major Association, Langley Top Three and the Chief’s Group, which allow members to focus on topics relevant to their rank tier, such as mentoring junior enlisted members and continuing education information. U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Jeffrey Koenig, 633rd Air Base Wing Protocol superintendent, is a member of Langley Top Three, the Air Force Sergeants Association, and an advisor to Airmen Committed to Excellence. “These organizations are a great way for Airmen to get information and develop professionally among their peers while setting a good example of leadership,� said Koenig. “The senior leadership organizations always look for opportunities to mentor junior enlisted Airmen.� All of the organizations have primary goals to foster morale and camaraderie among peers, while devel-

oping their members professionally by giving them the chance to organize volunteer opportunities. “These groups provide volunteer opportunities unique to their members,â€? said Senior Airman Major Powell, 633rd Communication Squadron client systems technician and ACE vice president. “These opportunities teach us that it is not just about us, it is about giving back to the local community as well. I think the best way to ďŹ nd yourself is through the service and betterment of others.â€? While each organization has educational and professional development opportunities unique to their members, they all ďŹ nd common ground when it comes to teaching Soldiers and Airmen the importance of being individuals who make their job duties, education, leadership and giving back to be priorities in their dayto-day lives. Service members interested in joining any professional development organization should contact their supervisor or ďŹ rst sergeant for more information.

â– Make a master resume with all previous employers, skills, certiďŹ cations, schooling, etc. â–  Research companies you may want to work for and the jobs they have available â–  Create a targeted resume speciďŹ cally for that job or career path by copying and pasting from your master resume â–  Highlight your education and work experience that is directly relevant to the types of jobs the employer is offering â–  Remember, recruiters have a limited amount of time to look over each resume, usually 30 to 45 seconds â–  Font sizes should be no larger than 12 points and no smaller than 11 â–  Headlines being either bold or underlined â–  Place your name and contact information at the top of the second page so if the pages get separated they can easily be matched again â–  Resumes should be no more than

two pages and if you are going to have a second page it must be at least a halfpage ■Don’t print resumes double-sided ■ Do not put “references available upon request� at the end. Instead, use the space to put more information ■ Always get a point of contact for the company to follow up with when handdelivering or sending out a resume

Job Fairs â– As soon as you even start to think about transitioning from the military, you should start attending job fairs â–  Research what companies will at the fair and what positions they have open â–  Have business cards of some kind, or a resume to leave with prospective employers â–  Only bring copies of your targeted resumes, or resumes focused towards a speciďŹ c occupational ďŹ eld â–  Dress for success; change out of your uniform and into appropriate attire. This step will convey that you are now concentrating on transitioning and you are ready for the next step â–  Remember that job fairs are very busy and your time with a perspective employer will be limited. â–  Prepare a 30-second “elevator speechâ€? focused around tying your skills and abilities to the job requirements â–  Ensure you are showing an employer the value you can bring to an organization

Interviewing â– Research the company so you know as much as you can about it â–  Remember that often the person interviewing you is not a professional interviewer and every question is asked for a reason. â–  Remember ďŹ rst impressions are everything. Show the same professionalism shown in the military â–  Show up early to your interview,

Graphic by Staff Sgt. Wesley Farnsworth

With the Department of Defense force reduction, Joint Base Langley-Eustis has increased efforts to ensure separating Service members are set up for success as they enter the civilian job market.To do this, JBLE will continue to hold workshops on resume writing and federal employment, as well as hosting job fairs, and offering Service members the chance to ask questions to panels of local employers.

but no more than 15 minutes early â– Greet the interviewer with a solid handshake and make good eye contact â–  Wait to sit down until you are asked, and when you do, sit without crossing your legs â–  Have a few follow-up questions to ask after the interviewer is done with their questions such as: • If they need you to clarify any answers • What is next in the process â–  Always ask for the job; don’t assume they know you want the job because you showed up for the interview When it comes to researching a company or searching for available jobs, the AFRC offers a database of jobs available in the area. They also offer the “employer panelâ€? workshop, which allows individuals to ask questions of employers around the community. All these resources are geared towards assisting a job seeker with writing a resume, attending job fairs, or going in for an interview. Additionally, the Army Community Services offers workshops on resume writing and federal employment that are available to Service members, dependents, civilians and retirees. While this may seem like a lot of information, Wilson and Bullis both stress the importance of networking and researching companies when starting to plan a transition. Preparing early can help save a lot of headaches while leaving military life to ďŹ nd work in the civilian sector.

For more information, contact the Airman and Family Readiness Center at 764-3990 or Army Community Services at 878-3173.

Upcoming Resume Writing Workshops: (Registration required, all classes are held from 9 to 11 a.m. at 650 Monroe Ave., Fort Eustis) â– Feb. 13 â–  March 21

Upcoming Federal Employment Workshops: (Registration required, all classes are held from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at 650 Monroe Ave., Fort Eustis) â– Feb. 27 â–  March 20

Upcoming Employer Panels Dates: (Registration required, all classes are held from 2 to 4 p.m. at 45 Nealy Ave, B Wing, room 201, Langley) â– March 5 â–  May 21 â–  July 18 â–  Sept. 19 â–  Nov. 19

Upcoming Job Fairs: â– Feb. 12, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., 100 19th St., Virginia Beach â–  March 27, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Fort Eustis Club, Fort Eustis â–  March 25, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., 740 Town Center, Newport News. â–  March 27, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., 1500 North Military Highway, Norfolk


14

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JANUARY 31, 2014

From horse-drawn to horsepower: Transportation Museum shares history By Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

DR. CALVIN R. WHITE, D.D.S.

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

Fort Eustis’ transportation mission history runs deep. Since the formation of the now-relocated Transportation School in 1943, the post has been a leader in transportation initiatives and innovations. All of Fort Eustis’ transportation history, and that of the whole U.S. Army, can be found in an unassuming building on a tree-lined street: the U.S. Army Transportation Museum. The museum contains transportation artifacts from the beginning of the Army, a library for research on all things transportation, guided tours, a gift shop and a room ďŹ lled with historic transportation pieces, which serve to educate and enlighten members of the Fort Eustis community. “Before the end of this year, we hope to cover all topics of our history from the Revolutionary War all the way until today,â€? said Matt Fraaz, Transportation Museum education specialist. “It is vital to have a comprehensive historical resource so future Soldiers can learn from the lessons of their ancestors.â€? The museum exhibits progress chronologically through the building, beginning with the Revolutionary War and ending with Operation Enduring Freedom. Since history is ongoing, the museum constantly acquires new items for display, and updates the facility. “We have two new [mine-resistant ambush protected vehicles] on their way here, in addition to two tanks for one of our carrier aircraft displays,â€? said Fraaz. “We are also constantly changing the backdrops and effects on our exhibits to give viewers the best experience possible.â€? Outside exhibits also highlight some larger equipment, such as airplanes, large track vehicles and trains. Most importantly, nearly every piece of equipment, from the jacket buttons to the railcars in the

Photo by Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill

U.S. Army 1st Lt. Demi Jones, 84th Ordnance Battalion movement control specialist, views an exhibit in the U.S. Army Transportation Museum at Fort Eustis, Jan. 28. According to museum staff, almost every museum exhibit piece is genuine, and some were even used in combat missions.

The museum contains transportation artifacts from the beginning of the Army, a library for research on all things transportation, guided tours, a gift shop and a room ďŹ lled with historic transportation pieces, which serve to educate and enlighten members of the Eustis community. yard, was donated, and some were even employed in the ďŹ eld. “We receive most of our items from donations either within the Army or from personal collectors,â€? said Fraaz. “The generosity of our donators and the diligent work of our researchers brought in the extensive collection we have.â€? Information on each piece and the missions they performed isn’t far away either. The museum has an entire library dedicated to the history of transportation, from mission statements to equipment manifests. “The library is free to use,â€? said Fraaz. “We offer newspaper articles,

training manuals and instructional videos. You name it, we have it.â€? Users may peruse the library during normal operating hours, but no items can leave the library. If the library and exhibits seem daunting, Fraaz said not to worry, the staff can help. “We offer free guided tours on request to any group,â€? explained Fraaz. “We go through each major conict in America’s history, focusing on Army transportation’s role.â€? Fraaz said he also offers educational programs, and will educate the community through school visitations. He believes understanding the history of Army transportation shouldn’t be a lecture-heavy experience, but rather an adventure, discovering how Soldiers of the past have the same ingenuity he sees today. “For decades, Fort Eustis has been home to transportation,â€? said Fraaz. “Whether I see a child smile at a big exhibit saying ‘Train, train!’ or a Soldier relating to the trials of his ancestors, I know our museum has done its job, and I know someone learned an important piece of history.â€?


JANUARY 31, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

•

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www.peninsulawarrior.com

7$3 $) UHYDPSV WUDQVLWLRQ SURJUDP By Staff Sgt. Steve Stanley AIR COMBAT COMMAND PUBLIC AFFAIRS

The U.S. Air Force is providing separating and retiring Airmen with the revamped Transition Assistance Program, which is now more comprehensive and standardized across the DoD. The goal of TAP is to reduce veteran unemployment, which is currently at 12.5 percent; however, the unemployment rate for veterans under 24 years of age has risen to 32 percent. “Our goal is to help our members from the highest rank to the lowest,� said Anna Bennett, Langley Air Force Base community readiness specialist. “All members receive identical information.� Pre-separation counseling provides information on transition benefits and assists members and spouses with assessing individual needs, referrals to service providers and future career guidance. Bennett said spouses are strongly encouraged to attend pre-separation counseling sessions. “The Airmen realize that it is valuable information and an opportunity to network and senior leaders get to guide our younger members,� she said. Transition assistance is recommended two years before retirement, and separating Airmen should begin looking into these programs one year out. “One challenge is making sure that we have time to give service members all of the information they need,� said Bennett. “Do this early and take advantage of the resources available. Don’t wait until it’s too late. A common misconception is that you have to have orders to attend the class. But in reality, you just have to have it in your mind.� The Airmen Family Readiness Center’s main goal for TAP is to help Service members transition successfully into civilian life. Individual transition plans are used to assist Service members identify a “game plan.� “It can be scary to write a resume or recreate a budget,� said Bennett. “We are here to help show [Service members] they have the skills required [to succeed] and that they are invaluable.� Optional training for higher education, entrepreneurial and vocational training is also available along with extensive counseling to help Airmen develop a individual transition plan that will outline education, training and employment objectives. “We want them to utilize the tools available to be successful,� said Bennett. “Airmen should know that we have programs like the employers panel and we have [Veterans Affairs representatives] to help them.� For Service members at geographically separated units, retiring or with a short-notice separation, a virtual curriculum has recently been made available.

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

JANUARY 31, 2014 According to the National Safety Council, at any given moment one in 50 drivers is not just impaired but legally intoxicated.Taking a taxi home after a night of drinking is a great way to get home and stay safe.

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$ GDQJHURXV PL[ 'UXQN GULYLQJ SXWV OLYHV DW ULVN By Jessica Rawlings U.S. ARMY PUBLIC HEALTH COMMAND

Drunk driving kills. On average, someone dies as a result of drunk driving every 53 minutes, and someone is injured as a result of drunk driving every 90 seconds. According to the National Safety Council, at any given moment one in 50 drivers is not just impaired but legally intoxicated; this number jumps to one in 10 on the weekends. In 2012, there were nearly 300,000 incidents of drinking and driving each day. Drunk driving costs the U.S. an estimated $132 billion per year, and costs each adult in the U.S. almost $500 per year in increased taxes due to the higher demand for law enforcement. In an effort to draw attention to this national tragedy, the National Safety Council has designated April as “Alcohol Awareness Prevention Month.” Alcohol is a depressant that slows down the brain and body. The first abilities that are altered are judgment and coordination. An impaired driver cannot recognize a dangerous situation and react quickly enough to avoid an accident. Unfortunately, because judgment is impaired, impaired drivers do not often realize they have had too much. Heavy alcohol consumption is a problem nationally and in the military. The Institute of Medicine recently reported the use of alcohol has spiked since the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan began. Nearly half of activeduty military personnel report being binge drinkers. Binge drinking is having five or more drinks on a single occasion at least once in the past 30 days; one drink is equal

According to the National Safety Council, at any given moment one in 50 drivers is not just impaired but legally intoxicated; this number jumps to one in 10 on the weekends. to 5 ounces of wine, 1.5 oz of 80-proof distilled spirits, or 12 ounces of regular beer. Unfortunately 20 percent of the population still admits to drinking and driving. Fortunately, drunk driving is 100% preventable. Appointing a designated driver who sticks to non-alcoholic beverages can save lives. If a designated driver slips or cannot be decided on, call a taxi (and keep a taxi company telephone number in your cell phone). If you are throwing a party, offer non-alcoholic drinks, arrange for a cab for someone that has had too much to drink, and do not be afraid to take someone’s car keys. You may save someone’s life. Even if you have not been drinking, there are ways to protect yourself on the road by knowing what to look for. According to law enforcement officials, there are several signs of drunk driving: wide turns, weaving, swerving, drifting, driving on the wrong side of the road, driving at a very slow rate, or stopping without reason. If you encounter someone on the road who you think is driving under the influence, keep a safe distance and call 1-1-0.


JANUARY 31, 2014

&RPPXQLW\ &RPPRQV ULEERQFXWWLQJ FHUHPRQ\ John Flood, 633rd Force Support Squadron deputy director, speaks during the Community Commons ribbon-cutting ceremony at Langley Air Force Base, Jan. 24.The new Community Commons is home to the Airman’s Attic,Thrift Shop, InformationTickets and Travel, and Heidi’s Cinderella Closet.

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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Peggy Jones, 633rd Force Support Squadron quilting instructor, performs a sewing demonstration after the ribbon-cutting ceremony.The 633rd Mission Support Group plans to add sewing, scrapbooking, photography and videography classes to the Community Commons.

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FROM THE HUTCHENS FAMILY TO YOURS... WE SALUTE YOU!

Photos by Airman 1st Class Victoria H. Taylor

(From left) U.S. Air Force Col. David Chisenhall, 633rd Mission Support Group commander, James Murrell, Langley Community Programs director, and Lt. Col. Charles Evitts, 633rd Contracting Squadron commander, perform the ribbon-cutting ceremony.

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VEHICLE PRICE MILEAGE 2010 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING ... $18,797 ...................62,395 2012 DODGE JOURNEY SE ................................ CALL FOR PRICE ......41,760 2012 FIAT 500 POP HATCHBACK ....................... $11,896 ...................26,068 2010 FORD EDGE SPORT ................................... $22,973 ...................54,869 2010 FORD F-150 LARIAT SUPERCREW ............ $31,575 ...................47,567 1999 FORD F-150 XLT EXTENDED CAB.............. $4,995 ...................182,153 2012 FORD FOCUS SE HATCHBACK................... $14,372 ...................28,505 2012 FORD FOCUS SE HATCHBACK................... $14,970 ...................20,331 1998 FORD MUSTANG GT 2D COUPE ................. $3,250 ...................126,500 2013 FORD MUSTANG V6 2D COUPE ................. $19,599 ...................17,244 2011 HONDA CR-V EX-L .................................... $22,600 ...................27,728 2013 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS.............................. $16,738 ...................18,016 2012 KIA FORTE EX 4D SEDAN .......................... $13,974 ...................33,237 2012 KIA SPORTAGE LX ..................................... $17,991 ...................16,449 2008 NISSAN ALTIMA 3.5 SE COUPE ................. $15,425 ...................47,516 2012 NISSAN PATHFINDER ................................ $24,550 ...................29,362 2011 NISSAN SENTRA 2.0 S.............................. $12,990 ...................41,422 2007 PONTIAC G6 BASE .................................... $5,995 ...................150,808 2012 TOYOTA CAMRY LE .................................... $17,550 ...................35,841 2012 VOLKSWAGEN TIGUAN S ........................... $17,997 ...................23,540

The Hutchens Family has Proudly Served the Military for More Than 90 Years!

*PRICES DO NOT INCLUDE TAX, TAGS AND TITLE FEES AND A $499.00 PROCESSING FEE. SALE ENDS 01/31/2014. PICTURED VEHICLES ARE FOR REFERENCE ONLY AND MAY NOT BE THE ACTUAL VEHICLE. ALL VEHICLES ARE SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE.

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

•

JANUARY 31, 2014

InTheNews

$UP\ WR RSHQ  SRVLWLRQV WR IHPDOH 6ROGLHUV WKLV $SULO By C. Todd Lopez ARMY NEWS SERVICE

About 33,000 positions in the Army today are closed to women because they were in units that were designated as direct ground combat. That will change this year in units that are not under Army Special Operations. The OfďŹ ce of the Secretary of Defense recently notiďŹ ed Congress of the Army’s intent to open those positions to women. The change is expected to take place in April 2014, said Col. Linda Sheimo, chief of the Command Programs and Policy Division at the Directorate of Military Personnel Management, Army G-1. Sheimo said that with recent force structure changes, the Army moved away from focusing on units. “Our plan allowed us to identify all the positions that were closed across the three components, regardless of the unit.â€? Those 33,000 positions do not include anything within the Special Operations community, she said. “When we complete congressional notiďŹ cation in April 2014, the Army will have opened approximately 55,000 positions to women, across all three components, since May 2012. “ Sheimo said. There are more than 400 military occu-

pational specialties, known as MOSs, in the Army, of those, 14 are closed to women. The positions that will open to women in April do not include jobs in MOSs that are closed to women. Instead, they are positions now open to women across the total force – positions which were previously closed prior to the notiďŹ cation. Sheimo said the Army still has more than 100,000 jobs closed to women. That includes those MOS that are closed to women. Among those MOS are the 12B combat engineer, 13B cannon crewmember, 11B infantryman, and 19K M1 armor crewman, for instance. The Army has a plan to determine whether these MOSs should open to women, Sheimo said, and women Soldiers may have the opportunity to serve in every position, unit, and MOSs where a male Soldier can currently serve. Before that happens, however, the Army Training and Doctrine Command is leading the effort to revalidate the physical standards required for entry into the 14 currently-closed MOSs. Sheimo explained that when the Army is complete with its efforts, all individuals joining the Army will understand what standards must be met to be awarded a military specialty. “Ensuring we have clear standards for all

Photo courtesy U.S. Army

Master Sgt. Renee Baldwin ďŹ res a .50-caliber machine gun during training last summer at Joint Multinational Training Command’s Grafenwoehr range in Germany.

Soldiers will ensure the best Soldiers are assigned to positions, something the Army is calling the ‘Soldier of 2020,’â€? Sheimo said. “What we are trying to do is get the best Solders for the future. The Army’s efforts across various spectrums will ensure all Soldiers have the opportunity to serve successfully.â€? The ďŹ rst MOS to ďŹ nish the revalidation will be 12B, combat engineer. When the validation is complete, TRADOC and Army G-1 will make a recommendation to the Secretary of the Army about opening the MOS to women Soldiers, or ask for an exception to keep the MOS closed to women. The Secretary will then review that recommendation, make his own decision, and pass his signed recommendation up

to the OfďŹ ce of the Secretary of Defense. The OSD will complete their own review of the Army’s recommendation and pass their signed recommendation on to Congress. After 30 in-session days of Congress, if lawmakers have not disagreed with the OSD’s recommendation, the Army can then begin recruiting female Soldiers into the previously closed-to-women MOS. For the 12B MOS, it is expected that the Army will have made its recommendation to the OSD by the end of 2014. The process must be completed for all 14 MOS’s that are currently closed to women, and Sheimo said by Jan. 1, 2016, the Army will have passed onto the OSD decisions on each of those.

AF to convene ďŹ scal 2014 Force Shaping Board in July By Debbie Gildea AIR FORCE PERSONNEL CENTER PUBLIC AFFAIRS

The Air Force will convene a ďŹ scal 2014 Force Shaping Board here July 14 to consider eligible ofďŹ cers within competitive categories for continued retention, Air Force Personnel Center ofďŹ cials said Jan. 27. Categories include line of the Air Force, LAF-judge advocate, biomedical sciences corps, dental corps, medical service corps and nurse corps. The purpose of the board is to retain ofďŹ cers whose careers illustrate suitability for continued service and future leadership

roles, said Lt. Col. Rick Garcia, the AFPC retirements and separations branch chief. “The board will make its determination using information such as selection briefs, performance reports, training reports and decorations,â€? Garcia said. “The board will also consider ofďŹ cers’ retention recommendation forms and any letters submitted by eligible ofďŹ cers to provide additional relevant information that is not included in other documents.â€? The board will evaluate active-duty LAF captains and ďŹ rst lieutenants in the 2009, 2010 and 2011 accession year groups (as computed by total active federal com-

missioned service date). The board will also consider LAF-J ofďŹ cers with a Jan. 1, 2009 to Dec. 31, 2011 date of rank to captain. The board will consider lieutenant colonels and below in the medical competitive categories in the 2009, 2010 and 2011 year groups. OfďŹ cers who are not selected for retention must separate no later than Dec. 31. OfďŹ cers who have an approved date of separation before Dec. 31, 2014 and those who entered active duty later than July 15, 2012 will not meet the board, Garcia said. OfďŹ cers with an approved DOS after Dec. 31, 2014 remain eligible

for board consideration, and if they are not selected for retention, their DOS will be curtailed to Dec. 31. In addition, ofďŹ cers with six or more years of total federal commissioned service or who have 15 or more years of total active service as of the mandatory separation date will not meet the board. A retention recommendation form must be accomplished for all eligible ofďŹ cers by their respective senior rater. Recommendation forms must be submitted to AFPC by June 12. SEE FORCE PAGE 19


JANUARY 31, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

19

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Army’s new officer rating form emphasizes leadership doctrine By 2nd Lieutenant Brooke Betit 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Beginning April 1, the U.S. Army will change their officer evaluation reporting system to a new format to analyze and rate officer performances in a manner more in line with Army doctrine. The system change switched DA Form 67-9 to DA Form 67-10, which has four different versions, or “grade plates”, based on the rank of the officer. “Our goal with the new system is to effectively link the evaluation of officers to our leadership doctrine, Army Training and Doctrine Publication 1: The Army and Army Doctrine Reference Publication 6-22: Army Leadership,” said Maj. Rebekah Lust, U.S. Army Human Resources Command assignments officer. One version of the evaluation system is for warrant officer one, chief warrant officer two, lieutenant and captain; another for chief warrant officer three through chief warrant officer five, major and lieutenant colonel; a third version for colonels and a fourth for brigadier generals. “The different versions focus on leadership attributes and competencies,” Lust said. “Officers will have to show strengths in a number of areas,

FORCE FROM PAGE 18 Officers eligible to meet the FSB are authorized to submit a letter to the board to address matters they believe merit consideration, Garcia said. Such letters must reach AFPC by July 10. Officers who are not selected for retention will not have to repay unearned portions of education assistance funds, special pay, bonuses or other monetary incentives. For specifics on Post 9/11 GI Bill benefits, officers should review PSDM 13-131 at the myPers link listed below or contact the career development section at their local military personnel section. Officers with more than six years of

and not just what they achieved, which is what the current form is focused on.” Sixteen boxes will be eliminated on the new DA 67-10, dealing with such items as “attributes, skills and actions.” Raters will be required to write an evaluation, rather than checking a box, regarding a particular officer’s attributes, specifically “character, presence and intellect.” Also, the different forms focus on the challenges that different levels of leadership face. “For example, a field-grade officer will be more focused on operational issues, as opposed to the tactical level of company-grade officers,” Lust said. The new system also keeps raters more accountable in providing accurate reports of their performers. Using the current system, raters can give all subordinates top-block, or “superior performance”, if they choose. The new system will only allow a rater to check the top block on less than 50 percent of the officers rated. “It provides more realistic ratings and reduces inflation,” said U.S. Army 1st Lieutenant Kyle Selig, B Company, 5-159 General Support Aviation Battalion executive officer, said. “I’d rather have an accurate picture of myself or my troops than try and figure out the true skills of a person based on an in-

flated system.” To enact the changes and quell potential confusion about the new product, a mobile training team was put into place. Lust was part of the team from Fort Knox who provided training for officers at Fort Eustis. Officers were briefed about the new system, data inLOWEST put, submission procedures and rating RATES IN philosophy. “One of the main reasons it was imDENBIGH! LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED portant to brief face-to-face was because we want officers to understand 15458 Warwick Blvd • Newport News that this is not a simple change in the 24-Hour Secured Property form,” Lust said. “This is a change in Management on Site • Larger Sizes Available how the Army will develop and assess Daily Access 7am to 9pm its officers.” Lust went on to outline other bene- MENTION THIS AD FOR 50% OFF FIRST 2 MONTHS fits of the new system. “The new officer rating system was developed as a web-based tool rather than a form,” she said. “That makes it quicker to use and better functionality in the system.” Lust referred to the Human Resource Center website for those who missed the training on Jan. 21-24. The Evaluations branch of the HRC is developing training videos to post on the website. The site should be updated in the next month for anyone seeking further clarification on the new rating system. To find out more information, visit the Army HRC at www.hrc.army.mil

active service may apply for voluntary separation pay. Those officers not selected for retention are also entitled to full separation pay if they have six or more but less than 20 years of active service as of the separation date. To be eligible for separation pay, officers must also sign the Individual Ready Reserve statement Officers selected for separation are authorized transition assistance program benefits, including permissive temporary duty, 180 days extended medical care for themselves and their families, and an identification card that grants commissary and exchange privileges for two years. All separating and retiring Airmen

must attend a transition assistance program offered at their local Airman and Family Readiness Center. The TAP program includes congressionally mandated pre-separation counseling; a required five-day workshop; veterans benefits briefings, which include details on disability; one-on-one assistance to develop an individual transition plan and a capstone which requires commander concurrence that the member has met all career readiness standards. Other related services include employment resources; financial planning and management; spouse employment assistance; relocation assistance and general information and referral.

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

EustisCommunity

JANUARY 31, 2014

Submit Eustis Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com

JBLE Tax Assistance Centers The Joint Base Langley-Eustis Tax Assistance Centers will open for business from Feb. 3 through April 15. Volunteers will assist customers on an appointment-only basis from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at offices on Fort Eustis and Langley Air Force Base. Tax services are available to active-duty Service members, retirees and military family members with valid identification. To schedule an appointment, call 878-2478 at Fort Eustis or 225-5777 at Langley Air Force Base.

Pay Day Scramble The Pines Golf Course will host a Pay Day Scramble starting at 11 a.m. Feb. 7. The event will include18 holes of golf, a cart, range balls, food and prizes. The cost is $25 for members, $18 for E4 and below, $20 for E5 and above, $40 for retirees and Department of Defense civilians and $45 for guests. For more information, call 878-2252.

Dinner for families of deployed Military families experiencing deployment or other dutyrelated separation are invited to attend a free dinner from 5:15 to 7 p.m. Feb. 11 at the Regimental Memorial Chapel. The schedule is as follows: ■ 5:15 p.m. – Welcome. ■ 5:30 p.m. – Dinner is served. ■ 6 to 7 p.m. – Craft and game time for children 3 1/2 and older. ■ 6:10 to 7 p.m. – Adult fellowship time. Free child care will be provided after dinner for children 3 1/2 and younger. For more information, contact Carole Carkhuff at 218-0871 or e-mail carkhuffs2@verizon.net.

SKIES Unlimited programs The Fort Eustis School of Knowledge, Inspiration, Exploration and Skills offers the following instructional programs for children and youth. ■ Gymnastics – Class types and times vary, Mondays and Wednesdays, ages 3-18. Tuition is $35. ■ Taekwondo – 5:30 to 6:15 p.m. for beginners; 6:15 to 7 p.m. for advanced students Tuesdays and Thursdays, ages 6-18. Tuition is $45. ■ Piano or Violin – Class times vary, Tuesday through Friday, ages 5-18. Tuition is between $60 to $120. Classes will take place at the Youth Center at 1102 Pershing Ave. The programs are open to children of active-duty military members, retirees, Department of defense civilians and contractors. To register or for more information, call 878-4025/5882 or visit www.eustismwr.com.

Scholarship applications ■ Scholarships for Military Children Program – Applications for the 2014 Scholarships for Military Children Program are available at commissaries worldwide or at www.militaryscholar.org. The application deadline is Feb. 28 and packages can be hand-delivered or mailed to a commissary. Faxed or e-mailed applications will not be accepted. Applicants must be a dependent or unmarried

Super Bowl party The Fort Eustis Club will host a Super Bowl party at 5 p.m. Feb. 2. Kickoff is at 6:30 p.m. and patrons can view the game on two widescreen televisions. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. To reserve a table, call 878-5700.

child of an active-duty, reserve or National Guard Service member or retiree, or a survivor of an active-duty or retired military member. Applicants and sponsors must also be enrolled in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System database and have a Department of Defense identification card. For more information about the scholarship, call (856) 616-9311 or visit militaryscholar@ scholarshipmanagers.com. ■ Army Emergency Relief Scholarships –The application period for 2014-15 Army Emergency Relief “needsbased” scholarships is open through May 1. AER supports the Spouse Education Assistance Program and the Maj. Gen. James Ursano Scholarship Program for dependent children. The entire application package must be submitted online including supporting documents, which will be outlined for the applicant based on data provided. To apply, visit www.aerhq.org.

Range schedule Ranges, training areas and associated facilities are off limits to personnel not engaged in scheduled firing, operations or inspections unless clearance is obtained (in person) from the Range Control Fire Desk or a designated Range Control technician. The Range Control office telephone number is 878-4412, ext. 226 or 878-3834, ext 234. The range operations schedule through Feb. 5 is: ■ Friday – Range 1, 2, 3 (7 a.m. to 5 p.m.) ■ Saturday and Sunday – Range 2, 3 (8 a.m. to 4 p.m.) ■ Monday through Wednesday – BTRACS, Range 1, 2, 3 (8 a.m. to 10 p.m.) All personnel are required to check in and out with Range Control before going into or departing from any range or training area.

Army Community Service Army Community Service classes and workshops for February will include: ■ Baby and Me Play Group – 10 to 11 a.m. onThursdays at 501 Madison Ave. ■ Civilian Professional Development – 10 to 11:30 a.m., Feb. 3, “Exploring PersonalityTraits;” 1:30 to 3 p.m., Feb. 11, “SuccessfulTeam Dynamics;” and 9 to 10:30 a.m., Feb. 24, “Learn to Communicate.” Registration is required. ■ Couponing Strategies – 1 to 2:30 p.m., Feb. 5 and 5:30 to 7 p.m., Feb. 6.

■ Credit Reporting, Scores and Debt Management – 9 to 10 a.m., Feb. 4 and 18. ■ DevelopingYour Financial Plan – 9 to 10 a.m., Feb. 11 and 25. ■ Effective Resume Writing – 9 a.m. to noon, Feb. 13. ■ Evenings with Army Family Team Building – 6 to 8 p.m., Feb. 4, “KnowYour Community Resources,” and 6 to 8 p.m., Feb. 11, “Military Family Preparedness.” Registration is required. ■ Federal Employment – 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 27. ■ Financial Readiness Training – 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Feb. 21. ■ Four Lenses Workshop – 5 to 7 p.m., Feb. 25. ■ Installation Volunteer Orientation – 10 to 11 a.m., Feb. 4. ■ ManagingYour CheckingAccount – 8:30 to 9:30 a.m., Feb. 20. ■ Play Mornings Play Group – 10 to 11:30 a.m. on Wednesdays at 1102 Pershing Ave. ■ Rear Detachment Commander/Family Readiness Group Training – 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Feb. 10. ■ ResiliencyTraining – 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Feb. 19-21. ■ Volunteer ManagementTraining – 1:30 to 2:30 p.m., Feb. 10. Registration is required. Unless otherwise noted, classes and briefings will take place in Bldg. 650, Monroe Ave. For more information, call 878-3638.

Family Advocacy Program The Family Advocacy Program is offering the following classes at 213 Calhoun St. ■ Active Parenting forTeens – 9 a.m. to noon, Feb. 21 and 28; March 7 and 14. ■ Anger Management – 1 to 2:30 p.m., March 18. ■ Family Advocacy Safety Education Seminar – 9 to 11 a.m., Feb. 20 and March 27. ■ Five Love Languages – 3:30 to 5:30 p.m., Feb. 13, and 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Feb. 14. ■ Journey to Strength – 1 to 2:30 p.m. on Thursdays. For more information or to register, call 878-0807. No children please.

Fort Eustis USO events The Fort Eustis United Service Organization is offering the following events at 833 Monroe Ave. ■ Super Bowl XLVIII Party – 5 p.m., Feb. 2. Light refreshments will be served. ■ Family Movie Night – 7 p.m., Feb. 7. The PG movie “Epic” will be shown and parents must stay with their children. Crafts will be provided and light refreshments will be served. ■ Winter Olympics Viewing – 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., Feb. 7-15. Light refreshments will be served. ■ Movie Marathon – noon to 6 p.m., Feb. 15-17. The “Hangover” movie trilogy will be shown on a rotating basis and light refreshments will be served. The events listed above are open to all military identification card holders and their families. Please RSVP at Facebook.com/USOHRCV/Events. For more information, call 878-2415.


JANUARY 31, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

LAFBCommunity

www.peninsulawarrior.com

Submit LAFB Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com

JBLE Tax Assistance Centers The Joint Base Langley-Eustis Tax Assistance Centers will open for business from Feb. 3 through April 15. Volunteers will assist customers on an appointment-only basis from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at offices on Fort Eustis and Langley Air Force Base. Tax services are available to active-duty Service members, retirees and military family members with valid identification. To schedule an appointment, call 878-2478 at Fort Eustis or 225-5777 at Langley Air Force Base.

Air Force Cycling Team registration The Air Force Cycling Team will celebrate its 20th anniversary at the “Register’s Annual Great Bicycle Ride Across Iowa” during the week of July 20. Registration is open to military, retirees, civilian employees or military dependents from Jan. 1 to Feb. 25. The AFCT’s objective during RAGBRAI is to display a positive and professional image to the public as well as offer assistance to those who need it throughout the week, advocating the Air Force’s wingman concept. Members of Team Langley and the National Capitol Region are looking for supporters who would enjoy the race either as a rider or supporter. For more information, visit the AFCT website at www. afcycling.com, or contact Mark Wilder at 225-4273 or mark.wilder.2@us.af.mil.

Inaugural LOA CRUD Tournament The Tidewater Logistics Officer Association will host its inaugural “CRUD” tournament from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. Feb. 21 at the Langley Club. Crud is a fast-paced game loosely based on billiards. This event is free and open to Joint Base Langley-Eustis members. Each team must contain for members. If a team does not have four members the event point-of-contacts will make every effort to put those interested on a team. Registration is open until Feb. 7. For more information or to register, contact 2nd Lt. Kevin Mendelsohn at kevin.mendelsohn@us.af.mil or 2250364 or 2nd Lt. Michael Weaver at michael.weaver.27@ us.af.mil or 764-2063.

Black History Month luncheon The 2014 Black History Month luncheon will take place from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 28 at the Bayview Commonwealth Center. Lunch will be a soul food buffet. Tickets are $15 for club members and $17 for nonmembers. For more information, contact Tech. Sgt. Simone Stewart at simone.stewart@langley.af.mil or 225-4309, Staff Sgt. Na’Tasha Wooten at natasha.wooten@langley. af.mil or 225-6830, or Staff Sgt. Tanesha Allen at tanesha.allen@langley.af.mil or 225-6689.

Month of the Military Woman Golf Tourney The Langley African American Heritage Council will host a golf tournament to celebrate Women’s History Month from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. March 7 at the Eaglewood

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Home-buying seminar Family Advocacy Program classes ■

Strengthening Bonds – The Family Advocacy Program will host “Strengthening Bonds” classes from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. each Wednesday from Feb. 26 to March 26. These classes will aim to enhance the knowledge and skills to strengthen marriages through a combination of discussions and exercises. ■ Magic Parenting – The Family Advocacy Program will host “1, 2, 3 Magic Parenting” classes from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Feb. 6 and from 10 a.m. to noon Feb. 13, 20 and 27. The classes will offer positive discipline techniques for parents of children from the ages of 2 to 12 through discussions and exercises. ■ Healthy relationship skills for singles – The Family Advocacy Program will host a “Healthy Relationship Skills for Singles” class from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Feb. 19. This class will discuss and offer information about creating healthy, sustainable relationships. ■ New and Expecting Fathers – The Family Advocacy Program will host a “New and Expecting Father’s” class from 8 a.m. to noon March 6. This class will offer information to fathers on caring for their child through a series of exercises. For more information or to register, call 764-2427.

The 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron Housing Office will host a home-buying seminar on the first or second Monday of each month from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. until Nov. 3. Three industry representatives, including a realtor, lender and home inspector, will host each class to help participants understand Virginia state laws and procedures. Children and pets are not allowed to attend these classes. For more information and specific class times, contact David Kea at david.kea@langley.af.mil, or at 764-5040.

Langley Customer Service Office hours update Beginning Jan. 2, 2014, the Langley Customer Service Office will utilize “Military in Uniform Priority hours” on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays from 7:30 to 9:30 a.m. at the Langley Air Force Base MPF. An updated category of “Active Duty in Uniform” will be available on the sign-in computer located in the Customer Service waiting area. For more information, contact Michael Halacy at 7642270 or michael.halacy.ctr@us.af.mil.

Discounted tickets and passes Discounted tickets and season passes to local amusement parks are available through Langley Information, Tickets and Tours. For more information, call 764-7176.

Golf Course. The event aims to raise the awareness of and educate the community about contributions women have made within our military communities. Event check-in will begin at 7 a.m. For more information, contact Master Sgt. Alvin Harris at alvin.harris@langley.af.mil or 764-4408/4410.

Volunteer drivers needed

Upcoming HAWC classes

The Virginia Peninsula Challenger Little League will host registration for the coming Spring Season at Newport News Midtown Community Center to Feb. 8 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Feb. 26 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., and March 15 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. For more information, contact Pat Swett at 660-8054 or KimCat74@gmail.com.

‘Correct your Weakness’ – The Health and Wellness Center will host “Correct your Weakness” at 3 p.m. on Tuesdays at the Shellbank Fitness Center at Langley Air Force Base. The course will runs until April 1, and consists of four classes which address issues that occur during strength training. Attendees are required to wear physical training gear to the program. ■ ‘Weighting on Women’ – The Health and wellness Center will host “Weighting on Women” every second Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Shellbank Fitness Center at Langley Air Force Base. The class will address women interested in becoming leaner or stronger. Attendees are required to wear Physical Training gear to the class. For more information, contact Tiffany Owen at Tiffany. owen.3.ctr@us.af.mil or call 764-8141.

Bateman Library hours of operation The Bateman Library’s hours of operation are now Tuesdays through Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information, contact the Bateman Library at 764-2906.

Volunteer drivers are needed to transport disabled veterans to appointments in Richmond and Hampton. A van will be provided for transportation. For more information, contact Richard Moore at 804-815-0730.

Challenger Little League

DD Form 214 hard copy no longer available Copies one and four of the DD Form 214 hard copy are no longer mailed to Service members. The policy will only affect forms filed at the Air Force Personnel CenterTotal Force Service Center. For individuals who began terminal leave before Dec. 1, 2013, hard-copy DD Form 214s will still be mailed. For more information, contact Staff Sgt. Darlene Rust at 574-5611 or 1st Lt. Robert Washburn at 764-8598.

Airman’s Attic Accepting Donations The Airmen’s Attic is accepting gently used donations. Housewares, kitchen items, linens and clothing are needed, and items such as large couches, mattresses or box springs will not be accepted. The Airman’s Attic will not accept broken furniture.


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

OutsideTheGate

JANUARY 31, 2014

Submit Outside The Gate announcements to pw1@militarynews.com

Virginia War Museum

Civil War ‘Walk and Talk’

■ Salute to the Tuskegee Airmen – A “Salute to the Tuskegee Airmen” will be held from noon to 3 p.m. Feb. 1. Members of the Tuskegee Airmen will discuss artifacts on display from noon to 1 p.m. A movie will be shown from 1 to 3 p.m. followed by guest speakers relating their wartime military experiences. ■ African-American History Month Film Fest – The museum will host a film festival at 1 p.m. featuring movies with African-American themes. The following movies are free with each day’s paid admission: Feb. 8: “Buffalo Soldiers” Feb. 15: “The Bicycle Corps: America’s Black Army on Wheels” Feb. 22: “Liberators: Fighting on Two Fronts in World War II” The museum is located at 9285 Warwick Boulevard in Newport News. Admission is $6 for adults, $5 for activeduty military and senior citizens ages 62 and older, $4 for children ages 7-18, and free for children ages 6 and under. For more information, call 247-8523 or visit www.warmuseum.org.

The York County Parks, Recreation and Tourism office will host a free Civil War “Walk and Talk” from 10 a.m. to noon Feb. 8 at New Quarter Park at 1000 Lakeshead Drive in Williamsburg. J. Michael Moore, Lee Hall Mansion historian and curator, will discuss the Battle of Williamsburg as he leads visitors from Redoubt 12 to Redoubt 13; the original earthen fortifications that were part of Williamsburg’s line of defense. For more information, call 890-3500 or 890-5840.

Free plant pruning clinics The York and Poquoson Extension office will host free plant pruning clinics from 10 a.m. to noon at various locations. Participants will be taught the proper techniques to use in pruning ornamentals to improve plant health and reduce the need for pesticides. Clinics will be held on the following dates and locations: ■ Feb. 1 – Grafton True Value Hardware. ■ Feb. 8 – Taylor’s Do-It Center in Poquoson. ■ Feb. 22 – Ken Matthews Garden Center in Yorktown. To register, call 890-4940 or email ex199@vt.edu and include your name, address, phone number and date preferences.

Mariners’ Museum ‘First Thursdays’ The Mariners’ Museum will host its free “First Thursdays” social event from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Feb. 6 at 100 Museum Drive in Newport News. Activities will include live music, a 50/50 raffle and access to the Age of Exploration, Nelson Touch and Defending the Seas galleries. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. For more information, visit www.marinersmuseum.org or call 596-2222.

Home and Garden Show The 2014 Hampton Roads Home and Garden Show will be held Feb. 7-9 at the Hampton Roads Convention Center at 1610 Coliseum Drive. Sponsored by the Peninsula Housing and Builders Association, the show features home and garden experts, a custom landscape giveaway, Habitat for Humanity Restoration Challenge and entertainment by “K-9’s in Flight.” Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for military and senior citizens ages 62 and older, and free for children ages 12 and under. Hours are 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Feb. 7-8 and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Feb. 9. For more info, visit http://hamptonroadshomeshow.com.

Peninsula Fine Arts Center

File photo by Senior Airman Antoinette Gibson

Military Appreciation Night The Norfolk Admirals hockey team presents Military Appreciation Night at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 7 at the Norfolk Scope at 201 E. Brambleton Ave. The Admirals will play the Hartford Wolf Pack, an affiliate of the New York Rangers. Single game tickets purchased at the Scope Box Office are $11 with valid military identification. Group tickets are $9 each for 15 or more (purchased through the Admirals Group Sales office seven days in advance). To purchase tickets, contact Charlie Colon at charlie@norfolkadmirals.com or call 640-1212, ext. 23.

World of Pets Expo The World of Pets Expo will take place Feb. 15-16 at the Hampton Roads Convention Center at 1610 Coliseum Drive.The event will feature products and services for pet care and training, interactive and educational presentations, entertainment, contests and door prizes. Admission is $9 for adults, $5 for ages 5-12 and free for children ages 4 and under. Tickets are available online or payable by cash at the door. Hours are 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Feb. 15 and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Feb. 16. For more information, call (800) 882-9894 or visit www. worldofpets.org.

‘Veterans Writing Project’ workshop The College of William and Mary’s Mason School of Business will sponsor a free “Veterans Writing Project” workshop from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Feb. 22-23 in Williamsburg. Participants will receive a course curriculum, instruction from professional writers and one-on-one guidance. Veterans will be encouraged to continue working on their projects and submit their work for publication following the workshop. The event is open to all veterans, active-duty Service members and their family members. To register, e-mail sjpressler@email.wm.edu or jpcimino@wm.edu

Registration is open for the following winter art classes and workshops: ■ After School Clay Camp – 4 to 5:30 p.m., onWednesdays from Feb. 12 through March 5. Students ages 9-12 will have the opportunity to play with different forms of hand building, ranging from pinch pots to assembly of slab pieces. Tuition includes a $10 materials fee. The cost is $85 for members and $95 for non-members. ■ American Impressionists Painting – 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Feb. 19 and 20 or 1:30 to 4:30 p.m., March 15 and 16. The classes will begin with drawing in the American Impressionism gallery followed by studio painting or drawing. Bring your own painting supplies, pastels or any other material. Paper and drawing materials for gallery work will be provided. The cost is $85 for members and $100 for non-members. ■ Exploring Encaustic Painting – 10:15 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Feb. 8 and 1:15 to 3:30 p.m., Feb. 9. Students will learn how to paint with wax including creating their own encaustic medium and paints. Tuition includes a materials fee. The cost is $100 for members and $120 for nonmembers. ■ Origami Time – 6 to 8:30 p.m., on Thursdays from Feb. 20 through March 13. Come join us and learn how to make decorative boxes, animals, flowers and jewelry using the art of Japanese paper folding. The class is open to ages 17 and older, and all materials are included. The cost is $90 for members and $105 for non-members. ■ Papermaking Workshop – 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Feb. 22. Students can create handmade papers from materials found in nature. Art and recycling will be combined to produce papers suitable for framing, journaling, sculpting, mixed media and printmaking. Bring a bagged lunch. The cost is $70 for members and $85 for non-members. ■ Surface Design and Decoration – 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., on Fridays from Jan. 31 through Feb. 28. Learn how to decorate pottery using brushwork, slip trailing, stenciling, layering and resist techniques. The cost is $120 for members and $140 for non-members. ■ Watercolor on Gesso: Energize Your Paintings – 9:30 a.m. to noon, on Tuesdays from Feb. 4 through April 22. Classes will focus on the techniques of painting on gessoed paper with an emphasis on creating original designs. The cost is $210 for members and $230 for nonmembers. The Peninsula Fine Arts Center is located at 101 Museum Drive in Newport News. To register, call 596-8175 or for more information, visit www.pfac-va.org.


JANUARY 31, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

•

Classifieds TO PLACE AN AD...

BY PHONE:

BY FAX: (757) 853-1634

MILITARY NEWSPAPERS OF VIRGINIA

Call: (757) 222-3990 Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

23

www.peninsulawarrior.com

BY MAIL:

DEADLINE: Reader & Display Thursday 5:00 p.m. (week prior)

BY EMAIL:

PENINSULA WARRIOR adswork@militarynews.com CLASSIFIEDS 150 W. Brambleton Ave. Norfolk, VA 23510

Call 222-3 990 today!

Wanted To Buy WWII Relics. Retired Vet seeks WWII helmets, medals, daggers, etc. 757-869-1739 Her personal assistant

Furniture-Household

Her cook

Living Room Elegant Table purchased from Haverty's - $300 (Hampton). Brand New, tags still on 63"L x 34W" glass top stunning table. Call 201-803-3482

Her housekeeper

Free!

Brand New

Submit your classified ad and advertise for FREE Restrictions do apply see below for details

Layaway Available MATTRESS SETS Full- $99, Queen- $129, King- $169 40% Military Discount on all other sets!

Qualifications:

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Can deliver. 757-706-3667

For Rent-House (All)

Get online!

Her nurse

Hampton, , 3bd 2.5bth 1600 Sqft 10M from JBLE,fenced yard $1400 Ph:268-9209

Easy!

For Rent-Townhomes Hampton- 5 Salt March Quay Townhouse 2Br, 2.5Ba. $1195 mo. Tony 757-392-6275

Automobiles for Sale

Her daughter

2014 Chevrolet 1500 GM Employee discount to all military Call 757-450-7221.

Caring for a loved one requires playing many roles you never expected. But you’re not alone.

Submit online at: www.forteustiswheel.com/free &RQQHFW ZLWK H[SHUWV DQG RWKHU FDUHJLYHUV

DDUSRUJFDUHJLYLQJ 

•

For active-duty, retired military, their eligible family members and active or retired civil service employees If you are retired military or retired DOD civilian, include current employer and work phone number on the application.

Restrictions: • Only 5 ads per week, per household • Renewals, corrections and cancellations cannot be taken by phone and must be resubmitted • Illegible, too long or otherwise do not conform to instructions will not be published and must be resubmitted for the next issue • Automotive ads must begin with make, model and year • Real estate ads must begin with name of city, neighborhood and must be your primary residence. • Ads will not be accepted via official mailing channels such as guard mail or postage and fees paid indicia. • Free ads cannot be of a commercial nature (i. e., business opportunities, help wanted, etc) and must be personal property of the eligible member. Should not represent a sustained income or business or listed through agents or representatives. • When advertising a home for rent or home for sale, the home must be THE PRIMARY RESIDENCE. (All rental properties are considered paid ads.) WE DO NOT ACCEPT CALLS FOR FREE CLASSIFIED ADS Deadline Thursday, 5 p.m. for the following week’s publications

   

    


24

www.peninsulawarrior.com

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

JANUARY 31, 2014

JUST ANNOUNCED

THE TOYOTA MILITARY INCENTIVE IS NOW EXTENDED TO RETIREES OR VETERANS HONORABLY DISCHARGED WITHIN ONE YEAR OF SERVICE AND HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS OF ELIGIBLE QUALIFYING MILITARY PERSONNEL.

THANKS TO ALL THE BRAVE MEN AND WOMEN FOR YOUR SERVICE TO OUR COUNTRY.

1,000

$

NEW 2014 CAMRY

(excludes 2014.5 models and hybrids)

NEW 2013 RAV4

NEW 2014 COROLLA

LEASE AN LE FOR

199mo.

$

LEASE AN LE FOR

$

159mo.

24 mos. $2099 tax, registration, insurance and

due at 24 mos. $2099 signing tax, registration, insurance and

dealer fees are extra.

dealer fees are extra.

due at signing **

NEW 2013 PRIUS

LEASE AN LE FOR

189mo.

$

24 mos. $2999 tax, registration, insurance and

due at signing **

LIFTBACK

LEASE A PRIUS TWO FOR

199mo.

$

due at 24 mos. $2799 signing tax, registration, insurance and

dealer fees are extra.

**

dealer fees are extra.

U.S. Military

Incentive* CAN BE COMBINED WITH TOYOTA SPECIAL CASH BACK OR SPECIAL FINANCING OR SPECIAL LEASES!

Plus

PAY NO SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE WITH

Or choose from 10 vehicles with

0

% APR

NEW 2014 CAMRY, CAMRY HYBRID, VENZA, SIENNA, TUNDRA NEW 2013 PRIUS LIFTBACK, RAV4, AVALON, AVALON HYBRID, HIGHLANDER

CASEY TOYOTA

601 East Rochambeau Drive • Williamsburg 757-259-1000 • caseytoyota.com

CHARLES BARKER TOYOTA 1877 Laskin Road • Virginia Beach 757-437-4000 • charlesbarkertoyota.com

CHECKERED FLAG TOYOTA 5301 Virginia Beach Blvd. • Virginia Beach 757-490-1111 • checkeredflagtoyota.com

FIRST TEAM TOYOTA

3400 Western Branch Blvd. • Chesapeake 757-673-2345 • firstteamtoyota.com

GLOUCESTER TOYOTA 6357 George Washington Hwy. • Gloucester 804-693-2100 • gloucestertoyota.com

PEARSON TOYOTA

12978 Jefferson Ave. • Newport News 757-874-6000 • pearsontoyotascion.com

FINANCING

(excludes hybrids)

PRIORITY TOYOTA GREENBRIER 1800 Greenbrier Parkway • Chesapeake 757-366-5000 • prioritytoyota.com

RK TOYOTA

2301 W. Mercury Blvd. • Hampton 757-838-5000 • rktoyota.com

Smartphone users scan here for more incentive information. Go to gettag.mobi to download the free application. *HOW TO QUALIFY: 1.BE IN CURRENT ACTIVE DUTY STATUS IN THE U.S. MILITARY (NAVY, ARMY, AIR FORCE, MARINES, NATIONAL GUARD, COAST GUARD AND ACTIVE RESERVE) OR A U.S. MILITARY INACTIVE RESERVE (I.E., READY RESERVE) THAT IS PART OF THE INDIVIDUAL READY RESERVE, SELECTED RESERVE AND INACTIVE NATIONAL GUARD. RETIRED MILITARY PERSONNEL ARE NOT ELIGIBLE EXCEPT FOR RETIREES OR VETERANS HONORABLY DISCHARGED WITHIN ONE YEAR OF SERVICE AND HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS OF ELIGIBLE QUALIFYING MILITARY PERSONNEL. 2.PROVIDE VERIFIABLE PROOF OF MILITARY STATUS OR ACTIVE SERVICE AT THE TIME OF PURCHASE: LEAVE AND EARNING STATEMENT OR MILITARY IDENTIFICATION CARD. 3.RECEIVE A SALARY SUFFICIENT TO COVER ORDINARY LIVING EXPENSES AND PAYMENTS FOR YOUR TOYOTA. 4.RECEIVE CREDIT APPROVAL THROUGH A TOYOTA DEALER AND TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. INCENTIVE OFFERED BY TOYOTA MOTOR SALES, U.S.A., INC. ON LEASE CONTRACTS INCENTIVE MUST BE APPLIED TOWARD THE AMOUNT DUE AT LEASE SIGNING OR TOWARD THE CAPITALIZED COST REDUCTION. ON FINANCE CONTRACTS, INCENTIVE MUST BE APPLIED TOWARD THE DOWN PAYMENT. ONE INCENTIVE PER FINANCE OR LEASE TRANSACTION. NOT COMPATIBLE WITH THE TOYOTA COLLEGE GRADUATE INCENTIVE PROGRAM. FINANCE OR LEASE CONTRACT MUST BE DATED BY FEBRUARY 3, 2013 FOR INCENTIVE OFFER. THE MILITARY INCENTIVE PROGRAM IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE OR TERMINATION AT ANY TIME. OFFERS ON APPROVED CREDIT TO QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS THROUGH A PARTICIPATING TOYOTA DEALERSHIP AND TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. TERMS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS APPLY, INCLUDING A MAXIMUM TERM OF 60 MONTHS ON FINANCE CONTRACTS. PROGRAM IS AVAILABLE AT PARTICIPATING DEALERS IN MARYLAND, VIRGINIA, WEST VIRGINIA, PENNSYLVANIA, AND DELAWARE; AND MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE IN ALL STATES. NOT ALL APPLICANTS WILL QUALIFY. SEE PARTICIPATING DEALER FOR DETAILS. **ALL LEASE OFFERS CUSTOMER IS RESPONSIBLE FOR EXCESSIVE WEAR AND EXCESS MILEAGE CHARGES OF $.15 PER MILE IN EXCESS OF 24,000 MILES. YOUR PAYMENT MAY VARY BASED ON DEALER PARTICIPATION AND FINAL NEGOTIATED PRICE. NOT ALL CUSTOMERS WILL QUALIFY. TAX, REGISTRATION, INSURANCE, AND DEALER FEES ARE EXTRA. CAMRY DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $1900 DOWN (AFTER APPLICATION OF $950 TOYOTA LEASE CASH INCENTIVE FROM TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES), FIRST $199 PAYMENT, AND NO SECURITY DEPOSIT. 2014 CAMRY LE 4 CYLINDER AUTOMATIC MODEL 2532, MSRP $23,930. EXCLUDES 2014.5 MODELS. COROLLA DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $1940 DOWN FIRST $159 PAYMENT, AND NO SECURITY DEPOSIT. 2014 COROLLA LE 4 CYLINDER AUTOMATIC MODEL 1852, MSRP $19,110. RAV4 DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $2,810 DOWN, (AFTER APPLICATION OF $250 TOYOTA LEASE CASH INCENTIVE FROM TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES), FIRST $189 PAYMENT, AND NO SECURITY DEPOSIT. 2013 RAV4 2WD 4 CYLINDER AUTOMATIC MODEL 4430, MSRP $24,295. PRIUS LIFTBACK DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $2,600 DOWN, (AFTER APPLICATION OF $550 TOYOTA LEASE CASH INCENTIVE FROM TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES), FIRST $199 PAYMENT, AND NO SECURITY DEPOSIT. 2013 PRIUS LIFTBACK MODEL #1223, MSRP $24,995. ***TOYOTACARE COVERS NORMAL FACTORY SCHEDULED SERVICE. PLAN IS 2 YEARS OR 25K MILES, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. THE NEW VEHICLE CANNOT BE PART OF A RENTAL OR COMMERCIAL FLEET, OR A LIVERY/TAXI VEHICLE. SEE PARTICIPATING TOYOTA DEALER FOR PLAN DETAILS. VALID ONLY IN THE CONTINENTAL U.S. AND ALASKA. ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE DOES NOT INCLUDE PARTS AND FLUIDS. †ALL APR OFFERS: 0% APR FINANCING TERMS VARY BY MODEL. NOT ALL BUYERS WILL QUALIFY. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.OFFERS DO NOT INCLUDE DEALER FEES. OFFERS END 02/03/14.

**

Peninsula Warrior Jan. 31, 2014 Army Edition  

Fort Eustis

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