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:DUULRU J O I N T July 12, 2013 Vol. 4, No. 27

B A S E

L A N G L E Y - E U S T I S

P u b l i s h e d i n t h e i n t e re s t o f p e r s o n n e l a t J o i n t B a s e L a n g l e y - E u s t i s

Fireworks, fun, freedom JBLE celebrates Independence Day with Hampton Roads communities – Page 12

HISTORY

Montford Point Marines share military legacy — Page 8

VISIT

WWE Superstars tour Langley AFB — Page 21

For more online content, check out JBLE.af.mil

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HEALTHCARE MCAHC’s updated operating rooms provide new medical capabilities — Page 3

Air force EDITION

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Health&Fitness

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0&$+&¶V XSGDWHG RSHUDWLQJ URRPV SURYLGH QHZ FDSDELOLWLHV By Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Approximately 1,500 surgeries were performed at Fort Eustis, Va., in 2012. This year, the McDonald Army Health Center plans to perform another 2,000 – and that’s the lowest estimate. After opening in June, the new operating rooms at MCAHC have given medical professionals new patient care capabilities, faster recovery times and additional services. “We spent $5.5 million renovating the whole second floor of the health center,” said U.S. Army Maj.Anissa Buckley, nursing and patient support services assistant deputy commander. “As well as updating other surgical clinics on the floor, we acquired two state-of-the-art operating rooms.” The health center originally housed three

operating rooms, but new technology prompted the creation of new facilities. During renovations, the OR closed two of the three rooms, leaving only one room for the entire section. Buckley arrived at MCAHC prior to the beginning of renovations and explained how the OR’s capabilities have improved. “Before the renovations, rooms were antiquated, to say the least,” said Buckley. “We were working with portable surgical towers, which were more difficult to see the surgical area adequately.” While Buckley said patients received quality care before, she and her colleague, U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Jose Prieto, noncommissioned officer in charge of the OR, agreed patients’ waiting times were too long.

A surgical technician cuts suturing line during a shoulder surgery, June 26 at Fort Eustis.The new operating rooms in McDonald Army Health Center provides a larger area for surgeons and staff to move around, giving them space to perform delicate surgeries. The health center originally housed three operating rooms, but new technology prompted the creation of new facilities. Photo by Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill

SEE SURGICAL PAGE 4

Lifestyle fitness: Proper preparation necessary before any workout routine By Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Photo by Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill

Preparing for a workout routine is critical to achieve results and prevent injury. Service members at Joint Base Lanlgey-Eustis can utilize services at McClellan Fitness Center at Fort Eustis or the Health and Wellness Center at Langley Air Force Base.

Approximately 115 deaths occur in gyms across the U.S. each year as a result of everything from weight-lifting incidents to heat exhaustion, according to the New York Times. Sadly, fitness professionals believe many of these victims could have avoided such tragedy had they been better prepared by stretching, hydrating and learning about exercising before they hit the gym. Bob Ornelaz, Fort Eustis, Va., Fit-toWin director, uses different methods to help clients understand their limitations. “Preparation is critical to any workout routine I make,” said Ornelaz. “Knowing yourself and your limitations is part of that preparation, too. “MicroFit gives users an overall pic-

ture of their present fitness condition,” he continued. “Utilizing blood pressure readings, body fat composition and so on, the program shows us your current level of flexibility, aerobic strength and anaerobic strength.” Ornelaz said flexibility plays an important role in total fitness. Knowing an individual’s flexibility will give a picture of what exercises might be dangerous and how each person should approach their routines. “I definitely require my clients to stretch after their warm-up and after their exercise,” said Ornelaz. “Stretching muscles can help [shorten] recovery times and prevent injury so that client can be happy and pain-free after a workout.” According to the American College of Sports Medicine, stretching before a workout and after a warm-up prevents

muscle strains, and some studies show post-exercise stretching might reduce muscle soreness. For activities such as weight-lifting, stretching might be more important if exercises involved wide ranges of motion. ACSM states static stretches of less than 30 seconds do not impair strength, and workouts consisting of less vigorous movement need not require as much stretching. After an exercise, however, ACSM recommended stretching used muscles. After stretching and warming up, Ornelaz said there are two different ways prospective athletes might begin training; aerobically or anaerobically. “Aerobic exercise concerns heart strength, fat loss, lung efficiency and vascular efficiency,” said Ornelaz. SEE FITNESS PAGE 4


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SURGICAL FROM PAGE 3 “We performed 1,500 operations in 2012, which is equivalent to approximately seven surgical procedures per day,” said Prieto. “Now, we see around 10 patients per day, and we plan to exceed the goal of 2,000 operations for 2013, even though we’ve only had the new OR since the beginning of June.” Themajorreasonforthisincreaseistheopening of two operating rooms as opposed to one. Seven specialties utilize the OR: ophthalmology, podiatry, orthopedics, dental, ear-nosethroat (ENT), general surgery and women’s health. With so many specialties clamoring to use one room and with variations of time for surgery for each service, the OR was constantly filled, adding to patients’ waiting times. According to Buckley, once two rooms became available, the wait time dropped dramatically. Additionally, equipment plays a major role in the efficiency and ease surgeons experience in the OR. Both rooms have builtin surgical suites to make the patients more comfortable and to allow more space for the surgical team. High-definition, flat-screen monitors provide the doctors a clearer view of the surgical area, and allow for quick assessments of surgical complications. Finally, the material service component of the hospital acquired better, quicker cleaning capabilities when the second floor was renovated. New sterilizers and surgical washers clean equipment faster so doctors never have to wait on surgical instruments to begin an operation. After all of these new additions to the work area, Buckley still believes patient care is the most important reason behind the updates. “All this new equipment makes my job easier, but the fact that our patients have quality

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force New sanitary stations and cleaning facilities within the operating room at McDonald Army Health Center allow surgeons and staff to handle more surgeries a day, as equipment is more readily available. Photo by Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill

care is what matters at the end of the day,” said Buckley. “Since the new OR was created, we have fewer complaints from our patients, and the surgical wait time has decreased.” Brian Bowen, an OR patient, recognized the improved care provided by the OR team. “Even though this is a small facility, the staff members function like it’s a major hospital,” said Bowen. “They are very professional, and the second you walk in the building, you immediately receive one-on-one service.” The perioperative team at McDonald expects an increase in its number of surgical cases. Buckley looks forward to a new ENT surgeon joining her staff, which will enable the OR to provide additional surgical procedures, including laser tattoo removal, ear-pinning for children and facial plastic surgery. With a new surgeon, new equipment, new facilities and a seasoned surgical staff, Buckley and Prieto have more than just a new workspace; they have the opportunity to provide better care to the Fort Eustis community.

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FITNESS FROM PAGE 3 Ornelaz said preparation for an aerobic exercise requires individual knowledge of self. Those wishing to hit the treadmill to trim their waistline need to know one key component before beginning an exercise. “Understanding your target heart rate is critical to improving your cardiovascular strength and losing weight,” said Ornelaz. “While individual cardio-intensive workouts may work different parts of the body, it is always necessary to know your target heart rate so you don’t exhaust yourself too quickly, or work yourself too little.” Ornelaz suggests seeing him for a completely accurate measure of individual target heart rates, however there is another mathematical method. By taking 220 minus the age of the athlete, one can find maximum heart rate. In order to workout aerobically, maintain 65 to 80 percent of that maximum for long periods of time. Following aerobic endurance, strength training requires knowledge of muscular power and exercise know-how. Weight training and bodyweight exercises comprise the majority of strength work, and understanding varying difficulty levels could be the difference between pain or gain. Utilizing strength tests and fitness awareness gives Ornelaz the capability to place his client in their comfortable range of workouts. “First, I test bicep strength to see

how a client’s overall strength measures up,” said Ornelaz. “Second, I see what the client knows about exercise and recommend they begin with either bodyweight, selectorized, plateloaded or free-weight exercises.” The different types of exercises vary in difficulty, and knowing what type best suits an individual’s desired results is paramount to muscular fitness. Tony Arroyo, Langley Air Force Base, Va., Health and Wellness Center exercise physiologist, suggested one way to learn how to work out safely without the help of a trainer or test. “When I instruct a client new to the gym, I always start them off with light weights performing about 15 repetitions per set,” he said. “Using selectorized machines and exercising large muscle groups will give you a good measure of your strength prior to a workout routine, and make you comfortable with the different motions an exercise requires.” Both Ornelaz andArroyo believe everyone can benefit from using the Fitto-Win office at Fort Eustis’ McClellan Fitness Center or Langley’s HAWC at the Shellbank Fitness Center before beginning a workout routine. Both offices offer an opportunity to individualize workout routines and find what methods work best with each client’s different goals and fitness levels. Beginning a workout routine can be challenging at first, but properly preparing for a good gym session means that challenge only becomes easier each and every day.


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JBLE offers youth programs throughout the summer By Staff Sgt. Dana Hill 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

With school out for the season, it can be difficult for parents to find programs to keep their children active during the summer months. Fortunately for the Joint Base LangleyEustis, Va. community, the installations’ youth programs offer summer activities that aim to improve a child’s team building, leadership and social skills while boosting academic performance, promoting physical health and providing a safe, structured environment for children of working parents. The Langley Air Force Base Youth Program offers a summer day camp, conducted June through August, which boasts a full range of community-based activities in a supervised and fun environment for children, said Shanda Misse, 633rd Force Support Squadron Youth Programs director. “The children learn everything from arts and crafts, science, math and performing arts in this center, but in a less structured way than school because they

Photo by Staff Sgt. Dana Hill

Children enrolled with the Langley summer youth program watch as they launch a model rocket during the Science,Technology, Engineering and Math DreamTeam Camp at Bethel Park in Hampton, June 28.The weeklong camp is one of the many programs offered to children through summer youth programs at Joint Base Langley-Eustis.

have the freedom to choose what they want to learn,” said Misse. “It helps them build relationships and it helps them when they return to school.” The Fort Eustis School-Age Program also offers a day camp program during the summer and includes field trips, spe-

cial events and activities, and swimming pool trips. Activities are organized within four core service areas: Arts, Recreation, and Leisure; Life Skills, Citizenship and Leadership; Sports, Fitness and Health; and Academic Support, Mentoring and Intervention Services.

Recently, children involved in the Langley Youth Programs were able to participate in a weeklong Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Dream Team Camp, where they were led by an instructor from NASA in building and launching their own model rockets. Weekly themes help foster the summercamp experience by offering a different perspective. Each staff member is responsible for creating a catchy theme that helps the developmental learning for the week. “We encompass several different areas in our program, [such as] sports week were we have trainers come out, or water week where we introduced them to water polo,” said Kristin Benson, 733rd Mission Support Group School Age Services director. “We try to keep them hands on, encouraged and active.” With fieldtrips planned each week, campers will also be able to participate in activities such as science projects, team-building projects, swimming, writing, singing and community service events, said Benson. SEE YOUTH PAGE 7

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As DOD enters the furlough period, the department will concentrate on the core mission of defending the United States and its interests, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said July 8. “That’s where our center of gravity is during this furlough period,” Little said. Because of sequestration, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel made the difficult decision to furlough approximately 85 percent of DOD civilian employees one day a week through the end of the fiscal year, a total of 11 days, the press secretary said. “My assumption is the vast majority of that population is on furlough at least one day this week,” Little said. Little estimated the action will save the department $1.8 billion by the end of September, and some missions in the department will be impacted. “We’re very clear with our own staff that there will be some impact, and we expect other offices to have similar impacts,” the press secretary said. What happens in fiscal 2014 remains up in the air, Little said in response to a reporter’s question about the possibility of future layoffs. “We’re getting ahead of ourselves talking about layoffs at this stage,” he said. “Right now we’re in the furlough period and no decisions have been reached about what may happen going forward.” Little said much of what will happen depends on the government’s ability to move beyond sequestration. “[Hagel] has been clear that he would like for there to be a deal on sequestration, so we can lift this burden off of all our employees in the department,” Little said. Sequestration “was an unfortunate mechanism designed to avoid unfortunate consequences. We’re seeing some of those consequences already in regards to military training and readiness,” the press secretary said. “It’s unfortunate we’re in this period but we’re going to muscle through it best we can,” he added.

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YOUTH FROM PAGE 6 Both directors agree they hope children use their creativity and imagination to enjoy the challenging, yet rewarding, activities the programs offer. They also agree that ensuring the children have fun is a top priority. The JBLE summer youth programs also offer seasonal baseball and soccer leagues. All activities are available to dependents of active-duty military, DOD civilians, activeduty reservists or contract employees. Parents can find out more about these summer youth programs and school age services by visiting www.jble forcesupport.com.

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FeatureStory

0RQWIRUG 3RLQW 0DULQHV VKDUH PLOLWDU\ OHJDF\ ZLWK /DQJOH\ By Airman 1st Class R. Alex Durbin 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Five original Montford Point Marines visited the Exchange at Langley Air Force Base, Va., July 2 to share their story with local Airmen. The retired Marines are part of the Tidewater chapter of the Montford Point Marine Association, a non-profit organization founded to memorialize the legacy of the first African-Americans to serve in the Marine Corps. “These men are not only a part of military history, but American history,” said U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Dawn McBride-Smith, Air Combat Command air traffic control training and operations superintendent. “They represent where we’re from, and how far we’ve come in such a short time.” On June 25, 1941, just months before America’s entrance into World War II, then-president Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 8802 which prohibited government agencies and defense contractors from refusing employment based on race, color or creed. The order required fair employment practices in all federal services, including the armed forces. In 1942, Roosevelt established a presidential directive giving African-Americans the opportunity to enlist in the U.S. Marine Corps for the first time since 1778. When recruitment for African-American Marines began, thousands of young

men flocked to recruiting offices nationwide. The first class of African-American recruits was admitted to basic training June 1, 1942, and sent to Camp Montford Point in Jacksonville, N.C., a segregated training camp located adjacent to Camp Lejeune, N.C. In July 1948, former president Harry S. Truman issued Executive Order 9981, which required equal treatment of all people in the U.S. military. By the time Montford Point closed in 1949, more than 20,000 Marines were trained within its walls. Following its deactivation, African-American recruits were sent to newly-integrated basic training at Recruit Depot Paris Island, S.C., and Camp Pendleton, Calif., ending seven years of segregation. The training camp was later renamed Camp Johnson in honor of the late Sgt. Maj. Gilbert “Hashmark” Johnson, one of the first Montford Point Marines and a distinguished drill instructor. The Marines who visited Langley trained under Johnson and other wellknown drill instructors like Sgt. Maj. Edgar Huff, and provided unique insight into a pivotal moment in military history by answering questions and providing signed photos to members of the Langley community. Among the Marines sat retired Master Gunnery Sgt. Jim Hargrove, a Montford Point Marine who was pleased to share his story with fellow Service members.

Photo by Airman 1st Class R. Alex Durbin

Retired Pfc. Charles Norman, a Montford Point Marine, sits, ready to share his story at the Exchange on Langley Air Force Base, July 2. The Marines gave unique insight into a pivotal moment in the Marine Corps’ distinguished history by answering questions and providing signed photos.

Courtesy photo

“At first, I didn’t give [being a Montford Point Marine] much thought. I was just doing my job,” he said. “Looking back now, it’s rewarding to feel we set goals and provided guidance to the younger generation of Service members.” Hargrove and the other members of the association feel it’s important for Service members of all branches of the military to learn about each other’s legacies. This sentiment was echoed by those in attendance. “It’s important to share what these men have done for Marines and all Service members. They represent what the

LEFT: U.S. Marines jump over an obstacle during basic training at Camp Montford Point, N.C. The Marines who visited Langley Air Force Base, July 2, trained under wellknown drill instructors like Sgt. Majs. Gilbert “Hashmark” Johnson and Edgar Huff. RIGHT: U.S. Marines attached to the 3rd Ammunition Company take a break from supplying the front lines duringWorldWar II in Saipan. By the time Camp Montford Point, N.C. closed in 1949, more than 20,000 Marines were trained within its walls. Courtesy photos

LEFT: A Montford Point U.S. Marine holds his Congressional Gold Medal after the award ceremony inWashington, D.C., June 27, 2012.

military is today,” said Master Gunnery Sgt. Michael Stephens, an event attendee. “The Montford Point Marines are where we’ve come from, not just as African-Americans, but Service members of all races, colors and creeds in all branches of the military.” In recognition of their important contributions to U.S. history, the Montford Point Marines received the Congressional Gold Medal, one of the highest civilian honors, on June 27, 2012, further cementing their place in history while setting a shining example of pride and resiliency to Service members everywhere.


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Season Begins September 14 and Ends November 9

Photos by Airman Areca T. Wilson

TOP LEFT: U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Ashli Phillips, 633rd Force Support Squadron chef, poses for a photo before taking her team’s cupcakes out to be judged during the 633rd FSS Cupcake Challenge at the Langley Air Force Base Crossbow Dining Facility, July 3. RIGHT: U.S. Air Force Capt. Kady Pauley, 633rd Force Support Squadron sustainment services flight commander, decorates cupcakes.

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Cupcake Wars: 633rd FSS hosts holiday cupcake challenge By Airman Areca T. Wilson 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

The 633rd Force Support Squadron held an Independence Day-themed Cupcake Challenge July 3 at the Langley Air Force Base, Va. Crossbow Dining Facility. The competition, modeled after the television series “Cupcake Wars” which airs on the Food Network, was open to all members of the 633rd FSS. Participants were given two hours to bake and decorate two dozen cupcakes, which had to represent the Independence Day theme. The cupcakes would be judged on taste, presentation and originality. “We host the event every six months as a morale-boosting event,” said U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Julie Nix, 633rd FSS Crossbow Dining Facility assistant manager. “It brings everyone together to show support and showcase talents.” U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Michael Udave, 633rd FSS chef, seized the opportunity to display his baking abilities. Having baked for the first time in a 633rd FSS Cupcake Challenge held last year, Udave knew that participating a second time would be exciting and rewarding. “I really loved baking at the last challenge and realized that I had a real knack

for it,” said Udave. “I decided I wanted to be recognized for my talent, and this was a great opportunity to work with my team to do that.” U.S. Air Force Capt. Kady Pauley, 633rd FSS sustainment services flight commander, and U.S. Air Force 2nd Lt. Emily Combest, 633rd FSS sustainment services deputy flight commander, also enjoyed the event for its social aspects. They used their creativity to create rocket-inspired red, white and blue cupcakes. When the time for baking came to an end, the teams brought their finished cupcake platters to the judges. Along with a crowd of spectators from the 633rd FSS, the teams waited patiently as the judging began. Having made their cupcakes and the majority of the decorations from scratch, it was clear Pauley and Combest’s hard work and passion paid off – they were announced as the winners. While taking best in show was a rewarding achievement for Pauley and Combest, Pauley said the event held a deeper significance. “We just wanted to bake with the Airmen,” said Pauley. “It wasn’t about winning – it was more about building camaraderie with our Airmen and seeing what they do on a daily basis.”


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This 2010 graphic shows a breakdown of proposed changes to the Army Combat Uniform design to better fit female Soldiers. The uniform, called the ACU-Alternate, has since been approved for use by both sexes, and has started being issued to Soldiers going through Basic CombatTraining at Fort Sill, Okla. Soldiers can choose whether to wear the ACU-As or the ACUs.

$&8$OWHUQDWH XQLIRUP RIIHUV PRUH ¿W RSWLRQV By Spc. Danielle Gregory ARMY NEWS SERVICE

A new Army Combat Uniform with special consideration to the female form is now at Fort Sill, Okla., and it is being issued to new Soldiers going through Basic Combat Training. The new uniform, several years in the making, was initially considered as being the first female-only uniform, but is now approved for both sexes and is being called Army Combat Uniform-Alternate (ACU-A). “We started issuing them slowly in April, and we’ve since been issuing them more frequently as our fitters get more comfortable placing Soldiers in them,” said Trevor Whitworth, Central Initial Issue Point project manager, where new Soldiers are first issued their uniforms at Fort Sill. While ACU-As are not yet available at Fort Sill’s Military Clothing Sales Store, they are available for all Soldiers at Fort Eustis, Va.; Fort Hood, Texas; Fort Lee, Va.; and Fort Belvoir, Va. “They were initially designed for female Soldiers, but we were told if we [found] male Soldiers [who were better fitted in these] than the ACUs, then we can issue it to them as well,” Whitworth said. “It’s more about the fit and the body type.” The new uniform trousers feature wider areas at the hips, waist and backside; elastic around the waistband instead of a pull string; adjusted pockets and knee-pad inserts; and a shortened crotch length. SEE UNIFORM PAGE 16

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The U.S. Air Force Heritage of America Band plays patriotic music for the "4th of July Stars in the Sky” event held at Victory Landing Park in Newport News, July 4.The band, established in 1941, features the diverse talents of 38 professional musicians who tour across the country year round.

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Photo by Airman 1st Class Victoria H. Taylor

:KDW WKH\¶UH VD\LQJ  “We are the face of the Army. When people see us perform, they see a positive representation of our Army values. It’s a wonderful opportunity to play for the local community, and playing for Independence Day just makes it that more meaningful.” — Sgt. 1st Class Derek Pearsall U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command New Orleans Jazz Ensemble senior team leader and bass player Photo by Staff Sgt. Dana Hill

Crowd members watch the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command d Band New Orleans Jazz Ensemble performance during the 34th annual Yorktown Fourth of July Celebration, July 4.The event also included an Independence Day 8K R Run and 5K Walk, parade, bell-ringing ceremony and fireworks display.

Photos by Staff Sgt. Dana Hill

ABOVE: Fireworks burst into the night over the York River during the 34th annual Yorktown Fourth of July Celebration, July 4.

YORKTOWN More than 7,000 members of the Yorktown community attended th he 34th annual Yorktown Fourth of July Celebration, which kicked off with an a Independence Day 8K Run and 5K Walk at York High School. Soldiers from the 7th Sustainment Brigade Color Guard from Fort Eustis participated in the t event’s parade. The celebration also included a bell-ringing ceremony, music from the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command New Orleans Jazz Ense emble and a fireworks display over the York River.

NEWPORT NEWS More than 10,000 community members attended “4th of July Stars in the Sky,” hosted by Newport News Parks, Recreation and Tourism at Victory Landing Park. The event featured a colors presentation from the base honor guard at Langley Air Force Base, children’s rides and a Dixieland band, followed by music from the U.S. Air Force Heritage of America Band. The celebration concluded with a fireworks display over the James River.

LEFT T:The Langley Air Force Base hono or guard presents the colors at the ""4th of July Stars in the Sky” even nt atVictory Landing Park in New wport News, July 4.The event featu ured performances by a Dixieland d band and the U.S. Air Force Herittage of America Band, as well as a fire eworks display.

RIGHT: U.S. Army Master Sgt. Steven King (left), U.S. ArmyTraining and Doctrine Command Band New Orleans Jazz Ensemble clarinet player, and U.S. Army Sgt. Matthew Fattal,TRADOC Band New Orleans Jazz Ensemble trumpet player and vocalist, perform during theYorktown celebration. Photo by Airman 1st Class Victoria H. Taylor

RIGH HT: U.S. Air Force Col. John J. Allen n Jr., 633rd Air BaseWing comman nder, introduces the U.S. Air Forc ce Heritage of America Band at the “4th “ of July Stars in the Sky” even nt. More than 10,000 community mem mbers took part in the free event hostted by the Newport News Parks, Recrreation andTourism office.

“We loved having the [TRADOC Band] here, they put on a wonderful concert. They really enriched our program through their musical talents.” — Kevin Ritchie York County Parks, Recreation and Tourism division event planner

“To be a part of history is really something special. Celebrating and establishing the Army in the hearts of the local community is an honor.” — U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Demetrius Harrell 7th Sustainment Brigade color guard noncommissioned officer in charge

“I think it was especially meaningful on our country’s birthday to be able to celebrate all of our veterans and those who served who live in our community. It is very meaningful to have a really strong military-based community.” — Airman 1st Class Mark Clates Heritage of America Band trumpet player

“It was wonderful to have our base commander come out and meet and engage with the community. It was also a great opportunity to show the area that the Air Force is still vibrant and alive in this tough economic time. We were thrilled to be able to give back to the community in such a way.” — Chief Master Sgt. Michael Marshall Heritage of America Band manager Photo by Airman 1st Class Victoria H. Taylor


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75$'2& OHDGV UHYLHZ HIIRUWV RI 026 VWDQGDUGV JHQGHU LQWHJUDWLRQ By Amy L. Robinson U.S. ARMY TRAINING AND DOCTRINE COMMAND PUBLIC AFFAIRS

As U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command continues to design the force of the future, it will also review the standards for all Soldiers – men and women alike – to support the future force. TRADOC is currently leading two efforts, part of what is collectively called “Soldier 2020.â€? The ďŹ rst examines the physical demands of specific military occupational specialties, or MOSs, starting with those currently closed to women. The second studies the cultural and institutional effects of integrating women into those previously-closed occupations and units. The ďŹ rst effort, with support from the U.S. Army Medical Command’s U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, or USARIEM, is a three-year review of the physical standards required for MOSs across the Army – regardless of gender. “Not only are these gender-neutral standards, but they’re also age-neutral and body-type neutral,â€? said Edward Zambraski, chief of USARIEM’s Military Performance Division. “In other words, it’s purely physical.â€? Currently in the ďŹ rst phase of the gender-neutral physical standards review, TRADOC will begin by verifying the required tasks for each MOS, starting with branches with closed occupations, including the engineer, ďŹ eld artillery, armor and infantry branches. Researchers from USARIEM will then use these task lists to determine the physical demands required to perform each task successfully. According to Marilyn Sharp, USARIEM’s lead investigator for the project, once researchers analyze the physical demands required for a speciďŹ c task, they will develop a task simulation to measure the effort required to perform the task successfully. “Let’s say it’s a task that involved lifting a certain structure a certain

Photo by Sgt. Brian Fore

Pfc. Trevor Coursey loads a round as part of a U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command task evaluation at Fort Bliss,Texas, April 25, during Network Integration Evaluation 13.2.

TRADOC is currently leading two efforts, part of what is collectively called “Soldier 2020.â€? The ďŹ rst examines the physical demands of speciďŹ c military occupational specialties, or MOSs, starting with those currently closed to women. The second studies the cultural and institutional effects of integrating women into those previously-closed occupations and units. distance and placing it someplace,â€? Zambraski said. “We would do the [simulation] in our laboratories and take measurements on the subjects to see how much strength and endurance they are using to do this, and how long it takes them to do this – then we can quantify the task.â€? The end goal, Zambraski said, is a set of predictive tests – whether it be strength, endurance, ďŹ ne-motor skills or a combination of several tests – to determine the right match for the right MOS. “The idea would be to have a series of tests – relatively simple tests – that could be applied early on in a Soldier’s career, perhaps at the beginning or end of basic training, that would give information as to whether or not the Soldier would be physically capable of performing in that MOS,â€? Zambraski said. Tom DeFilippo, TRADOC G-3/5/7

senior plans analyst, likened the concept of the predictive tests to a sort of physical version of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery, which would beneďŹ t Soldiers, their units and the Army overall. “Having a more deďŹ ned requirement – not just mental, but physical – will lead to less attrition, lower injury rates and better performance of our Soldiers,â€? DeFilippo said. “[This] allows them to be more successful when they get to a unit, thereby making the unit more successful.â€? Gen. Robert W. Cone, TRADOC’s commanding general, also took some time to discuss the command’s efforts regarding standards, success and TRADOC’s efforts in Soldier 2020 during a recent professional development forum. SEE MOS PAGE 15


JULY 12, 2013

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MOS FROM PAGE 14 “I go up and talk to units all the time – I was talking to the 1st Cavalry Division, 101st Airborne Division and 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment, and Soldiers are okay with this – as long as we maintain standards,” Cone said. Cone said through a standards-based approach, success will not be defined by numbers, such as having 5 or 10 percent of women in infantry, but rather it will be defined as the opportunity for women to be able to serve. He cited some of the recently opened MOSs, including Bradley fighting vehicle system maintainer and multiple launch rocket system crewmember, where Pvt. Alexandra Seccareccio recently set the standard for all Soldiers. “We had our first woman graduate from [MLRS] school with a 100 percent score – in everything,” Cone said. “And now, the key is getting them to the right units.” Unit success also depends on a number of additional factors, many of which are currently being examined through a gender integration study led by the TRADOC Analysis Center in the second effort supporting Soldier 2020. TRAC’s study, with support from the Army Research Institute, began in January and will use interviews, focus groups and surveys with leaders and Soldiers to look at the cultural effects of implementing full gender integration. “We want to hear from the ground up, from the top down and from the middle,” said Peter Kerekanich, deputy director for TRAC’s gender integration study. The study will analyze cultural factors -- expectations, customs and social behaviors of the Army associated with integration -- as well as institutional factors, which include Army processes and policies that may be affected or changed because of integration. Most important, Kerekanich added, is the Soldiers’ perspective -- listening to and capturing the challenges they identify and polling them to identify possible solutions to potential Army challenges. TRAC’s study team has already planned initial visits to the engineer, field artillery, infantry and armor schools, as well as engaging a wide breadth of additional institutions throughout the Army, including Intermediate Level Education, Pre-Command Course and the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy. The team is also working toward visiting National Guard and U.S. Army Forces Command units. In addition to numerous site visits to gather information from the force, TRAC has also reached out to academia, monitored sister service progress and will continue to review other published material on gender integration throughout the study, which is scheduled to end March 2015. “This is a complex issue,” Kerekanich said. “It will require the study team and the Army to go beyond just the service and incorporate findings and data from external sources.” As TRAC continues to gather data from a variety of sources, the team will identify positive, neutral and negative factors, Kerekanich said; however, the end goal is to proactively identify the problems – and solutions – before integration begins. Cone said TRADOC’s efforts are off to a good start; however, the studies will take time in order to be successful, and ultimately, improve standards throughout the Army. “As the TRADOC commander, I can’t lower organizational performance – our hard-earned reputation is combat-ready formations,” Cone said. “We can make this a better Army by uniformly imposing these valid standards across the board.”

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UNIFORM FROM PAGE 11 In the jackets, changes include adjusted rank and nametape positioning; adjusted pockets and elbow-pad inserts; slimmer shoulders; a thinner and more ďŹ tted waist; and a longer and wider ACU coat bottom. Also, buttons are replacing the Velcro pockets. “If it makes you more comfortable in wearing that, then I think it’s well worth it,â€? Whitworth said. “When you’re low crawling or doing a lot of physical training, it’s nice to have a pair of trousers that have a little give-and-take in them. Having made uniforms for a female body type will make a big difference for female Soldiers.â€? Compared to the original ACUs, which were designed principally by males for males, the new ACU-As were created to ďŹ t a wider range of body types. There are more sizes to choose from, as 13 sizes are available in both the jacket and trouser. “The old uniform was meant to be one size ďŹ ts ďŹ ve sizes; these are more tailored,â€? Whitworth said. Program Executive OfďŹ ce Soldier, the program that develops and improves military uniforms and equipment, de-

veloped the new uniforms by letting male and female Soldiers wear the uniform and provide feedback. This came about after a 2008 focus group of female Soldiers showed PEO Soldier that ACUs have a non-female friendly ďŹ t. Many females in the focus group reported that the knee-pad inserts fell on their shins, that they didn’t have as much mobility because of the poor ďŹ t and that they felt they had an overall unprofessional appearance. Maj. Sequana Robinson, one of the many that tested the new uniform, said in a PEO Soldier press release that she was very skeptical when ďŹ rst hearing of the uniforms; she didn’t think women needed a uniform more ďŹ tted to their bodies. After trying it on the ďŹ rst time, she was very pleased with the ďŹ t. PEO Soldier is also in the process of developing female body armor and female ight suits, which are still in development stages. New black and yellow PT uniforms are also in the development stages, and an improved dufe bag, which includes a zipper, has just been released and is being issued to basic training Soldiers.

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:DUUDQW RI¿FHU FRUSV FHOHEUDWHV ELUWKGD\ (From left) U.S. Army Chief Warrant Officer Timothy Turner, 7th Sustainment Brigade chief maritime operations officer, and Warrant Officer Cy'Tique Johnson, 7th Sustainment Brigade adjutant general technician, cut the warrant officer birthday cake during the U.S. Army warrant officer corps' 95th birthday celebration inside Jacobs Theater at Fort Eustis, July 9.The U.S. Army warrant officer corps was created July 9, 1918. Photo by Staff Sgt. Wesley Farnsworth

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JULY 12, 2013

Submit LAFB Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com

Finance office closure

Langley Club events

Due to an official function, the 633rd Comptroller Squadron’s hours of operation on July 18 will be from 7 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. For after-hours emergencies during the afternoon closure, contact Master Sgt. Danny Avery at 291-7247.

There will be a New and Expecting Fathers Class from 8 a.m. to noon July 29 in the Langley Chapel Annex, classroom two. This class will provide helpful information and discussion about father-baby attachment, labor and delivery, communication with a spouse or partner, soothing your baby and managing deployments. To register or for more information, call Family Advocacy at 764-9581.

Please see below for events at the Langley Club: ■ Latin Night – Fom 8 p.m. Aug. 9 to 1 a.m. Aug. 10 in the main ballroom.The event is free to club members and $5 for non-members. Dance lessons will be from 8 to 9 p.m. Light refreshments will be served. ■ Comedy Night – Doors open at 7 p.m. Aug. 15 and comedians begin at 7:30 p.m. The event is $7 for club members and $12 for non-members. Due to the content, viewing may not be suitable for audiences under the age of 18. ■ Soul Food Dinner Night/Membership Appreciation – From 5:30 to 8 p.m. Aug. 16. The event is $7 for club members and $12 for non-members. For more information, contact the Langley Club at 7661361.

Thornell parking lot closure

IDEA and PECI Program suspension

Hispanic Heritage committee meetings

The Thornell parking lot near the Langley Marina will be closed from June 26 through July 31 due to renovations of the shoreline near the marina. For more information, contact Anhthu Nguyen at 764-1446 or Joe Sirois at 846-8479.

In an effort to support the Airmen Powered by Innovation initiative, the vice chief of staff of the Air Force has suspended the Air Force Innovative Development through Employee Awareness (IDEA) and the Productivity Enhancing Capital Investment (PECI) Programs, effective June 1. Procedures on submitting ideas through this new initiative can be found on the Air Force Portal. Ideas previously submitted through IDEA Program Data System (IPDS) are still being processed. For ideas still open for members who submitted while assigned to Joint Base Langley-Eustis, contact Michelle Johnson at 764-7637 or michelle.johnson.2@us.af.mil. If an idea was submitted while assigned to another base, please contact that installation’s manpower office.

The Hispanic Heritage committee meets the third Wednesday of each month at 2 p.m. in the Langley bowling alley activities room. For more information, contact Master Sgt. Jose Perez at 764-1735 or the Equal Opportunity Office at 764-5878.

New and Expecting Fathers Class

Armed Services Blood Program blood drive The Armed Services Blood Program blood drive will be held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. July 23 in the Langley Chapel Annex. For more information, contact Ralph Peters at Ralph.peters@med.navy.mil. Online appointments can also be scheduled at www.militaryblood.dod.mil.

Summary court officer The summary court officer detailed to secure and make proper disposition of the personal effects of Senior Airman Nicholas Tuttle is 2nd Lt. Heath Turley, 633rd Security Forces Squadron. Anyone having knowledge of money or property due to deceased or claims against the deceased’s estate, contact 2nd Lt. Turley at 764-5526.

Langley Housing road closure A section of First Street north of the Langley Housing shoppette will be closed from July 1 to Aug. 16. The closure will allow for emergency vehicle access, but neither pedestrian nor vehicular traffic will be permitted to pass. For more information, contact the off-base Welcome Center at 865-1330.

Medical Service Corps applications The Medical Service Corps (MSC) has more than 1,000 Air Force officers who serve as professional healthcare administrators throughout the world. For those interested in applying, accession packages are due Sept 13. For more information, contact 2nd Lt. Irene Mitchell at 764-8203.

Heart Link The next Heart Link event is scheduled from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Aug. 9 at the Airman and Family Readiness Center. There will be games, prizes and fun, and discussions on Air Force traditions, resources and the spouse’s role in today’s Air Force. Childcare is available on a spaceavailable basis. To sign up, call 764-3990.

New Moms workshop The Pediatric Clinic hosts “New Moms Tea/Weigh Day” workshops at 1 p.m. Mondays in the Pediatrics Clinic conference room. Bring your questions to share or just come to listen in. Meet in an informal setting for expert advice, education and experience from a board-certified lactation consultant on topics including breastfeeding support, infant care, getting sleep, childproofing and safety, positive parenting skills and more. To reserve a space in the class or for more information, contact the Langley Lactation Center at 764-9730.

Out of the Darkness Community Walk The eighth annual Out of the Darkness Community Walk will take place Sept. 7 at MountTrashmore in Virginia Beach. The walk is dedicated to bringing awareness to depression and suicide. It is open to everyone including families and children, and registration is free under “Team Langley.” For more information, contact 1st Lt. Sarah Whiddon at 764-9577, Tech Sgt. Neco Johnson at 764-1421, licensed clinical social worker Chris Gilchrist at 518-1818 or visit www.sos-walk.org.

TRICARE hazardous weather e-alerts TRICARE is offering state-specific e-alerts for beneficiaries who want the latest information about how TRICARE has been affected during and after severe weather. To sign up for state-specific TRICARE severe weather e-alerts, go

to www.tricare.mil/subscriptions.

Single Airman Ministry events A Shenandoah Valley National Park camping trip will take place from Aug. 30 to Sept. 2. The trip will cost $89 per person, which includes tents, food, a scavenger hunt and transportation. Those interested must sign up no later than Aug. 13. For more information, contact Larry Blakely at 273-1033 or 528-0455.

Women’s Equality Day planning committee The Women’s Equality Day planning committee meets the second and fourth Thursday of each month at 1 p.m. in the Bateman Library. For more information, contact the Equal Opportunity Office at 764-5878.

Langley African American Heritage Council The Langley African American Heritage Council meets the third Thursday of each month at 11:30 a.m. in the Enlisted Lounge. For more information, contact Master Sgt. Alvin Harris at 764-4410.

Langley Lanes Bowling Center events Please see below for upcoming events at Langley Lanes Bowling Center: ■ The“Incredibowl Summer Program” will be held through Aug 31. Prizes will be available anytime open lanes are available. Fill up a 10-game punch card to be entered to win. ■ An “8 for 8” kids league will be held starting June 21 for eight weeks. ■ The “DV8 from the Norm” ball league will be held from June 17 to August 19. Cost is $16 for adults. ■ Cosmic Bowling will be held every Wednesday from 7 to 10 p.m. and Friday from 8 p.m. to 12 a.m. There will be black-light bowling, a deejay and prizes available. The bowling center also offers a game room with darts, pool tables, air hockey and other arcade games. For more information, contact the Langley Lanes Bowling Center at 764-2433.

Langley Hazmart, 90-Day CAP operations The Hazmart Pharmacy, located at 23 Sweeney Blvd., is responsible for the authorization and monitoring of all hazardous materials on Langley Air Force Base. The 90-Day Central Accumulation Point facility, located at 510 Poplar Road, is responsible for curbside pickup, preparing and processing of hazardous waste. Both facilities are open Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Before purchasing hazardous materials, you must contact the Hazmart Pharmacy. For more information concerning the Langley Hazmart Pharmacy or the 90-Day CAP, call 764-3837. For hazardous waste issues, contact 225-5808/5809.


JULY 12, 2013

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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Home Buying and Selling Seminars The Fort Eustis Housing Referral Office is sponsoring a Home Buying Seminar from 6 to 8:30 p.m. July 16 and a Home Selling Seminar from 6 to 8:30 p.m. July 18. Both seminars will take place at the Civil Engineer Division conference room at Bldg. 1407, Washington Blvd. Industry experts will include a realtor, mortgage lender, attorney and home inspector.The seminars are free and open to the public. Please RSVP at least three business days prior to attending the seminar of your choice. To register, call 8782977/5687/5579.

597th Trans. Bde. change of command The 597th Transportation Brigade will host a change of command ceremony at 2 p.m. July 17 at McClellan Fitness Center, Bldg. 673 Monroe Ave. Col. Charles R. Brown will relinquish command to Col. Jason R. Vick. For more information, call 878-8404.

Movies Under the Stars Fort Eustis’ Morale, Welfare and Recreation will host its Movies Under the Stars series at sunset July 17 at Murphy Field. Come out and join us for a free showing of “The Pirates, Band of Misfits” on the giant outdoor screen. Bring your lawn chairs, blankets, family and friends. Other activities will include bounce houses for the kids, and food and beverage concessions. For more information, call 878-3329.

Summary court officer The summary court officer detailed to secure and make proper disposition of the personal effects of Sgt. Justin R. Johnson is 1st Lt. Brendan Kasony, 11th Transportation Battalion, 7th Sustainment Brigade. Anyone having knowledge of money or property due to the deceased or has claims against the deceased’s estate, contact 1st Lt. Kasony at (571) 225-7596.

Summary court officer The summary court officer detailed to secure and make proper disposition of the personal effects of Sgt. Timothy Updike is Capt. Edward J. Slavik, 11th Transportation Battalion, 7th Sustainment Brigade. Anyone having knowledge of money or property due to the deceased or has claims against the deceased’s estate, contact Capt. Slavik at 422-7310 or edward.slavik@us.army.mil.

Distributed Learning Training Facility The Distributed Learning Training Facility offers free individual Army career training for active-duty Army, National Guard, reserves and DA civilians. Soldiers can earn promotion points (enlisted), retirement points (reservists) and college credit. The DLTF also offers training for various military occupational skills. Sixteen workstations are available for video tele-training. The Distributed Learning Training Facility is located in Hunter Hall at Bldg. 2730, Madison Ave. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. For more information, contact Nathan Wortham at 8786934 or visit www.dls.army.mil.

Army Career and Alumni Program Army Career and Alumni Program classes and briefings for July will include: ■ Career Expo – 1:30 to 3 p.m., July 31. Employers, college recruiters and other transition service providers are invited to come and network with transitioners and their family members. Job seekers should dress for success and bring resumes. Featured employers will include those in the areas of towing, shipbuilding, law enforcement, power and electricity, and more. Various universities will also be represented. ■ Lunchtime Workshop – 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., July 31. Workshop topics will include “Interviewing” and the USAJOBS federal resume application process. This monthly training will be provided by ACAP and Civilian Personnel Advisory Center staff. ■ Transition GPS (TAP Workshop) – 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., July 22-26. This five-day workshop provides training for transitioning Soldiers and their family members to prepare them to succeed with civilian employment and educational pursuits. Topics will include financial planning, resume writing, interviewing techniques, job search tips, VA benefits (disability ratings, filing claims, and vocational rehabilitation) and MOS Crosswalk. ■ VA Claims Workshop – 9 a.m., July 15. A Department of Veterans Affairs representative will provide information on vocational rehabilitation benefits and entitlements. Unless otherwise noted, classes and briefings will take place in Bldg. 601, training room 127. For more information, call 878-4955.

School and sport physical exams

Music Under the Stars

School and sport physical exams are available at McDonald Army Health Center’s Pediatric and Family Health clinics by appointment only. Appointments can be scheduled for Monday through Friday. Call the Hampton Roads Appointment Center at (866) 645-4584 or use TRICARE Online to schedule an appointment (up to 28 days in advance). Appointments are also available on the following Saturdays: July 27 and Aug. 24. For more information, visit http://mcdonald.narmc.amedd. army.mil.

The U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Band’s Music Under the Stars summertime concerts will take place at 7 p.m. Thursdays at Magnolia Park on Fort Eustis (end of Lee Blvd, nearTaylor Ave.).The schedule for July is: ■ July 18 – Stage and Screen ■ July 25 – ¡Festiva Latina! The concerts are free and open to the public. Attendees are invited to bring picnic dinners and lawn chairs. Non-DOD cardholders must use the Fort Eustis main gate to receive a pass. Valid vehicle registration, proof of insurance and a photo ID are required for access. In the event of inclement weather, the concerts will be cancelled.To learn more about the concerts, to receive a pre-vetted vehicle pass or to sign up for the band’s newsletter and concert announcements, visit www.tradocband.com, or call 501-6944.

Soldier and Family Readiness Soldier and Family Readiness (ACS) classes and briefings for July will include: ■ Baby and Me Play Group – 10 to 11 a.m., Thursdays, Bldg. 501, Madison Ave. ■ Care Team Training – 9:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., July 17 ■ Credit Reporting, Scores and Debt Management – 9 to 10 a.m., July 16 ■ Developing Your Financial Plan – 9 to 10 a.m., July 23 ■ Federal Employment – 10 a.m. to noon, July 18 ■ Financial Readiness – 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., July 19 ■ Growing Through Change – 10 to 11:30 a.m., July 17 ■ Job Search Strategies – 10 to 11 a.m., Mondays ■ Leadership Development – 9 a.m. to 4:45 p.m., July 18-19 (registration required) ■ Lunch and Learn Effective Communication – noon to 1 p.m., July 16, 30 (bring your lunch) ■ Managing Your Checking Account, Online Banking – 8:30 to 9:30 a.m., July 18 ■ Newcomers Brief and Information Fair – 9 to 11 a.m., July 23 ■ Sponsorship Training – 2 to 3 p.m., July 18 ■ Spouse Resilience Seminar – 9 a.m. to noon, July 22-25 Unless otherwise noted, classes and briefings will take place in Bldg. 650, Monroe Ave. For more information, call 878-3638.

Latin Night at the club Kick off your weekend with Latin Night every Friday from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. at the Fort Eustis Club’s Wheelhouse Lounge (no cover charge). For more information, call 878-5700.

Range schedule Ranges, training areas and associated facilities are off limits to personnel not engaged in scheduled firing, operations or inspections unless clearance is obtained (in person) from the Range Control Fire Desk or a designated Range Control technician. The Range Control office telephone number is 878-4412, ext. 226 or 878-3834, ext 234. The range operations schedule through July 17 is: ■ Friday and Saturday – Range 1 (7 a.m. to 5 p.m.) ■ Sunday – No scheduled ranges ■ Monday – Range BTRACS, 1, 2, 3 (7 a.m. to 4 p.m.) ■ Tuesday – Range BTRACS, 1, 2, 3 (7 a.m. to 5 p.m.) ■ Wednesday – Range BTRACS, 1, 6 (7 a.m. to 4 p.m.) All personnel are required to check in and out with Range Control before going into or departing from any range or training area.


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â&#x20AC;˘ The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

OutsideTheGate Ocean View Beach Park concerts Start the weekend with live music, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities and more at the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thank Goodness itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ocean Viewâ&#x20AC;? beach music concert series from 6 to 9:30 p.m. Fridays at Ocean View Beach Park, 300 W. Ocean View Ave., Norfolk. The concert series is free and open to the public. Food and beverages will be available for purchase; coolers, food and soft drinks are permitted (no alcohol or glass). The concert schedule is: â&#x2013; July 12 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Atlantic Groove â&#x2013;  July 19 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Coolinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Out â&#x2013;  July 26 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Holiday Band â&#x2013;  Aug. 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Bill Dealâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Original Rhondels â&#x2013;  Aug. 9 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Main Event Band â&#x2013;  Aug. 16 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Mark Roberts and the Breeze â&#x2013;  Aug. 23 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Janitors For more information, visit www.festevents.org or call 441-2345.

Summer Breeze Concert Series The 22nd annual Summer Breeze Concert Series will take place from 7 to 9 p.m. Wednesdays on Merchants Squareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Duke of Gloucester Street in Williamsburg. The outdoor concerts are free and open to the public. Bring a lawn chair or blanket for seating. The concert schedule is: â&#x2013; July 17 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Kings of Swing â&#x2013;  July 24 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Rare Mixx â&#x2013;  July 31 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Slapwater â&#x2013;  Aug. 7 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Band (TRADOC Rock) â&#x2013;  Aug. 14 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; U.S. Air Force Heritage of America Band (Rhythm in Blue) â&#x2013;  Aug. 21 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Band (Jazz Combo) â&#x2013;  Aug. 28 - U.S. Air Force Heritage of America Band (Blue Aces) For more information, visit www.merchantssquare.org or call 565-8889.

â&#x20AC;˘

JULY 12, 2013

Submit Outside The Gate announcements to pw1@militarynews.com

Jobs for Veterans Program Peninsula Worklink, in partnership with Thomas Nelson Community College and the Virginia Employment Commission, will sponsor â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jobs for Veterans Programâ&#x20AC;? information sessions from 5 to 6 p.m. at the Peninsula Workforce Development Center, 600 Butler Farm Rd., Hampton. The information sessions will take place on July 16, Aug. 6 and 20; and Sept. 3 and 17. This program trains eligible veterans for immediate employment in the following high-demand career ďŹ elds: precision welding; sheet metal fabrication; computer numeric-controlled machining; heating, ventilation and air conditioning; industrial electrician; and broadband/ďŹ ber optics installation. For more information or to apply, contact Thomas Goodman (Peninsula Worklink) at 766-4914; Leslie Holthoff (TNCC) at 825-2767; or Paige Glass (VEC) at 865-3166.

Sandy Bottom Nature Park Sandy Bottom Nature Park will host a Junior Ranger Program from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. July 22-26 at 1255 Big Bethel Rd., Hampton. Come join the staff for a week of fun and adventure at the day camp for children ages 7-12. Educational class topics will include local wildlife, wetlands and pollution, in addition to outdoor survival skills. The cost is $50; registration deadline is one week prior at 3 p.m. For more information, call 825-4657 or visit www.hampton.gov/ sandybottom.

Marinersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Museum â&#x2013; Maritime Mondays childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Join us on Mondays from 10 to 11:30 a.m. through August for fun learning activities for children. Children will be divided into the following age groups: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mini Marinersâ&#x20AC;? (18 months to rising pre-kindergarten); â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shipmatesâ&#x20AC;? (rising kindergarten to second graders); and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Daring Discoverersâ&#x20AC;? (rising third to ďŹ fth graders). The cost per program is $2 per student (members); and $2 plus admission (non-members). To register, visit http://marinersmuseumm.org/maritimemondays. Walkins will be accepted as space allows. Groups will meet in the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main lobby. â&#x2013;  Kayak camp â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 22-26; and Aug. 19-23. This camp is open to children between the ages of 9 and 15. Times vary depending on the age of the child. To register, visit www.chesapeakeexperience. org. For more information, call Wisteria Perry at 591-7744 or email wperry@marinersmuseum.org. The Marinersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Museum is located at 100 Museum Dr., Newport News. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday; and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. For more information, call 591-7718 or visit www.marinersmuseum.org.

Cinema Under the Stars Cinema Under the Stars will take place at 8:30 p.m. Saturdays at TowneBank Fountain Park on the downtown Norfolk waterfront. This event is free and open to the public. Join us and watch movies on a 16-foot screen. Bring a lawn chair or blanket for seating. The movie schedule is: â&#x2013; July 13 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; How to Train Your Dragon (PG) â&#x2013;  Aug. 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey (G) â&#x2013;  Aug. 31 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Babe, the Gallant Pig (G). In the event of inclement weather, visit www.festevents.org to check for delays or cancellations.

   

    


JULY 12, 2013

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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::( 6XSHUVWDUV YLVLW -%/( 6HUYLFH PHPEHUV Photos by Staff Sgt. John D. Strong II

Joint Base Langley-Eustis community members take a group photo with WWE Superstars Darren Young and Titus O’Neil, and WWE Diva Natalya at the Langley Air Force Base Exchange, July 9.The WWE entertainers signed autographs and took photos with JBLE Soldiers, Airmen and their families.

U.S.Air Force 1st Lt. FrankVandegriff, 27th Fighter Squadron pilot, explains the capabilities and instruments of theT-38A talon to WWE Superstar DarrenYoung at the 94th Fighter Squadron at Langley Air Force Base, July 9.Young, along with WWE SuperstarTitus O’Neil andWWE Diva Natalya, interacted with theT-38ATalon and received a tour of the F-22A Raptor.

WWE Superstar Titus O’Neil dons a HGU-55P aircraft helmet at the 94th Fighter Squadron at LangleyAir Force Base, July 9. While on Langley, the WWE entertainers received a mission brief on the F-22A Raptor and its capabilities.

Members of the 633rd Security Forces Squadron take a group photo with WWE Superstars DarrenYoung andTitus O'Neil, and WWE Diva Natalya at the Exchange on Langley Air Force Base, July 9. The WWE entertainers signed autographs and took photos with Joint Base Langley-Eustis Soldiers, Airmen and their families.

Members of the 1st Fighter Wing take a group photo with WWE Superstars Darren Young and Titus O’Neil, and WWE Diva Natalya at Langley Air Force Base, July 9.TheWWE entertainers signed autographs, took photos with the Joint Base Langley-Eustis community and received a mission brief on the F-22A Raptor.


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â&#x20AC;˘ The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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JULY 12, 2013

$) 6SHFLDO 9LFWLPVÂś &RXQVHO SURYLGHV DGYRFDF\ VXSSRUW IRU DVVDXOW VXUYLYRUV By Senior Airman Jason J. Brown 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

In continuing the war against sexual assault, the Air Force recently established the Special Victimsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Counsel (SVC) Program, designed to give sexual assault survivors legal assistance in navigating the criminal justice system with help from lawyers trained to handle their unique needs. The SVCs provide direct legal advice to clients throughout the military justice process, and ensure clientsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rights are being observed and protected by advocating on their behalf both inside and outside of the courtroom. Ultimately, SVCs aim to encourage survivors of sexual assault to seek assistance from military legal professionals. Survivors of sexual violence can take advantage of SVC counseling upon making a report to the Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC), victim advocate, military criminal investigator, victim/witness liaison or legal ofďŹ ce attorney. These base agencies are obligated to inform the survivor of the availability of legal assistance from the SVC. When the SVC ofďŹ ce is notiďŹ ed by one of these agencies that a survivor requests support, the ofďŹ ce determines the victimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eligibility and assigns a specially-trained attorney to provide counsel. â&#x20AC;&#x153;While we understand there are a variety of circumstances that lead an individual to report a sexual assault, such as talking to a ďŹ rst sergeant, supervisor, co-worker, friend or spouse, the main goal is to get the victim the support they need and allow them the opportunity to seek legal guidance from an SVC,â&#x20AC;? said Tech. Sgt. Alan Salmones, a paralegal from the Andrews Region SVC, which supports survivors from Langley Air Force Base, Va. Capt. Dustin Kouba, an Andrews Region SVC attorney, said that even if a survivor wishes to make, or has made, a restricted report, they remain eligible for SVC support. Restricted reports of sexual assault can be made through the SARC or the victimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s primary care manager.

Graphic by Sylvia Saab

To initiate a report of sexual assault at Langley AFB, survivors may report the incident through their (or the Service member's) chain of command, or contact the following agencies:

â&#x20AC;˘ Langley Law Center: 764-3277 â&#x20AC;˘ SARC: 764-7272 â&#x20AC;˘ Andrews Region SVC: (240) 612-4697/4672 Air Force attorneys, like any other attorney, owe ethical duties and privileges of conďŹ dentiality to their clients. These duties come directly from state bar rules of professional conduct and the Air Force Rules of Professional Conduct, and encourage clients to make â&#x20AC;&#x153;full and frankâ&#x20AC;? disclosures to their attorneys, who are then better able to provide candid advice and effective representation, Kouba explained. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our ofďŹ ce, like the [Area Defense Counsel], is completely independent of the command and base legal ofďŹ ce. We are not bound by the chain of commandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s practices or reporting procedures,â&#x20AC;? Kouba said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;SVCs advocate the interests of their clients, not of the Air Force.â&#x20AC;? In the near future, Kouba said perspective clients will be allowed to contact the SVC ofďŹ ce directly without making a report. Subsequent meetings are covered by the same ethical rules and conďŹ dentiality agreements as reports, guaranteeing survivor conďŹ dentiality even if they ultimately decide not to use the program. Though the SVC attorneys are not located at each installation, they remain ďŹ&#x201A;exible in providing counsel to clients. In instances where an SVC

cannot meet with the client face to face, telephone correspondence will be the main source of contact. â&#x20AC;&#x153;SVCs will always travel to Article 32 hearings and courts-martial, and will attend interviews if feasible. If they cannot attend, every attempt will be made to have the SVC available via telephone and advise their client appropriately,â&#x20AC;? Salmones explained. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Overall, the SVC is there to advise their client whenever the client has questions and needs legal advice.â&#x20AC;? Counseling is available to all Air Force active duty, reserve, and Air National Guard victims who are in Title 10 status at the time of the offense and report they are a victim of sexual assault. Additionally, all active duty and reserve members of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard, including Army National Guard personnel in Title 10 status at the time of the offense and report that they are a survivor of sexual assault, are eligible for SVC counseling when an Air Force commander exercises jurisdiction, or when the perpetrator is an Air Force member. All remaining categories of eligibility for the SVC program fall under Air Force Instruction 51-504, Legal Assistance, Notary, and Preventative Law Programs, which governs who is eligible for legal assistance depending on their location and circumstance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It takes a strong team to succeed in our mission to protect and defend the nation, and sexual assault undermines that,â&#x20AC;? said Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Welsh III when announcing the launch of the program in January. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s devastating to those involved. The Special Victimsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Counsel will provide victims of sexual assault with a better understanding of the criminal process from an expert who is specially qualiďŹ ed to represent the victim. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This program embodies what the Air Force is all about: taking care of our people,â&#x20AC;? the general said. Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Note: Rich Lamance of the Air Force News Service contributed to this report.


JULY 12, 2013

â&#x20AC;˘ The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

â&#x20AC;˘

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*†

• No Credit Needed*†

*THE MATTRESS FIRM CREDIT CARD IS ISSUED BY WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL NATIONAL BANK. SPECIAL TERMS OF 48 MONTHS VALID ON PURCHASES OF $2299 AND ABOVE, 36 MONTHS VALID ON PURCHASES OF $1999 AND ABOVE, AND 24 MONTHS VALID ON PURCHASES OF $1499 AND ABOVE. SPECIAL TERMS APPLY TO QUALIFYING PURCHASES CHARGED WITH APPROVED CREDIT. SOME PLANS REQUIRE DOWN PAYMENT. SEE STORE FOR DETAILS. REGULAR MINIMUM MONTHLY PAYMENTS ARE REQUIRED DURING THE PROMOTIONAL (SPECIAL TERMS) PERIOD. INTEREST WILL BE CHARGED TO YOUR ACCOUNT FROM THE PURCHASE DATE AT THE APR FOR PURCHASES IF THE PURCHASE BALANCE IS NOT PAID IN FULL WITHIN THE PROMOTIONAL PERIOD. FOR NEWLY OPENED ACCOUNTS, THE APR FOR PURCHASES IS 27.99%. THIS APR MAY VARY WITH THE MARKET BASED ON THE U.S. PRIME RATE AND IS GIVEN AS OF 5/1/13. IF YOU ARE CHARGED INTEREST IN ANY BILLING CYCLE, THE MINIMUM INTEREST CHARGE WILL BE $1.00. OFFER VALID 7/13/13-7/14/13. PHOTOGRAPHY IS FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY AND MAY NOT REFLECT ACTUAL PRODUCT. ***WHILE SUPPLIES LAST 6/26/13 THRU 7/14/13. SAVE $500 ON KINGS/CA KINGS ($250 PER UNIT), $300 ON QUEENS AND DOUBLES, $250 ON TWINS AND TWIN EXTRA LONGS ON THE TEMPUR-ERGO™ PREMIER SYSTEM, SAVE $200 OFF SRP PER UNIT ($400 ON DUAL SYSTEMS) ON REMAINING TEMPUR-ERGO™ ADVANCED BASES AND SAVE $100 OFF SRP PER UNIT ($200 ON DUAL SYSTEMS) ON THE TEMPUR-ERGO™ BASIC SYSTEM. NOT VALID ON PREVIOUS PURCHASES OR ORDERS PLACED PRIOR TO 6/26/13. SEE STORE FOR COMPLETE DETAILS. **TEMPUR-CLOUD® SELECT SAVINGS: SAVE UP TO $200 ON TEMPUR-CLOUD® SELECT MATTRESS SETS (MATTRESS + FOUNDATION OR MATTRESS + TEMPUR-ERGO™ ADJUSTABLE BASE) PURCHASED BEFORE 7/15/13. SEE STORE FOR DETAILS. †ON AVAILABLE PRODUCTS IN LOCAL DELIVERY AREAS. MUST BE PURCHASED BEFORE DELIVERY CUT OFF TIME. NOT AVAILABLE FOR ONLINE PURCHASES. PRICES DO NOT REFLECT DELIVERY FEE. SEE STORE FOR DETAILS. ††LOW PRICE GUARANTEE IF YOU FIND THE SAME OR COMPARABLE SLEEP SET FOR LESS THAN OUR DISPLAYED OR ADVERTISED PRICE, SIMPLY BRING IN THE ADVERTISEMENT AND WE WILL BEAT THE PRICE BY 10% OR IT’S FREE; EVEN FOR UP TO 100 DAYS AFTER YOUR PURCHASE. NOT VALID ON LIMITED TIME AND DOOR BUSTER PROMOTIONS. COMPARE AT PRICING IS DETERMINED BASED ON PRICE OF COMPARABLE MERCHANDISE OF SIMILAR QUALITY AND CIRCUMSTANCES. AS A COMPANY, WE STAND BEHIND OUR COMPARE AT PRICES, BASED ON OUR MARKET EXPERIENCE AND KNOWLEDGE. THESE PRICES REFLECT NATIONALLY COMPETITIVE MSRP, LIST PRICES AND DO NOT REFLECT INTERIM MARK-DOWNS, WHICH MAY HAVE BEEN TAKEN. WE INVITE YOU TO ASK ABOUT ANY INDIVIDUAL PRICES. PRODUCT AND SELECTION MAY VARY FROM STORE TO STORE. MATTRESS FIRM, INC. STRIVES FOR ACCURACY IN OUR ADVERTISING, BUT ERRORS IN PRICING AND/OR PHOTOGRAPHY MAY OCCUR. MATTRESS FIRM RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CORRECT ANY SUCH ERRORS. SOME PRODUCTS ARE AT THE MANUFACTURER’S MINIMUM SELLING PRICE AND FURTHER REDUCTIONS CANNOT BE TAKEN. STORE HOURS MAY VARY BY LOCATION. OFFERS VALID 7/13/13-7/14/13 OR WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. *†SEE STORE FOR COMPLETE DETAILS. MF24_ROP_MILITARY_PAPER_7.11

Peninsula Warrior July 12, 2013 Air Force Edition  

Langley Air Force Base edition of the July 12, 2013 issue of Peninsula Warrior

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