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:DUULRU J O I N T June 28, 2013 Vol. 4, No. 25

B A S E

L A N G L E Y - E U S T I S

P u b l i s h e d i n t h e i n t e re s t o f p e r s o n n e l a t J o i n t B a s e L a n g l e y - E u s t i s

Air force EDITION

w w w. p e n i n s u l a w a r r i o r. c o m

FEATURE PROFILE

Airman’s story of surviving Khobar Towers bombing — Page 4

NASA TRAINING Landing and Impact Research Facility — Page 24

For more online content, check out JBLE.af.mil

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ARMY SOLDIER SHOW Fort Eustis Soldier finds passion through singing — Page 20

AFJROTC cadets ‘shadow’ Airmen – Page 16


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

JUNE 28, 2013

Commentary Joint Base Langley-Eustis Editorial Staff Joint Base Langley-Eustis Commander Col. John J. Allen Jr. Joint Base Langley-Eustis Public Affairs Officer Capt. Matthew Miller • matthew.miller9@langley.af.mil Joint Base Langley-Eustis Editor Staff Sgt. Katie Gar Ward • katherine.ward@langley.af.mil Fort Eustis Managing Editor Tech Sgt. April Wickes • pw1@militarynews.com Per Air Force Instruction 35-101/Army Regulation 360-1, only stories and photos submitted by members of the Department of Defense community and DOD news services may be printed in The Peninsula Warrior. Any stories, photos or announcements must be submitted eight days prior to publication. Stories and photos should be submitted to the editor and/or assistant editor at 633abw. paedit@langley.af.mil or Public Affairs Office, 601 Hines Cir., Fort Eustis, VA 23604. Announcements for the Community Section should be submitted to pw@militarynews.com. Announcements for the Outside the Gate Section should be submitted to pw1@militarynews.com. For more information call 757-878-4920. Authors’ names may be withheld, but all letters must include the authors’ signatures and telephone number. The Peninsula Warrior is an authorized publication for all the members of the U.S. military. Contents of The Peninsula Warrior are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, Department of the Air Force or the Department of the Army. The Peninsula Warrior is printed every Friday by offset as a civilian enterprise newspaper for the Public Affairs Office, U.S. Air Force by Military Newspapers of Virginia at 150 W. Brambleton Ave. Norfolk, VA 23510 under exclusive written contract with the commander, Joint Base Langley-Eustis. MNV is a private firm in no way connected with the Department of the Air Force or Department of the Army. Printed circulation: 25,000. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. A confirmed violation or rejection of this policy of equal opportunity by any advertiser will result in refusal to print advertising from that source. All editorial content of The Peninsula Warrior is prepared, edited, provided and approved by the Public Affairs Office Joint Base Langley-Eustis. All photographs are Air Force or Army photographs unless otherwise stated. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts and supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense or MNV of the products or services advertised.

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&RUH9DOXHV6SRWOLJKW([FHOOHQFHLQDOOZHGR By Master Sgt. Brian Potvin AIR COMBAT COMMAND

W

hen the subject comes up, I always tell Airmen that the last of our three core values does not mean the Air Force expects perfection. It expects us all to strive for continuous improvement in everything we do in our lives. Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. once said this about excellence: “If a man is called to be a street sweeper, he should sweep streets even as Michelangelo painted, or Beethoven composed music, or Shakespeare wrote poetry. He should sweep streets so well that all the hosts of heaven and earth will pause to say, ‘Here lived a great street sweeper who did his job well.’” While we should strive for our best, perfection is hard to come by. As human beings we are inherently fallible. If we expect perfection from our people, then we will be consistently disappointed. I have fallen short of this core value numerous times in my career. I failed to meet the mark of “excellence” from time to time as a young Airman, as a noncommissioned officer and even while I served as a first sergeant. I am still wearing our uniform today because I stood up, dusted myself off and told my superiors, “I take responsibility for what I did wrong, and it will never happen again.” I had leadership that took me at my word and gave me another chance. In order to seriously strive towards excellence in all we do, we need to lean upon some of the qualities in our first two core values. One of the attributes of “Integrity First” is justice. In adhering to this attribute, we must treat everyone fairly, regardless of the differences we have as human beings. How can we ex-

Heritage Spotlight On June 28-29, 1927, the Bird of Paradise, crewed by the Army Air Corps’ 1st Lts. Lester J. Maitland and Albert F. Hegenberger, completed the first transpacific flight from California to Hawaii, a feat for which the crew received the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Mackay Trophy. The Bird of Paradise was one of three Atlantic-Fokker C-2 tri-motor transport planes developed for the Air Corps from the civilian Fokker F.VIIa/3m airliner design. Its two-ton carrying

Army Core Values: • Loyalty, duty • Respect, selfless service • Honor, integrity • Personal courage Air Force Core Values: • Integrity first • Service before self • Excellence in all we do pect everyone to be excellent if we don’t show them respect as a person? Self-discipline is an attribute of “Service Before Self” that also applies to excellence. We have to be disciplined enough to learn our jobs and seek out ways that we can improve the things we produce. Something leaders should consider is making sure people know how their jobs contribute to the mission of their squadrons, wings and ultimately, the Air Force. The importance of personnel working in the fitness center is as important as the crew chief who makes sure an F-22 is ready to fly. If our Airmen don’t have an understanding of how their job impacts mission accomplishment, this could lead to a lack of desire to perform all tasks to an excellent level. The four aspects of excellence are personal, organizational, resource and operational. All play a significant role in achieving excellence in all we do.

Personal excellence This is all about being excellent in all areas of your life, not just your job. Think about pursuing off-duty education or trying to score an “excellent” on your next physical fitness test.

Organizational excellence The success of our organizations is a

team effort. We must always strive to foster a team environment in which everyone is encouraged to work together.

Resource excellence Our most precious resource is our people. Effective leaders must do what is necessary in order to ensure our Airmen are ready to accomplish their mission to the best of their ability. This means securing training when appropriate and scheduling fitness sessions to help your people do their best on fitness assessments. Keep in mind that the most effective leaders lead from the front. It also means ensuring that you’ve been trained on your own tasks as well.

Operational excellence Operational excellence means that we all understand exactly what the Air Force does, and how the Air Force plays a part in carrying out the orders of our commander in chief. Ask yourself, do you know what the Air Force’s core competencies are? Have you ever looked at the Air Force doctrine documents? Chances are, if you have not, neither have your Airmen. We must take the time to learn about these things, and to instruct our Airmen to do the same. It was the honor of my career to have worked for and traveled with our 18th chief of staff, Gen. T. Michael Moseley. While speaking at a graduation banquet for the U.S. Air Force Weapons School at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., he told the newly-minted weapons officers something that has stayed in my mind: “Never walk by a problem. Stop, fix it and move on.” If we all take Gen. Moseley’s advice, our Air Force will continue to be a better place today than it was yesterday.

The Bird of Paradise capacity gave it the ability to carry sufficient fuel for the 2,500-mile flight, and its three motors provided an acceptable safety factor in the event one failed. Moreover, although modified for the long distance flight, the C-2 was a widely-used standard design, demonstrating the practicality of flying long distances. Maitland and Hegenberger flew the Bird of Paradise primarily to experiment with the use of radio beacon aids in air navigation.

Immediately after the flight, Assistant Secretary of War for Air F. Trubee Davison said of the feat, “The flight is unquestionably one of the very greatest aerial accomplishments ever made.” The flight tested not only the reliability of the machine, but the navigational skill and the stamina of the two officers as well, for had they strayed even three-and-a-half degrees off course, they would have missed Kauai and vanished over the ocean.

Courtesy photo


JUNE 28, 2013

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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InTheNews

Donley steps down as secretary of the Air Force By Desiree N. Palacios AIR FORCE NEWS SERVICE

Five years to the day from when he entered the position, the longest-serving secretary of the Air Force stepped down during a farewell ceremony at Joint Base Andrews, Md., June 21. Donley was confirmed as the 22nd secretary of the Air Force Oct. 2, 2008. He served as the acting secretary since June 21 of that year, as well as for seven months in 1993, making him the longest-serving secretary in the Air Force’s history. “America is stronger because Mike Donley chose to serve. You leave us now focused on the continued delivery of airpower for America,” Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Welsh III said. “The Air Force remains ready to provide global vigilance, global reach and global power for America because of your leadership and your clear, consistent commitment to our core values of integrity, service and excellence. We’ve all been privileged to know you, and honored to follow you.” In addition to Welsh, Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel and Deputy Defense Secretary Ash Carter honored Donley at the ceremony, where hundreds gathered to say thanks and farewell. The defense secretary said Donley’s leadership as the Air Force’s top civilian rested on hard work, constant attention and the trust and confidence of his subordinates. “If we had more of the Mike Donley attitude and sense of purpose in our country today, we’d probably all be a little better off,” Hagel said. “I have been impressed [and] inspired. He has never shied away from taking the big issues on, straight up.” During his tenure, Donley’s accomplishments include reinvigorating the nuclear enterprise by, among other things, successfully standing up the first new Air Force major command in 17 years – Air Force Global Strike Command. He helped

to ensure modernization of the force remained a priority by overseeing the successful award of the KC-46A tanker, initiated work on the long range strike family of systems and continued F-35A Lightning II development and its transition to pilot training. He placed major emphasis on recapturing acquisition excellence with the establishment of the acquisition continuous process improvement plan and the successful implementation of the efficient space procurement strategy. He also was pivotal in standing up 24th Air Force to focus the service’s cyber efforts, and he helped set the stage for total force integration, to find the right mix of capabilities that will maximize operational effectiveness across the active and reserve components. Carter credited Donley with rebuilding the morale and reputation of the Air Force, “brick by brick,” and described him as a man of great character. “He has reestablished the reputation and morale of our Air Force and has gone from there to build it higher and higher and higher,” Carter said. “You are everything we want in a leader and a man of great integrity and humility.” Welsh thanked Donley and his wife, Gail, for their constant focus on taking care of Airmen and their families. “Gail, your influence has been felt across our Air Force. Thank you for your genuine love of our Airmen and the 178,000 spouses [who benefited from that never-ending advocacy],” Welsh said. He also thanked Hagel and Carter for joining the Air Force “as we celebrate a great American, a true patriot and I believe a consummate Airman... my boss, my partner and my friend.” After a pass in review by the U.S. Air Force Honor Guard and the U.S. Air Force Band, Donley reflected on his tenure and how much Airmen have impressed him over the years. “I am most grateful to have had this opportunity to meet, to know and to rep-

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Photo by Scott M. Ash

resent America’s Airmen...the living engine of our Air Force who have stepped forward, generation after generation, to sustain and advance American airpower,” Donley said. “Our total force Airmen manage an incredibly diverse mission set and utilize the most technologically advanced systems, all of which come together to provide global vigilance, reach and power for America.” Donley took the opportunity while on stage to offer one last appeal. “To members of Congress continuing to struggle with the nation’s fiscal and defense priorities ... on behalf of our Airmen, please repeal sequestration,” he said. “And always feel free to add a few more resources to the U.S. Air Force ... consistent with the president’s budget certainly.” Before leaving the podium, Donley asked how the Air Force can be worthy of the “incredible” Airmen who volunteer to serve the nation. “My answer is simple,” he said. “We must lead our Air Force and our military in a way that continues to sustain our most valuable assets: the trust of the American people, the confidence of our partners and allies, and the fear and respect of any potential adversary. Ladies and gentlemen, it has been an honor to serve with you in the world’s finest Air Force.”

)DQQLQJ EHFRPHV DFWLQJ VHFUHWDU\ RI WKH $LU )RUFH Under Secretary of the Air Force Eric Fanning became the acting secretary of the Air Force June 21, succeeding Michael Donley, who departed the position after more than five years. Fanning was confirmed under secretary by the Senate April 18 and, under federal law, automatically assumes the job of acting secretary until the president nominates and the Senate confirms a replacement. Fanning will continue to serve as under secretary during this time. The service has had numerous acting secretaries over the years. Most recently, in 2005, three individuals served in the acting role in between the tenures of Dr. James Roche and Michael Wynne. From Jan. 20 to Nov. 4, 2005, Peter Teets, Michael Dominguez and Pete Geren filled the position, in varying durations.

We want to hear from you. Contact us at pw1@militarynews.com and 633abw.paedit@langley.af.mil or call (757) 878-4920 or (757) 764-2144.


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

JUNE 28, 2013

Everyone has a story: The grocery bagger By Staff Sgt. Jarad A. Denton 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

With wild brown hair pulled back into a ponytail and oval glasses accentuating his eyes, Paul Blais easily blends into his surroundings as people rush through the lines at the Langley Air Force Base Commissary – their minds lost in fervor of the day. He quietly and calmly bags their groceries as he limps from register to register, working for the tips people hurriedly leave him. It is hard to imagine that on June 24, 1996, this unassuming man was a 26-year-old senior airman, celebrating his birthday inside a laundry room in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. “It was a squadron tradition to have your birthday off,” the former airborne communications systems operator said, his speech slow and strained by a heavy slur. “I stayed in the dorm and did laundry.” As Paul folded his clothes, his thoughts drifted to Greenland. He and his crewmates, who specialized in combat search and rescue, had spent April enjoying the unseasonably warm weather of the country. On the flight to Dhahran, Paul said he had some rather nice conversations with his friend, Airman 1st Class Justin Wood, about “snow bunnies.” “Justin was always friendly and quickwitted,” Paul said. “He could turn any situation into a smile.” The two became fast friends after Wood replaced Paul as the youngest member of their aircrew, talking about the things most 20-somethings talk about while making the most of their deployment. Everyone on the crew was close. “They were my second family,” Paul said, his cheerful voice suddenly turning somber. “I am the only survivor of my second family.”

said. “At 10:05 I woke up, needing to use the bathroom.” Outside the Khobar Towers, where Paul lived, Ahmad Ibrahim Al-Mughassil, head of the Saudi Hizballah military wing, turned the ignition key to a olive drab fuel tanker truck he and his accomplices had converted into a bomb. Al-Mughassil drove the truck into a parking lot and backed it up to a fence in front of the towers. He and his passenger, Ali Saed Bin Ali El-Hoorie, casually stepped out of the tanker, entered a white Chevrolet Caprice and drove away into the night, never to be seen again. From the rooftop of the eight-story dorm, Staff Sgt. Alfredo Guerrero was checking a security post when he saw the tanker follow the Caprice through the parking lot. After the truck backed against the fence, Guerrero saw two men in white robes with red and white checkered headdresses exit the tanker and enter the car. As it sped away, Guerrero said his heart skipped a beat. “At that point I knew something pretty big was about to happen,” Guerrero said in a 2006 interview. He immediately radioed the control center and started an evacuation of the building. Racing down the steps, he pounded on doors and shouted through the hallway. In seconds, the entire eighth, and half of the seventh floors, were emptied. On the third floor, Paul was in the bathroom at 10:09 p.m., when an explosion equal to the force of nearly 30,000 pounds of dynamite tore through the Khobar Towers like a hot knife through butter. It left a crater 85-feet wide and 35-feet deep. “If I had been in my room, asleep in my bed, I wouldn’t have survived,” Paul said. “Being in the bathroom put an extra wall between me and the explosion. Ten feet saved my life.”

Photo courtesy DOD

U.S. and Saudi military personnel survey the damage to Khobar Towers caused by the explosion of a fuel truck outside the northern fence of the facility on King Abdul Aziz Air Base near Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, June 25, 1996. Several buildings were damaged and there were numerous U.S. casualties.

The floor beneath Paul gave way and he plummeted three stories, entering a coma as soon as he hit the ground. As Paul lay unconscious, the five stories above him buried him alive and left him bleeding profusely from the head. For two-and-ahalf hours, the blood flowed from Paul’s head, inching him closer to death. Wood, who lived on the sixth floor, and the rest of Paul’s crew died during the terrorist attack.

Mistaken identity More than a month later, then-Secretary of Defense William S. Cohen issued a statement that forever changed the way the military viewed antiterrorism – specifically citing Guerrero’s actions. “This sergeant’s good judgment and prompt action unquestionably saved lives the night of the bombing,” Cohen said. “But one individual’s exemplary performance cannot take the place of functional alarm systems and well-conceived evacuation plans and procedures.”

Right place at wrong time It all happened the day after Paul’s birthday. He and his crew were scheduled to fly a routine mission to Aviano, Italy – taking 50 Airmen home to their families. The pre-flight check stated the plane was in perfect condition, with the exception of an engine due for inspection. The crew agreed to ground the plane until the following morning. “I went to sleep at 9:30 p.m.,” Paul

“Freedom really is not free. My aircrew paid the price with their lives. I paid the price by having to survive and carry on with the knowledge of what they might have accomplished, had they lived.” — Paul Blais survivor of the Khobar Towers attack, June 25, 1996, in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia

Those inadequacies paved the way for the military’s current view of antiterrorism measures – measures implemented too late to save the 19 Airmen killed, and hundreds more wounded by the attack; including one Airman 1st Class Christopher Lester, who lay comatose in a hospital in Germany. Lester was a 19-year old young man from Pineville, W.V., who was engaged to be married and serving in the U.S. Air Force as an electrical technician. Dhahran was his first overseas deployment. He was only in the country four days when the towers were attacked. Sadly, Lester was killed in the explosion. The Airman lying in the hospital bed was actually Paul, who had miraculously survived the ordeal. “When I went to the bathroom, I forgot to take my dog tags with me,” Paul said. “They misidentified me as Airman Lester.” In a news release, the Department of Defense later clarified that members of Lester’s unit had incorrectly identified Blais as the fallen Airman. For Lester’s family, the news that their son had not survived the attack was unbearable. “They took it as well as you would think,” Paul said. “For one week they thought their son had survived.” Paul’s mother, Maria Taylor, had been preparing for the worst ever since she was told Paul was missing and presumed killed in the explosion. When Paul was properly identified, Taylor was relieved beyond words. SEE BAGGER PAGE 6


JUNE 28, 2013

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BAGGER FROM PAGE 4 “I waited a long time for the answer and finally [the officials] call us today and tell me my son is alive and is 100 percent my son,” she said in an interview, June 29, 1996. “It’s a very, very, very happy day of my life.”

The price of freedom Although still in a coma, Paul was well enough to be transported to the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C. His condition steadily improved, and on Aug. 3, 1997, Paul opened his eyes for the first time since his world literally collapsed around him. His first thoughts were of the Air Force and the mission he had sworn to complete. “I wanted to get up and return to work,” he said. “I wanted to do my job, not be a pin cushion.” There was only one problem – the attack had left Paul with severe physical injuries. “I was in essence a newborn child,” Paul said. “I still had the mental capacity of a 26-year-old, but I couldn’t eat, drink, walk or talk. I could think it, but I couldn’t do it.” Frustrated, Paul became obsessed with thoughts of escaping the hospital and re-

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

turning to his aircrew, his mind refusing to accept that they had all died in the attack. “I was not going to stay there and be stuck full of needles,” he said. “Every night, I tried to escape. It didn’t work. Two steps out of the bed and I would fall flat on my face. So I did what I was trained to do in survival school – I low-crawled.” Unfortunately, the nurse’s station was adjacent to the elevator. Every time Paul got close to “freedom,” a nurse would see him and carry him back to bed, chiding him as a “bad Airman.” By the end of the second week, Paul’s escape attempts had become so frequent his doctor began restraining him to the bed. “My doctor didn’t realize I had been through escape and evasion training,” Paul said. “Those restraints gave the nurses an extra five or 10 minutes of slack time.” During Paul’s recovery and repeated escape attempts, he was visited by the then-chief of staff of the Air Force, Gen. Ronald Fogleman. The general, who regarded the Khobar Towers bombing as “a wanton act of terrorism,” awarded Paul a Purple Heart and medically retired him from active-duty service. According to Paul, his doctor hoped the retirement would curb the escape attempts.

JUNE 28, 2013

Photo by Staff Sgt. Jarad A. Denton

Paul Blais was awarded the Purple Heart after he survived the Khobar Tower bombing, June 25, 1996.

By the end of the third week, a restraining cage had been built around Paul’s bed to keep him from breaking free. “I could not get out of that cage to save my life,” Paul said with a chuckle. “I was in there for two weeks, but had I been in there a third, I would have gotten out of that cage.” As Paul physically recovered, stunning doctors who said he would never walk again, his thoughts began to dwell on his second family. “I would try to remember the attack and all that would come to mind would be feelings of sorrow and guilt,” he said. “I was the one to survive when they all

died. I was the ‘lucky one.’” For years, Paul would struggle with survivor’s guilt and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. He said he never truly got over those feelings, but rather learned to manage them better. Now, he tries to only remember the trips to Greenland and conversations about “snow bunnies.” “I think of all the good times we had together,” Paul said. “They, we, were all ready and willing to give our lives in defense of this country.” Now, Paul carries on the legacy of his fallen comrades by speaking to every class of senior airmen at Langley’s Airman Leadership School. He stands in front of the future leaders with a solemn and powerful message. “Freedom really is not free,” he said. “My aircrew paid the price with their lives. I paid the price by having to survive and carry on with the knowledge of what they might have accomplished, had they lived.” Those memories stayed with Paul as he methodically placed groceries inside bags at the Langley Commissary – his face once again lost in the sea of tasks and distractions that follow people throughout their day.

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JUNE 28, 2013

FeatureStory

JBLE nature trails offer a green getaway By Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Photo by Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill

The Fort Eustis nature trail crosses the Fort Eustis Lake, a manmade lake designed to catch runoff and divert it from the installation. Trail-goers can also bring their fishing poles with them since the lake is a license-free, catch-and-release area.

Photo by Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill

Fiddler crabs make their homes in muddy marshes near the nature trail at Langley Air Force Base.These marshes buffer the eroding waters to prevent damage to other habitats.

A horse whinnies in the distance while a small rabbit darts from the road. Sounds of life emanate from tall grass on the shore as the wings of a hungry egret eclipse the sun, sending fiddler crabs rushing from their silt-laden hovels to the safety of the grass. The flourishing life soon scatters when an Airman approaches to sit down, taking a well-deserved lunch break. At Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., two nature trails serve as getaways for those wishing to escape from the daily grind, and each trail hosts unique ecosystems and accommodations for walkers. “The nature trail is a great escape,” said Michael Mallozzi, 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron pollution prevention specialist. “It is usually impossible to walk over wetlands, but at Langley you can.” The Langley Air Force Base nature trail is a short, quarter-mile boardwalk across marshy wetlands. In addition to protected walkways, the trail features an elevated, covered viewing pavilion and placards along the walkway depicting and describing the flora and fauna around the trail. While many trails boast similar accommodations, Mallozzi explained what makes Langley different. “You have the ability to walk out over the wetlands to get up close and personal with many different species and see their natural habitat,” said Mallozzi. “There are a wide range of fish, bird and other species unique to this area.” This unique area in particular holds a special purpose to Langley as a protector of life, said Harry Jeavons, former 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron natural resources manager. “This trail supports a natural estuary,” said Jeavons. “Estuaries create more organic matter each year than similarlysized forests and agricultural areas. They do this by supporting many different environments to include shallow waters, open waters, marshes, wetlands, sandy beaches, mud flats and oyster reefs.” Estuaries also protect the inland by

At Joint Base Langley-Eustis, two nature trails serve as getaways for those wishing to escape from the daily grind, and each trail hosts unique ecosystems and accommodations for walkers. buffering against erosion and preventing pollution from reaching the ocean, said Jeavons. Fort Eustis’ nature trail also sits along the estuary, but it provides different scenery from Langley’s trail. The Fort Eustis trail spans a 1.2-mile loop near Fort Eustis Lake. Constructed in 1995 as a conservation effort, the trail is home to species similar to those at Langley, however more reptilian and amphibious life can be found near Fort Eustis Lake. Unlike Langley, fishers are welcome on the trail since it crosses Fort Eustis Lake, which is a license-free, catch-and-release lake. Susan Miller, 733rd Civil Engineer Division Asset Management flight chief, explained why she enjoys the nature trail at Fort Eustis. “It allows the Fort Eustis community somewhere natural to go for a run or take a lunch,” said Miller. “I personally enjoy the little bridges along the way; you can see a lot more critters around them.” Fortunately, finding these secluded trails doesn’t require a map, as both trails start from main thoroughfares at JBLE. The Langley trail has two points of entry, both across the street from the stables before crossing the bridge into “ammo country.” Eustis’ nature trail is similarly easy to access. Beginning on the right side of Jacobs Theater, the trail ends just short of the obstacle course on the other side of the theater. When the hustle and bustle of everyday work starts to become overwhelming, it is possible to whisk away the daily grind and replace it with the subtle sound of stirring from JBLE’s nature trails.


JUNE 28, 2013

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VEHICLE MILES SALE PRICE 2012 CHEVROLET SONIC 2LT STK#130044 .................................29,690 ..............$13,980 2012 CHEVROLET SONIC 2LT STK#130039 .................................36,536 ..............$13,980 2011 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA 2.5L SE STK#12C0239A ...................53,934 ..............$14,240 2012 CHEVROLET MALIBU LT 1LT STK#130035 ..........................41,147 ..............$14,830 2012 CHEVROLET MALIBU LT 1LT STK#130033 .........................47,460 ..............$14,830 2012 CHEVROLET MALIBU LT 1LT STK#130032 .........................46,065 ..............$14,830 2010 CHEVROLET IMPALA LT STK#130065 ................................38,509 ..............$14,930 2012 CHEVROLET CRUZE ECO STK#13T0100B ..........................22,658 ..............$15,880 2011 CHEVROLET CRUZE LT STK#130027 ..................................41,169 ..............$15,890

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utchens THE CHEVROLET AUTHORITY SINCE 1921

12920 Jefferson Ave., Newport News Vehicles subject to prior sale. Prices do not include taxes,titling,licensing, $489 Processing fee. Dealer retains all rebates. 2013 Sonic – dealer discount, $500 Rebate, $750 USAA Rebate (must be member of USAA), 2013 Camaro – Dealer discount, $1000 Rebate, $500 Bonus Cash, $750 USAA Rebate (must be a member of USAA), 2013 Equinox – Dealer discount, $1000 Rebate, $500 Bonus Cash, $750 USAA Rebate (must be a member to qualify), 2013 Silverado – dealer discount, $2500 Rebate, $2000 All Star Rebate, $1000 Trade-in rebate (must trade a 1999 or newer Chevy or GMC Truck), $1000 Owner Loyalty (must own a 1999 or newer Chevy or GMC Truck), $750 USAA Rebate (must be a member of USAA), 0% to well qualified buyers, 0% in lieu of rebate. Pictures may not represent actual vehicles. SALE ENDS 07/01/13.

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FIND WHAT YOU’RE E LOOKING FOR IN THE CLASSIFIEDS.

Photo by David Kamm

Ben Cooper (left) and Bob Hall have been working on the development of phase two of the HotWeather Mountain Combat Boot at Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center, Mass.

Army is putting new boots on the ground By Bob Reinert U.S. ARMY GARRISON-NATICK PUBLIC AFFAIRS

What it all comes down to is keeping Soldiers’ minds on their missions in Afghanistan, rather than on their feet. That’s how Ben Cooper views the development of the Hot Weather Mountain Combat Boot, or HWMCB, at Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center, which began in spring 2011. Cooper thought it was so important that he got permission to continue working on the boot after leaving the Footwear Performance Laboratory at NSRDEC to become a senior materials engineer for the Air Force, still situated at Natick. “Ben was so involved in the early phases of this and had been really running this project superbly, I thought that it was a good idea that he was able to continue on this project,” said Bob Hall, the current Army footwear engineer. “Obviously, in these fiscal times, being able to join together and work toward a common goal for the warfighter and for our country, I think, is the most important thing,” Cooper said. “My supervisors have been very supportive about me taking time to help out and support the Army with this effort, and we’re all happy to do it. “The Air Force has been a team player in this,” he continued. “It’s a sister service – one team, one fight.” Cooper and Hall are working with Program Executive Office Soldier and Product Manager Soldier Clothing and Individual Equipment to unveil phase two of the boot. Phase one – a lighter, more breathable version of the popular Mountain Combat Boot – has been issued to every Soldier deploying to Afghanistan for the past year. As many as 200,000 pairs of the boots have been fielded with great success. “[For] the amount of boots that are out there, we’ve had very, very few complaints,” Hall said. SEE BOOTS PAGE11


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BOOTS FROM PAGE 10 “Soldiers will give you honest feedback,â€? Cooper said. “We haven’t heard bad things. In this business, silence is a great thing.â€? Cooper pointed out that nothing like the HWMCB existed before Soldiers in Afghanistan began asking for it two years ago. “We were trying to develop and identify the salient characteristics of the Hot Weather Mountain Combat Boot,â€? Cooper said. “Since it was a new item, it’s not commercially available. We evaluated three different material solutions at that time from three different manufacturers.â€? Using Soldier feedback from phase one, which included requests for more breathability, Cooper and Hall conďŹ dently strode into phase two. “We cherry-picked the very best features on each of the boots, and we provided that feedback to industry,â€? Cooper said. “They responded and provided new, updated solutions.â€? Three new styles are now being evaluated at the National Training Center, Fort Irwin, Calif., by units from the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, based at Fort Carson, Colo. Each boot is nearly a half-pound lighter than the original mountain boot. “Due to Afghanistan’s unique climate and environment, they needed a boot that not only would provide them ankle stability and traction and durability, but they also needed greater breathability,â€? Cooper said. “It’s a balancing act. We were constantly walking that ďŹ ne line. I think that we have worked with the industry tirelessly on trying to make sure that we accomplish exactly what the warďŹ ghter wants and needs.â€? The industry made the boots more breathable by including moisture-wicking linings, perforating the leather and inserting textiles wherever possible between the leather and rubber, without compromising stability. “It took some creative approaches to be able to do that,â€? Cooper said. “If you’re kicking rocks and crawling while in the prone position, you need to be able to not have this thing rip.â€? Cooper will travel to Fort Irwin at the end of June with Chris King, of the Operational Forces Interface Group at Natick, to collect data from Soldiers on the 285 pairs of boots that had been issued to them. “We’re going to go meet them as soon as they get out of the box at NTC,â€? Cooper said. “I think the phase one boots were fairly well received. We would expect to ďŹ nd more positive feedback. We’re hopeful that we’re going in the right direction.â€? The goal is a technical speciďŹ cation for a boot that could be supplied by any manufacturer. When it’s achieved, said Cooper, it will be because of the “collaborative atmosphereâ€? at Natick. “I can walk down the hall and speak with the foremost expert in [ďŹ re-resistant] clothing and apparel,â€? Cooper said. “I can walk down the other end of the hall and talk to the foremost expert in cold-weather equipment, in mountaineering gear, in footwear. “I think that’s just part of the culture that is here, and I’m proud to be a part of that,â€? he continued. “We were able to leverage all the resources that we have available to us.â€?

.1)1061*&%1/72.1#&;1742+%674'106*')4#2*+%9#.. #0&2156+661174(#%'$11-2#)'(146*'%*#0%'619+0 SOUTHSIDE HARLEY-DAVIDSON BUELL 385 N. Witchduck Road, Virginia Beach (757) 499-8964 HAMPTON ROADS HARLEY-DAVIDSON 6450 G. Washington Hwy., Rt. 17, Yorktown (757) 872-7223

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HHHuntHomes.com 0UMVYTH[PVU *LU[LYZ 6WLU +HPS` *$99 down offer is only available with certain loan programs and subject to credit approval/qualiďŹ cations with preferred lender. Offers cannot be combined with any other offers or incentives. Actual homes as constructed may not contain the features and layouts depicted and may vary from photos, renderings and plans. Features and options may not be available on all plans or in all communities. Homes depicted may not represent the lowest-priced homes in the community and may be shown with upgraded landscaping and optional features. Prices shown may not include charges for options, upgrades and/or lot premiums. Floorplans, elevations, features, plans, amenities, speciďŹ cations and related information, and information concerning the pricing, incentives and availability of our homes, are subject to change without notice. See new home sales executive for details.

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Earlier this month, President Barack Obama issued a proclamation declaring June as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Pride Month. The proclamation notes the progress across the nation toward marriage equality and the steps taken toward protections for transgender Americans. “This year, we celebrate LGBT Pride Month at a moment of great hope and progress, recognizing that more needs to be done. Support for LGBT equality is growing, led by a generation which understands that, in the words of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., ‘injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere,’â€? the president stated in his proclamation. The Department of Defense and the OfďŹ ce of Diversity Management have added LGBT Pride Month as an annual observance to be celebrated by military and civilian members of the Armed Forces. During the month of June, all DOD personnel are encouraged to recognize the accomplishments of all members of its workforce and what this group of individuals has helped achieve by their service to the nation. The purpose of the commemorative month is to recognize the impact that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals have had on history. “This observance celebrates the achievements this group has made along with their sacriďŹ ces for this country,â€? said Senior Master Sgt. Sonya Hildebrand, 633rd Air Base Wing Equal Opportunity superintendent. “It is about taking a stance against discrimination and violence toward LGBT individuals and promoting equality, dignity and a respect for sexual differences. We are a team and they are a part of that team.â€? The last Sunday in June was initially celebrated as Gay Pride Day. In major cities across the nation, the day soon grew to encompass a month-long series of events. Today, these events attract millions of participants around the world. While JBLE has not scheduled an event for this year, Service members wishing to celebrate the observance can ďŹ nd opportunities in the local community: â–  www.hamptonroadspride.shuttlepod.org â–  www.gayrva.com/news-views/richmond-pride-2013 -announced/ â–  www.equalityvirginia.org/pride/


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*THEMATTRESSFIRMCREDITCARDISISSUEDBYWELLSFARGOFINANCIALNATIONALBANK.SPECIALTERMSOF72MONTHSVALIDONQUALIFYINGPURCHASESOF$2899ANDABOVE.SPECIALTERMSAPPLYTOQUALIFYINGPURCHASESCHARGEDWITHAPPROVEDCREDIT.THESPECIALTERMSAPROF5.99%WILLAPPLYTOTHEQUALIFYINGPURCHASE,AND72MONTHLYPAYMENTSEQUALTO1.6640%OFTHESPECIALTERMSBALANCEAREREQUIRED.THEADVERTISEDTERMSAREANESTIMATE ASSUMINGREQUIREDMONTHLYPAYMENTSAREMADEONTHEPAYMENTDUEDATE;NOOTHERBALANCESARECURRENTLYCARRIEDORWILLBECARRIEDONTHEACCOUNT;ANDNOADDITIONALCHARGESAREORWILLBEADDEDTOTHEACCOUNT.BECAUSEYOURACTUALACCOUNTACTIVITYMAYBEDIFFERENTTHANTHEASSUMPTIONSUSED,ORBECAUSEOFROUNDING,THENUMBEROFPAYMENTSORTHEFINALPAYMENTAMOUNTCOULDBEDIFFERENTTHANTHEADVERTISEDTERMS. ADVERTISEDSETPRICESREFLECTEDAREBEFOREINTERESTISACCRUED.THESPECIALTERMSAPRWILLCONTINUETOAPPLYUNTILALLQUALIFYINGPURCHASESAREPAIDINFULL.THEAPRFORPURCHASESWILLAPPLYTOCERTAINFEESSUCHASALATEPAYMENTFEEORIFYOUUSETHECARDFOROTHERTRANSACTIONS.FORNEWLYOPENEDACCOUNTS,THEAPRFORPURCHASESIS27.99%.THISAPRMAYVARYWITHTHEMARKETBASEDONTHEU.S.PRIMERATEANDISGIVENASOF5/1/13. IF YOU ARE CHARGED INTEREST IN ANY BILLING CYCLE, THE MINIMUM INTEREST CHARGE WILL BE $1.00. OFFER VALID 6/26/13-7/2/13. **LIMIT ONE COUPON PER ORDER. APPLIES TO ADVERTISED SET PRICE AND MUST BE PRESENTED PRIOR TO FINALIZED SALE. MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER DISCOUNT, COUPON, GROUPON OR SPECIAL OFFER, NONREFUNDABLE, MAY NOT BE USED ON PREVIOUS PURCHASES AND HAS NO CASH VALUE. NOT VALID ON TEMPUR-PEDIC®, ICOMFORT® OR FURNITURE.DOUBLECOUPONSAVINGSONSELECTMODELS.SEESTOREFORDETAILS.***WHILESUPPLIESLAST6/26/13THRU7/14/13.SAVE$500ONKINGS/CAKINGS($250PERUNIT),$300ONQUEENSANDDOUBLES,$250ONTWINSANDTWINEXTRALONGSONTHETEMPUR-ERGO™PREMIERSYSTEM,SAVE$200OFFSRPPERUNIT($400ONDUALSYSTEMS)ONREMAININGTEMPUR-ERGO™ADVANCEDBASESANDSAVE$100OFFSRPPERUNIT($200ONDUALSYSTEMS)ONTHETEMPUR-ERGO™ BASICSYSTEM.NOTVALIDONPREVIOUSPURCHASESORORDERSPLACEDPRIORTO6/26/13.SEESTOREFORCOMPLETEDETAILS.††*TEMPUR-CLOUD®SELECTSAVINGS:SAVEUPTO$200ONTEMPUR-CLOUD®SELECTMATTRESSSETS(MATTRESS+FOUNDATIONORMATTRESS+TEMPUR-ERGO™ADJUSTABLEBASE)PURCHASEDBEFORE7/15/13.SEESTOREFORDETAILS.†**LIMITONECOUPONPERHOUSEHOLD.MAYNOTBECOMBINEDWITHANYOTHERDISCOUNT,COUPON,ORSPECIALOFFER, NONREFUNDABLE, MAY NOT BE USED ON PREVIOUS PURCHASES AND HAS NO CASH VALUE. OFFER VALID ON LUXURY MEMORY FOAM PILLOWS. OFFER EXPIRES 7/2/13. SEE STORE FOR DETAILS. †††LIMIT ONE COUPON PER CUSTOMER. VALID ON SAME OR COMPARABLE MATTRESS SETS WITH COMPETITOR’S CURRENT AD OR COUPON. EXCLUDES CLOSEOUTS, SPECIAL PURCHASES, FLOOR SAMPLES AND PREVIOUS PURCHASES. NOT VALID ON TEMPUR-PEDIC®, ICOMFORT® OR FURNITURE. SOME PRODUCTS ARE AT MANUFACTURER’S MINIMUM PRICE AND FURTHER REDUCTIONS CANNOT BE TAKEN. MUST PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF PURCHASE. OFFER EXPIRES 7/2/13. SEE STORE FOR DETAILS. †ON AVAILABLE PRODUCTS IN LOCAL DELIVERY AREAS. MUST BE PURCHASED BEFORE DELIVERY CUT OFF TIME. NOT AVAILABLE FOR ONLINE PURCHASES. PRICES DO NOT REFLECT DELIVERY FEE. SEE STORE FOR DETAILS. ††LOW PRICE GUARANTEE IF YOU FIND THE SAME OR COMPARABLE SLEEPSETFORLESSTHANOURDISPLAYEDORADVERTISEDPRICE,SIMPLYBRINGINTHEADVERTISEMENTANDWEWILLBEATTHEPRICEBY10%ORIT’S FREE;EVENFORUPTO100DAYSAFTERYOURPURCHASE.NOTVALIDONLIMITEDTIMEANDDOORBUSTERPROMOTIONS.DOLLARSAVINGSRANGEFROM$50-$500.COMPAREATPRICINGISDETERMINEDBASEDONPRICEOFCOMPARABLEMERCHANDISEOFSIMILARQUALITYANDCIRCUMSTANCES.ASACOMPANY,WESTANDBEHINDOUR COMPARE AT PRICES, BASED ON OUR MARKET EXPERIENCE AND KNOWLEDGE. THESE PRICES REFLECT NATIONALLY COMPETITIVE MSRP, LIST PRICES AND DO NOT REFLECT INTERIM MARK-DOWNS, WHICH MAY HAVE BEEN TAKEN. WE INVITE YOU TO ASK ABOUT ANY INDIVIDUAL PRICES. PRODUCT AND SELECTION MAY VARY FROM STORE TO STORE. MATTRESS FIRM, INC. STRIVES FOR ACCURACY IN OUR ADVERTISING, BUT ERRORS IN PRICING AND/OR PHOTOGRAPHY MAY OCCUR. MATTRESS FIRMRESERVESTHERIGHTTOCORRECTANYSUCHERRORS.PHOTOGRAPHYISFORILLUSTRATIONPURPOSESONLYANDMAYNOTREFLECTACTUALPRODUCT.SOMEPRODUCTSAREATTHEMANUFACTURER’S MINIMUMSELLINGPRICEANDFURTHERREDUCTIONSCANNOTBETAKEN.STOREHOURSMAYVARYBYLOCATION.OFFERSVALID6/26/13-7/2/13ORWHILESUPPLIESLAST.*†SEESTOREFORCOMPLETEDETAILS. MF22_ROP_MILITARY_PAPER_6.27


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

JUNE 28, 2013

IndependenceDay

<RUNWRZQ )RXUWK RI -XO\ &HOHEUDWLRQ KRQRUV LQGHSHQGHQFH By Tech. Sgt. April Wickes 633D AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

This Independence Day, Americans can proudly celebrate their freedom during the 34th annual Yorktown Fourth of July Celebration. With the participation of Fort Eustis Soldiers, Yorktown, Va. will host an Independence Day 8K Run and 5K Walk, a parade, a bell ringing ceremony, music and fireworks. On July 4, 1776, the American Continental Congress approved the Declaration of Independence. This document announced the 13 American colonies regarded themselves as independent states and no longer a part of the British Empire. Its words effectively formed the United States of America. Years later, during the Battle of Yorktown in the autumn of 1781, American and French soldiers clashed against British forces for 21 days, ending with the surrender of British Gen. Charles Cornwallis. This was the final battle toward gaining independence from Great Britain and the last battle of the Revolutionary War, although the war would not officially end until years later. The 34th annual Yorktown Fourth of July Celebration will honor the freedom Americans hold so dearly, said

File photo by Tech. Sgt. Barry Loo

The 34th annual Yorktown Fourth of July Celebration will take place July 4 in Yorktown. Events will include an Independence Day 8K Run and 5K Walk, a parade, a bell ringing ceremony, music and fireworks.

Jim Shamblen, parade coordinator. “Because freedom was won during the Battle of Yorktown, many people who live in Yorktown see themselves as ‘Patriots’ and they support the military,” said

Shamblen. “This is why it’s great for the military to participate in these events.” The celebration will kick-off with a Yorktown Independence Day 8K Run and 5K Walk at York High School, followed by Soldiers from the 7th Sustainment Brigade Color Guard marching down Water Street, carrying flags in a parade. U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Simotu Jones, Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 10th Battalion, movement noncommissioned officer, said she is honored to participate in the parade as a member of the color guard. “This is a great event to remember Independence Day and a great way for all Service members to show respect to the local community and America,” she said. Following the parade, the Sounds of Liberty Bell Ringing Ceremony will take place, honoring a tradition started in 1963 when Congress passed a continuing resolution asking Americans to ring bells on July 4. Fort Eustis’ U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Band Dixie Band will also perform during the celebration that will end with a fireworks display. For more information on the Yorktown Fourth of July Celebration, visit the York County web site at http://york county.gov/Default.aspx?alias=yorkcounty.gov/fourth.

introduce your kids to the joy of

PUBLIC HUMILIATION .

Y

our kids will enjoy all the hands-on fun. They can play a game called RevQuest: Save The Revolution!™ and use a cell phone to receive top-secret orders, get clues, and solve a mystery. Side streets are secret meeting spots and shop signs reveal hidden messages. And if your kids act up, we even have a place where you can put them in time out. Visit your local MWR office for details on a Colonial Williamsburg vacation. © 2013 The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

5/13-9256041


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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AFJROTC cadets ‘shad ‘shadow’ Langley Airmen By Senior Airman Teresa Aber 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

High school students from the Hampton Roads area got a taste of military life this week during the 2013 U.S. Air Force Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps Summer Leadership Program. More than 80 AFJROTC cadets participated in the weeklong program June 24-28. With support from Service members across Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., the cadets were able to experience firsthand what it takes to be a member of the U.S. Armed Forces during a military shadow day June 25. As part of the leadership program held each year by the Newport News Public School System, cadets woke up at 5 a.m. daily and endured an intense training environment consisting of drill practice, uniform and room inspections, ath-

letic competitions and team-building exercises. Retired U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Kristopher Alden, Menchville High School’s senior aerospace science instructor, hopes the cadets use the shadow-day experience to gain an appreciation for the things they learn daily in the classroom. “It’s all about the cadets seeing the overall big picture,” said Alden. “We want them to see why they are learning the things they are learning, and how it can all impact their future career choices.” During the shadow day, cadets experienced military working dog demonstrations, explosive ordnance disposal team training, F-22A Raptors take-offs and leadership opportunities. They even tested their physical endurance on the confidence course at Fort Eustis. “This program is a great way to expose cadets to active-duty Airmen living out the core

values through their day-to-day mission,” explained Alden. “It provides an opportunity outside of the classroom for the kids to grow and learn hands on.” One such cadet, Kenyon Strickland, believes his experience at the shadow day will help him make important future career decisions. “It has really broadened my perspective on what Airmen really do,” explained Strickland. “It was really cool to see the pride they all have in what they do every day, and they have given me a lot more to think about for my future.” Alden echoed Strickland’s sentiments. “We love the support that the Air Force and JBLE gives us,” said Alden. “It’s nice to know that they understand there is always room to invest in our future generations.” The cadets weren’t the only ones who gained insights during the shadow day. The

Airmen who volunteered enjoyed the opportunity to teach cadets what life and work is like in the Air Force. “It was a lot of fun and a great opportunity to show them how important our mission really is,” said Senior Master Sgt. Richard Corey, JBLE weather station superintendent. “You get a big sense of accomplishment from encouraging our possible future generation of Airmen, and seeing their faces light up when they learn about a career field they are interested in.” The program is offered during summer break for cadets. According to Alden, the cadets will be able to take what they learned and apply it to their lives at home and school. “These cadets won’t easily forget this experience,” said Alden. “They learned lifelong lessons from the Airmen they shadowed and will talk about this for a very long time.”

Photo by Airman Areca T. Wilson

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Kyle Smith, 633rd Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler, acts as a threat during a military working dog demonstration during U.S. Air Force Junior Reserve Officers’Training Corps shadow day at Langley Air Force Base, June 25. AFJROTC cadets looked on as Smith demonstrated what might happen when an individual disobeys the instructions of a MWD handler.

For more information on the AFJROTC program, contact AFJROTC Headquarters, 551 East Maxwell Blvd., Maxwell AFB, AL 36112-6106; dial 1-866-235-7682, opt. 1; or, visit the AFJROTC C Web site link at www.au.af.mil/au/holmcenter.

Air Force Junior ROTC provides leadership training and an aerospace hool students. science program for high sch Secondary school students wh ho enroll in the AFJROTC program are offered d a wide variety of curricular and extra-curricu ular activities.

Photos by Staff Sgt. Dana Hill

ABOVE: Vera Shinard, a U.S. Air Force Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps cadet, crawls through a tunnel on the obstacle course at Fort Eustis, June 26. More than 40 local AFJROTC cadets completed the obstacle course as a part of a summer leadership course.

The objectives of AFJRO OTC are to educate and train cadets in n citizenship and life skills; promote co ommunity service; instill a sense of re esponsibility; and develop character and sself-discipline through education and instrruction in air and space fundamentals and the Air Force’s core values of “Integrity First, Service Before Self and Excellence in All We Do.”

LEFT:Taylor Pobiak, a U.S. Air Force Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps cadet, completes the rope swing as a portion of the obstacle course. Four different high schools in the local area brought together their AFJROTC cadets to complete the obstacle course.

Photo by Airman 1st Class Victoria H. Taylor

ABOVE: Andrew Hansinger, U.S. Air Force Junior Reserve Officers’Training Corps cadet, tests out a pair of night-vision goggles during the AFJROTC shadow day at Langley Air Force Base, June 25. AFJROTC cadets were shown various parts of the base to learn about the operational Air Force. LEFT:Travis Jones, a U.S. Air Force Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps cadet, hammers a nail during shadow day. Jones shadowed Service members from the 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron, learning the importance of their mission.

Photo by Airman Areca T. Wilson

Kenyon Strickland, U.S.Air Force Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps cadet, looks at a rifle during the AFJROTC shadow day. AFJROTC cadets were taken to Combat Arms Training and Maintenance to learn about one aspect of the 633rd Security Forces Squadron’s mission.

Photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Nagle

Jamelle Ransey, a U.S. Air Force Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps cadet, controls a robot used by 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance disposal technicians during shadow day. Ransey was one of more than 80 AFJROTC cadets who visited Langley.

Photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Nagle


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JUNE 28, 2013

$UWV DQG &UDIWV &HQWHU SURYLGHV FUHDWLYH RXWOHW IRU -%/( By Senior Airman Kayla Newman 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

As the sharp, steel blade sliced through a piece of glass, rugged hands skillfully pulled it apart along the scoring line. The man then re-measured the wood frame he had made hours before, envisioning a photo he would later place in it. It’s a Thursday evening at the Langley Air Force Base, Va., Arts and Crafts Center. Ernie Sanchez, the framing and matting instructor, finishes working on frames as he prepares for his students to arrive. For many Service members and families, finding ways to unwind from daily routines isn’t always easy. Luckily, the Arts and Crafts center offers a variety of outlets for members of the JBLE community to capitalize on their creativity. “We find it important to be able to come here for relaxing purposes,” explained Emili Perez, the center’s director. “People can come here and take a night away from everything and just enjoy the classes that we offer.” The classes and resources provided by the Arts and Crafts Center are an affordable and creative way for Service members to build confidence, said Sanchez. “At first, the students are a little hesitant to use the glass cutter,” he explained. “But, the sense of accomplishment that they feel once they get over the initial fear is great.”

Photo by Senior Airman Kayla Newman

Ernie Sanchez, framing and matting instructor, creates mats in preparation for his class at Langley Air Force Base, June 20. The Arts and Crafts Center provides the opportunity to learn a craft, as well as provides custom frames for any occasion.

Just a few feet away, Marie Freeman, a sewing instructor at the Arts and Crafts Center for seven years, prepares for her sewing class to arrive. Freeman knows firsthand how important it is to have a creative outlet. Freeman’s dad worked at a shipyard for nearly his entire life. When he was in his late-40s, Freeman’s mom signed her dad up for a furniture-making class. Freeman said her father had never thought furniture

making would be something that he wanted to do, but his wife insisted the creative outlet would be good for him. “He took the basics of woodworking at Hampton High School here in Virginia,” explained Freeman. “By the time he retired, he was making furniture for me, my mom and my sister.” By starting with a basic class, Freeman’s father was able to take a simple skill and evolve it into something that he greatly enjoyed. Freeman says seeing that evolution in people is what she enjoys about being an instructor. “Anytime you can learn how to do something, it gives you a better feeling about yourself because you accomplished something,” said Freeman. While Fort Eustis does not provide classes at their Frame Shop or Engraving Shop, members of the Fort Eustis community can take advantage of the classes offered at Langley. The Langley Arts and Crafts Center not only offers the framing, matting and sewing classes, but also provide opportunities for the JBLE community to learn jewelry making, quilting and basic wheel pottery. The center holds all of these classes from 5:30 to 8:00 p.m. Thursdays. “Arts and crafts can get you out of the work mode,” explained Freeman. “It can give you an escape from whatever it is that may be stressful in your life.” To sign up for classes at Langley, call the Arts and Crafts Center at 764-4647.

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Photos by Staff Sgt. Wesley Farnsworth

LEFT: Cast members with the 2013 Army Soldier Show perform in front of a crowd inside Jacobs Theater at Fort Eustis, June 25. The show, “Ready and Resilient,” is a 75-minute high-energy, live musical production that showcases the talents of active-duty Soldiers selected by audition from throughout the Army. CENTER: U.S. Army Spc. Reuben Eldridge performs during the gold star tribute, which pays tribute to families who lost a loved one in the line of duty. RIGHT: U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Felicia Holcomb sings for a crowd.

)URP D FDUSRUW WR WKH µELJ VWDJH¶ 6ROGLHU ¿QGV SDVVLRQ WKURXJK VLQJLQJ By: Staff Sgt. Wesley Farnsworth 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

“It’s a dream come true to be a part of this show. I have a passion for More than 1,300 people came out to singing and performing and I’ve always wanted to do something with watch the 2013 U.S. Army Soldier Show, it. Operation Rising Star and this show is a way for me to do that.” “Ready and Resilient,” at Fort Eustis, Va., June 25, as part of the show’s 29-base tour across the United States. “Ready and Resilient” is a a 75-minute high-energy, live musical production that showcases the talents of active-duty Soldiers selected by audition from throughout the Army. Although they are Soldiers first, these artists also have a passion for music, dance and performance. With specialties ranging from information technology to combat medicine, they use music to put an entertaining spin on how Soldiers and their families maintain readiness and resiliency. U.S. Army Spc. Reuben Eldridge, assigned to the 688th Rapid Port Opening Element, is not only one these talented Soldiers traveling with the show, but also the Fort Eustis 2012 Operation Rising Star winner. He was ranked one of the top 12 competitors for the Army-wide competition. “It’s a dream come true to be a part of this show,” said Eldridge. “I have a passion for singing and performing, and I’ve always wanted to do something with it. Operation Rising Star and this show is a way for me to do that.”

— U.S. Army Spc. Reuben Eldridge 688th Rapid Port Opening Element and performer in 2013 U.S. Army Soldier Show

Eldridge learned at an early age that he enjoyed singing. “My passion [for singing] stems from watching my mother sing with my grandmother. But when I was 14, I learned I had a talent for it,” said Eldridge. This discovery started when Eldridge heard his uncle singing, and decided to sing along. This became a weekly tradition, where eventually family and friends started coming to watch them perform. The performances would become an all-day barbeque event, with Eldridge and his uncle singing under the carport as the entertainment. Ever since that time, he’s had a passion for singing. When it came to his singing career, the Soldier Show was an unexpected step for Eldridge. “I had heard about the show before but never really knew much about it,” said Eldridge. “When I was at Fort Sam Houston participating as one of the top 12, they asked

us to submit an application for the show.” After being accepted to the show and working with the other cast members, Eldridge says the level of professionalism exhibited every day from the other Soldiers has helped him improve as not only a Soldier, but also as a performer. “I get a chance to perform a form of music that I’m not used to in this show. I’m used to country music where you have a lot of runs, but I do a number during this show ... [which] requires me to actually act it out, and that’s something I’ve never learned how to do,” said Eldridge. “Through this show and the other cast members, I’ve learned about theater and acting and how to incorporate it into my music.” Annetta Thompson from Yorktown, Va., came out to watch the Solder Show at Fort Eustis. “I absolutely loved the show,” said Thompson. “I think the best part was seeing everyone in uniform and being

Photo by Staff Sgt. Wesley Farnsworth

U.S. Army Spc. Reuben Eldridge, assigned to the 688th Rapid Port Opening Element, performs during the Army Solder Show at Fort Eustis, June 25.The 75-minute show is performed by active duty, reserve and National Guard Soldiers.

able to shake their hands at the end.” The Soldier Show tour continues, stopping next at Fort Lee, Va. For Eldridge, the remaining performances are just another way for him to showcase his passion. “The artistic expression of singing drives my passion. Every song means something different to each person,” said Eldridge. “Being able to express those feelings is a great outlet for me. It’s just like an artist with a paint brush; you can see the expression, but with me, you can hear it.”


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JUNE 28, 2013

Army initiating collaborative effort to address TBI, PTSD By David Vergun ARMY NEWS SERVICE

Over the last 12 years, many Soldiers have returned from Iraq and Afghanistan with wounds, some visible and some not, said a leader in Army Medicine. “The invisible wounds – post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury – are just as damaging as the visible ones. They impact the families as well as the Soldiers,” said Brig. Gen. John M. Cho, a doctor and deputy chief of staff for operations with Army Medical Command. An Iraq war veteran himself, Cho spoke June 22 on Capitol Hill as part of National Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Day. This year’s theme was “Visible Honor for Invisible Wounds.” Post-traumatic stress disorder, known as PTSD, and traumatic brain injury, or TBI, are not just military-specific issues, Cho said. “They deserve a national discussion.” A big part of that discussion needs to focus on reducing the stigma associated with mental health issues, he said. Besides a national discussion, Cho said agencies need to come together, both inside and outside the military, to learn more about identifying and treating PTSD and TBI, as well as preventing it in the first place. Cho said a PTSD diagnosis is particularly challenging, as “you can’t simply get a lab test or take an X-ray to find it.” As part of its collaborative effort, the Army is participating in a $60 million research study for TBI, sponsored by the National Football League, General Electric and Under Armour, he said. Also, $700 million has been allocated toward both PTSD and TBI as the result of an Aug. 31, 2012, White House executive order to go after the problem with renewed effort in a collaborative manner with the Department of Veterans Affairs and other organizations. Additionally, the Army has set up seven “restorative centers” in Afghanistan, where TBI can be identified and treated, often allowing Soldiers to stay in theater as they improve, he said. He explained that PTSD often, but not always, occurs with TBI, and that relationship is also being researched.

Photo by David Vergun

Brig. Gen. (Dr.) John M. Cho, deputy chief of staff for Operations (G-3/5/7), Army Medical Command, addresses the issue of post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury on Capitol Hill, June 22.

“We’re nowhere near where we want to be, however, when it comes to researching PTSD and TBI, a lot more needs to be done,” he said. Cho said PTSD impacted him personally when his brother, who also is a U.S. Military Academy graduate, returned from Afghanistan. His brother was suffering from PTSD. He sought treatment and is better now, Cho said, adding that his brother is telling his story to other Soldiers in an effort to get them to seek care. “We know treatment helps,” Cho said. “We can help them get better and they can continue to serve in our Army with honor and distinction.” As a result of his brother’s experience, Cho said he’s a big believer in group therapy, particularly cognitive processing psychotherapy. Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. Ray Odierno, unable to attend the day’s event, wrote in a letter for the attendees: “PTSD is a combat injury. Veterans suffering from PTSD deserve the same dignity and respect as our fellow wounded warriors. With the continued support and encouragement of organizations like Honor for ALL, the Army and this nation have made enormous strides in treating this injury, removing the stigma and instilling dignity in our recovering veterans. But more work must be done.” Honor for ALL, a nonprofit sponsoring the event, is dedicated to eliminating the stigma of PTSD and supports research into finding the causes and treatment of the disorder.


JUNE 28, 2013

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Maj. Christine Ludwig (center), program executive ofďŹ cer for the Deployment Health Assessment Program, answers questions from Soldiers about the DHA.

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In this month alone, the Army has screened more than a million Soldiers to ensure they are physically and mentally healthy before deployment and after they return home to their families. The Deployment Health Assessment Program, or DHAP, screenings are part of an ongoing Army effort to assess the health of Soldiers involved in deployments. Such screenings happen before deployment, and twice after returning home. The DHAP is a key element in the Armyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ready and Resilient Campaign, an effort to integrate and synchronize multiple efforts and programs to improve the readiness and resilience of Soldiers and their families. The Army began screening active duty, Army Reserve and Army National Guard Soldiers though DHAP in August 2006. The DHAP includes three individual assessments, including the pre-deployment health assessment, which is taken before a Soldier deploys; the postdeployment health assessment, which is taken within 30 days of returning home; and the post-deployment health reassessment, which is taken within six months of returning home. All three assessments involve resilience training, the completion of an electronic form that asks various questions

about a Soldierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health, and a one-onone conďŹ dential meeting with a healthcare provider. The pre-deployment health assessment questionnaire is short, asking a limited number of questions about current medical health. The follow-on questions are more detailed, delving into both physical and mental health, and touching on the speciďŹ c kinds of events a Soldier might have experienced while deployed. The DHAP is intended to evaluate both the physical and mental health of a Soldier before and after deployment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As Soldiers, we all have challenges downrange,â&#x20AC;? said Maj. Christine Ludwig, DHAP program manager. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This program examines what we ... go through on a personal level. Soldiers deploy to combat zones, support humanitarian missions and respond to natural disasters. This program aims to identify conditions and symptoms as early as possible in every type of deployment.â&#x20AC;? The DHAP plays a unique role across the Army, both as a tool used to identify physical and behavioral health concerns, and also as a conduit to various forms of treatments, access to medical services and other health programs, all with the goal of taking care of Soldiers. SEE ASSESSMENT PAGE 25

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JUNE 28, 2013

To the moon and beyond 1$6$ /DQGLQJ DQG ,PSDFW 5HVHDUFK )DFLOLW\ SOD\V UROH LQ KLVWRULFDO PRRQ ODQGLQJ By Airman 1st Class R. Alex Durbin

would handle drastically differently in the moon’s gravitational atmosphere, a sixth of Earth’s gravity. Tackling the problem of “We choose to go to the moon in this de- how to reproduce a low-gravity environcade ... not because [it is] easy, but because ment became NASA’s first step in its jour[it is] hard, because that goal will serve to ney to the moon. organize and measure the best of our en“The astronauts needed simulations to ergies and skills, because that challenge is determine landing conditions while in the Courtesy file photo one that we are willing to accept, one we moon’s gravity,” said Richard Boitnott, An astronaut uses the then-Lunar Lander Research Facility to practice walking in a low-gravare unwilling to postpone and one which NASA Langley Research Center senior itational setting similar to the moon in 1965, at the National Aeronautics and Space Adminiswe intend to win.” aerospace engineer. “It was imperative to tration Langley Research Center in Hampton. In 1961, then-President John F. Kennedy learn everything possible before sending proclaimed the United States would suc- the astronauts to space.” cessfully land a man on the moon by the In an effort to overcome this obsta- to use the gantry to create a lunar-walk- into a full-scale aircraft crash test facility. end of the decade. Achieving the dream cle, William Hewitt Phillips, a respected ing simulator. The gantry is the only structure of its fell to the engineers and researchers of the NASA aircraft specialist, conceived a soThis was achieved by suspending an kind in the United States, and only one of National Aeronautics and Space Adminis- lution. Phillips proposed the construction astronaut on a system of slings and ca- two worldwide offering a pendulum-style tration, and culminated in a “giant leap for of the Lunar Lander Research Facility, a bles and placing him on an inclined plane. test center, allowing researchers to control mankind” in 1969. training simulator that allowed NASA By walking on the plane parallel to the vertical and horizontal velocities, making But before Neil Armstrong took that engineers to study landing processes ground while suspended, engineers were it uniquely suited to recreate crash scenes. small step on the moon, he was walking while giving Apollo astronauts critical able to mimic the conditions experienced The structure was redesignated the Imaround NASA’s Langley Research Center hands-on training. while walking on the moon. pact Dynamics Research Facility in 1972. in Hampton, Va., suspended on a system Completed in 1965, the facility located In another effort to make the training as Engineers used data from the center’s reof slings and cables. at NASA’s Langley campus featured an realistic as possible, engineers created a search as baseline information and recTowering above the rapidly-evolv- A-frame steel structure able to simulate “moonscape,” complete with craters, us- ommendations to institute safety reging world around it, the 240 foot-tall Lu- the final 150 feet of the descent. An over- ing dust thought to resemble the material ulations in both military and civilian nar Lander Research Facility remains head suspension system known as a gan- found on the moon’s surface. organizations including the Federal Aviunchanged in appearance, but has under- try counteracted all weight but the gravity On July 16, 1969, the world watched in ation Administration. gone several functional transformations in felt on the moon’s surface. anticipation as three men rocketed skyThe research team uses state-of-theits long life. It all began more than 50 years “Analytical simulations cannot always ward in the culmination of nearly a de- art analysis tools and test mannequins to ago with Kennedy’s vision. translate into real-world results, making cade’s worth of research and planning. model crashes, determine structural integWhile planning the Apollo space pro- physical testing important,” said Boitnott. Just four days later, Neil Armstrong and rity and identify the “crash pulse,” or the gram, NASA determined its success ulti- “Real-world tests show results that we Ed “Buzz” Aldrin Jr. were the first humans time it takes for the tested object to decelmately depended on whether astronauts may not have ever thought of. We use this to step foot on the moon. erate after impact. could learn to safely land on the moon’s data with analytical results to identify poBy the time the Apollo program ended “[The facility] has been a national resurface and return to orbit. tential shortfalls.” three years later and the astronaut train- source for conducting crash tests for airHowever, a major obstacle presentTo understand the potential variables ing facilities were moved to the Lyndon planes, helicopters and other manned ed itself as the NASA scientists designed of space, the facility used unique meth- B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, the vehicles,” said Boitnott. “[The researcha viable training plan for the astronauts. ods to accurately simulate the moon’s LLRF had trained 24 astronauts for lu- ers] can control the exact conditions of The scientists realized a manned capsule gravitational force. Engineers were able nar missions. a crash, as well as gather a great deal of With the end of manned-moon mis- post-test information that contributes to sions, it seemed the research facility was safety worldwide.” Interested in learning more? Use a barcode reader no longer needed. However, NASA found application on a cell phone to scan the code on the left. a new use for the facility by converting it SEE MOON PAGE 25 It will open a browser and navigate to the associated link. 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS


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MOON FROM PAGE 24 In 1985, the LLRF was designated a National Historic Landmark to preserve its significance and contributions to the space program. With a multitude of testing complete and no foreseeable need for the IDRF, NASA decided to finally close the historic facility in 2003, and it was placed on a NASA list of structures planned for demolition. With President George W. Bush’s announcement of the Vision for Space Exploration in 2004, the facility was once again adapted to be used in support of the agency’s new Constellation Program, aimed to gain experience in operating outside of Earth’s atmosphere and to develop technologies needed for exploring space. The facility was reopened in 2005 to conduct landing tests on the new-

ASSESSMENT FROM PAGE 23 “We have seen that for every Soldier in the deployment cycle who gets help, there is a commander reinforcing the message and raising awareness,” said Maj. Tracie Willie, who works within the Army National Guard’s surgeon general’s office. Stigmas associated with seeking help during the deployment process remain important challenges to overcome, said Capt. Quana Wright, DHAP manager for the Army Reserve. “Soldiers have a negative percep-

ly-developed exploration vehicle, Orion. Its new mission closely resembled the original space mission of the facility. It was renamed the Landing and Impact Research Facility. Minor modifications were made to include installation of a new support system to facilitate full-scale Orion testing. In an effort to analyze all possible outcomes, NASA determined it was necessary to test Orion’s capabilities and determine if it was structurally sound to touchdown on land or water upon return to Earth’s atmosphere. To gather the data, a new hydro-impact basin was installed to fully test the Orion’s capabilities. The basin, a 115 foot-long, 90 foot-wide pool reaching 20 feet deep, was completed in January 2011. Although the Constellation Program was cancelled, Boitnott and

tion of the process for reporting medical issues,” said Wright. “Overall there is a reluctance to seek help, which then becomes a barrier for reporting, diagnosing and seeking medical care. Some Soldiers believe getting help will hinder career advancement, and certain kinds of diagnosis or treatment will be reported as the Soldier not being fit for duty.” Wright said the Army and the DHAP program have worked hard to dispel that misconception. “As leaders and Soldiers, we need to be the front line to dispel these types of myths and stigmas,” Wright

the facility’s team continue to test the Orion capsule, as it is planned to be used as an escape capsule on the International Space Station. The Orion capsule was recast as a “MultiPurpose Crew Vehicle,” and became NASA’s vehicle for manned flight beyond low earth orbit. “We constantly strive to innovate practical experiments during testing because our research can save lives,” said Boitnott. The team’s constant drive and dedication are testament to Kennedy’s famous words. “Those who dare ... can achieve greatness.” As humanity reaches further into the cosmos and surpasses the dream sparked by Kennedy decades ago, the NASA Landing and Impact Research Facility remains, ready to adapt to new challenges set before it.

said. “We are currently working with Army Reserve Command to dispel these stigmas and communicate the medical process for care following deployment health assessments – it is this kind of open dialogue that pays off in great dividends for Soldiers.” Ludwig urges all Soldiers to actively participate in the deployment assessment process. “DHAP brings the medical care system to the Soldier,” she said. “It allows them to tap directly into the system to get the care they need, when they need it the most.”

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ed paths and went north along the east coast saving the region from the brunt of the storm, it still left widespread damage and flooding across the Hampton Roads region. According to the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, more than 450 people died and nearly 2,600 were injured in the U.S. last year as a result of severe weather. The effects of Hurricane Sandy caused more than 280 of those deaths, and the storm has since become the second costliest hurricane in U.S. history. Throughout this year’s hurricane season, it is imperative for members of the JBLE community to be prepared in case of severe weather. Whether riding out the storm at home or evacuating to safe haven, the information on this page can help prepare the community for the worst.

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June 1 marked the beginning of the 2013 hurricane season in the U.S., kicking off six months of the threat of tropical weather affecting the Hampton Roads area. Hampton Roads most recently experienced this type of severe weather in the form of Tropical Storm Andrea earlier this month. Meteorologists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predict 16 named storms during the 2013 season. Of these, nine are projected to strengthen to hurricane status, with five of these becoming major hurricanes. In October 2012, Hampton Roads felt the effects of Hurricane Sandy. The storm forecasted 52-63 miles per hour winds, and high tides that fluctuated between six and seven feet. While the storm shift-

Editor’s Note: Staff Sgt. Wesley Farnsworth contributed to this report.

JBLE operates a severe weather information line. In the case of a tropical storm or hurricane, information about installation closures or evacuations will be available via recordings by calling (800) 553-3302. For more information, contact the Langley AFB Emergency Management Flight at 764-4840, or visit the following websites: • • • •

www.ready.gov www.fema.gov www.redcross.org www.vaemergency.com

• • • •

www.floodsmart.gov www.ReadyVirginia.gov www.VirginiaDOT.org/hurricanes www.fema.gov/kids

In the event of an approaching storm, residents may or may not be ordered to evacuate. Whether riding the storm out or evacuating, having an emergency kit can be the difference between life and death, especially when hunkering down through the storm. Essential items in an emergency kit include: ■ Water – one gallon per person per day for a minimum of three days ■ Food – at least a three day supply of non-perishable goods ■ Battery-powered or hand-crank radio, and a NOAAweather radio with tone alerts and extra batteries ■ Flashlight ■ First aid kit

■ Whistle to signal for help ■ Dust mask, plastic sheeting

and duct tape to shelter-in-place ■ Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for sanitation ■ Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities ■ Can opener for food ■ Local map When building an emergency kit and emergency action plan, consider the needs of family members who may not be as capable, such as the elderly, disabled, children and family pets. Be sure to include all necessary medications and the name of the doctor who prescribed the medications in the emergency kit.

'HFLGLQJ ZKHWKHU WR VWD\ RU JR Riding it out Depending on the severity of the storm, officials may not order mandatory evacuations, in which case you may decide to remain and shelter-in-place. You can shelter at home or in a public shelter. If sheltering at home, be sure to accomplish the following: ■ Identify how your property location is affected by storm surge and tidal flooding, ■ Know the hurricane evacuation routes, ■ Secure your outside property, i.e. lawn chairs, lawn ornaments and anything not anchored to the ground, ■ If your home does not have permanent storm shutters, board windows with 5/8-inch plywood. Tape does not offer protection, ■ Ensure you have flood insurance, if recommended. If you decide to seek refuge in a public shelter, you must take your emergency kit. While public shelters provide basic necessities, most do not provide cots, bedding, infant items or items for those with special needs. Most shelters will only accept service animals. Talk to your vet hospital or kennel in advance to get your pet sheltered. Personnel and families living in base housing may seek shelter in the provided emergency evacuation centers on the installation or in the base housing area. Note that personnel living at the Landings at Langley at Bethel Manor may also use York County’s shelters. The base housing shelters are provided exclusively for personnel residing in base housing. Personnel and families living in commu-

nity housing should use public shelters. For a listing of available shelters, space availability and pet policies, contact the American Red Cross.

‘Getting out of dodge’ In the event that you are ordered to evacuate, be sure to know the evacuation routes. Hampton Roads has established evacuation routes, and has posted blue signs around the area identifying them. The following routes are designated by the Commonwealth: ■ U.S. Route 460 West ■ U.S. Route 58 West ■ State Route 10 West ■ U.S. Route 17 North ■ U.S. Route 60 West ■ U.S. Route 13 North, north of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel. ■ Interstate 64 Note: Commonwealth officials may implement I-64 lane reversal to expedite the flow of traffic out of the area. Be alert and pay attention to news broadcasts, police officials and roadway signage. If you are evacuating, follow these tips: ■ 1. Leave early – Avoid traffic delays. If you are evacuating, many others likely are as well. ■ 2. Stay Local – Stay with nearby family who live outside of storm surge areas. Hotels are also available outside of storm surge areas, but must be booked as early as possible. Public shelters should be a last resort. ■ 3. Listen to local weather reports – Stay updated on current and developing conditions.


JUNE 28, 2013

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Preparing for most critical day of summer By Airman 1st Class R. Alex Durbin 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Grilling. Sitting poolside. Watching fireworks. These enjoyable activities are part of the Independence Day tradition. Unfortunately, with these customs comes increased risk and hazards, making the Fourth of July one of the most critical days of summer safety. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the Fourth of July continuously tops the list of deadliest U.S. holidays. This year is no different with the National Safety Council estimating more than 370 deaths and 36,300 serious injuries to occur during the holiday weekend. To help curb these statistics, the U.S. Army and Air Force designate May 25 through Sept. 4 of every year as the “Critical Days of Summer,” a campaign dedicated to ensuring Soldiers and Airmen have a safe summer. Because Independence Day falls during this period, it is imperative for Service members to take safety precautions, said Bartolome. “The majority of the year’s accidents happen during the summer,” said Senior Airman Maegann Bartolome, 633rd Air Base Wing Safety Office ground safety technician. “Weather, gatherings, wa-

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the Fourth of July continuously tops the list of deadliest U.S. holidays. This year is no different with the National Safety Council estimating more than 370 deaths and 36,300 serious injuries to occur during the holiday weekend.

“The majority of the year’s accidents happen during the summer. Weather, gatherings, water sports and increased traffic flow are a few of the contributing factors to summertime incidents. ... A great deal of summertime injuries can be avoided. It’s important to have a backup plan – and a backup plan for your backup plan.” — Senior Airman Maegann Bartolome 633rd Air Base Wing Safety Office ground safety technician

ter sports and increased traffic flow are a few of the contributing factors to summertime incidents.” A leading source of Fourth of July injuries comes from the most common Independence Day tradition. Fireworks cause an average 22,500 fires and 7,000 injuries yearly, and the risk of injury is highest for children ages five through 19, according to the NSC. Although legal in some states, fireworks are strictly limited in the state of Virginia. Only sparklers, fountains, wheels, strobe and novelty fireworks are legal without a permit. Breaking these laws carries a maximum penalty of a $2,500 fine and possibly one year in jail. For those that live in on-base housing, fireworks, to include sparklers, are not authorized for use. For those that live in

privatized housing, exercise proper safety precautions and always have adult supervision, said Bartolome. As one of the largest risk factors during the Fourth of July weekend, impaired driving and other automobile accidents claim the lives approximately 148 people each holiday season, according to the NSC. Drivers under the influence of drugs or alcohol contribute to more than 65 percent of these fatalities. While impaired driving is the most well-known motor-vehicle risk, using watercraft while under the influence is also highly dangerous. Nearly 57 percent of boating accidents can be attributed to operator error, causing 651 deaths and 3,000 injuries, and totaling more than $38 million in damages in 2012 alone. According the U.S. Coast Guard, more than

3,800 people perish each year from water and watercraft-related incidents, equaling a death every two and a half hours. “Agreatdealofsummertimeinjuriescanbe avoided,” she said. “It’s important to have a backup plan – and a backup plan for your backup plan.” One in five yearly water-related deaths are children under the age of 14. While on the beach or by the pool, it is paramount to employ safe habits while swimming. While swimming, be sure to use properly approved flotation devices. The chance of drowning while not wearing a life jacket is one in 11, but when wearing a flotation device, the odds plummet to one in every 66, according to the U.S. Coast Guard. With the traditional cookouts and parties, the holiday brings one of the most overlooked hazards. In a four-year span, fire departments have responded to nearly 8,000 home fires caused by barbeque grills, ultimately leading to nearly 40 deaths. Before grilling, ensure the grill is free of any debris, and has a 10-foot clearing from anything combustible. While cooking, keep a 3-foot perimeter for children and pets. When finished, continue to watch the grill until it is cool. Temperatures emanating from the grill could still be hot enough to ignite any nearby combustibles. “When celebrating, it may be easy to forget to be aware of what is around you. It is easy for bad things to happen,”said Bartolome. While enjoying the long weekend and celebrating America’s independence, Bartolome encourages Service members to always have a plan. “Even minor safety tips are life saving,” she said. “No one is above safety. It can affect everyone around you. It’s up to all of us to make this a fun, safe summer.”


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Quarterly health information brief The 633rd Medical Group will host a briefing for commanders and first sergeants from 10 a.m. to noon July 10 in the base theater. The briefing will cover how the Military Command Authority allows leadership to gain access to medical information concerning their assigned Service members. Commanders and first sergeants must be briefed on health information privacy procedures within 90 days of assignment. For more information, call 225-6535.

Montford Marines to visit Langley In 1941, African Americans had the opportunity to receive training to become United States Marines for the first time in history. On Aug. 26, 1942, the first African American would report to a segregated training base, known then as Camp Montford Point. A group of these veterans, known as the Montford Point Marines, will be signing autographs from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. July 2 at the Langley Exchange. Commemorative autograph cards will be provided.

Hispanic Heritage committee meetings Langley Housing road closure A section of First Street just north of the Langley Housing shoppette will be closed from July 1 to Aug. 16. The closure will allow for emergency vehicle access, but neither pedestrian nor vehicular traffic will be permitted to pass. For more information, contact the off-base Welcome Center at 865-1330.

Air Force traditions, resources and the spouse’s role in today’s Air Force. Childcare is available on a space-available basis.To sign up, call 764-3990.

Langley African American Heritage Council The Langley African American Heritage Council will have its meetings the third Thursday of each month at 11:30 a.m. in the Enlisted Lounge. For more information, contact Master Sgt. Alvin Harris at 764-4410.

Medical Service Corps applications

Exchange offers back-to-school sweepstakes

The Medical Service Corps (MSC) has more than 1,000 Air Force officers who serve as professional healthcare administrators throughout the world. For those interested in applying, accession packages are due Sept 13. For more information, contact 2nd Lt. Irene Mitchell at 764-8203.

The Army and Air Force Exchange Service will ease the burden of back-to-school shopping for 15 lucky shoppers during the Unilever “Salute to Clean” sweepstakes. Each winner will be awarded a $1,000 gift card, redeemable at any Exchange location worldwide or online at www.shopmyexchange.com. The drawing will be held on or around Aug. 22 – just in time for students to coordinate their closets and stock up on supplies for the first day of class. Customers can fill out and drop off entry forms at any Exchange location through July 11. No purchase is required to enter. Entrants must be 18 or older with a valid driver’s license.

Vehicle Operations Control Center closure The Vehicle Operations Control Center will be closed for normal operations from 12:01 a.m. July 3 to 5 a.m. July 8 to observe Independence Day. During this period, theVOCC will be operating on standby operations, and services will be limited to on-call emergency wrecker operations, protocol service and aircrew support. For any of these emergencies, please contact the Fuels Service Center at 764-4105 or 764-3505.

New Moms workshop The Pediatric Clinic hosts “New Moms Tea/Weigh Day” workshops at 1 p.m. Mondays in the Pediatrics Clinic conference room. Bring your questions to share or just come to listen in. Meet in an informal setting for expert advice, education and experience from a board-certified lactation consultant on topics including breastfeeding support, infant care, getting sleep, childproofing and safety, positive parenting skills and more. To reserve a space in the class or for more information, contact the Langley Lactation Center at 764-9730.

Deployed Families Dinner The 633rd Force Support Squadron is hosting a free Deployed Family Members dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. July 10 at the Crossbow Dining Facility. Register no later than July 3 by calling 764-3990.

Heart Link event The next Heart Link event is scheduled from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Aug. 9 at the Airman and Family Readiness Center. There will be games, prizes and fun, and discussions on

Langley Hazmart and 90-Day CAP operations The Hazmart Pharmacy, located at 23 Sweeney Blvd., is responsible for the authorization and monitoring of all hazardous materials on Langley Air Force Base. The 90-Day Central Accumulation Point facility, located at 510 Poplar Road, is responsible for curbside pickup, preparing and processing of hazardous waste. Both facilities are open Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Before purchasing hazardous materials, you must contact the Hazmart Pharmacy. For more information concerning the Langley Hazmart Pharmacy or the 90-Day CAP, call 764-3837. For hazardous waste issues, contact 225-5808/5809.

The Hispanic Heritage committee will have its meetings the third Wednesday of each month at 2 p.m. in the Langley bowling alley activities room. For more information, contact Master Sgt. Jose Perez at 764-1735 or the Equal Opportunity Office at 764-5878.

Logistics Officers Golf Tournament The 2013 Tidewater Logistics Officers Association Golf Tournament will be held at 8 a.m. July 3 at the Eaglewood Golf Course. Cost is $45 per player for four-person best ball. There will be prizes and raffle giveaways. There are also special events, including longest drive and closest-to-pin. Those interested must register by June 28.To register or for more information, contact Capt. Robert Rabon at 7643966 or Robert.rabon@langley.af.mil.

Single Airman Ministry events A Shenandoah Valley National Park camping trip will take place from Aug. 30 to Sept. 2. The trip will cost $89 per person, which includes tents, food, a scavenger hunt and transportation. Those interested must sign up no later than Aug. 13. For more information, contact Larry Blakely at 273-1033 or 528-0455.

Langley Lanes Bowling Center events Please see below for upcoming events at Langley Lanes Bowling Center: ■ The “Incredibowl Summer Program” will be held from May 31 to Aug 31. Prizes will be available anytime open lanes are available. Fill up a 10-game punch card to be entered to win. ■ An “8 for 8” kids league will be held starting June 21 for eight weeks. ■ The “DV8 from the Norm” ball league will be held from June 17 to August 19. Cost is $16 for adults. ■ Cosmic Bowling will be held every Wednesday from 7 to 10 p.m. and Friday from 8 p.m. to 12 a.m. There will be black-light bowling, a deejay and prizes available. The bowling center also offers a game room with darts, pool tables, air hockey and other arcade games. For more information, contact the Langley Lanes Bowling Center at 764-2433.

Summary court officer

TRICARE is offering state-specific e-alerts for beneficiaries who want the latest information about how TRICARE has been affected during and after severe weather. To sign up for state-specific TRICARE severe weather e-alerts, go to www.tricare.mil/subscriptions.

The summary court officer detailed to secure and make proper disposition of the personal effects of Senior Airman Nicholas Tuttle is 2nd Lt. Heath Turley, 633rd Security Forces Squadron. Anyone having knowledge of money or property due to the deceased or has claims against the deceased’s estate, contact 2nd Lt.Turley at 764-5526.

Women’s Equality Day planning committee

Airmen’s Attic accepting donations

The Women’s Equality Day planning committee will have its meetings the second and fourth Thursday of each month at 1 p.m. in the Bateman Library. For more information, contact the Equal Opportunity Office at 764-5878.

The Airmen’s Attic is accepting gently-used donations.The following items are needed: housewares, kitchen items, linens and clothing. For information, call 764-1363.

TRICARE hazardous weather e-alerts


JUNE 28, 2013

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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Summary court officer The summary court officer detailed to secure and make proper disposition of the personal effects of Sgt. Justin R. Johnson is 1st Lt. Brendan Kasony, 11th Transportation Battalion, 7th Sustainment Brigade. Anyone having knowledge of money or property due to the deceased or has claims against the deceased’s estate, contact 1st Lt. Kasony at (571) 225-7596.

Movies Under the Stars Fort Eustis’ Morale, Welfare and Recreation will host its Movies Under the Stars series at sunset July 3 at Murphy Field. Come out for a free showing of “The Lorax” on the giant outdoor screen. Bring your lawn chairs, blankets, family and friends. Other activities will include bounce houses for the kids, and food and beverage concessions. For more information on Movies Under the Stars, call 878-3329.

Summary court officer The summary court officer detailed to secure and make proper disposition of the personal effects of Sgt. Timothy Updike is Capt. Edward J. Slavik, 11th Transportation Battalion, 7th Sustainment Brigade. Anyone having knowledge of money or property due to the deceased or has claims against the deceased’s estate, contact Capt. Slavik at 422-7310 or edward.slavik@ us.army.mil.

MCAHC holiday closure McDonald Army Health Center will be closed July 4 in observance of Independence Day. Limited services will be available in the Family Health Clinic, Pediatrics, Pharmacy, Lab and Radiology on July 5. Please call the Hampton Roads Appointment Center at 1-866-645-4584 to schedule appointments and/or facilitate authorization to visit an Urgent Care Center during this time. In the event of an emergency, patients should dial 911 or report to the closest emergency room.

Prescription drop-off service McDonald Army Health Center is now offering a prescription drop-off service at the Refill Pharmacy, located inside the Fort Eustis Exchange. Patients can drop off hand-written prescriptions, which will be filled in two hours. Prescriptions will not be accepted for controlled or scheduled medications, or any medication that has to be signed for at the pharmacy. For more information, contact a pharmacy team member at 314-7900, option three.

Music Under the Stars The U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Band’s Music Under the Stars summertime concerts will take place at 7 p.m. Thursdays at Magnolia Park on Fort Eustis (overlooking the James River). The schedule for July is: ■ July 4 – No concert (band will perform at 8 p.m. at Town Point Park, Norfolk) ■ July 11 – Wind Dances ■ July 18 – Stage and Screen ■ July 25 – ¡Festiva Latina! The concerts are free and open to the public. Attendees are invited to bring picnic dinners and lawn chairs. Non-DOD cardholders must use the Fort Eustis main gate to receive a pass. Valid vehicle registration, proof of insurance and a photo ID are required for access. To learn more about the concerts, to receive a pre-vetted vehicle pass or to sign up for the band’s newsletter and concert announcements, visit www.tradocband. com, or call 501-6944.

Courtesy Universal Pictures

Soldier and Family Readiness Soldier and Family Readiness (ACS) classes and briefings for July will include: ■ Baby and Me Play Group – 10 to 11 a.m., Thursdays, Bldg. 501, Madison Ave. ■ Care Team Training – 9:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., July 17 ■ Credit Reporting, Scores and Debt Management – 9 to 10 a.m., July 2, 16 ■ DevelopingYour Financial Plan – 9 to 10 a.m., July 9, 23 ■ Effective Resume Writing – 9 a.m. to noon, July 12 ■ Federal Employment – 10 a.m. to noon, July 18 ■ Financial Readiness – 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., July 19 ■ Growing Through Change – 10 to 11:30 a.m., July 17 ■ Job Search Strategies – 10 to 11 a.m., Mondays ■ Leadership Development – 9 a.m. to 4:45 p.m., July 18-19 (registration required) ■ Lunch and Learn Effective Communication – noon to 1 p.m., July 9, 16, and 30 (bring your lunch) ■ Managing Your Checking Account, Online Banking – 8:30 to 9:30 a.m., July 18 ■ Newcomers Brief and Information Fair – 9 to 11 a.m., July 23 ■ Sponsorship Training – 2 to 3 p.m., July 18 ■ Spouse Resilience Seminar – 9 a.m. to noon, July 22-25 Unless otherwise noted, classes and briefings will take place in Bldg. 650, Monroe Ave. For more information, call 878-3638.

Picnic on the patio Join us for a picnic on the patio from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Wednesdays in June at the Fort Eustis Club (weather permitting).The cost is $10 per person. Menu items will include chilled pineapple-avocado gazpacho soup, barbecued pork spare ribs, smoked turkey legs, hot dogs, salad, baked po-

tatoes, corn on the cob, baked beans, cole slaw, and peach and blackberry cobbler with vanilla ice cream. For more information, call 878-5700.

School and sport physical exams School and sport physical exams are available at McDonald Army Health Center’s Pediatric and Family Health clinics by appointment only. Appointments can be scheduled for Monday through Friday. Call the Hampton Roads Appointment Center at (866) 645-4584 or use TRICARE Online to schedule an appointment (up to 28 days in advance). Appointments are also available on the following Saturdays: June 29, July 27 and Aug. 24. For more information, visit http://mcdonald.narmc.amedd. army.mil.

Latin Night at the Club Kick off your weekend with Latin Night every Friday from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. at the Fort Eustis Club’s Wheelhouse Lounge (no cover charge). For more information, call 878-5700.

Range schedule Ranges, training areas and associated facilities are off limits to personnel not engaged in scheduled firing, operations or inspections unless clearance is obtained (in person) from the Range Control Fire Desk or a designated Range Control technician. The Range Control office telephone number is 878-4412, ext. 226 or 878-3834, ext 234. The range operations schedule through July 3 is: ■ Friday – Range BTRACS, 1, 2, 3, 6 (7 a.m. to 5 p.m.) ■ June 29 through July 3 – No scheduled ranges. All personnel are required to check in and out with Range Control before going into or departing from any range or training area.


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OutsideTheGate

Fourth of July Picnic and Fireworks Show The 31st annual AT&T Fourth of July Great American Picnic and Fireworks Show will take place from 5 to 10 p.m. July 4 at Town Point Park in downtown Norfolk. This event is free and open to the public. Come out and enjoy patriotic sounds by the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Band at 8 p.m. A fireworks show is scheduled for 9:30 p.m. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. For more information, visit www.festevents.org.

Fourth of July Stars in the Sky

JUNE 28, 2013

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hot dogs, hamburgers, ice cream and soft drinks. Entertainment will be provided by the U.S. Air Force Heritage of America Band from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Fireworks will light up the sky at 9:30 p.m. Admission and parking are free. Parking will be available at the Newport News City Hall parking lot and designated non-restricted public parking spaces in the downtown area. Guests can bring blankets or lawn chairs for seating. No pets, bicycles, alcohol, skateboards or radios will be permitted in the festival area. For more information, call 926-1400.

vice members, veterans and family members (with military ID). ■ Music by the Bay Summer Concert – 7 p.m., Continental Park.The U.S. Fleet Forces Band Wind Ensemble will perform. Boy Scout Troop 31 will be selling hot dogs, chips and cold drinks. ■ Fireworks Display – 9 p.m. Fireworks will be launched from the area adjacent to Batteries Irwin and Parrot. For more information, visit www.fmauthority.com.

Yorktown Independence Day Parade

A Fourth of July celebration will take place July 4 at Fort Monroe in Hampton. Activities will include the following: ■ Beaches, Engineer Wharf Fishing Pier – 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; City of Hampton lifeguards will be on duty. ■ Military Appreciation Day – Free event hosted by the Freedom Support Center; open to active-duty Ser-

Yorktown will be hosting a number of free events to celebrate Independence Day in Historic Yorktown. The Yorktown Independence Day Parade will begin at 9 a.m. July 4 on Water Street. There will be a bell ringing ceremony at 7 p.m. and patriotic entertainment at Riverwalk Landing followed by fireworks at 9:15 p.m. on the York River. For more information, visit www.visityorktown.org or call 890-3500.

Military Appreciation Night rescheduled

Photo walk and gallery tour

Port Warwick Concert Series

The Virginia Peninsula Chamber of Commerce and the Daily Press will host “Military Appreciation Night” from 6 to 11 p.m. June 29 at Langley Speedway, 11 Dale Lemonds Dr., Hampton. Come out for an evening of stock car and kart racing. Admission is free for active-duty military and their family members (with military ID). Activities will include a special recognition ceremony, military static displays and a special race where the top drivers will race for one of the five branches of the armed forces for the Chamber Cup. Register online at www.military-salute.com for your free ticket voucher. Limited tickets are available. For more information, call 325-8162.

Come join us as we take to the NolandTrail to learn about nature photography techniques with renowned marshlands photographer Dorothy Kerper Monnelly at 9 a.m. June 29 at the Mariners’ Museum Park, 100 Museum Dr., Newport News. A gallery tour will take place at 11 a.m. This event is free for museum members and $15 for nonmembers (includes museum admission). Reservations are required; walk-ins will be accepted as space allows. For more information, call 591-7718 or visit www.marinersmuseum.org.

Virginia Health Services presents the annual Summer Concert Series from 6 to 9 p.m. Wednesdays at Port Warwick’s Styron Square in Newport News (Jefferson Avenue at Loftis Boulevard). The concerts are free and open to the public. The schedule for July is: ■ July 10 – Martha and Triple Threat ■ July 17 - Butter ■ July 24 – Gina Dalmas and the Cow Tippin’ Playboys ■ July 31 – The Jukes For more information, contact Debi Ernest at 223-0284, e-mail debi@portwarwick.com, or visit www.liveonthesquare.org.

Newport News Parks, Recreation and Tourism will celebrate Independence Day with its “4th of July Stars in the Sky” festival July 4 at Victory Landing Park (end of 23rd Street at the James River). The event begins at 7 p.m. with free children’s rides (giant slides, moon bounces and obstacle courses). Food vendors will be on site selling a variety of items including funnel cakes, seafood,

Hermitage Studio Artists’ open house Studio artists at the Hermitage Museum and Gardens will hold their annual open house from 4 to 8 p.m. July 12 at 7637 North Shore Rd., Norfolk. Guests can meet the artists, tour the studios, and enjoy complimentary hors d’oeuvres and wine. This event is free. Unique works of art will be available for purchase including photographic prints, textiles, acrylic and oil paintings, jewelry and mixed media. The open house will take place in the studio artists’ cottage on the Hermitage grounds, adjacent to the visual arts studio. For more information, contact Melissa Ball at 4232052, ext. 207 or e-mail mball@thehermitagemuseum.org.

Independence Day at Fort Monroe

Faith and Freedom Services Bethel Church invites active-duty Service members, retirees, National Guard, reserves and family members to its Faith and Freedom Services June 30 at 1705 Todds Lane, Hampton. The services will take place at 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. A free catered lunch will be provided following the 11 a.m. service. To register, call 826-1426, ext. 248 or visit bethellife@ betheltemple.com.

Volunteer DAV Drivers Needed The Disabled American Veterans Volunteer Service is seeking volunteers in the Gloucester/Matthews County area to drive the DAV van and transport veterans to Veterans Affairs medical centers in Hampton and Richmond. For more information, contact Richard Moore at (804) 815-0730.

Big Bands on the Bay Come out and join us for live music and dancing at the Big Bands on the Bay music series from 7 to 9 p.m. Sundays at Ocean View Beach Park, 300 W. Ocean View Ave., Norfolk. The music series is free and open to the public. Bring a lawn chair or blanket for seating. The schedule for July is: ■ July 7 – The Terry Chessen Orchestra ■ July 14 – The Top Hats ■ July 21 – Glen Boswick and the Sounds of Swing ■ July 28 – The Continentals In the event of inclement weather, visit www.festevents. org to check for event delays or cancellation.


JUNE 28, 2013

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Restrictions: â&#x20AC;˘ Only 5 ads per week, per household â&#x20AC;˘ Renewals, corrections and cancellations cannot be taken by phone and must be resubmitted â&#x20AC;˘ Illegible, too long or otherwise do not conform to instructions will not be published and must be resubmitted for the next issue â&#x20AC;˘ Automotive ads must begin with make, model and year â&#x20AC;˘ Real estate ads must begin with name of city, neighborhood and must be your primary residence. â&#x20AC;˘ Ads will not be accepted via official mailing channels such as guard mail or postage and fees paid indicia. â&#x20AC;˘ Free ads cannot be of a commercial nature (i. e., business opportunities, help wanted, etc) and must be personal property of the eligible member. Should not represent a sustained income or business or listed through agents or representatives. â&#x20AC;˘ When advertising a home for rent or home for sale, the home must be THE PRIMARY RESIDENCE. (All rental properties are considered paid ads.) WE DO NOT ACCEPT CALLS FOR FREE CLASSIFIED ADS Deadline Thursday, 5 p.m. for the following weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s publications


32

www.peninsulawarrior.com

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

JUNE 28, 2013

JUST

ANNOUNCED!

0

NEW 2013 SIENNA

THANKS TO ALL THE BRAVE MEN AND WOMEN FOR YOUR SERVICE TO OUR COUNTRY.

1,000

$

U.S. Military

Incentive

*

% APR FINANCING FOR

5 YEARS

$

**

+ $1,000 TOYOTA

OR

UP TO

2,000 CASH BACK†† FROM TOYOTA

BONUS CASH†

NEW 2013 RAV4

UP TO

LEASE FOR

$

209mo.

36

BONUS CASH

2999

mos. $

due at signing††† tax, registration, insurance and dealer fees are extra.

0

+ $1,000 TOYOTA INCLUDES $

500

AND $

CASH BACK x FROM TOYOTA

500

LOYALTY

LEASE INCENTIVExx

OFFERS ON SIENNA AND RAV4 END 7/1/13

% APR FINANCING

NEW 2013 CAMRY

CAN BE COMBINED WITH TOYOTA SPECIAL CASH BACK OR SPECIAL FINANCING OR SPECIAL LEASES!

FOR

+$ TOYOTA

500

5

YEARS**

NEW 2013 COROLLA

FINANCE CASHxxx (excludes hybrids)

NEW 2013 TUNDRA

+ $1,000

NEW 2013 PRIUS LIFTBACK

TOYOTA

FINANCE CASHxxx

CASEY TOYOTA

601 East Rochambeau Drive • Williamsburg 757-259-1000 • caseytoyota.com

CHARLES BARKER TOYOTA 1877 Laskin Road • Virginia Beach 757-437-4000 • charlesbarkertoyota.com Smartphone users scan here for more incentive information. Go to gettag.mobi to download the free application.

CHECKERED FLAG TOYOTA 5301 Virginia Beach Blvd. • Virginia Beach 757-490-1111 • checkeredflagtoyota.com

FIRST TEAM TOYOTA

3400 Western Branch Blvd. • Chesapeake 757-673-2345 • firstteamtoyota.com

GLOUCESTER TOYOTA 6357 George Washington Hwy. • Gloucester 804-693-2100 • gloucestertoyota.com

PEARSON TOYOTA

12978 Jefferson Ave. • Newport News 757-874-6000 • pearsontoyotascion.com

PRIORITY TOYOTA GREENBRIER 1800 Greenbrier Parkway • Chesapeake 757-366-5000 • prioritytoyota.com

RK TOYOTA

2301 W. Mercury Blvd. • Hampton 757-838-5000 • rktoyota.com

EveryNewToyotaComesWith

buyatoyota.com

*HOW TO QUALIFY: 1.BE IN CURRENT ACTIVE DUTY STATUS IN THE U.S. MILITARY (NAVY, ARMY, AIR FORCE, MARINES, NATIONAL GUARD, COAST GUARD AND ACTIVE RESERVE) OR A U.S. MILITARY INACTIVE RESERVE (I.E., READY RESERVE) THAT IS PART OF THE INDIVIDUAL READY RESERVE, SELECTED RESERVE AND INACTIVE NATIONAL GUARD. RETIRED MILITARY PERSONNEL ARE NOT ELIGIBLE. 2.PROVIDE VERIFIABLE PROOF OF MILITARY STATUS OR ACTIVE SERVICE AT THE TIME OF PURCHASE: LEAVE AND EARNING STATEMENT OR MILITARY IDENTIFICATION CARD. 3.RECEIVE A SALARY SUFFICIENT TO COVER ORDINARY LIVING EXPENSES AND PAYMENTS FOR YOUR TOYOTA. 4.RECEIVE CREDIT APPROVAL THROUGH A TOYOTA DEALER AND TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. INCENTIVE OFFERED BY TOYOTA MOTOR SALES, U.S.A., INC. ON LEASE CONTRACTS INCENTIVE MUST BE APPLIED TOWARD THE AMOUNT DUE AT LEASE SIGNING OR TOWARD THE CAPITALIZED COST REDUCTION. ON FINANCE CONTRACTS, INCENTIVE MUST BE APPLIED TOWARD THE DOWN PAYMENT. ONE INCENTIVE PER FINANCE OR LEASE TRANSACTION. NOT COMPATIBLE WITH THE TOYOTA COLLEGE GRADUATE INCENTIVE PROGRAM. FINANCE OR LEASE CONTRACT MUST BE DATED BY JULY 8, 2013 FOR INCENTIVE OFFER. THE MILITARY INCENTIVE PROGRAM IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE OR TERMINATION AT ANY TIME. OFFERS ON APPROVED CREDIT TO QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS THROUGH A PARTICIPATING TOYOTA DEALERSHIP AND TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. TERMS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS APPLY, INCLUDING A MAXIMUM TERM OF 60 MONTHS ON FINANCE CONTRACTS. PROGRAM IS AVAILABLE AT PARTICIPATING DEALERS IN MARYLAND, VIRGINIA, WEST VIRGINIA, PENNSYLVANIA, AND DELAWARE; AND MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE IN ALL STATES. NOT ALL APPLICANTS WILL QUALIFY. SEE PARTICIPATING DEALER FOR DETAILS.**0% APR FINANCING UP TO 60 MONTHS AVAILABLE TO QUALIFIED BUYERS THRU TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. TOTAL FINANCED CANNOT EXCEED MSRP PLUS OPTIONS, TAX AND LICENSE FEES. 60 MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF $16.67 FOR EACH $1000 BORROWED. NOT ALL BUYERS WILL QUALIFY. †INCLUDES $500 CASH BACK FROM TOYOTA PLUS $500 FINANCE INCENTIVE FROM TOYOTA IN ADDITION TO 0% APR FINANCING IF VEHICLE IS PURCHASED AND FINANCED THROUGH TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. ON FINANCE CONTRACTS, INCENTIVE WILL BE APPLIED TO THE DOWN PAYMENT. ONE INCENTIVE PER FINANCE TRANSACTION. FINANCE INCENTIVE IS AVAILABLE ON APPROVED CREDIT TO QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS THROUGH TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. ††PURCHASERS CAN RECEIVE $2,000 CASH BACK FROM TOYOTA OR CAN APPLY CASH BACK TO DOWN PAYMENT †††DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $2,790 DOWN FIRST $209 PAYMENT, AND NO SECURITY DEPOSIT. NOT ALL CUSTOMERS WILL QUALIFY. TAX, REGISTRATION, INSURANCE, AND DEALER FEES ARE EXTRA. CUSTOMER IS RESPONSIBLE FOR EXCESSIVE WEAR AND EXCESS MILEAGE CHARGES OF $.15 PER MILE IN EXCESS OF 36,000 MILES. YOUR PAYMENT MAY VARY BASED ON DEALER PARTICIPATION AND FINAL NEGOTIATED PRICE. 2013 RAV4 2WD 4 CYLINDER AUTOMATIC MODEL 4430, MSRP $24,295. xINCLUDES $500 CASH BACK FROM TOYOTA IN ADDITION TO SPECIAL LEASE OFFER. CUSTOMER CAN TAKE CASH BACK FROM TOYOTA OR APPLY CASH BACK TO LEASE TRANSACTION. xxPLUS $500 LOYALTY CASH INCENTIVE FROM TOYOTA ON NEW 2013 RAV4 LEASE WITH TOYOTA TRADE IN. CUSTOMERS CAN RECEIVE A $500 INCENTIVE FROM TOYOTA UPON LEASING A NEW 2013 RAV4 AND TRADING IN A TOYOTA VEHICLE. INCENTIVE CAN BE TAKEN AS CASH BACK FROM TOYOTA OR CAN BE APPLIED TOWARD AMOUNT DUE AT LEASE SIGNING. ONE INCENTIVE PER TRANSACTION. INCENTIVE IS AVAILABLE ON APPROVED CREDIT THROUGH TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. NOT ALL CUSTOMERS WILL QUALIFY. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. xxxFINANCE INCENTIVE FROM TOYOTA ON CAMRY AND TUNDRA IN ADDITION TO 0% APR FINANCING WHEN VEHICLE IS PURCHASED AND FINANCED THROUGH TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. ON FINANCE CONTRACTS, INCENTIVE WILL FIRST BE APPLIED TO THE DOWN PAYMENT. ONE INCENTIVE PER FINANCE TRANSACTION. FINANCE INCENTIVE IS AVAILABLE ON APPROVED CREDIT TO QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS THROUGH TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.***TOYOTACARE COVERS NORMAL FACTORY SCHEDULED SERVICE FOR 2 YEARS OR 25K MILES, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. THE NEW TOYOTA VEHICLE CANNOT BE PART OF A RENTAL OR COMMERCIAL FLEET OR A LIVERY OR TAXI VEHICLE. SEE PARTICIPATING DEALER FOR COMPLETE PLAN DETAILS. VALID ONLY IN THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES AND ALASKA. OFFERS DO NOT INCLUDE DEALER FEES. SIENNA AND RAV4 BONUS CASH ENDS 7/1/13, ALL OTHER OFFERS END 7/8/13.


Peninsula Warrior June 28, 2013 Air Force Edition