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:DUULRU J O I N T April 25, 2014 Vol. 5, No. 16

B A S E

L A N G L E Y - E U S T I S

P u b l i s h e d i n t h e i n t e re s t o f p e r s o n n e l a t J o i n t B a s e L a n g l e y - E u s t i s

Home, sweet home 94th Fighter Squadron returns to Langley AFB – Page 12

COMPETITION

JBLE members to compete at Warrior, Invictus games — Page 3

SAFETY

Alarm shop Airmen ensure safe work environment — Page 4

For more online content, check out www.JBLE.af.mil

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JLOTS Ship-to-shore transportation troops take on tide — Page 8

Air force EDITION

w w w. p e n i n s u l a w a r r i o r. c o m


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HEADQUARTERS AIR COMBAT COMMAND PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Joint Base Langley-Eustis Public Affairs Officer Capt. Kevin Whitlatch • kevin.whitlatch@us.af.mil Joint Base Langley-Eustis Editor Senior Airman Jason J. Brown • jason.brown.80@us.af.mil Fort Eustis Managing Editor Staff Sgt. Katie Gar Ward • fteustismain@gmail.com Per Air Force Instruction 35-101/Army Regulation 360-1, only stories and photos submitted by members of the Department of Defense community and DOD news services may be printed in The Peninsula Warrior. Any stories, photos or announcements must be submitted eight days prior to publication. Stories and photos should be submitted to the editor and/or assistant editor at 633abw.paedit@langley.af.mil or Public Affairs Office, 601 Hines Cir., Fort Eustis, VA 23604. Announcements for the Community Section should be submitted to fteustismain@gmail.com. Announcements for the Outside the Gate section should be submitted to fteustismain@gmail.com. For more information call 878-4920. Authors’ names may be withheld, but all letters must include the authors’ signatures and telephone number. The Peninsula Warrior is an authorized publication for all the members of the U.S. military. Contents of The Peninsula Warrior are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, Department of the Air Force or the Department of the Army. The PeninsulaWarrior is printed every Friday by offset as a civilian enterprise newspaper for the Public Affairs Office, U.S. Air Force by Military Newspapers of Virginia at 150 W. Brambleton Ave. Norfolk, VA 23510 under exclusive written contract with the commander, Joint Base LangleyEustis. MNV is a private firm in no way connected with the Department of the Air Force or Department of the Army. Printed circulation: 25,000. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. A confirmed violation or rejection of this policy of equal opportunity by any advertiser will result in refusal to print advertising from that source. All editorial content ofThe Peninsula Warrior is prepared, edited, provided and approved by the Public Affairs Office Joint Base Langley-Eustis. All photographs are Air Force or Army photographs unless otherwise stated. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts and supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense or MNV of the products or services advertised.

During these fiscally challenging times, saving money is at the top of the Air Force’s priority list. With the recent Air Force network migration, the Air Force is doing just that. The goal of the migration is to collapse base, major command, field operating agency, direct reporting unit and GSU networks, e-mail and directory services into a single, standardized and centrally managed Active Directory structure. “The migration will reduce cost and system complexity through consolidation of network systems,” said Todd Haller, Air Combat Command AFNET Migration Lead. “Centralized management of email accounts and the reduction of other servers at bases will also yield a proportional manpower savings.” Other key benefits of the network consolidation include a “career” email address and accessibility to e-mail, applications and shared drives from any af.mil domain through use of a single Common Access Card login. Personnel will also be able to take their government device (i.e., laptop) anywhere world-wide and be able to securely access their email without a virtual private network connection, Haller added. Although inherent risks come with many major information technology projects, ACC has successfully migrated more than 100,000 email accounts, 70,000 personal computers, 3,000 BlackBerry

Heritage Spotlight On April 29, 2004, the National World War II Memorial opened in Washington, D.C., to thousands of visitors, providing recognition for the 16 million U.S. Service members who served in the war.The memorial is located on 7.4 acres at the former site of the Rainbow Pool at the National Mall between theWashington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial. The Capitol dome can be seen to the east, and Arlington Cemetery sits across the Potomac River to the west. The granite and bronze monument features fountains between arches symbolizing hostilities in Europe and the Far East. The arches are flanked by semicircles of pillars, one each for the states, territories and the District of Columbia. Beyond the pool is a curved wall of 4,000 gold stars, one for every 100

APRIL 25, 2014

By Staff Sgt. Candice C. Page

Joint Base Langley-Eustis Commander Col. John J. Allen Jr.

• HOME OFFICE: 150 W. Brambleton Ave., Norfolk, VA 23510 222-3990 • ADVERTISING SALES: 728 Blue Crab Road, Suite C, Newport News, VA 23606; 596-0853; fax 596-1473

ACC completes AFNET migration

Joint Base Langley-Eustis Editorial Staff

MILITARY NEWSPAPERS OF VIRGINIA

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

Graphic courtesy U.S. Air Force

The Air Force Network Integration Center, a direct reporting unit to Air Force Space Command, works closely with other Air Force organizations to shape, provision, sustain and integrate the Air Force enterprise network.

devices and 500 iOS devices. “The AD account management overhead has eliminated 20,000 obsolete email accounts and 9,000 personal computer objects,” said Haller. “We have also decommissioned 863 servers, a 43 percent reduction in ACC’s server footprint, and eliminated 2,667 BlackBerry devices saving over $89,000 annually in licensing and maintenance fees.” By gaining certification and accreditation for more than 90 servers that were operating on the network without proper authorization, network security has also improved. As bases transition, the communications squadron personnel and functional system administrators complete the bulk of the necessary work for a successful migration.

U.S. Air Force Brig. Gen. David C. Uhrich, ACC Director of Communications, stated, “We worked through each problem as one AFNET team to improve efficiency and effectiveness. Due to this team approach, the migration was successful and relatively transparent to our users.” ACC began their AFNET migration with Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho in May 2013 and completed the MAJCOM’s total migration with Holloman Air Force Base, N.M., in February 2014. The Air Force expects to have all network cleanup actions complete by the end of fiscal year 2014. For more information aboutAFNet migration, Airmen can access AFSPC’s AFNET migration dashboard at https://eis. af.mil/cs/afnet/majcom/default.aspx.

The World War II Memorial opens Americans killed in the war. An Announcement Stone proclaims that the memorial honors those “Americans who took up the struggle during the Second World War and made the sacrifices to perpetuate the gift our forefathers entrusted to us: A nation conceived in liberty and justice.” Though the federal government donated $16 million to the memorial fund, it took more than $164 million in private donations to get it built. Former Kansas Sen. Bob Dole, who was severely wounded in the war, and actorTom Hanks were among its most vocal supporters. Only a fraction of the 16 million Americans who served in the war would ever see it. Four million World War II veterans were living at the time, with

more than 1,100 dying every day, according to government records. The memorial was inspired by Roger Durbin of Berkey, Ohio, who served under Gen. George S. Patton. At a fish fry near Toledo in February 1987, he asked U.S. Rep. Marcy Kaptur why there was no memorial on the Mall to honor World War II veterans. Kaptur, a Democrat from Ohio, soon introduced legislation to build one, starting a process that would stumble along through 17 years of legislative, legal and artistic entanglements. Durbin died of pancreatic cancer in 2000. The monument was formally dedicated May 29, 2004, by President George W. Bush. Open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, it received some 4.4 million visitors in 2005.

Courtesy photo

We want to hear from you. Contact us at fteustismain@gmail.com and 633abw.paedit@langley.af.mil or call 878-4920 or 764-2144.


APRIL 25, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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-%/( PHPEHUV WR FRPSHWH DW :DUULRU ,QYLFWXV *DPHV By Airman 1st Class Devin Scott Michaels 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Air Force Wounded Warrior program ofďŹ cials have announced four athletes from the Joint Base Langley-Eustis community who will represent the U.S. Air Force during the 2014 Warrior and Invictus Games. The games are a set of Paralympic-style competitions including multiple modiďŹ ed sports. In the four years U.S. Air Force Airmen have participated, the number of Airmen athletes competing has grown exponentially. During the Air Force Trials in Las Vegas, April 11, more than 100 wounded and ill Airmen’s abilities were tested. A 40-member Wounded Warrior team was selected for the Warrior Games at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Sept. 28 through Oct. 4. Additionally, 22 athletes were selected to compete for Team U.S.A. against more than 300 other athletes from around the world at the Invictus Games in London, Sept. 10 through 14. U.S. Air Force Capt. Mitchell Kieffer, Air Combat Command staff operations research analyst, earned last year’s Warrior Games’ “Ultimate Warriorâ€? title and was selected to compete again this year. Motivation to compete in the Warrior Games has helped Kieffer recover after an ambush in Iraq during which he was wounded. “The Warrior Games have helped me

cope with the adversity and the stress of recovering from trauma and give me purpose to pursue new goals,� said Kieffer. “They keep me driven and distracted from the monotony of a seemingly never-ending recovery.� Dwayne Parker, Air Force military police assistant and retired security forces Airman, is an alternate for this year’s Warrior Games, but has been selected to compete in the international Invictus Games for Team U.S.A. “It is exciting to represent the Air Force and Team U.S.A.,� said Parker. “The Warrior and Invictus Games give wounded warriors an opportunity to forget about what we cannot do and concentrate on what we can do.� Staff Sgt. Derrick David, a former munitions technician currently in treatment with the 633rd Inpatient Squadron, is also competing in the Invictus Games for Team U.S.A. David was diagnosed with Leukemia in 2010, and explained how the games have helped him. “The Wounded Warrior Program introduced me to an adaptive sports camp where people with limited mobility can play sports,� said David. “After attending various camps, I tried out for the Air Force Wounded Warrior team. On the last day of a grueling week of tryouts from cycling, swimming and sitting-volleyball, I found out I made the Invictus Team and I felt hon-

Photo illustration by Airman 1st Class Devin Scott Michaels

(From left) U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Michael Napier, Air Combat Command aircraft armaments journeyman; Staff Sgt. Derrick David, former munitions technician and current member of the 633rd Inpatient Squadron; Capt. Mitchell Kieffer,ACC staff operations research analyst; and Dwayne Parker, security forces veteran and current military police assistant at Fort Eustis, were selected to represent the Air Force and Joint Base Langley-Eustis in the Warrior Games, Sept. 28 through Oct. 4, and the Invictus Games, Sept. 10 through 14.

ored. “I am using this as a tool for recovery,â€? he coninued. “Over the past years, I have gone through numerous treatments from chemotherapy to pain management. It’s rehabilitative and it creates drive. People go through injuries and illnesses and lose track of staying ďŹ t. The Warrior and Invictus Games help us stay motivated to get better.â€? Senior Airman Michael Napier, ACC aircraft armament systems journeyman, is representing the Air Force in the Warrior Games. Diagnosed with metastatic cancer,

Napier underwent surgery and chemotherapy. He said wounded warrior competitors are his inspiration to push his own limits in the Warrior Games. “I believe if you want something bad enough, like a medal in the Warrior Games, and you give it everything you have, you’ll rebound from the low point in your life,� said Napier. “You can accomplish things you had no idea you could.� For more information, visit the Wounded Warrior program’s website at www. woundedwarriorproject.org.

-7)&6 SUHSDUHV IRU Âľ6XGGHQ 5HVSRQVHÂś LEFT: Rick George, JointTask Force Civil Support communications control center chief, and Karl Ludwig, JTF-CS deployed communications technician, check the connection of their deployed communications gear during an exercise at Fort Eustis, April 16. Members of the communications directorate conducted an internal exercise to validate their communications equipment to train new personnel in preparation for the May Sudden Response command post exercise. RIGHT: RichardTyson, JointTask Force Civil Support network engineer, sets up a deployed communications network. JTF-CS anticipates, plans and prepares for chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense support to civil authorities. Photos by U.S. Navy Petty OfďŹ cer 1st Class Brian Dietrick


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

APRIL 25, 2014

Alarm shop Airmen ensure safe work environment By Senior Airman Kayla Newman

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Mario Francis, 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron electrical system craftsman, checks an alarm systems panel at Langley Air Force Base, April 16. Francis is assigned to the alarm shop, which ensures systems used to report fire alarm activity to the fire department are working properly.

633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Fire alarm systems are found in every U.S. military building and play a vital role in alerting personnel to imminent dangers. If systems aren’t working properly, buildings and the individuals inside can be harmed, which is why several U.S. Air Force Airmen have the responsibility of maintaining these systems. The 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron electricians perform a rotational duty in the alarm shop, where they work to maintain all alarm systems on the installation. These Airmen ensure systems used to report fire alarm activity to the fire department are working properly at all times. “Most of our job consists of performing preventive maintenance,” said U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Mario Francis, 633rd CES electrical systems craftsman. “We typically do a cou-

Photo by Senior Airman Kayla Newman

ple of preventative maintenance jobs a day, [including] making sure fire alarm systems are working the way they are supposed to.” Six Airmen and three Department of Defense civilians fulfill the alarm

shop tasks. Along with maintenance, the team is responsible for installing advanced systems to replace outdated or defective equipment. The technicians are aware of the impact preventive maintenance has on

buildings and the personnel working within. According to Francis, sound notifications are among the next vital inspections the team makes. In the event of an emergency, it is important that the sound is heard throughout the entire building. The safety of buildings and the personnel inside them is top priority for the alarm shop technicians. “The biggest part of our job is the life and safety aspect,” said Francis. “A lot can fall on our shoulders if the job isn’t done correctly. If there is a fire and the alarm system isn’t working properly, the building could potentially burn down.” Francis advises facility managers, or any authorized individuals, to contact the alarm shop if they suspect equipment malfunction. To report an issue, contact the 633rd CES customer service desk at 7645342.


APRIL 25, 2014

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APRIL 25, 2014

Fort Eustis honors volunteers in annual ceremony By Senior Airman Austin Harvill

“It is phenomenal to see the difference we can make in other The U.S. Army Volunteer Corps recog- people’s lives.”

633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

nized Fort Eustis community members for their commitment to service during an award ceremony at Fort Eustis, April 16. Volunteers in eight different categories took home awards, and others were recognized for their contribution to the overall Fort Eustis mission. The volunteer activities mentioned included Boy Scout troop leaders, food drive coordinators, school board representatives and more. “Our volunteers make a difference in how we run our installation,” said U.S. Army Col. William Galbraith, 733rd Mission Support Group commander. “Youth service programs, family support groups and other keystone programs would not exist without your help.” Donna Cloy, AVC coordinator, quantified the efforts made by the volunteers, most of whom contribute to more than one organization. “I make a big effort to ensure all of our

— Emily Wilson Fort Eustis Volunteer of the Year

volunteer hours don’t go unnoticed,” said Cloy. “This year, all of our contributions have paid off. The Fort Eustis community volunteered [more than] 81,000 hours, saving almost 2 million dollars for the installation.” Emily Wilson, the Fort Eustis volunteer of the year, said a lot of the volunteers don’t volunteer for the numbers – they do it for their community. “It is phenomenal to see the difference we can make in other people’s lives,” said Wilson. “While we learn a lot about our community and receive a lot of training we can use elsewhere, the real treat is seeing everyone’s happiness. It is just so much fun to get out and interact with the people who make up our wonderful Army family.”

Photo by Sgt. Stephanie Warner

Winners from eight different volunteer of the year categories pose for a picture during an award ceremony at Fort Eustis, April 16. The categories included youth, civilian, retiree, single U.S. Army Soldier, military, family, family member and overall volunteer of the year.

Retired Military Veteran Chooses Top 10 Online School After 20 years of service to her country, retired military veteran Carmella Murray still wants to lead and serve. She chose Regent University, ranked a Top 10 Online Bachelor’s Program by U.S. News & World Report, 2013, to finish her undergraduate degree. The former Air Force recruiter says Regent’s military-friendly benefits, tuition discounts and textbook credits make her exceptional education possible. Ready to join us?

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APRIL 25, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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APRIL 25, 2014

FeatureStory

6KLSWRVKRUH WUDQVSRUWDWLRQ WURRSV WDNH RQ WLGH DW -/276 By Sgt. Stefanie D. Warner 7TH TRANSPORTATION BRIGADE (EXPEDITIONARY) PUBLIC AFFAIRS

On March 27, 1964 at 5:36 p.m., a 9.2-magnitude earthquake shook the Prince William Sound region of Alaska. It was the second-largest earthquake ever recorded in the world. The Fort Eustis-based 7th Transportation Brigade (Expeditionary) hosted a Joint Logistics Over-the-Shore exercise

in Anchorage on the 50th anniversary of what is now known as the “Great Alaskan Earthquake,” March 16 to April 14. A joint task force consisting of U.S. Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard personnel demonstrated the ability to rapidly deploy in support of the local and state authorities during the JLOTS portion of the large-scale Alaska Shield 14 exercise. Alaska Shield 14 combined federal, state, local and military agencies to test

Photo by Sgt. Stefanie D. Warner

U.S. Army Spcs. Joyce Hardin and Zachary Swim, 11th Transportation Battalion, 7th Trans. Brigade (Expeditionary) watercraft operators, assist Logistics Support Vessel 7 in mooring to the pier during Joint Logistics Over-the-Shore operations as part of Alaska Shield 14 in Anchorage, Alaska, March 27.

Photo by Sgt. Stefanie D. Warner

U.S. Army Soldiers assigned to Fort Eustis’ 7th Transportation Brigade (Expeditionary) operate a crane to move shipping containers and equipment.

response and coordination efforts during a disaster such as the 1964 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that devastated much of South Central Alaska. Key capabilities in the exercise included establishing and managing port operations, fuel transfer, storage capabilities, receiving large cargo vessels and transferring supplies to port. The 7th Trans. Bde. (Ex.) has performed JLOTS operations around the globe, and brought their wealth of experience to the exercise to allow the JTF to reach further and respond faster. “We could do this anywhere,” said U.S. Army Col. Randal Nelson, 7th Trans. Bde. (Ex.) commander and the JTF-7 commander. “We have done this in Haiti, South Korea, South America; it makes no difference here at the Port of Anchorage – this applies everywhere.” During the exercise, assets from different branches of the military worked in concert to achieve maximum results. For example, the Navy provided a large seagoing vessel to work alongside a fleet of

smaller, highly maneuverable boats while the Coast Guard provided port security. The scenario involved damage to the port that prevented seagoing ships from docking, and the JTF was tasked with bridging the gap. U.S. Naval Ship Mendonca, a Large Medium-Speed Roll-on/ Roll-off, downloaded 20-foot shipping containers onto Army logistic support vessels and landing craft utilities, who then transferred the containers to an unimproved ramp for movement ashore. Additionally, Army large tug and small tug vessels helped the LSVs and LCUs navigate the heavy currents of the port. Nelson said 7th Trans. Bde. (Ex.) came away from the exercise “prepared to provide Alaska with assistance in any situation.” “The bottom line is getting the critical relief supplies off the naval ships in deep water and shuttled onto the port,” said Nelson. “[While] we’re up here to learn lessons, document them and [improve our performance], we are ready to go [in the event of a real-world disaster].”


APRIL 25, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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APRIL 25, 2014

&$&7 WR KRVW 7UDLQLQJ DQG (GXFDWLRQ  ,QGXVWU\ )RUXP By Mike Casey COMBINED ARMS CENTER TRAINING

The Combined Arms Center – Training will host a Training and Education 2025 Industry Forum June 18 and 19 to inform industry partners of U.S. Army training and education gaps, and discuss training and education capabilities for the Army of 2025 and beyond. On June 18, the Industry Forum will take place from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at 1737 Jackson Ave. on Fort Eustis, and will feature a speech and panel presentations. The second day’s event will be from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the same location and will offer industry representatives an opportunity to meet one-onone with U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command capability managers for training. The first day will include a presentation about the future vision for Army training and education given by CAC’s deputy commanding general for training, U.S. Army Brig. Gen. Joseph M. Martin. There will be three panel discussions to provide information concerning the Army’s training and education required capabilities and gaps identified for 2025 and beyond: ■ The Future Holistic Training Environment. Panelists will cover the current status of the Army’s Integrated Training Environment and the future merging of environments to provide simpler, low-overhead, easily accessible and higher-fidelity training. ■ Future Army Training and Education Capabilities. Panelists will discuss the future of Army training and education, the Army Learning Model and Distributed Learning. They will discuss how the Army is leveraging technology to deliver content to U.S. Army Soldiers at the point of need, possible industry help in closing gaps and Army improvement efforts. ■ Network Integration Evaluations Opportunities and Trainability. Panelists will present and discuss training gaps and opportunities available during upcoming Network Integration Evaluations. Panelists will also present for discussion ways that industry can help the Army deliver advanced systems that will be more intuitive for Soldiers to operate and require less effort to learn, use and sustain. At the conclusion of the first day, a Senior Leader General Officer Panel will discuss the priority issues confronting Army training and education and provide opportuni-

Graphic courtesy U.S. Army

The Combined Arms Center – Training will host a Training and Education 2025 Industry Forum June 18 and 19 to inform industry partners of Army training and education gaps, and discuss training and education capabilities for the Army of 2025 and beyond.

ty to dialogue with the leaders of the Army’s training and education community. The second day will provide attendees with optional one-on-one break-out sessions between industry representatives and TRADOC Capability Managers to further clarify the information provided during the first day. To register for the conference and the optional one-on-one meetings, contact the Training Support and Analysis Integration Division at: Lt. Col. Aaron Leonard Industry Forum AO TSAID/ATSC (757) 878-0427 aaron.m.leonard6.mil@mail.mil Pam Davis Industry Forum Admin TSAID/ATSC (757) 878-2910 pamela.e.davis.civ@mail.mil The one-on-one meetings will be scheduled on a first-come basis. Registration closes June 2. There is no charge for attending the forum and no meals are provided. For additional information about the event, visit http://usacac.army.mil/cac2/ CAC-T/IndustryForum.asp CAC-T, headquartered at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., manages the Army’s Training Support System Enterprise, the Training Development Enterprise and the Combat Training Center Program to enable commanders and commandants to train and educate versatile units and develop agile and adaptive leaders. TSAID is part of the Army Training and Support Center, a subordinate organization of CAC-T.


APRIL 25, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Angela Dees, 2nd Battalion, 210th Aviation Regiment, 128th Avn. Brigade training developer, watches a 3-on-3 basketball game at Fort Eustis, April 19. More than 30 teams registered to play during the event and raise awareness during Sexual Assault Awareness Month.

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U.S.Army Pfc.Aramis McFarland, 558thTransportation Company, 10th Trans. Battalion, 7th Trans. Brigade (Expeditionary) automated logistics specialist, attempts a shot during a 3-on-3 basketball tournament. Service members and their families competed to raise sexual assault awareness.

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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APRIL 25, 2014

APRIL 25, 2014

RIGHT: U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Ashley Freeman Sr., 1st Maintenance Squadron low observable technician, is hugged by his son Ashley Freeman Jr. and daughter Aneesa Freeman at Langley Air Force Base, April 19.The 94th Fighter Squadron was deployed for nearly four months to Kadena Air Base, Japan, to demonstrate the continued U.S. commitment to help maintain peace throughout the Western PaciďŹ c.

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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+R RPH VZHHW KRPH WK K )LJKWHU 6TXDGURQ UHWX XUQV WR /DQJOH\ $)% By Melissa Walther 633RD AIR BA ASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

ON THE COVER: U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Daniel Caban, 94th Aircraft Maintenance Unit crew chief, reunites with his wife Jennifer Caban and daughter Serenity Caban after a nearly fourmonth deployment to Kadena Air Base, Japan. Photo by Staff Sgt. John D. Strong II

Friends and family turned out in force the ev vening of April 18 at Langley Air Force Base B to welcome home U.S. Air Force A Airmen with the 94th Fighter Squadron n from a four-month deployment to Kad dena Air Base in Japan. While deeployments are a fact of military life, U U.S. Air Force Col. Kevin Huyck, 1stt Fighter Wing commander, said this pa articular deployment was a little unusu ual. “Deployiing a full Theater Security Package lik ke this is something unique for the lastt couple of years,â€? he said. “Usually in n the Air Force we deploy as smaller gro oups, but doing it this way allows us to become tighter as a squadron and it reeally reinforces the â€˜ďŹ ght like you train, trrain like you ďŹ ght’ mentality. I couldn’t be b prouder of them. They did outstanding g work integrating with both local forces and Japanese forces.â€? That “tra ain like you ďŹ ghtâ€? mentality meant th he 94th FS deployed with not only their F F-22 Raptors, pilots and crewmembers, b but maintenance and support staff, includ ding members of the Virginia Air Nationa al Guard. “We had about a quarter of our force from the [A Air] National Guard as maintainers and d yers, and they did an outstanding jo ob,â€? said Lt. Col. Jefferson Hawkins, 994th FS commander. “It was absolutely seamless, and it allowed us to integratee with local forces, both U.S. PaciďŹ c Com mmand forces and the Japanese Self Defense D Forces, with no problems.â€?

Deploying with such a large force is never an easy task, but Hawkins said it’s something they are used to, and is part of “what makes the Air Force special.â€? “Movement and equipment are key components of any operation, and we’re used to packing and going at the drop of a hat,â€? he said. “It’s a true testament to the capabilities of the Air Force and our people.â€? Another unique aspect of this particular deployment was the ability to train with live and inert munitions, according to Hawkins. “We could use the Japanese ranges, and this is the ďŹ rst time in a couple years we’ve been able to do something like that,â€? he said. “It was great training, and really helped make this deployment something special.â€? For Hawkins, the deployment was special in another way. “I lived there for three years, so it was nice to go back and see how things changed or stayed the same,â€? he said. “But I’m glad to be home now. Being away from family and friends is hard, but it’s part of the military, and we’re doing it for all the people back home, waiting for us.â€? For the family of Staff Sgt. Ashley Freeman, Sr., this deployment is just one of many they have experienced over the years, but the thrill of being reunited never fades. “We’re stoked to have him back,â€? said Chaunte Freeman, who was there to welcome her husband. “We’re so excited and we miss him so much. When he deploys we all feel it, but we can still talk and make it work.â€?

“I’m m glad to be home now. Being away from family and friend ds is hard, but it’s part of the military, and we’re doing it for aall the people back home, waiting for us.� Photo by Staff Sgt. John D. Strong II

Photo by Staff Sgt. John D. Strong II

Airmen from the 1st Fighter Wing and the 192nd Fighter Wing Air National Guard are U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Abraham Lailson, 1st Maintenance Group weapons standardizagreeted by friends and families at Langley Air Force Base, April 19. Close to 300 Airmen tion technician, is greeted by his wife Tech. Sgt. Berenice Lailson, Air Combat Command from the 1st and 192nd, deployed to Kadena Air Base, Japan, to provide stability and A4 Directorate of Maintenance and Logistics equipment manager. security while allowing units to integrate with U.S. and Japanese forces.

— Lt. Col. Jefferson Hawkins 94th Fighter Squadron commander

Photo by Staff Sgt. John D. Strong II

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Jeff Barber, 94th Aircraft Maintenance Unit specialist ight chief, embraces his daughters Anna and Abigale Barber at Langley Air Force Base, April 19. Close to 300 Airmen from the 1st Fighter Wing, Joint Base Langley-Eustis and the 192nd FighterWing Air National Guard, deployed to Kadena Air Base, Japan, to provide stability and security while allowing units to integrate with U.S. and Japanese forces.


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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APRIL 25, 2014

(XVWLV /DQJOH\ VZDS SROLFH IRUFHV By Senior Airman Teresa J.C. Aber 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Joint basing is not an exact science – each unit overcomes challenges in unique ways. To give personnel a better understanding of the joint base concept, the 633rd and 733rd Security Forces Squadrons at Joint Base Langley-Eustis exchange Soldiers and Airmen for one week each month, allowing them to shadow U.S. Service members from the opposite branch. “The exchange program was initially developed as an informal method to give both Airmen and Soldiers exposure to the Army and Air Force cultures, respectively,â€? said U.S. Army Sgt. Maj. Michael King, 733rd SFS provost sergeant major. “It has evolved to show our young Soldiers and Airmen a broader range of law enforcement skills used by both the Army and Air Force.â€? U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Sandra Chisholm, 633rd SFS response force leader, shadowed Derrick Lee, 733rd SFS TrafďŹ c Accident Investigations police ofďŹ cer,

spending time going through the various sections of the unit. “This program is a really great opportunity for the units to provide more cohesion between the different branches of the military and our civilian personnel,â€? said Chisholm. “When we learn from each other and how we may do things differently, it allows us to operate together more smoothly and quickly in times of crisis.â€? Service members who switched places were immersed in the various sections of the corresponding unit, such as guard mount, road patrol, trafďŹ c investigations, military working dogs and force protection. This program reinforces the concept of ‘One Team, One Fight,’ and allows the units to send Security Forces Airmen and Military Police Soldiers into the ďŹ eld who are well-rounded and capable of working in an increasingly joint environment, said Lee. “Everyone comes from a different background so each unit runs their programs a

Photo by Senior Airman Teresa J.C. Aber

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Sandra Chisholm, 633rd Security Forces Squadron response force leader, shadows Derrick Lee, 733rd SFSTrafďŹ c Accident Investigations police ofďŹ cer at Fort Eustis, April 16.

little differently,� said Lee. “By spreading the information around and sharing each Soldier or Airman’s knowledge, we can broaden our law enforcement mission and keep the community safe.�

The program has run for six months, and both units hope to grow it into longer and more frequent exchanges, giving Soldiers and Airmen more time to experience each others’ realities.

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APRIL 25, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

www.peninsulawarrior.com

MAY 26 - JUNE 1, 2014 VIRGINIA BEACH OCEANFRONT

WARRIOR WEEK is designed to support Wounded Warriors in the recovery process with therapeutic physical health and recreational act activitie ies. activities.

WARRIOR WEEK ACTIVITIES • • • • •

Skydiving Waterskiing Horsemanship Program Coastal Fishing Surf Camp

• Kayaking • Ride 2 Recovery Cycling Challenge • Grand Prix Cycling Race • US Sailing Training Boot Camp

We expect 400 wounded warriors along with their caregivers and families to attend the events. WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT? Warrior Week is an opportunity for our recovering heroes to return to a physical activity that they can continue throughout their lives. These events are also an opportunity for these service men and women to connect with others who are experiencing the same challenges of recovery and reintegration back into their lives post injury.

SUPPORT WARRIOR WEEK Your donation will help offset the cost of transportation, food, beverage and entertainment for these Wounded Warriors.

VISIT WWW.FLAGSHIPNEWS.COM AND CLICK ON SUPPORT WARRIOR WEEK TO MAKE A TAX DEDUCTIBLE DONATION

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

APRIL 25, 2014 To keep military working dogs healthier and more comfortable during deployments, new, portable kennels will have a forced-air system that provides fresh air circulation inside the shelter.

Photo courtesy U.S. Army

1HZ GHSOR\DEOH NHQQHOV IRU PLOLWDU\ ZRUNLQJ GRJV PLWLJDWH WHPSHUDWXUH By Audra Calloway PICATINNY PUBLIC AFFAIRS

In Afghanistan, summer temperatures soar to 120 degrees and winter temperatures dip into the teens. Mix in some blinding sandstorms and one can appreciate the importance of adequate military shelter not only for U.S. Army Soldiers, but also for military working dogs. To keep the working dogs healthier and more comfortable during deployments, Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center engineers from Picatinny and Rock Island are developing kennels for environments with temperature extremes, said Project Officer Frank Altamura, who is with the Program Executive Office for Ammunition. The duties of military working dogs include patrolling and searching for explosive and narcotics. “Military working dogs have been used for different missions within the Army since Vietnam, and they are probably the most reliable source of explosive detection that the Army has,” Altamura said. The new, portable kennels will have a forced-air system that provides fresh air circulation inside the shelter in the absence of natural breezes, heated air during extreme cold and cooled air during extreme heat. The operating temperatures inside the kennel are a minimum of 45 degrees when the temperature outside the kennel is 5 degrees. When the temperature is 120 degrees outside, the inside temperature cannot exceed 85 degrees.

The temperature requirements were approved by the Army Veterinary Corps headquartered at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. Because the current portable kennels, called Vari Kennels, are open-air, they must be kept in the barracks with troops so that the temperature is controlled. “The new kennel gives the dog his own place, while not being cramped in the Vari Kennel in the troop’s quarters,” Altamura said. In addition, the new kennel includes a shelter along with a “run” or exercise area that allows dogs to stretch their legs. The dogs will access the run area through a doggie door that lets them enter and exit the shelter as they please. The length of a mission determines what type of kennel is used, explained Deputy Project Officer Tom Case. On missions that last up to 30 days, the dogs stay in Vari Kennels. The new deployable kennel will house the dogs when they are on missions that last from 30 to 180 days. Beyond 180 days, the dogs are housed in brick and mortar structures. The kennel can be used independent of the “run” area and is designed to be transported on quick notice on the back of a truck. If a Soldier needs to take the dog to a forward operating base, he can remove the run and only take the kennel if the mission will be under 30 days. The kennels are modular and can be assembled by two people in less than 15 minutes with relatively few tools. The kennels are 48 inches long, by 24 inches wide, by 40 inches high and the attachable run is 6 feet long, by 4 feet wide, by 4 feet high. SEE WORKING DOGS PAGE 17


APRIL 25, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

www.peninsulawarrior.com

WORKING DOGS FROM PAGE 16 The new kennels have passed numerous environmental tests at Aberdeen Test Center in Aberdeen, Maryland. In addition, testing with dogs has contributed to changes in kennel design. “The doggie door at one time was aluminum skinned, like the walls, with insulation inside to keep the heat and cold in,” Altamura said.” But we discovered that the door was too heavy and it kept hitting the dog. After a few times going in and out, the dogs refused to go through it. So that was a major change we had to make.” The program is preparing to seek bids for production. The kennels are scheduled for deployment abroad and to training facilities in December 2014 with fielding and logistics support from the TACOM Life Cycle Management Command. PEO Ammunition was assigned the management of the Family of Military Working Dog Equipment Program for the Army, and is a participant in the Department of Defense working group.

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Photo by Staff Sgt. Vernon Young Jr.

Chief Master Sgt. of the Air Force James A. Cody speaks with Airmen during a visit April 13, 2014, to Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan. Cody visited to encourage, inform and congratulate Airmen for hard work throughout Operation Enduring Freedom.

FIND WHAT YOU’RE E LOOKING FOR IN THE CLASSIFIEDS.

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

APRIL 25, 2014

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By Senior Airman Alexander W. Riedel

A Google Glass test model rests on a dummy Airman at the 711th Human PerformanceWing atWright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. Engineers and software designers with theWing's Battlefield AirTargeting, Man-Aided Knowledge, or BATMA(N) group, here are currently testing Google Glass for possible use by battlefield Airman.

AIR FORCE NEWS SERVICE

Whether trying to coordinate aircraft in a three-dimensional battlespace, calling in precise close air support or evacuating personnel caught behind enemy lines, effective multitasking is at the heart of the mission for U.S. Air Force special operators. Researchers with the 711th Human Performance Wing at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, are now working to make missions lighter and faster for U.S. Air Force Airmen by testing Google Glass and its head-mounted optical see-through display technology, for potential battlefield use. Still in beta-testing, the trials are conducted by the Battlefield Air Targeting, Man-Aided Knowledge, or BATMA(N) group, an advanced technology demonstration and research program commissioned by the Air Force Special Operations Command to develop, build and investigate advanced wearable technologies. “Trying to interact in the battlespace places a lot of burden on the dismounted battlefield Airmen,” said Dr. Gregory Burnett, the

Photo by Richard Eldridge

chief engineer of the BATMA(N) program. “BATMA(N) is a constant endeavor to try to improve tactical decision making and reduce the human error associated with our Airmen’s mission set.” A combination between a hardware and software product, Google Glass is based on Google’s own Android operating system and can leverage a great majority of modern smartphone capabilities while remaining light and allowing for largely hands-free operation. “Its most distinguishing feature is that its screen sits above the user’s right eye,” said

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Andres Calvo, a software developer and civilian contractor with the 711th HPW. “What that means is that the screen is off by default. Whenever you need to access the information, you either look up, or you touch on the trackpad and only then will the screen turn on.” While aircraft pilots have been using variations of heads-up displays for years, with the latest iteration being incorporated in the new helmets worn by F-35 Lightning II pilots, the engineers said the tactical ground missions put high demands on the operators over extended periods of time and varying environ-

ments. One possible use being investigated in preliminary studies Calvo said, is a medical app that would allow first responders in the pararescue community to monitor vitals of multiple casualties, without taking their hands off patients or weapons. “Since (pararescuemen) have the need to recover personnel it’s beneficial for them to monitor many people at once,” Calvo said. “The app aims to better enable them to assess who needs urgent medical attention,and it would improve their accountability. Google Glass is a display that has the potential to display that information. So, if a (pararescueman) has the need to see somebody’s vitals immediately and urgently, Google Glass could fill that need.” With the aim to reduce the overall size, weight and power required of the dismounted operator engineers are attempting to move away from clunky, ruggedized laptops with short battery life. Google Glass is intended to work within an ensemble in combination with cellphones or tablet devices that will hold the data and supplement the heads-up display.


APRIL 25, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

19

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Photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Nagle

U.S. Air Force Col. Kevin Huyck, 1st Fighter Wing commander, makes a toast in honor of the 72nd anniversary of the Doolittle Raid during a ceremony at Langley Air Force Base, April 18. The Doolittle Raid was an air raid conducted by the U.S. on Tokyo, Japan during WorldWar II.The attack was used to demonstrate that Japan was susceptible to American air attack in retaliation of the attack on Pearl Harbor.

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

LAFBCommunity The Five Love Languages

APRIL 25, 2014

Submit LAFB Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com

Holocaust Day of Remembrance

The Health and Wellness Center will host a Five Love Languages class from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., on the first Wednesday of each month. The class will teach participants how to identify their own and their partner’s love languages, and how to communicate. For more information, contact Aillen Ford at aillen.ford. ctr@us.af.mil or 764-2427.

The 2014 Holocaust Day of Remembrance Ceremony will take place at Quesada Hall at 10:15 a.m., April 28. The guest speaker for this event is Ruth Kapp Hartz, Holocaust survivor and author of “Your Name is Renée.” To sign up, visit https://einvitations.afit.edu/inv/anim. cfm?i=192088&k=03684009735F. For questions or concerns about the 2014 Holocaust Day of Remembrance Ceremony contact 2d Lt Chance Smith, CDC Annex Ribbon Cutting Ceremony 764-7556, Senior Master Sgt. Leon Southard at 764-6073 the Joint Base Langley-Eustis Child Development Cen- or Master Sgt. Jaclyn MacKinley at 225-2121 ter Annex Ribbon Cutting Ceremony will be held at 3:30 p.m., April 28 at Bldg. 60. For more information, contact Langley hospital renovation updates Sheila Robinson at 225-0280 or Cathy Barber at 764-3585. As USAF Hospital Langley continues its improvement reno-

Langley Chapel Coordinator

vation process, the hospital’s southeast entrance is open to patients, allowing a more direct path to the Emergency Department, Flight Medicine clinic, Dermatology clinic, Allergy and Immunizations, and Public Health clinic. As the Radiology clinic moves into the third phase of renovations, the reception/check-in area has a new location north of the previous area. Additionally, the new Mammography and Ultrasound sections are now adjacent to the reception area. As a reminder, the main hospital patient thoroughfares on the northwest side of the hospital will be closed for renovations, rerouting patient traffic via alternate hallways for 2 to 3 months. Patients and visitors are encouraged to pay close attention to temporary way-finding signage posted throughout the facility. For more information, contact Maj. Jeffrey Chaperon at 764-5768 or email Jeffrey.chaperon@us.af.mil.

The Langley Chapel has a part-time contract vacancy for a Langley Chapel Coordinator. Applicants must be an active participant in either the Langley Chapel’s Protestant or Catholic program, possess a working knowledge of the essential teachings and religious practices of the Protestant and Catholic faith, be familiar with chapel financial plans and programs and possess a basic working knowledge of essential computer programs including: Microsoft Word, Power Point, Excel and Outlook. The contract will be awarded based on “best value” to the government. Other requirements are listed in the Statement of Work along with the Basis of Award; available for pick up at the Langley Chapel Annex administrative office. Three letters of recommendation and an interview is also required with the chaplain advisor and will be scheduled when the application is returned. Applications must Holocaust Remembrance Day movie showings be submitted to the chapel by 4 p.m., May 5. Public bid opening will be in the Langley Chapel Annex conference The Holocaust Remembrance Day committee will host a room at 10 a.m. May 6, with interviews scheduled prior series of movie showings throughout April and May at Queto that time. sada Hall. Popcorn will be provided, free of charge. Below For more information, contact Chaplain (Maj.) James F. are the dates and times: Richey at 764-7847. ■ April 29 – “Life is Beautiful,” 2 p.m. ■ May 2 – “The Pianist,” 2 p.m. Asian Pacific American Heritage Tasters For more information, contact 2nd Lt. Chance Smith at Choice 574-7556, Senior Master Sgt. Leon Southard at 574-6073, The Asian Pacific American Heritage Committee will or the Equal Opportunity office at 764-5878. be hosting a Tasters Choice from 1 to 3 p.m., May 9. The event will consist of performers representing different Anger Management class Asian cultures and food from local restaurants. The Health and Wellness Center will host an Anger ManFor more information or questions, contact Master Sgt. agement class from 2 to 3:30 p.m., April 28. The class will Darwin Mallari at 764-5004. teach participants how to identify and express the normal, healthy feeling of anger before it gets out of control and reArmed Forces 5K Warrior Run sults in negative consequences. The 2nd Annual Armed Forces 5K Warrior Run will take For more information, contact Aillen Ford at aillen.ford. place at 6 a.m., May 2. Proceeds will go toward the Virgin- ctr@us.af.mil or 764-2427. ia Wounded Warrior Program. Early registration $25 and $30 the day of, including a t-shirt, dog tag, water bottle JBLE Golf Course bar, lounges open and bottler cooler. The first 100 participants will receive a The Joint Base Langley-Eustis golf facilities bar and loungfree shake from Power Blendz. es are open 2 to 7 p.m., Friday, Saturday and Sundays during April. Come out and enjoy a drink or two while you relax Cinco De Mayo in a casual atmosphere. The Fort Eustis Club will be hosting an early Cinco De To reserve a table, contact the Fort Eustis Pines Golf Mayo celebration from 4:30 to 8:30 p.m., April 30. For Course at 878-2252 or the Langley Eaglewood Golf Course more information, contact Azeb Aweke at 848-5700. at 764-4547.

Call for Asian artifacts The Asian Pacific American Heritage planning committee is soliciting Asian artifacts to be used during May to showcase the Asian culture. the committee is requesting figurines, costumes and other significant items. All items will be returned to the rightful owners after the celebration. If interested in assisting, call Master Sgt. Lynn Ward at 764-3414 or Master Sgt. Tamika Richmond at 7645550

Asian Pacific American Heritage committee The Asian Pacific American Heritage planning committee will host its next meeting at 11 a.m., April 25 and May 2, 9, 16, 23 and 30 at the Langley Chapel Auditorium. For more information, contact Master Sgt. Darwin Mallari at 574-5004 or the Equal Opportunity office at 764-5878.

Annual Restoration Advisory Board Joint Base Langley-Eustis is soliciting public interest regarding the annual Restoration Advisory Board for Langley Air Force Base. The purpose of the RAB is to inform the public of the base environmental restoration program. For more information, contact Mr. John Tice at 7649394 or john.tice@us.af.mil.

Latin Nights at the Langley Club The Langley Hispanic Heritage Countil presents Latin Nights at the Langley Club May 2 from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Music by DJ Chino includes salsa, bachata, merengue and reggaeton. Drink specials all night. For more information, call (830)-765-9157 or email LHHC@us.af.mil.

AFAF golf tournament An Air Force Assistance Fund golf tournament is scheduled for May 9 at Eaglewood Golf Course. Registration runs from 6:45 to 7:45 a.m., with a shotgun start at 8 a.m. Cost is $75 per person, and includes green fees, cart usage, range balls, and pulled poark sandwich lunch. Cheat packages include three feet of string (one per team) for $5, and two mulligans, one kick and one throw (per person) for $10. Long Drive and Closest to the Pin contests are scheduled with prize giveaways, as well as a silent auction (cash only). All proceeds benefit AFAF. Sign-up deadline is May 2. To register, contact Master Sgt. Brandon Finefrock at 764-6360 or brandon.finerock@us.af.mil, or Master Sgt. Kristine Pierce at 764-0785 or kristine.pierce@us.af.mil.

‘Standing Together Against Rape’ road rally A “Standing Together Against Rape” road rally will take place at Memorial Park at 9:30 a.m., April 30. Registration is free, but participants must complete the motorcycle safety course prior to the event. Safety checks and registration will take place at 7:30 a.m. on the event day. For more information, contact Vanessa Williams at 764-3359 or clara.williams.3@us.af.mil.


APRIL 25, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

EustisCommunity

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Prescription DrugTake-Back Day

American Red Cross blood drive

Army Community Service

The National Prescription DrugTake-Back Day will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., April 26 at the Fort Eustis Exchange at 1386 Lee Boulevard and the Langley Air Force Base Exchange at 51 Spaatz Drive.The Joint Base Langley-Eustis community can turn in expired, unwanted or unused pharmaceutical controlled substances and other medications to law enforcement officials for destruction. For more information, contact Walter Gaines at walter.m. gaines.civ@mail.mil or Sgt. 1st Class Sharonda Howell at sharonda.d.howell.mil@mail.mil.

The U.S. Army Medical Department Activity will sponsor an American Red Cross Blood Drive from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., May 7 at the U.S. Army Reserve Center at 1034 24th St. The event will provide the opportunity for Joint Base Langley-Eustis personnel to donate blood and support this critical cause. For more information, contact Capt. Vidhika Persaud at 314-7584 or vidhika.m.persaud.mil@mail.mil.

Army Community Service classes and workshops for April and May will include: ■ Baby and Me Play Group – 10 to 11 a.m. on Thursdays at 501 Madison Ave. ■ Civilian Professional Development – 1:30 to 3 p.m., May 15, Problem Solving Strategies and 9 to 10:30 a.m., May 19, Improving Personal Relationships. Registration is required. ■ Command Team Spouses Course – 9 a.m. to 3:45 p.m., May 13-14. Register by May 2 to receive free child care. ■ Credit Reporting, Scores and Debt Management – 9 to 10 a.m., May 20. ■ Developing Your Financial Plan – 9 to 10 a.m., May 27. ■ Effective Resume Writing – 9 a.m. to noon, May 16. ■ Federal Employment – 10 a.m. to noon, May 15. ■ Financial Readiness Training – 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., May 16. ■ Instructor Facilitator Training, Army Family Team Building – 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., May 27-30. Registration is required. ■ Installation Volunteer Orientation – 10 to 11 a.m., May 6. ■ Leadership Development, AFTB – 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., May 20-22. Registration is required. Call 878-3638 to register and sign up for free child care. ■ Managing Your Checking Account, Online Banking – 8:30 to 9:30 a.m., May 16. ■ Military Knowledge for Military Spouses, AFTB – 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., April 30-May 2. Registration is required. Call 878-3638 to register and sign up for free child care. ■ Play Mornings Play Group – 10 to 11:30 a.m. on Wednesdays at 1102 Pershing Ave. ■ Spouse Resilience Fair – 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., May 16 at the Balfour Beatty Community Center at 126 Madison Ave. Unless noted, classes and briefings will take place in Bldg. 650, Monroe Ave. For more information, call 8783638.

Change of Responsibility ceremony The 1st Battalion, 222nd Aviation Regiment will host a change of responsibility ceremony at 8 a.m., May 1 at Winners Field. Command Sgt. Maj. Estevan Sotorosado will relinquish responsibility to Sgt. Maj. Russell R. Merchant. RSVP by April 25 to Amber Evans at 878-2724 or amber.r.evans2.civ@mail.mil.

Certified lifeguard class An American Red Cross certified lifeguard class will be held from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., May 3, 4, 10 and 11 at the Aquatic Center. A mandatory pre-test will take place at 6 p.m., May 2.The cost is $175 for active-duty U.S. military members and $200 for all others. The fee includes instruction, a manual, CPR mask and certification. Applicants must be at least 15 years old to participate and must attend all classes to receive complete certification. Bring a lunch or snack to class each day. To register, call 878-1090 or 878-1091.

Education Center FAST classes The Herb Bateman Army Education Center is offering Functional Academic Skills Training classes at 1500 Madison Ave. The next class will be held from 8 a.m. to noon, Monday through Friday, May 5-23. A pre-diagnostic test is scheduled for 8:30 a.m., April 30. Students can visit the education center to register. For more information, call 878-2083, ext. 221.

Officer professional development The Hampton Roads Chapter of the Rocks, Inc. will sponsor an officer professional development briefing at 6 p.m., May 6 at the McDonald Army Health Center dining facility. The topics will be evaluations, counseling and letters of introduction. For more information, contact Maj. Riecharde Prenell at riecharde.t.prenell.mil@mail.mil or call (615) 974-0877.

Home buying and selling seminars The Fort Eustis Housing Referral Office will host a home buying seminar from 6 to 8:30 p.m., May 6 and a home selling seminar from 6 to 8:30 p.m., May 8. Both seminars will take place in the Civil Engineer Division conference room at 1407 Washington Blvd. Industry speakers will include a realtor, mortgage lender, attorney and home inspector. The seminars are open to active-duty U.S. military members, retirees, reservists, National Guard and their family members. To register, call 878-2977/5687/5579 at least three business days prior to attending the seminar of your choice.

America’s Armed Forces Kids Run The 12th annual America’s Armed Forces Kids Run will be held May 17 at Youth Services at 1102 Pershing Ave. The event is free and open to military dependent children ages five to 13. Online registration is available at http://www.americaskidsrun.org. Race day registration will begin at 8 a.m. and participants can pick up a bib andT-shirt during this time. For more information, contact Debbie McPherson at 8782662.

Pay Day Scramble The Pines Golf Course at Fort Eustis will be hosting a Pay Day Scramble tournament 1 p.m., shotgun start May 2. For more information contact Andy Weissinger at 878-2252.

Mother’s Day Brunch The Fort Eustis Club will be hosting a Mother’s Day Brunch, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., May 11. Reservations are required; contact Azeb Aweke to attend at 878-5700.

JBLE Retiree Appreciation Day The Joint Base Langley-Eustis Retiree Appreciation Day will take place from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., May 17 at the Fort Eustis Exchange mall. Participating agencies will include the Department of Veteran Services, Defense Finance and Accounting Service, Retiree Dental Association of the U.S. Army, American Association of Retired Persons and more. Other activities will include games, door prizes and a sidewalk sale. For more information, call 878-3220.

Range schedule Ranges, training areas and associated facilities are off limits to personnel not engaged in scheduled firing, operations or inspections unless clearance is obtained (in person) from the Range Control Fire Desk or a designated Range Control technician. The range operations schedule through April 30 is: ■ Friday and Saturday – No scheduled ranges ■ Sunday – POW Range 2, 3 (8 a.m. to 4 p.m.) ■ Monday – BTRACS, Range 1 (7 a.m. to 10 p.m.) ■ Tuesday – BTRACS, Range 1, POW Range 2, 3 (7 a.m. to 10 p.m.) ■ Wednesday – BTRACS, Range 1, 2 (7 a.m. to 10 p.m.) All personnel are required to check in and out with Range Control before going into or departing from any range or training area. For more information, contact the Range Control office at 878-4412, ext. 226 or 878-3834, ext 234.

SKIES programs The Fort Eustis School of Knowledge, Inspiration, Exploration and Skills offers the following instructional programs for children and youth. ■ Gymnastics – Class types and times vary; Mondays and Wednesdays; ages three to 18; Tuition is $35. ■ Taekwondo – 5:30 to 6:15 p.m. for beginners; 6:15 to 7 p.m. for advanced students; Tuesdays and Thursdays; ages six to 18; Tuition is $45. ■ Piano or Violin – Class times vary; Tuesday through Friday; ages five to18; Tuition is between $60 to $120. Classes will take place at the Youth Center at 1102 Pershing Ave. The programs are open to children of activeduty U.S. military members, retirees, Department of Defense civilians and contractors. To register or for more information, call 878-4025/5882 or visit www.eustismwr.com.


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The Peninsula Town Center will host its second annual Celebration of the Military Child from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., April 26 at Town Square. The event is free and open to the public and will feature children’s activities, military family resources, a carnival midway and live entertainment. The Peninsula Town Center is located at I-64 and Mercury Boulevard in Hampton. For more information, visit www.peninsulatowncenter. com.

Virginia Living Museum ■ Earth Day – Visitors can learn about ways to help the environment at the museum’s Earth Day celebration on April 26. The Goodson Living Green House and Conservation Garden will be open for tours.The museum will also be collecting gently used books, old sneakers, batteries and electronics equipment. Earth-friendly vendors will show and sell green wares and guests can enjoy free samples of hormone-free milk and sustainable seafood. Other activities will include crafts, displays and live animal shows. The Abbitt Planetarium will host a showing of Oasis in Space, a search for water on neighboring planets. The cost is $4 in addition to museum admission. ■ Spring Native Plant Sale – The community is invited to purchase plants for their gardens at the spring native plant sale scheduled for April 26-27. Admission is free and the event will take place rain or shine. All plants are nursery propagated. Hours are from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 26 and from noon to 4 p.m., April 27. The Virginia Living Museum is located at 524 J. Clyde Morris Boulevard in Newport News. Admission is $17 for adults, $13 for children ages three to 12 and free for members and children ages two and under. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. For more information, call 595-1900 or visit www.thevlm.org.

Garden Day inYorktown In celebration of Historic Garden Week, the Hampton Roads and Huntington garden clubs will host Garden Day in Yorktown. Guests can tour up to five private homes and gardens from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., April 30. Admission is $25 for block tickets in advance or $30 the day of the event. Single-site tours are $15 per person. Tickets are available at www.vagardenweek.org, and at the following locations in Yorktown: ■ Ken Matthews Garden Center, 4921 George Washington Memorial Highway ■ NancyThomas Gallery, 145 Ballard Street ■ The House Key, 7628 George Washington Memorial Highway Refreshments will be served from 1 to 3 p.m. at 105 Church Street and a plant sale is scheduled for 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the Yorktown Baptist Church parking lot. Other activities will include a Hardy Annuals lecture and botanical artist reception and print signing. Free parking will be available at the Riverwalk Landing parking terrace,York Hall, York-Poquoson Courthouse, County Administration building and other designated public parking lots.

For a complete listing of planned activities, visit www.vagardenweek.org.

YMCA Healthy Kids Day Healthy Kids Day is scheduled from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., April 26 at all peninsula YMCA locations. Visitors will receive a $25 voucher which can be used for YMCA programs including summer camp, swim lessons, youth and adult sports, personal training and more. A joining fee will not be charged to individuals who join the YMCA during this event. For more information, visit www.peninsulaymca.org.

Asian-American Heritage Month film festival In recognition of Asian-American Heritage Month, the Virginia War Museum will host a film festival at 1 p.m. in May, featuring the contributions of Asian-Americans in the military. The following movies are free with each day’s paid admission: ■ CitizenTanouye, May 3 – California’s Ted Tanouye was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions during World War II, while his family lived in a JapaneseAmerican camp. Decades later, eight students from his hometown of Torrance began researching his life, discovering both the glory of his sacrifice and the shame of his family’s treatment. ■ Hawaii to the Holocaust, May 10 –This is the story of the 522nd Field Artillery Battalion of the 100th/442nd Regimental Combat Team, a fighting force comprised of AsianAmerican soldiers who help liberate the Dachau concentration camp, and was a part of the most highly decorated unit of its size in U.S. history. ■ Most Honorable Son, May 24 – After the Pearl Harbor attack, Ben Kuroki volunteered for the U.S. Army Air Corps. He would become the first Japanese-American war hero, surviving 58 missions as an aerial gunner. Between tours of duty as the lone spokesman, he found himself at the center of controversy. ■ The Silent Glory, May 31 – During World War II, many young Japanese-Americans from internment camps volunteered to fight for the country that had turned its back on them. The 442nd Regimental Combat Team would go on to become one of the most decorated units in U.S. military history. Admission is $6 for adults, $5 for active-duty U.S. military and senior citizens ages 62 and older, $4 for children ages seven to 18 and free for children ages six and under. For more information, call 247-8523 or visit www.warmuseum.org.

Women Veterans Conference 2014 The “Still Serving America”: Women Veterans Conference will be held at the Hampton Roads Convention Center, 1610 Coliseum Drive, Hampton, 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. May 8. The convention will allow for women veterans to connect with national employers and non-profit organizations that provide valuable resources such as healthcare, education and career resources. Reserve a spot by register at, https://www.eventbrite.com/e/still-serving-americawomen-veteran-conference-2014-tickets-9223821699.


APRIL 25, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

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Peninsula Warrior April 25, 2014 Air Force Edition