Page 1

3HQLQVXOD

:DUULRU J O I N T January 24, 2014 Vol. 5, No. 3

B A S E

L A N G L E Y - E U S T I S

P u b l i s h e d i n t h e i n t e re s t o f p e r s o n n e l a t J o i n t B a s e L a n g l e y - E u s t i s

SAI, RecOn ‘shred’ slopes at Snowshoe

MOBILE APP

JBLE ‘in the palm of your hand’ — Page 2

RECREATION

Langley opens doors to Community Commons — Page 6

For more online content, check out www.JBLE.af.mil

$UP\ 1HZV

DEPLOYMENT 511th Dive Detachment deploys in support of OEF — Page 3

– Page 12

Air force EDITION

w w w. p e n i n s u l a w a r r i o r. c o m


2

www.peninsulawarrior.com

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

JANUARY 24, 2014


JANUARY 24, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

www.peninsulawarrior.com

3

SpecialEvents

511th Dive Detachment deploys in support of Operation Enduring Freedom By Staff Sgt. Ciara Wymbs 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Friends and families gathered to bid farewell to U.S. Army Soldiers assigned to the 511th Dive Detachment, Special Troops Battalion, 7th Sustainment Brigade, during a deployment ceremony at Fort Eustis Jan. 18. The Soldiers left for a deployment to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Their mission is to provide engineer dive support to theater commanders in the areas of ports, harbors, inland waterways and littoral zones, which are parts of bodies of water closest to the shore. The Soldiers will support a theater asset available to complete tasks ranging from hull inspections on U.S. Army, Navy and Coast Guard vessels to port openings, maintenance and salvage operations. The unit is prepared to perform multiple tasks that support waterborne operations. U.S. Army Lt. Col. Paul Kremer, 30th Engineer Battalion commander, spoke to new members of the team. “For some, this is your first deployment; follow your leaders and you will be fine,”

Photos by Staff Sgt. Ciara Wymbs

ABOVE: U.S.Army Staff Sgt. Peter Fountain, 511th Engineer Dive Detachment, kisses his wife and children goodbye during a deployment ceremony at Fort Eustis, Jan. 18. LEFT: U.S. Army Soldiers assigned to the 511th Engineer Dive Detachment stand in formation during the ceremony.

said Kremer. “Enjoy the dives in a new body of water. For the experienced leaders, remember to take care of your battle buddy so that you all cross the finish line as one

team.” Kremer ended the ceremony with a final message to the Soldiers of the 511th. “We go to bring home the trophy. That’s

what America expects. Do your mission [and] be professional,” said Kremer. “Make us proud. In the U.S. Army there is only one end state – and that is to win.”

/DQJOH\ KRVWV 0/. PHPRULDO FHUHPRQ\ By Airman 1st Class Areca T. Wilson 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Photo by Airman 1st Class Areca T. Wilson

Langley Air Force Base Honor Guard members post the colors during the Martin Luther King Jr. Day ceremony at Langley Air Force Base, Jan. 17.The event was held to celebrate King’s message of freedom and equality for all races.

The Langley African-American Heritage Council hosted a ceremony in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at the Langley Air Force Base theatre Jan. 17. Event attendees witnessed the reading of King’s “I Have a Dream” speech, a video presentation and guest speaker Edith White, Urban League of Hampton Roads president and chief executive officer. “It is important to celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day because it marks the major impact made by a significant activist in the African-American Civil Rights Movement,” said U.S. Air

Force Staff Sgt. Tanesha Allen, 439th Supply Chain Operations Squadron specials stock control supervisor. “Dr. King combated segregation and racial inequality without using violence.” King inspired Americans to accept their differences, which increased equality throughout the entire nation. This is especially important to military members, as diversity is promoted throughout all branches, said Allen. Tech. Sgt. Simone Stewart, 439th Supply Chain Operations Squadron Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance weapon systems manager, also agreed celebrating King’s life and sacrifices is valuable.

“Martin Luther King Jr. Day represents not only the life of a great man, but the spirit in which he lived that life and the life that he wanted not only for AfricanAmericans, but all people,” said Stewart. “His message of freedom, equality and nonviolent activism transcended more than one nation; Martin Luther King Jr. Day is also observed in other countries such as Japan and Canada. “ In addition to the ceremony, a luncheon will be held Feb. 28 to honor King, and other civil rights-era African Americans, as part of Black History Month, at the Bayview Commonwealth Center at Langley. SEE MLK PAGE 6


4

www.peninsulawarrior.com

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

JANUARY 24, 2014

HealthCare

UNLOCK OPPORTUNITY WITH A CYBERSECURITY DEGREE FROM UMUC

Prepare for a career in a fast-growing industry offering high-paying job opportunities. Get noticed with a bachelor’s or master’s degree in cybersecurity from University of Maryland University College (UMUC). Our innovative online educational programs; cutting-edge curriculum; and award-winning, globally ranked cyber competition team have helped make us a recognized leader in the field. At UMUC, you can • Take courses that address industry-standard certifications on the DoD 8570 list. • Earn credit for military service, industry certifications, and DANTES and CLEP exams. • Talk to advisors who understand military benefits.

Flu season: There is still time to get flu vaccinations By 1st Lt. Lauren Angelo 633RD AEROSPACE MEDICINE SQUADRON PUBLIC HEALTH OFFICE

Influenza is common during the months of January and February, and as late as May. Although most people who become infected with the virus recover without any complications, the flu can cause serious illness, and even death. According to the Virginia Department of Health, the current flu activity level in Virginia is widespread. This means there are outbreaks in at least half the regions of the state. “People who have the flu can spread it to others even if they don’t show symptoms,” said U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Rena Robinson, 633rd Aerospace Medicine Squadron noncommissioned officer of community health element. “Most healthy adults can infect others one day before symptoms develop and five to seven days after they appear. Young children and those with weakened immune systems may be contagious for longer periods of time.” In Virginia, influenza A, or H1N1, is the predominant strain circulating. This strain emerged in 2009 and continues to cause more illness in children and young adults compared to older counterparts. Members of the Joint Base Langley-Eustis community are best able to protect themselves with vaccinations through both the 633rd Medical Group at Langley and the

McDonald Army Health Center Immunization Clinic at Fort Eustis, who have ample vaccines on hand for all beneficiaries. “Vaccination is the best way to protect yourself,” said Robinson. “Also, everyday precautions, such as washing your hands frequently with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer and avoiding closecontact with sick people should be taken.” An annual vaccination through either the flu shot or the flu mist nasal spray is recommended for those ages 6 months or older. For children 6 months to 8 years of age, two doses are recommended the first year the vaccine is received. It is important to get vaccinated if you, someone you live with or someone you care for is at a high-risk for developing flu-related complications. Those susceptible include pregnant women, children under the age of five, adults over the age of 65 and with certain medical conditions such as asthma, diabetes or heart disease. “Vaccination reduces the spread of illness and protects you, your family and the community,” said Robinson. “Anyone can get sick from the flu, even otherwise healthy individuals.” For more information about the flu vaccine and its benefits, talk to your doctor or nurse, visit www.flu.gov or contact the Langley Immunization clinic at 764-6985, Public Health at 764-6731 or the McDonald Army Health Center Immunization Clinic at 878-7500.

• Continue your program wherever you go with online classes.

AT YOUR SERVICE SINCE 1947 Ì

Designated a National Center of Academic Excellence in Ì Information Assurance Education by the NSA and DHS

On-site classes offered this spring at Joint Base Langely Eustis and everywhere online Call 757-510-3787 or visit military.umuc.edu/jblecyber

According to theVirginia Department of Health, the current flu activity level inVirginia is widespread. Members of the Joint Base Langley-Eustis community are best able to protect themselves with vaccinations through both the 633rd Medical Group and the McDonald Army Health Center Immunization Clinic, who have ample vaccines on hand for all beneficiaries. Photo illustration by Airman 1st Class Areca T. Wilson


JANUARY 24, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

5

www.peninsulawarrior.com

JUST ANNOUNCED

THE TOYOTA MILITARY INCENTIVE IS NOW EXTENDED TO RETIREES OR VETERANS HONORABLY DISCHARGED WITHIN ONE YEAR OF SERVICE AND HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS OF ELIGIBLE QUALIFYING MILITARY PERSONNEL.

THANKS TO ALL THE BRAVE MEN AND WOMEN FOR YOUR SERVICE TO OUR COUNTRY.

1,000

$

NEW 2014 CAMRY

(excludes 2014.5 models and hybrids)

NEW 2013 RAV4

NEW 2014 COROLLA

LEASE AN LE FOR

199mo.

$

LEASE AN LE FOR

$

159mo.

24 mos. $2099 tax, registration, insurance and

due at 24 mos. $2099 signing tax, registration, insurance and

dealer fees are extra.

dealer fees are extra.

due at signing **

NEW 2013 PRIUS

LEASE AN LE FOR

189mo.

$

24 mos. $2999 tax, registration, insurance and

due at signing **

LIFTBACK

LEASE A PRIUS TWO FOR

199mo.

$

due at 24 mos. $2799 signing tax, registration, insurance and

dealer fees are extra.

**

dealer fees are extra.

U.S. Military

Incentive* CAN BE COMBINED WITH TOYOTA SPECIAL CASH BACK OR SPECIAL FINANCING OR SPECIAL LEASES!

Plus

PAY NO SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE WITH

Or choose from 10 vehicles with

0

% APR

NEW 2014 CAMRY, CAMRY HYBRID, VENZA, SIENNA, TUNDRA NEW 2013 PRIUS LIFTBACK, RAV4, AVALON, AVALON HYBRID, HIGHLANDER

CASEY TOYOTA

601 East Rochambeau Drive • Williamsburg 757-259-1000 • caseytoyota.com

CHARLES BARKER TOYOTA 1877 Laskin Road • Virginia Beach 757-437-4000 • charlesbarkertoyota.com

CHECKERED FLAG TOYOTA 5301 Virginia Beach Blvd. • Virginia Beach 757-490-1111 • checkeredflagtoyota.com

FIRST TEAM TOYOTA

3400 Western Branch Blvd. • Chesapeake 757-673-2345 • firstteamtoyota.com

GLOUCESTER TOYOTA 6357 George Washington Hwy. • Gloucester 804-693-2100 • gloucestertoyota.com

PEARSON TOYOTA

12978 Jefferson Ave. • Newport News 757-874-6000 • pearsontoyotascion.com

FINANCING

(excludes hybrids)

PRIORITY TOYOTA GREENBRIER 1800 Greenbrier Parkway • Chesapeake 757-366-5000 • prioritytoyota.com

RK TOYOTA

2301 W. Mercury Blvd. • Hampton 757-838-5000 • rktoyota.com

Smartphone users scan here for more incentive information. Go to gettag.mobi to download the free application. *HOW TO QUALIFY: 1.BE IN CURRENT ACTIVE DUTY STATUS IN THE U.S. MILITARY (NAVY, ARMY, AIR FORCE, MARINES, NATIONAL GUARD, COAST GUARD AND ACTIVE RESERVE) OR A U.S. MILITARY INACTIVE RESERVE (I.E., READY RESERVE) THAT IS PART OF THE INDIVIDUAL READY RESERVE, SELECTED RESERVE AND INACTIVE NATIONAL GUARD. RETIRED MILITARY PERSONNEL ARE NOT ELIGIBLE EXCEPT FOR RETIREES OR VETERANS HONORABLY DISCHARGED WITHIN ONE YEAR OF SERVICE AND HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS OF ELIGIBLE QUALIFYING MILITARY PERSONNEL. 2.PROVIDE VERIFIABLE PROOF OF MILITARY STATUS OR ACTIVE SERVICE AT THE TIME OF PURCHASE: LEAVE AND EARNING STATEMENT OR MILITARY IDENTIFICATION CARD. 3.RECEIVE A SALARY SUFFICIENT TO COVER ORDINARY LIVING EXPENSES AND PAYMENTS FOR YOUR TOYOTA. 4.RECEIVE CREDIT APPROVAL THROUGH A TOYOTA DEALER AND TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. INCENTIVE OFFERED BY TOYOTA MOTOR SALES, U.S.A., INC. ON LEASE CONTRACTS INCENTIVE MUST BE APPLIED TOWARD THE AMOUNT DUE AT LEASE SIGNING OR TOWARD THE CAPITALIZED COST REDUCTION. ON FINANCE CONTRACTS, INCENTIVE MUST BE APPLIED TOWARD THE DOWN PAYMENT. ONE INCENTIVE PER FINANCE OR LEASE TRANSACTION. NOT COMPATIBLE WITH THE TOYOTA COLLEGE GRADUATE INCENTIVE PROGRAM. FINANCE OR LEASE CONTRACT MUST BE DATED BY FEBRUARY 3, 2013 FOR INCENTIVE OFFER. THE MILITARY INCENTIVE PROGRAM IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE OR TERMINATION AT ANY TIME. OFFERS ON APPROVED CREDIT TO QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS THROUGH A PARTICIPATING TOYOTA DEALERSHIP AND TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. TERMS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS APPLY, INCLUDING A MAXIMUM TERM OF 60 MONTHS ON FINANCE CONTRACTS. PROGRAM IS AVAILABLE AT PARTICIPATING DEALERS IN MARYLAND, VIRGINIA, WEST VIRGINIA, PENNSYLVANIA, AND DELAWARE; AND MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE IN ALL STATES. NOT ALL APPLICANTS WILL QUALIFY. SEE PARTICIPATING DEALER FOR DETAILS. **ALL LEASE OFFERS CUSTOMER IS RESPONSIBLE FOR EXCESSIVE WEAR AND EXCESS MILEAGE CHARGES OF $.15 PER MILE IN EXCESS OF 24,000 MILES. YOUR PAYMENT MAY VARY BASED ON DEALER PARTICIPATION AND FINAL NEGOTIATED PRICE. NOT ALL CUSTOMERS WILL QUALIFY. TAX, REGISTRATION, INSURANCE, AND DEALER FEES ARE EXTRA. CAMRY DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $1900 DOWN (AFTER APPLICATION OF $950 TOYOTA LEASE CASH INCENTIVE FROM TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES), FIRST $199 PAYMENT, AND NO SECURITY DEPOSIT. 2014 CAMRY LE 4 CYLINDER AUTOMATIC MODEL 2532, MSRP $23,930. EXCLUDES 2014.5 MODELS. COROLLA DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $1940 DOWN FIRST $159 PAYMENT, AND NO SECURITY DEPOSIT. 2014 COROLLA LE 4 CYLINDER AUTOMATIC MODEL 1852, MSRP $19,110. RAV4 DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $2,810 DOWN, (AFTER APPLICATION OF $250 TOYOTA LEASE CASH INCENTIVE FROM TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES), FIRST $189 PAYMENT, AND NO SECURITY DEPOSIT. 2013 RAV4 2WD 4 CYLINDER AUTOMATIC MODEL 4430, MSRP $24,295. PRIUS LIFTBACK DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $2,600 DOWN, (AFTER APPLICATION OF $550 TOYOTA LEASE CASH INCENTIVE FROM TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES), FIRST $199 PAYMENT, AND NO SECURITY DEPOSIT. 2013 PRIUS LIFTBACK MODEL #1223, MSRP $24,995. ***TOYOTACARE COVERS NORMAL FACTORY SCHEDULED SERVICE. PLAN IS 2 YEARS OR 25K MILES, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. THE NEW VEHICLE CANNOT BE PART OF A RENTAL OR COMMERCIAL FLEET, OR A LIVERY/TAXI VEHICLE. SEE PARTICIPATING TOYOTA DEALER FOR PLAN DETAILS. VALID ONLY IN THE CONTINENTAL U.S. AND ALASKA. ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE DOES NOT INCLUDE PARTS AND FLUIDS. †ALL APR OFFERS: 0% APR FINANCING TERMS VARY BY MODEL. NOT ALL BUYERS WILL QUALIFY. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.OFFERS DO NOT INCLUDE DEALER FEES. OFFERS END 02/03/14.

**


6

www.peninsulawarrior.com

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

/DQJOH\ RSHQV WKH GRRUV WR LWV &RPPXQLW\ &RPPRQV

JANUARY 24, 2014

By Airman 1st Class Kimberly Nagle 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Hours of operation

The Langley Air Force Base Community Commons will hold a ribbon cutting ceremony, Friday Jan. 24, 2014 at 2:30 p.m., at Building 61. The new Community Commons, previously known as the Community Center, will provide a central location for recreational and leisure activities, including trips, events and a game room featuring billiard and table-tennis, for all base personnel. Adventure and fun is just a short walk away, at the new Community Commons, said James Murrell, Community Center and Information, Tickets and Travel director. U.S. Air Force Col. David Chisenhall, 633rd Mission Support Group commander, will be the key speaker for the ceremony. The commons staff will offer martial arts and recording studio demonstrations, and beverages will be provided by Force Support Squadron organizations. A video game competition will begin at 4 p.m., followed by a dance demonstration and competition the following day. “The Community Commons is a concept of one central location for several programs to benefit the Joint Base Langley-Eustis community,” said Murrell. “The commons will be a place for Airmen who work hard all day, to get out of ‘work mode’ and have some fun.” The new Community Commons will be home to the Airman’s Attic, Thrift Shop,

■ Community Commons and ITT: 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday - Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, closed on Sunday

U.S. Air Force Capt. Christopher Underwood II, 633rd Air Base Wing chaplain, performs the invocation during the Martin Luther King Jr. Day ceremony at Langley Air Force Base, Jan. 17.The holiday, which celebrates the sacrifices made by King, is observed on the third Monday of January each year. Photo by Airman 1st Class Areca T. Wilson

■ Heidi’s Cinderella Closet: By appointment only. To schedule an appointment, call 504-0746 or e-mail cinderellasclosetlaft@gmail.com ■ Airman’s Attic: Tuesday and Thursday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Nagle

The new Langley Community Commons at Langley Air Force Base is opening Friday at 2:30 p.m., and will provide a central location for recreational and leisure activities for all base personnel. The newly renovated building will feature the Airman’s Attic, Thrift Shop, Information,Tickets andTravel and Heidi’s Cinderella Closet.

Thrift Shop: Wed. and Fri. from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., and Saturdays, during Air National Guard drill weekends, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

ITT, and Heidi’s Cinderella Closet. In addition to the shops, the commons will continue to hold classes, including piano, guitar, and drum lessons. The 633rd MSG plans to add quilting, sewing, scrapbooking, photography and videography, and cooking and baking classes in the future. The Youth Center was renovated for the needs of the base, said Murrell. The commons will be able to host more squadron-based events, parties, and other possible occasions in the space of “The Virginian,” the old basketball court. For more information on the ceremony, contact the Community Commons at 764-2984.

Photos by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Nagle

At the new Community Commons at Langley Air Force Base, patrons can participate in recreational activities such as billiards and table-tennis (above), plus there are rooms dedicated to music (left), including piano, guitar and a recording station.

MLK FROM PAGE 3 “I hope, through these events, we are able to enlighten those among us of the importance of diversity, equality and nonviolence,” said Allen. While Stewart also hopes to educate others, she encourages Service members to remember the trials King endured as Service members work to defend America’s freedom. “I hope we are able to provide our military community with an awareness of who Dr. King was, what he stood for and to instill

an appreciation for his trials, his endurance, his dream, and ultimately his sacrifice,” said Stewart. “Never forget his dream as we all are faced with challenges, obstacles and roadblocks. We share the challenge of defending our great nation from the enemies who seek to destroy the freedoms Dr. King fought for.” Stewart also suggested King may serve as a beacon to Service members as they serve to protect the United States. “His resiliency, hope, dream and sacrifice should serve as an example for the men and women who serve our great nation.”


JANUARY 24, 2014

NOW OPEN in

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

www.peninsulawarrior.com

HAMPTON and on DENBIGH

Non-appointment, walk-in urgent care for routine injuries and illnesses. 365 days a year, 8 am to 10 pm. •

Staffed by physicians

X-rays, lab tests, and prescription drugs on-site

49 locations in the mid-Atlantic region

All major insurance plans accepted – your claims filed for you

Hampton 2304 West Mercury Blvd. (757) 951-1579

Denbigh 143

Je

173

ig nb

ve

De

nA

h

Bl

rso

vd

ffe 64

611 Denbigh Blvd. (757) 283-8300 – Dr. Scott Greenfield Board-Certified, American Board of Family Medicine In practice since 1983 With Patient First since 1983

npham1113post

7


8

www.peninsulawarrior.com

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

JANUARY 24, 2014

Medical commander reemphasizes continued support of healing process By Marlon J. Martin MCDONALD ARMY HEALTH CENTER

Courtesy photo

U.S. Army Maj. Gen. M. Ted Wong, U.S. Army Northern Regional Medical Command commander, met with Soldiers and leadership from Community BasedWarriorTransition Unit-Virginia during a visit toVirginia Beach, Jan. 16.Wong held an open-floor discussion to address any concerns of the Service members.

“One team, one fight. Even though you’re [part of the CBWTU], you’re still Soldiers.” — Maj. Gen. M. Ted Wong U.S. Army Northern Regional Medical Command commander

U.S. Army Maj. Gen. M. Ted Wong, U.S. Army Northern Regional Medical Command commander, addressed concerns of wounded, ill and injured Soldiers during a visit to Virginia Beach, Jan. 16. The open-floor discussion took place at Virginia Beach’s Law Enforcement Training Academy, where Wong met with Soldiers and leadership from Community Based Warrior Transition Unit-Virginia. Wong opened the floor for the Soldiers for more than an hour, allowing Service members an opportunity to address their concerns with officials and other senior leaders. Wong discussed the quality of care Soldiers are entitled to receive, challenges they may face during rehabilitation and each phase of support while emphasizing his commitment to supporting Soldiers. “Your mission is to heal and transition; our job is to help you with that process,” Wong said. “If we’re doing something wrong or doing something that doesn’t work for you, we want

“Your mission is to heal and transition; our job is to help you with that process. If we’re doing something wrong or doing something that doesn’t work for you, we want to know so we can fix the problem.” — Major Gen. M. Ted Wong U.S. Army Northern Regional Medical Command commander

to know so we can fix the problem. If we’re doing something right, we want to know that as well to keep programs in place and strive to make them better.” The general discussed various support programs that are available to assist the Soldiers while in the unit. Although he allowed the attendees to discuss issues with the program, he also reminded them of their duties as a Soldier. “One team, one fight,” Wong said. “Even though you’re [part of the CBWTU], you’re still

'R \RX ZDQW WR JHW SURPRWHG" %H DQ H[SHUW DW \RXU MRE ¿UVW Commentary by Master Sgt. Brian Potvin HEADQUARTERS, AIR COMBAT COMMAND

How many of us have heard our fellow Airmen say, "Want to get promoted? You've got to volunteer every weekend." Many think the only way to win a quarterly award is to volunteer, pursue education and spend time seeking the attention of leadership. I have heard so many times in my career how we've got to "fill the right squares" in order to get promoted. There may be some truth to this. For example, any senior non-commissioned officer will tell you that in order to be eligible for a coveted senior rater endorsement on your EPR, you need your Community College of the Air Force degree, and you must have completed your SNCO Academy course by correspondence. Without that endorsement, the chance of promotion past master sergeant is out of reach.

Airmen should be told the best way to truly separate themselves from their peers is to become the “go-to” in their work centers. When we senior enlisted personnel guide our junior Airmen, they should be told the best way to truly separate themselves from their peers is to become the "go-to" in their work centers. It seems we only tell Airmen seeking awards that we need three bullet statements for "base or community involvement" and "significant self-improvement", because that's usually the number of bullets you need for those categories in a quarterly award package. Let's also mentor them that before they think about how many events they can

volunteer for, they need to spend time learning how to be the very best at their jobs. Study AFIs and Training Orders intently. Ask seasoned Airmen to take you under their wings. If you don't know how to complete a specific task, find someone who does, and ask them to show you how to do it. Make yourself feel capable of tackling any job your superiors place before you. When the opportunity does present itself for you to volunteer, or to take an offduty education course during your duty day, ask yourself one question: ‘will your absence from your work center cause your fellow Airmen to pick up any slack?’ If so, you might want to consider prioritizing your tasks so your co-workers won't bear the brunt of the workload during your absence. Leaders, when deciding whether or not to allow one of your subordinates to take

time out of the duty day for a volunteer event, you should ask yourself if that Airman has demonstrated a dedication to his or her job first. If they don't give you 100 percent of their effort when they are at work, why would you allow them time away from their primary duty location? Finally, let me make it clear that I'm not saying volunteerism is unimportant; that's not true at all. As professional Airmen, we have a duty to serve our local communities as well as the Air Force. One of the ways we become the best Airmen we can be is to better ourselves through off-duty education and through selfless service to our communities. However, we can never lose sight of the fact that we are here to fulfill our responsibilities within our Air Force Specialty Code first. The Air Force needs Airmen who embody the “whole Airman” concept, but that begins with being the best Airmen and technicians they can be.


JANUARY 24, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

www.peninsulawarrior.com

9


10

www.peninsulawarrior.com

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

•

JANUARY 24, 2014

6PDUWHU URERWV OLNHO\ LQ $UP\ÂśV IXWXUH SODQQHUV VD\ By David Vergun ARMY NEWS SERVICE

Unmanned robots have already proven their worth on the battleďŹ eld by neutralizing improvised explosive devices, and more capable ones are coming in the future, according to U.S. Army Gen. Robert W. Cone, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command commander. While robots and unmanned platforms will continue to provide valuable assistance to Soldiers on the battleďŹ eld, there may even come a day when they can begin replacing Soldiers, Cone told reporters at Association of the United States Army’s Aviation Symposium, earlier this month. Cone’s remarks sparked further discussion at a Jan. 22 media roundtable, co-hosted by the College of William & Mary and TRADOC, held on the campus of W&M. Discussions focused on a range of other issues as well that came out of this month’s Strategic Trends Seminar, which looked at challenges and opportunities that will test the force in the coming years and decades. “The Army already has teamed Apache

Photo courtesy U.S. Army

Unmanned ground vehicles of different capabilities are displayed during the 2013 Association of the United States Army’s Aviation Symposium and Exposition in Washington, D.C.

helicopters and unmanned aircraft in Afghanistan, so there’s a potential to augment that capability, and in some cases, replace manpower,â€? said Maj. Gen. Bill Hix Army Capabilities Integration Center deputy director. Dismounted ground robots are already assisting Soldiers, much in the same way a dog provides extra eyes and ears and a keen sense of smell for a hunter, Hix said. “That additive capability that makes a Soldier that much more effective because the robot may carry additional munitions or logistics and even sensors that allow the Soldier to focus mission tasks and not deal with what’s sometimes called dirty, dumb, dangerous and repetitive tasks,â€? he said. There might even be convoys that are principally unmanned in the future, he continued. Convoys in Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan were often the target of attacks by insurgents using improvised explosive devices and small-arms ďŹ re. The integration of robotics into all of the capabilities the Army brings to the table was the focus of Soldiers, scientists and academia at the Strategic Trends Seminar, said Col. Chris Cross, Army Capabilities Integration Center Science and Technology chief. “It’s hard to conceive that we’ll ďŹ ght a ďŹ ght in 2035 without the integration of some type of unmanned combat platform,â€? he said, referring to the thoughts of scientists and academia at the seminar. Cross, who has a doctorate in nuclear physics, agreed with Hix regarding convoy duty for robots, adding that this capability could be added “fairly quicklyâ€? with tethered or untethered robots. Tethered robots are controlled by a wire and untethered is wireless controlled. Besides performing physical tasks that are “dumb and dirty,â€? Cross expects future robots will be able to assist Soldiers in decision-making processes. The science and technology community is looking at a range of options to provide to Army leaders for future planning purposes, he added. “We will ďŹ ght against robotic platforms in the future that are either autonomous or semi-autonomous,â€? he said. So it’s not just how robots will be integrated into the force, it’s also how the Army will deal with enemy robots.

Photo courtesy U.S. Army

Future robots will be even smarter and more capable, possibly replacing Soldiers, future planners say.

When it comes to the autonomous decision-making capability of robots, there was a great discussion at the seminar about the levels of responsibility, said Col. Kevin Felix, ARCIC Future Warfare Division chief. The technology is already here for robots, but there needs to be more discussion and consensus on the ethics of it, he said. That discussion will have to be done at the national level. Felix added adversaries won’t necessarily play by the same rules that we play by. Also, as more robotic systems are brought in, there are a host of considerations like procurement and sustainment costs, he said. Human enhancements – things that allow Soldiers to lift more and augment the senses – while not strictly robotic, are also on the horizon, Felix predicted.

Investing in science Despite the budget squeeze, the Army needs to continue to invest in science, technology, research and development so it’s better prepared for the next war, Hix said.

Hix believes holding the Strategic Trends Seminar on the campus of W&M with scientists and academia present was good for the Army because they offer a unique perspective. Additionally, it’s fortunate that TRADOC is located so close to the W&M campus in Williamsburg, Va., added Dr. Jim Golden, vice president, Strategic Initiatives, W&M. There’s a large area of intersection between research at the college and by Army planners, Golden said. W&M can offer the Army its analysis of topics like neuroscience, cultural and societal trends that might shape the environment 30 years out that the Army might want to take into consideration when planning, he said. Hix said TRADOC is also partnering with the intelligence community to determine where opponents are investing their money in robotics, electro-magnetic and cyber warfare and other capabilities. “It’s not inevitable that we’ll be overmatched by future adversaries,� he said, “But we don’t want to face that prospect.�


JANUARY 24, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force Beginning Jan. 24, U.S. Army and Air Force active duty Service members will be able to access their 2013 W-2 tax statements from the myPay website. National Guard and Reserve Service members currently have access to view or print theirW-2 forms.

•

11

www.peninsulawarrior.com

Governor’s Pointe 0RGHO 1RZ 2SHQ

2IIHULQJ  GLVWLQFWLYH Ă RRU SODQV ZLWK XQLTXH +HULWDJH %XQJDORZ &RDVWDO DQG (XURSHDQ DUFKLWHFWXUDO GHVLJQV

Photo by Airman First Class VictoriaTaylor

-%/( JHDUV XS IRU WD[ VHDVRQ By Staff Sgt. Jarad A. Denton 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Beginning Jan. 24, U.S. Army and Air Force active duty Service members will be able to access their 2013 W-2 tax statements from the myPay website. Also, National Guard and Reserve Service members currently have access to their W-2 forms. After the forms are printed, Joint Base Langley-Eustis Service members can take their tax documents either the Langley Air Force Base or Fort Eustis tax centers. The byappointment service offers free tax preparation for active duty, retirees and their dependents, open Feb. 3 to April 15, Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. For individuals looking to prepare their

taxes themselves, the IRS has published a newly-revised comprehensive tax guide now available on their ofďŹ cial website. Publication 17, Your Federal Income Tax, provides taxpayers with details on a wide range of tax-saving opportunities. It also features a rundown on tax changes for 2013, including information on revised tax rates and new limits on various tax beneďŹ ts. For more information on Publication 17, as well as updated versions of various tax forms, instructions and publications visit www.irs.gov. To make an appointment at the Langley tax center, contact 225-5777. To schedule an appointment at the Fort Eustis tax center, contact 878-2343. Appointments cannot be made until after Feb. 3 for both Langley and Fort Eustis.

• New Patients Welcome • Most Insurances Accepted • Taking Care of Our Military Families • Quality Care in a Comfortable Setting

%UXQVZLFN %HGURRPV  %DWKV  *DUDJHV 

&DOGZHOO %HGURRPV  %DWKV  *DUDJHV 

*UD\VRQ %HGURRPV  %DWKV  *DUDJHV 

%UDGHQWRQ %HGURRPV  %DWKV  *DUDJHV 

$W WKH KHDUW RI *RYHUQRU¡V 3RLQWH LV WKH  VTXDUH IRRW FRPPXQLW\ FHQWHU 'HVLJQHG WR HQFRXUDJH DFWLYLW\ DQG XVH E\ WKH UHVLGHQWV WKH *RYHUQRU¡V 3RLQWH QHLJKERUKRRG DOVR IHDWXUHV ERFFH DQG WHQQLV FRXUWV D SXWWLQJ JUHHQ D FKLOGUHQ¡V SOD\ DUHD DQG WZR SRROV 7KH RXWGRRU JDV JULOO DQG ÀUH SLW SURYLGH D SHUIHFW SODFH WR HQMR\ IULHQGV DQG IDPLO\ ZKLOH ZDWFKLQJ WKH VXQVHW RYHU WKH 1DQVHPRQG 5LYHU 7RXU RXU *RYHUQRU¡V 3RLQWH PRGHO WRGD\ RU YLVLW XV RQOLQH DW ZZZKKKXQWKRPHVFRP

Community Features:

Contact!

• • • • •

)UDQ 6SHQFH DQG .LP %R\NLQ 3KRQH  

Contemporary new home styles Durable hardie plank lap siding Distinct architectural themes Great selection of design upgrades Beautiful lakefront and lake view homesites

Model Hours! 2SHQ 'DLO\  ² SP

YORKSHIRE FAMILY DENTISTRY PC ROBERT W. GEORGE D.D.S. HEATH CASH, III D.D.S. ASHLEY W. LAMAY, D.D.S.

Actual homes as constructed may not contain the features and layouts depicted and may vary from photos, renderings and plans. Features and options may not be available on all plans or in all communities. Homes depicted may not represent the lowest-priced homes in the community and may be shown with upgraded landscaping and optional features. Prices shown may not include charges for options, upgrades and/or lot premiums. Floorplans, elevations, features, plans, amenities, speciďŹ cations and related information, and information concerning the pricing, incentives and availability of our homes, are subject to change without notice. Sales by Rose & Womble.

3212 HAMPTON HIGHWAY, STE A, YORKTOWN, VA 23693

757-867-9341 • www.yorkshiredentistry.com

HHHuntHomes.com


12

www.peninsulawarrior.com

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

•

JANUARY 24, 2014

JANUARY 24, 2014

6$, 5HF2Q ÂľVKUHGÂś VORSHV DW 6QQRZVKRH By Airman 1st Class Victoria H. Taylor 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Photos by Airman 1st Class Victoria H. Taylor

U.S. Service members participated in the third annual “Ski trip to Snowshoe Mountain,â€? Jan. 18 at Snowshoe Mountain Ski Resort in Snowshoe, W.Va.The Single Airmen Initiative partnered with the 633rd Force Support Squadron Outdoor Recreation to host nearly 50 Airmen and their families on its ďŹ rst trip of the year. Participants enjoyed skiing, snowboarding, snow tubing, off-road snowmobiling and resort restaurants. SAI provides programs to meet the needs and interests of single Service members through leisure activities, including go-carting, bowling and other recreational trips.

Even with temperatures below freezing, U.S. Air Force Airmen from Langley Air Force Base indulged in the fresh air while hitting the slopes during the third annual “Ski Trip to Snowshoe Mountain,� Jan. 18-20 in Snowshoe, W.Va. Single Airmen Initiative provides programs to meet the needs and interests of single Service members through leisure activities, including gocarting, bowling and other recreation trips. “I see Service members working hard every single day at Joint Base Langley-Eustis,� said James Murrell, Langley Community Programs director. “The trips and events that SAI offers give Airmen and Soldiers a chance to play hard too.� Nearly 50 Airmen and their families attended the trip which was hosted by the SAI and 633rd Force Support Squadron and also introduced the Family RecOn Program. The program is an Air Force initiative similar to the SAI, which is designed to address the challenges faced by Service members reintegrating into regular social net-

“I jump at the opportunity to get out of the dorms without spending a lot of money. It was a chance to do something I love, while meeting people that I wouldn’t have normally met outside of the ofďŹ ce.â€? — Airman 1st Class Ryan Leonard 633rd Logistics Readiness Squadron vehicle maintainer

works, family life and local communities after returning home from deployments. “[The trip] was a great opportunity to implement both programs and bring more Service members to enjoy the event,� said Murrell. “The expenses of skiing and snowboarding can deter a lot Service members from [enjoying] the sport, but this is our chance to pick up a part of the bill.�

Participants eenjoyed skiing, snowboarding, snow tubing, offf-road snowmobiling and resort restaurants. The resort also offered group or private lessons so b beginners could get a feel for the sport. For Airman 1sst Class Ryan Leonard, 633rd Logistics Readinesss Squadron vehicle maintainer, the trip to Snowshoee Mountain was one to remember. “I jump at th he opportunity to get out of the dorms without spending a lot of money,â€? said Leonard. “It wass a chance to do something I love, while meeting people p that I wouldn’t have normally met outsid de of the ofďŹ ce.â€? The SAI and RecOn R have a calendar full of activities for the year, r, including the SAI camping trip, vacation to Myrttle Beach, the Singles and Strikes bowling league and a many others in the making. “I look forwarrd to this trip every season,â€? said Murrell. “It was a great way to start the new year, but there is much h more to come through SAI and RecOn in 2014.â€? For more in nformation on upcoming trips through SAI or RecOn, R contact Langley Information, Tickets and Tours at 764-7176.

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

•

www.peninsulawarrior.com

13


14

www.peninsulawarrior.com

23(1 +286( 681 -$1 

   SP GDLO\ WRXUV XSRQ UHTXHVW

)8//< $&&5(',7(' &  3UH.  \U  WK *UDGH Â&#x2021;%UDQG 1HZ :DWHUIURQW 1(: &ODVVURRP /LYLQJ 6KRUHOLQH Â&#x2021;0DULQH 6FLHQFH 67(0 &XUULFXOXP (15,&+0(17 352*5$06 0DULQH 6FLHQFH$UW 0XVLF'UDPD 6SDQLVK 3( 7HFKQRORJ\

), F& OaddYj\ 9n]&$ @Yehlgf$ N9 *+..+

6WURQJ &DWKROLF ,GHQWLW\:HOFRPLQJ $OO )DLWKV 7HVW 6FRUHV $ERYH 1DWLRQDO $YHUDJH Â&#x2021; )LQDQFLDO $VVLVWDQFH &RXUVHV IRU +LJK 6FKRRO &UHGLW Â&#x2021; ([WUDFXUULFXODU $FWLYLWLHV 6SRUWV Â&#x2021; %HIRUH $IWHU 6FKRRO &DUH

/-/%/*+%.+-0

ooo&kYafleYjqklYjg^l`]k]Y&[ge

WATTS FAMILY DENTISTRY ~ Caring Dentistry with An Artist's Touch ~

Dr. Jasper N. Watts â&#x20AC;˘ Dr. Kenneth Boyd Dr. Adam Lane â&#x20AC;˘ Dr. Elias Llerandi Dr. Katherine Petersen â&#x20AC;˘ Dr. Jorge Pelaez

WELCOME MILITARY! We accept ALL Military Insurance

â&#x20AC;˘ EVENING HOURS & SATURDAY HOURS â&#x20AC;˘ INVISALIGN AND BLEACHING OFFERED

907 Big Bethel Road â&#x20AC;˘ Hampton, VA 23666

(757) 838-5999 â&#x20AC;˘ www.wattsdentistry.com

â&#x20AC;˘ The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

â&#x20AC;˘

JANUARY 24, 2014

POL Airmen â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;pump lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; into Langleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission By Senior Airman Teresa Aber 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I get a sense of pride every time I hear an F-22 ďŹ&#x201A;y by,â&#x20AC;? said U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Jeremiah Garfoyle, 633rd Logistics Readiness Squadron petroleum, oils and lubricants distribution operator. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know I played a part in getting that aircraft in the air.â&#x20AC;? The 633rd LRS POL ďŹ&#x201A;ight supplies fuel to 1st Fighter Wing aircraft and all aircraft and vehicles in support of the overall ďŹ&#x201A;ying mission at Langley Air Force Base. Approximately 70 POL Airmen supply more than 8.5 million gallons of fuel to more than 40 aircraft each year. Additionally, they provide fueling services to all government-operated vehicles, generators and service stations around base. Before use, fuel requires testing and analysis to ensure the best product for Langleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vehicles and aircraft. Lab specialists check fuel samples for contaminants using several testing methods. If a sample is contaminated, it is placed into a separate storage labeled â&#x20AC;&#x153;waste fuelâ&#x20AC;? and discarded according to local environmental regulations. If the sample shows no contamination, the fuel is pumped into a truck and sent to fuel

equipment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important to make sure the fuel is free of water and any contamination that can damage the engine of the vehicle or aircraft it is pumped into,â&#x20AC;? said Chief Master Sgt. Steven George, 633rd LRS fuels management ďŹ&#x201A;ight chief. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Accountability and quality control of fuel are the most important parts of our mission.â&#x20AC;? To ensure fuel is of the highest caliber for the safety of all of their customers on base, the unit is divided into six sections that work together to make sure the mission is completed effectively and efďŹ ciently. The sections include laboratory, distribution, control center, training and support, refueling maintenance and materiel divisions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I always [tell] my Airmen that POL is not the most glamorous job in the Air force, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of the most important jobs,â&#x20AC;? said George. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t supply the fuel, the planes are not going anywhere.â&#x20AC;? POL Airmen ensure the mission is ready at all times by maintaining their own equipment and ensuring it is operates properly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We directly support the mission and maintain the capability to respond immediately,â&#x20AC;? said Staff Sgt. Sean Smith, 633rd LRS POL service center technician. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If something should hap-

Photo by Senior Airman Teresa Aber

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. David Rinck, 633rd Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels distribution operator, carries a line from a Hydrant Mobile Refueler for a â&#x20AC;&#x153;hot refuelâ&#x20AC;? operation at Langley Air Force Base, Dec. 13, 2013. During â&#x20AC;&#x153;hot refueling,â&#x20AC;? Airmen refuel a jet while it is still running, allowing it to get airborne quickly.

pen that we werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expecting, as long as we work together, we can handle it -- no matter what.â&#x20AC;? With the various divisions working together to provide clean and high-quality fuel, the skilled Airmen of the POL team do their part every day to ensure every Airman in the pilotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s or driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seat can perform his or her mission safely. U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. David Rinck, 633rd Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels distribution operator, connects hoses from a Hydrant Mobile Refueler to the underground hydrant system and operates an R-11 fuel truck for a â&#x20AC;&#x153;hot refuelâ&#x20AC;? operation at Langley Air Force Base, Dec. 13, 2013.The underground hydrant system allows fuel to be easily transported to the ďŹ&#x201A;ightline. A threemile-long underground hydrant system allows fuel to ďŹ&#x201A;ow directly to the ďŹ&#x201A;ight line for an expedited operation.

'4+175.;W ;174' 016 )1+0) 61 75' +6 #)#+0T +8' ;174 1.& %'.. 2*10' # 0'9 .+('i4'%;%.' +6T

            

Photos by Senior Airman Teresa Aber


JANUARY 24, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

www.peninsulawarrior.com

µ%HORZ WKH =RQH¶ SURJUDP SURPRWHV H[HPSODU\ $LUPHQ By Senior Airman Teresa Aber 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Most U.S. Air Force Airmen hear about the possibility of being promoted to senior airman “Below the Zone” when they go through basic military training. BTZ is a competitive early promotion program offered to those in the rank of airman first class who stand out from their peers and perform duties at a level above their current rank. Selection opportunity is 15 percent of the total time-in-grade and time-in-service eligible Airmen. Those selected are promoted to senior airman effective six months prior to the fixed fully-qualified phase point. “Earning BTZ comes from dedication beginning in basic training, and sustaining the standard of excellence through your technical training schools and at your duty station,” said Chief Master Sgt. Trae King, 633rd Air Base Wing command chief master sergeant. “In today’s Air Force, we are deliberately developing leaders, which gives us the opportunity to identify those who set themselves apart.” For Airmen who strive for success early in their careers, achieving BTZ is an important goal, allowing them a chance to excel. “[The program] gives leaders an opportunity to recognize those Airmen who go above and beyond,” said King. “When you make BTZ, you’re almost a noncommissioned officer so there are more responsibilities and opportunities available.” To be eligible for BTZ, Airmen in the rank of airmen first class must have 36 months TIS and 20 months TIG, or 28 months TIG, whichever occurs first, and be recommended by their commander. King said Airmen who make BTZ do more than concentrate on excelling in their career field. Airmen like Senior Airman Daniel Ramos, 633rd Logistics Readiness Squadron vehicle fleet manager, push themselves in other areas, including community involvement, professional development and education. “Making BTZ is about being a well-

“In today’s Air Force, we are deliberately developing leaders, which gives us the opportunity to identify those who set themselves apart.” — Chief Master Sgt. Trae King 633rd Air Base Wing command chief

rounded Airman,” said Ramos. “You have to find what is important to you and make those things priority. For me, it was being the best I could be at my job, my volunteer work and going to school.” Another important consideration for BTZ, depending on the time of year an Airman is eligible, if selected, they may get the chance to test for promotion to become an NCO early. “I was originally supposed to be promoted to senior airman May 2013, which means I would have had to wait until 2014 to test for staff sergeant,” said Ramos. “Because I made BTZ, I ‘sewed on’ senior airman six months early, so I was able to meet the TIG requirement to test in 2013.” For Ramos, the promotion served as motivation to continue pursuing excellence when it came time to test for promotion. “It gave me a boost of confidence,” said Ramos. “I knew that I had proven myself in my unit, but I couldn’t stop there, so I pushed myself harder to study and I made staff sergeant the first time I tested.” Making BTZ may serve as inspiration and motivation for Airmen to continue to seek leadership opportunities. However, King said those Airmen who are not nominated for BTZ, and those who are nominated, but don’t make it, should not consider it a negative impact to their career. “I never made BTZ, but I used it to push myself harder to reach my goals,” said King. “You still have to pursue excellence. The race isn’t given to the swift; it’s given to the one who endures to the end.”

To be eligible for a “Below the Zone” promotion, Airmen in the rank of airmen first class must have 36 months time in service and 20 months time in grade, or 28 months TIG, whichever occurs first, and be recommended by the commander.

CareerConnection presents...

NewYear NewCareer 2014 CAREER FAIR

This career fair will enable you to meet face to face with recruiters and hiring managers from real companies with real opportunities, all in one spot!

Wednesday, January 29th 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Constant Convocation Center 4320 Hampton Boulevard, Norfolk, VA This event is FREE TO JOB SEEKERS! Dress professionally and bring plenty of rèsumès. PARTICIPATING EMPLOYERS

DAILY IN THE VIRGINIAN-PILOT AND AT HAMPTONROADS.COM

15


16

www.peninsulawarrior.com

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

JANUARY 24, 2014

Premier transitioning now available to Soldiers, but command support required By David Vergun ARMY NEWS SERVICE

U.S. Army Soldiers now have the military’s best career transition program, which the Army began re-engineering about three years ago, said the program’s director. “The re-engineering was the result of a pretty detailed analysis and a lot of surveys, interviews and discussions with Soldiers,” said Walter Herd, Army Career and Alumni Program director. The program helps Soldiers with their transition from military to civilian life. Herd said discussions led to three important take-away messages. First, it was found that those Soldiers who had the most successful transitions were the ones who started the transition process early and spread that process out over time, touching bases with relevant experts along the way. “So the earlier you begin and the more you engage, the more successful you are,” he said. “It’s that simple.” Second, ACAP found that commanders need to be supportive of their Soldiers’ transition processes, become more involved and understand where their Soldiers are in the process. “We found when commanders do that and know what their Soldiers are doing, Soldiers are more successful,” he said. It might seem common sense that leaders would support that, but it isn’t always the case, he said. The most common comment on surveys was “this is a great program, but my first sergeant won’t let me go,” Herd said. Leaders are becoming more and more aware of that but the message still needs to be reinforced, he emphasized. Third, Soldiers need to meet career readiness standards and commanders need to track progress on Soldiers attaining those standards well before their transition date, he said. Those standards include: Department of Veterans Affairs benefits counseling; Army

It was found that those Soldiers who had the most successful transitions were the ones who started the transition process early and spread that process out over time, touching bases with relevant experts along the way pre-separation counseling; Department of Labor workshop attendance; a 12-month, post-transition budget plan; continuum of military service opportunity counseling – for active duty only; a military occupational specialty analysis of skill-sets applicable to civilian jobs; individual assessment tool to determine proficiencies; individual transition planning with a counselor; creation of a job application package, including completed resumes for targeted employment, reference lists, and two job applications or job offer letters; and follow-on activity with the Department of Labor, the VA and if applicable, the Small Business Administration.

ACAP’s roots Until about two years ago, ACAP was a voluntary and staff-coordinated effort. Commanders didn’t have visibility over how their Soldiers were doing in getting ready for leaving the Army. About that time, Congress passed the VOW to Hire Heroes Act of 2011, designed to address some of the challenges of veteran unemployment.

Photo courtesy ACAP

Additional counselors are also at the Army's virtual Army Career and Alumni Program center. Soldiers can log on at www.acap.army.mil, or call toll-free 1-800-325-4715 to chat with a master's degree-level counselor 24/7.

At the same time, the president directed the Office of the Secretary of Defense to add policy mandates to the VOW Act. Significant resources have been allocated to increasing size and number of brick and mortar ACAP centers, now found on all major installations and most others. The number of ACAP counselors has tripled over the last couple of years, totally about 700 counselors at about 75 locations on installations, including centers used by the Guard and Reserve. “Their sole task is to help Soldiers reach their career-readiness standards,” Herd said. Additional counselors are also at the Army’s virtual ACAP center. Soldiers can log on to it at www.acap.army.mil or call tollfree 1-800-325-4715 to chat with a master’s degree-level counselor 24/7. Every month about 2,000 Soldiers log into the virtual ACAP center to work on their individualized transition plans. More

“Over the next six or eight months, we’re going to spread that planning across the entire Soldier lifecycle, beginning at Basic Training level and at key points in their careers.” — Walter Herd Army Career and Alumni Program director

Soldiers are visiting the site every month. No other service has a similar virtual transition assistance website, Herd said. Herd encourages Soldiers to both visit the ACAP center on post as well as use the virtual ACAP center online.

Future goals Today, Soldiers still do most of their transition work during the 12 to 24 months before separation, he said. “Over the next six or eight months, we’re going to spread that planning across the entire Soldier lifecycle, beginning at Basic Training level and at key points in their careers.” For example, a Soldier doing 20 years, might do a resume and budget at the eight and 12 year time, he said. That would let those career Soldiers know where they stand in relation to military-to-civilian job skill sets and would also better enable them to assist and counsel their own younger Soldiers, having gone through the process themselves, he said. Another step the Army is taking is to codify the transition process in a campaign plan and in an Army regulation that should be published within about a year. Herd concluded that while ACAP is important for Soldiers, it is equally important they do it for their families. Spouses are encouraged to attend the workshops available to their Soldiers, he said.

Visit the Peninsula Warrior online at www.jble.af.mil


JANUARY 24, 2014

â&#x20AC;˘ The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

â&#x20AC;˘

17

www.peninsulawarrior.com

$LU )RUFH XQLIRUP SROLF\ XSGDWH

BUY ONE, GET ONE

:HOFRPH EDFN PRUDOH WVKLUWV EDGJHV DQG FRORUIXO DWKOHWLF VKRHV The U.S. Air Force updated the policy governing uniform wear Jan. 17, with a goal of lessening ďŹ nancial burdens to Airmen. Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark. A. Welsh III approved several updates to Air Force Instruction 36-2903, Air Force Dress and Appearance, with many of the ideas for changes coming directly from Airmen. During the past year, Welsh prompted Airmen to make their voice heard through the Every Dollar Counts campaign, held last spring, and suggestions made directly to him during base visits or comments to the uniform survey board. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The policy changes revolve around three areas,â&#x20AC;? said Col. Patrick Doherty, Director of Air Force Services who has oversight of the uniforms and awards and recognition branch. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The ďŹ rst area of policy changes is focused on heritage, team building, esprit de corps and unit pride. The second is recognizing and valuing Airmenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s experiences, qualiďŹ cations and job performance, allowing Airmen to wear what they have earned. The last area is a group of common sense approach inputs from Airmen in the ďŹ eld that senior leaders thought were great ideas.â&#x20AC;? There are dozens of updates to the AFI, including the following: Morale T-shirts and patches representing individual squadrons worn in the past to increase unit pride are now authorized to wear on Fridays. Squadron color T-shirts may be worn with the ABU or ďŹ&#x201A;ight suit when in-garrison or on-station during unit temporary duty assignments and contingency deployments. Shirts must be one color throughout the squadron, and may have only a small squadron patch over the left chest. Wing commanders can authorize personnel from different units to wear the same color T-shirts to facilitate esprit de corps and team building. For example, maintainers, life support personnel and ďŹ&#x201A;ight doctors are allowed to wear the color T-shirt of the ďŹ&#x201A;ying squadron they support. Also, in-garrison Friday wear of morale patches and nametags that have tasteful nicknames or call signs on ďŹ&#x201A;ight suits is authorized. Unit commanders have

d wne

&

Sub or Italian Dinner

ly O

By Staff Sgt. David Salanitri AIR FORCE PUBLIC AFFAIRS AGENCY

1/2 OFF

!

ated

r Ope

ami ng F

DINE IN OR TAKE OUT

di

The Air Force physical training uniform no longer has color restrictions for athletic shoes.

n Fou

RUSSO VILLAGE SHOPPING CENTER 2845 North Armistead Ave. â&#x20AC;˘ Hampton, VA 23666

757-766-1068 (Outside Langley Air Force Base, West Gate)

approval authority for morale patches and nametag naming conventions. Earned Air Force and other servicesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; badges are authorized to wear, but only the command insignia pin is mandatory. This reverses a previous decision to prohibit wear of qualiďŹ cation badges and various patches on ABUs to eliminate the need to remove and replace badges for deployment or permanent change of duty station moves. In recent years, Airmen who deployed to Afghanistan wore the Operation Enduring Freedom CamouďŹ&#x201A;age Pattern. The OCP is ďŹ&#x201A;ame retardant, treated with insect repellant and also used by the U.S. Army. Following this evolution, the ABU has become primarily an in-garrison uniform, according to Air Force senior leaders. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The increased wear of the ABU in-garrison, coupled with Airmenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s long-term desires to wear the qualiďŹ cation badges and the command insignia they have earned, makes authorized wear on the ABU a logical step,â&#x20AC;? said Lt. Gen. Sam Cox, Air Force deputy chief of staff for manpower, personnel and services. A list and examples of all newly authorized badges for wear on the ABU is located in attachment ďŹ ve of AFI 36-2903. Also, the Air Force physical training uniform no longer has color restrictions for athletic shoes. Airmen are now also authorized to wear black socks with their athletic shoes. Cell phone cases no longer have to be black, as long as theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not worn on the uniform or attached to a purse. Changes came directly from the ďŹ eld and major commands, said Cox. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The changes are the result of months of the chief of staff listening to what Airmen had to say about ABUs and other uniform wear policies,â&#x20AC;? Cox said. Airmen can expect to ďŹ nd the optional badges on the AAFES website by mid-July to early August. The commanderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s insignia pin will be mandatory once cloth pins go on sale at AAFES.

www.annasva.com Not valid with any other offers. Must present coupon. Expires 1/31/14.

midasnorfolk.com

ª:H KDYH WHFKQLFLDQV HYHQ Q KDQGLHU WKDQ PH $QG ,­P  KDQG Save on brakes, tires, maintenance and total car care.

ANY SERVICES WITH MILITARY I.D.

Save on oil changes

OIL CHANGE PLUS

19

$

99

INCLUDES FREE TIRE ROTATION

â&#x20AC;˘ Oil and filter change â&#x20AC;˘ Courtesy Check including visual brake check, battery, air filter, fluid, belts, and hoses

OFF

â&#x20AC;˘ 4 wheel tire rotation â&#x20AC;˘ Brakes â&#x20AC;˘ Exhaust

Most vehicles. Up to 5 quarts of conventional oil. High mileage, synthetic, synthetic blend oils extra. Up to 10% shop fee where permitted based on non-discounted retail price, not to exceed $35.00. Plus applicable tax. Tire rotation at time of service. No cash value. Not valid with other offers. At participating Midas locations, with coupon. Expires: 04-30-14

10% â&#x20AC;˘ Suspension â&#x20AC;˘ Wheel Alignments

â&#x20AC;˘ Belts â&#x20AC;˘ Hoses

â&#x20AC;˘ Headlamps â&#x20AC;˘ Bulbs and More!

Discount off regular price of least expensive service. Consumer pays all tax. Most vehicles. Cash value 1/100th of 1¢. Coupon required at time of purchase. Not valid with other offers. Valid at participating location(s) listed below. Void if sold, copied or transferred and where prohibited by law. Expires: 04-30-14

*OC905USOTH*

*BD913USOTH*

Save on brakes

SECURE STOP BRAKE SERVICE

99

$

99

HAMPTON 2801 MERCURY BLVD. WEST 757-826-0222

â&#x20AC;˘ Lifetime guaranteed brake pads or shoes installed

NEWPORT NEWS 14798 WARWICK BLVD. 757-874-8133

â&#x20AC;˘ Comprehensive brake system evaluatio

PER AXLE. MOST VEHICLES. Reconditioning rotors, additional parts and labor extra. Up to 10% shop fee where permitted based on non-discounted retail price, not to exceed $35.00. Lifetime guarantee valid for as long as you own your car. See manager for limited guarantee terms. Plus applicable tax. No cash value. Not valid with other offers or brake warranty redemptions. At participating Midas locations, with coupon.Expires: 04-30-14

*BK331DOOTH* We employ

technicians

VIRGINIA BEACH 2597 VIRGINIA BEACH BLVD. 757-340-0366 VIRGINIA BEACH 3696 HOLLAND RD. 757-498-9898

6 MONTHS SPECIAL FINANCING CA RD

FIND WHAT YOUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE E LOOKING FOR IN THE CLASSIFIEDS.

Available at participating shops with approved credit. Minimum monthly payment required. See manager for details


18

www.peninsulawarrior.com

HEALTHY TEETH

For a Lifetime

• Providing Dental Care For Your Entire Family • Military Insurance Provider • New Patients & Emergencies Welcome JEFFREY P. BOOTH, DDS • Provider of ClearCorrect Clear 757-827-0001 Braces for ALL Ages. 2212 Executive Drive – Suite A | Hampton, VA

HARRY H. HEYSON III Attorney At Law

from $ Divorce, Uncontested ................ 175 Separation Agreement ................ $75

★Fault and Contested Divorces ★Custody Hearings Mariner Bldg., Suite 103 12388 Warwick Blvd., N.N

FREE INITIAL CONSULTATION

595-1155

“off the hook”

You may not understand everything kids say.

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

JANUARY 24, 2014

:RUNLQJ WRJHWKHU 6HFXULW\ )RUFHV SDUWQHUV ZLWK ORFDO SROLFH GHSDUWPHQWV By Staff Sgt. Wesley Farnsworth 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

The 633rd Security Forces Squadron and the city of Hampton Police Department work together to help ensure safety of the citizens living and working around Langley Air Force Base and the city of Hampton. Members of the 633rd SFS work with local police departments to ensure proper support and training is foremost when a need arises for them to work together. “It’s proven time and time again that you respond how you train,” said Sergeant Jason Price, Hampton Police Department public information officer. “By training together, we [learn] how each other works so when something happens, we are a well-oiled machine.” Some recent training exercises included a simulated F-22 crash inside the Hampton city limits, as well as an active shooter exercise at Langley. In addition to major training exercises, the two departments are able to help each other attain training and certifications needed to perform their jobs. “The [Hampton police] are able to help train and certify our personnel on things like the Virginia International Criminal Network and

“It’s proven time and time again that you respond how you train. By training together, we [learn] how each other works so when something happens, we are a well-oiled machine.” — Sergeant Jason Price Hampton Police Department public information officer the Intox (breathalyzer) system which both require a state certification,” said U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Shannon Richardson, 633rd SFS police services patrolman. Price agreed with Richardson’s sentiments saying that the training is a two-way street. “Not only are we able to help with training, but Langley returns the favor with training and exercises for large scale operations like terrorism drills that may otherwise outreach what our normal capabilities are,” said Price. The joint-training ensures cooperation and camaraderie between the 633rd SFS and Hampton Police.

“We are able to [get to know] the people working on base,” Price said. “We know exactly who we need to call when we need support and what to expect when [that] call [is placed]; which in a real-world situation will make a big difference.” According to Price and Richardson, there have been times when Hampton and 633rd SFS have put the training and working relationship to use. “There was a time when we had to call on the [military working dogs] to help us sweep a local high-school after a credible bomb threat,” said Price. “Having that relationship with the unit allowed us to sweep the school at an accelerated pace allowing the students return to class in a timely manner.” Without the support of local police departments, some tasks would seem almost impossible, said Richardson. “When we have an Airshow or a security incident at the gate, Hampton is always quick to respond and help us where we need it,” Richardson said. “They are able to control traffic and perform security measures until additional help arrives.” At the end of the day, when the training is complete and calls have been answered, all agree the goal of the two departments is to ensure the security of citizens who live and work around Langley.

But that’s ok. You don’t have to be perfect to be a perfect parent. Because kids in foster care don’t need perfection. They need you. AdoptUsKids.org

SPECIALISTS IN ORTHODONTICS

Braces For Adults and Children

• Thomas W. Butterfoss, D.M.D., P.C. • Diplomate, American Board of Orthodontics

• Jennifer L. Butterfoss Barton, D.D.S., M.S. • New Patients Welcome Major Insurance Accepted • Invisalign Provider 3 LOCATIONS: • 2111 Hartford Rd., Hampton 838-3400 • 6882-A Main Street, Gloucester 804-695-2575 • 4310 George Washington Memorial Hwy, Grafton 898-5448 www.drbutterfoss.com

MENTION THIS PUBLICATION FOR COMPLIMENTARY EXAM

Graphic by Staff Sgt. Wesley Farnsworth


JANUARY 24, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

www.peninsulawarrior.com

19

5HFUXLWLQJ IRUFH UHPDLQV ¿UP GHVSLWH VKULQNLQJ JRDOV By C. Todd Lopez ARMY NEWS SERVICE

As U.S. military budgets decline, the U.S. forces prepare to pull out of Afghanistan and the U.S. Army is drawing down its force. The Army must still recruit new Soldiers every year, and less money means it may be harder to put young Americans into uniform. Maj. Gen. Thomas Seamands, the Army’s director of Military Personnel Management, discussed those challenges with members of the House Armed Services Committee, subcommittee on Military Personnel, Jan. 16. “Our Army is now made up of the highest quality, best trained, most experienced, and highest-skilled Soldiers ever,” Seamands said. “Our ability to meet the challenges of the current and future operational environment depends on our ability to recruit great citizens and retain great Soldiers.” The general told lawmakers despite challenges of the ongoing conflict in Afghanistan, drawdown plans and budgetary constraints, both the active-duty Army and the Army Reserve exceeded their enlistment and retention missions for fiscal year 2013, the National Guard achieved 86 percent of its goals. “The total Army percentage of newly enlisted Soldiers with a high school diploma was 98 percent, well above historic rates,” he said. “Additionally, the Army achieved 99 percent for each of its military occupational specialties.” Seamands told lawmakers the recruiting mission for the Army is shrinking, but that it has decided to maintain its pool of recruiters because their presence in communities builds and maintains trust between civilians and the military. “What the Army is doing is taking a long-term view of the issue,” he said. “If you look at our accessions mission for 2014, there is a reduction from 2013. What we opted to do is leave the recruiting force in the communities. We feel that what recruiters do ... is built on trust. You need to keep the recruiters in high schools, in communities and in cities to have that relationship and trust to maintain roughly the same level of support, despite a reduced mission out in the re-

cruiting force.” Vee Penrod, Defense for Military Personnel Policy deputy assistant secretary, also addressed lawmakers. She said that health and fitness issues prevent many youth from joining the military. Additionally, she said, the opinions of young Americans are moving away from considering the military as an “attractive lifestyle.” Seamands said that while the Army met recruiting goals, other indicators may be a harbinger of tough recruiting times ahead. One of those indicators is the number of young people enrolled in the Army’s Delayed Entry Program. “As we look at our delayed entry pool, we see that decreasing,” Seamands said. “We see it as kind of a ‘canary in the coal mine’ in terms of warning about a tough environment ahead. If you were to go back in time about a year ago, we would have had about half our mission in the Delayed Entry Program. If you look at it now, it’s about a third. It’s going down.” With declining budgets and the money military services receive for recruiting also decreasing, it becomes more important that the services be able to manage their own funds and use them where they think the funds can best be used. “We believe the services are really in the best position to determine how to spend recruiting dollars,” Penrod said. “They understand their force, they know the requirements, they understand the culture. When the services are directed or not directed to spend recruiting dollars, it is, we believe, a misdirection of funds. So we absolutely believe the decision should be left to the services. And we provide oversight to ensure they follow policy and law.” The Army does not just recruit, it also works to retain Soldiers. When Soldiers choose to leave the active force, the ser-

Photo by Sgt. Carl N. Hudson

Staff Sgt. Roger L.Whaley speaks with Phillip McDonald about the possibility of becoming a journalist or X-ray technician for the Army at the U.S. Army Recruiting Station in Radcliff, Ky.The Army must still recruit new Soldiers every year, and less money means it may be harder to put young Americans into uniform.

vice hopes they transition to the Army National Guard or Army Reserve. To facilitate that, Seamands said the Army has bolstered its relationships with the two reserve components. “We have developed a great partnership with the reserve and the Guard, and work hand-in-hand with them as we identify and downsize the active component,” Seamands said. “If you were to look at the active-component to reserve-component transition, the last couple of years we’ve exceeded 157 percent two years ago. We’ve raised the standard, or the goal for that across the board. My counterparts in the Guard and reserve understand what our process is.” The general said one of the things the Army has done is ensure reserve recruiters get to meet earlier with departing active Soldiers. “It becomes part of their thought process about getting out, going into the reserve and Guard,” Seamands said. “We

“Our Army is now made up of the highest quality, best trained, most experienced, and highest-skilled Soldiers ever. Our ability to meet the challenges of the current and future operational environment depends on our ability to recruit great citizens and retain great Soldiers.” — Maj. Gen. Thomas Seamands Army’s director of Military Personnel Management

talk about ‘Soldier for Life,’ where you continue to be a Soldier after you leave the service. We don’t like using the words ‘separation of service.’ It’s really a transition, whether you go to be a civilian, or you go into the reserve component.” Seamands also told lawmakers the Army is working to increase recruiting of Soldiers who are equipped to go into the Army’s cyber career fields. To that end, he said, recruiters are looking to recruit more among those who have educations and backgrounds in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. He also told legislators continued support from Congress for funding of recruiting efforts is what will help the Army continue to meet its goals in a difficult recruiting environment. “Recruiting is expected to become increasingly more difficult due to the tough recruiting environment and the impacts of the budget,” Seamands said. “These will likely cause a decline in the entry pool. The continued support of Congress for competitive military benefits and compensation, incentives, bonuses for our Soldiers and marketing to help us tell our story will remain critical to the allvolunteer Army’s effort to recruit, retain and support the highest caliber Soldier. While we transfer to a smaller Army, we will remain dedicated to improving readiness and building resilience in our Soldiers, civilians and families.”


20

www.peninsulawarrior.com

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

LAFBCommunity

JANUARY 24, 2014

Submit LAFB Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com

Tax Season volunteers The 633rd Air Base Wing requests volunteers from each squadron to serve as income tax assistants from Jan. 31 to April 15. Volunteers should possess some math or tax experience and good interpersonal skills. Volunteers must be able to commit at least 40 hours throughout the tax season, and should be available to work a minimum of one day a week. Each volunteer will be required to attend a training course unless they are administrative volunteers.The program is also open to spouses, retirees and Red Cross volunteers. Those interested must contact the 633rd ABW Legal Office by Jan. 10. For more information, contact Capt. Alan Serrano or Staff Sgt. Shaun Field at 764-3277.

Upcoming Family Advocacy Program classes ■ Strengthening Bonds – The Family Advocacy Program will host “Strengthening Bonds” classes from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. eachWednesday from Feb. 26 to March 26.These classes will aim to enhance the knowledge and skills to strengthen marriages through a combination of discussions and exercises. ■ Magic Parenting – The Family Advocacy Program will host “1, 2, 3 Magic Parenting” classes from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Feb. 6 and from 10 a.m. to noon Feb. 13, 20 and 27.The classes will offer positive discipline techniques for parents of children from the ages of 2 to 12 through discussions and exercises. ■ Healthy Relationship Skills for Singles – The Family Advocacy Program will host a “Healthy Relationship Skills for Singles” class from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Feb. 19. This class will discuss and offer information about creating healthy, sustainable relationships. ■ New and Expecting Fathers – The Family Advocacy Program will host a “New and Expecting Father’s” class from 8 a.m. to noon March 6.This class will offer information to fathers on caring for their child through a series of exercises. For more information or to register, call 764-2427.

Air Force CyclingTeam 2014 registration The Air Force CyclingTeam will celebrate its 20th anniversary at the “Register’s Annual Great Bicycle Ride Across Iowa” during the week of July 20. Registration is open to military, retirees, civilian employees or military dependents until Feb. 25. The AFCT’s objective during RAGBRAI is to display a positive and professional image to the public as well as offer assistance to those who need it throughout the week, advocating the Air Force’s wingman concept. Members of Team Langley and the National Capitol Region are looking for supporters who would enjoy the event either as a rider or supporter. For more information, visit AFCT website www.afcycling. com, contact MarkWilder at 757-225-4273 or mark.wilder.2@ us.af.mil.

Bateman Library hours of operation The Bateman Library’s hours of operation are nowTuesday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information, contact the Bateman Library at 764-2906.

Community Commons opening The new Community Commons will be moving into the old

Marriage seminar Upcoming HAWC classes ■

‘Correct your Weakness’ – The Health and Wellness Center will host “Correct your Weakness” at 3 p.m. on Tuesdays at the Shellbank Fitness Center at Langley Air Force Base. Through April 1, the course will consist of four classes which address issues that occur during strength training. Attendees are required to wear physical training gear to the program. ■ ‘Weighting on Women’ – The Health and Wellness Center will host “Weighting on Women” every second Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Shellbank Fitness Center at Langley Air Force Base. The class will address how women can become leaner or stronger. Attendees are required to wear physical training gear to the class. For more information, contact Tiffany Owen at Tiffany.owen.3.ctr@us.af.mil or call 764-8141.

The Langley Chapel will host a free marriage a seminar from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Jan. 30 at the Langley Club. The event is designed to address keys to developing a healthy marriage. For more information or to register, contact Chap. Joel Kornegay at joel.kornegay@us.af.mil.

Langley MPF Customer Service Office hours Beginning Jan. 2, 2014, the Langley Military Personnel Flight Customer Service Office will utilize “Military in Uniform priority hours” on Mondays,Tuesdays,Thursdays, and Fridays from 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. at the Langley MPF.To better support customers and provide quicker processing for active duty personnel, an updated category of “Active Duty in Uniform” will be available on the sign-in computer located in the customer service waiting area. For more information, contact Michael Halacy at 764-2270 or michael.halacy.ctr@us.af.mil.

2013 ACC HQ Medallion Ceremony Youth Center, located near the Child Development Center and Housing Office. All Community Center programs will be included in the move, including the Airman’s Attic, Thrift Shop and Cinderella’s Closet. A ribbon-cutting ceremony will be held at 2:30 Jan. 24. For more information, call 764-2984.

Volunteer drivers needed Volunteer drivers are needed to transport disabled veterans to appointments in Richmond and Hampton. A van will be provided for transportation. For more information, contact Richard Moore at 804-815-0730.

Inaugural LOA CRUD Tournament The Tidewater Logistics Officer Association will host its inaugural “CRUD” tournament from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. Feb. 21 at the Langley Club. Crud is a fast-paced game loosely based on billiards. This event is free and open to Joint Base Langley-Eustis members. Each team must contain for members. If a team does not have four members, the event point-of-contacts will make every effort to put those interested on a team. Registration is open until Feb. 7. To For more information or to register, contact 2nd Lt. Kevin Mendelsohn at kevin.mendelsohn@us.af.mil or 2250364 or 2nd Lt. Michael Weaver at michael.weaver.27@ us.af.mil or 764-2063.

Home buying seminar The 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron Housing Office will host a home buying seminar on the first or second Monday of each month from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. until Nov. 3. Three industry representatives, including a realtor, lender and home inspector, will host each class and aim to help participants understand Virginia state laws and procedures. Children and pets are not allowed to attend these classes. For more information and specific class times, contact David Kea at david.kea@langley.af.mil or 764-5040.

The Air Combat Command headquarters Medallion Ceremony will be held at 9 a.m. March 7 at the Static Display Hangar at Langley Air Force Base. For more information, contact Master Sgt. Christopher McDougal at christopher.mcdougal@us.af.mil or 679-5978.

Discounted tickets and passes Discounted tickets and season passes to local amusement parks are available through Langley Information, Tickets and Tours. For more information, call 764-7176.

Challenger Little League The Virginia Peninsula Challenger Little League will host registration for the coming spring season at Newport News Midtown Community Center from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Jan. 25 and Feb. 8, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Feb. 26 and 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. March 15. For more information, contact Pat Swett at 660-8054 or KimCat74@gmail.com.

Free financial and driving education seminars The Langley Federal Credit Union will host free financial-education seminars at the Langley Member Education Center in Newport News.The classes include: ■ AARP Driver Safety Class – Feb. 3 and 4 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Participants are required to attend both classes.The seminar will cover rules of the road, operating vehicles in challenging environments and adjustments to common, age-related change in vision, hearing and reaction time.This course will cost $12 for AARP members and $14 for nonmembers. ■ Fraud and scam seminar – Jan. 25 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. The seminar will cover identifying theft schemes, fraud defense, common scams and victim response. ■ Homeownership seminar – Jan. 25 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.The seminar will cover credit reports, lenders’ roles, budgeting and managing personal finances, relationship with the real estate agent, home inspection and the closing process. For more info or to register, visit www.langleyfcu.org/community/seminars or contact Kitty Simon at 825-7112.


JANUARY 24, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

EustisCommunity

www.peninsulawarrior.com

Submit Eustis Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com

Army Career and Alumni Program The Army Career and Alumni Program is offering the following classes and workshops: ■ Boots to BusinessTraining Workshop – 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 11-12.The workshop is geared toward transitioners pursuing entrepreneurship opportunities and small business ownership.To register, call 878-4955. ■ Employer Days – 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Jan. 29. The event will feature networking and interfacing with employers seeking to hire transitioning military members. ■ Informational Recruiting Event – 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Jan. 28.The featured employer has vacancies in the aerospace industry for rotary wing pilots and maintainers, and supply, contracts and strength management personnel.To view open positions, visit careers.utc.com/text and click on “Sikorsky.” To RSVP, e-mail Reba Gordon at reba.d.gordon.civ@mail.mil or Danita Johnson at danita.a.johnson.ctr@mail.mil. ■ Informational Recruiting Event – 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Jan. 30-31.The featured employer is seeking personnel with electronics skills and training and experience in Ohms Law. To view open positions, visit www.mcdean.com.To RSVP, e-mail Reba Gordon at reba.d.gordon.civ@mail.mil or Danita Johnson at danita.a.johnson.ctr@mail.mil. ■ Transition GPS (TAP Workshop) – 7:45 a.m. to 4 p.m., Jan. 27-31. This training provides transitioning Soldiers and their family members the skills necessary to succeed in civilian employment and educational pursuits. Topics will include financial planning, resume writing, interviewing techniques, job search tips,VA benefits (disability ratings, filing claims, and vocational rehabilitation) and MOS Crosswalk. Unless noted, classes and briefings will take place at 705 Washington Blvd., suite 71. For more information, call 8784955.

Range schedule Ranges, training areas and associated facilities are off limits to personnel not engaged in scheduled firing, operations or inspections unless clearance is obtained (in person) from the Range Control Fire Desk or a designated Range Control technician. The Range Control office telephone number is 8784412, ext. 226 or 878-3834, ext 234. The range operations schedule through Jan. 29 is: ■ Friday – BTRACS, Range 1 (7 a.m. to 5 p.m.) ■ Saturday and Sunday – No scheduled ranges ■ Monday – Range 1, 3 (7 a.m. to 10 p.m.) ■ Tuesday – Range 1, 2, 3, 5 (7 a.m. to 5 p.m.) ■ Wednesday – Range 1, 2, 3, 5 (7 a.m. to 10 p.m.) All personnel are required to check in and out with Range Control before going into or departing from any range or training area.

Kuder Journey career planner Kuder Journey is an online career and transition system designed for military members to address educational and career goals. Learn about your interests, skills and work values, and use the results to build a personal career plan, explore occupational interests and prepare for future success. To create an account, visit http://dantes.kuder.com. For more information, contact the Bateman Army Education Center at 878-2083, ext. 221.

21

‘SKIES Unlimited’ programs Scholarship applications ■

Scholarships for Military Children Program – Applications for the 2014 Scholarships for Military Children Program are available at commissaries worldwide or at www.militaryscholar.org. The application deadline is Feb. 28 and packages can be hand-delivered or mailed to a commissary. Faxed or e-mailed applications will not be accepted. Applicants must be a dependent or unmarried child of an active-duty, reserve or National Guard Service member or retiree, or a survivor of an active-duty or retired military member. Applicants and sponsors must also be enrolled in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System database and have a Department of Defense identification card. For more info, call (856) 616-9311 or visit militaryscholar@scholarshipmanagers.com. ■ Army Emergency Relief Scholarships – The application period for 2014-15 Army Emergency Relief “needs-based” scholarships is open through May 1. AER supports the Spouse Education Assistance Program and the Maj. Gen. James Ursano Scholarship Program for dependent children. The entire application package must be submitted online including supporting documents, which will be outlined for the applicant based on data provided. To apply, visit www.aerhq.org.

Army Community Service Army Community Service classes and workshops for January will include: ■ Baby and Me Play Group – 10 to 11 a.m. on Thursdays at 501 Madison Ave. ■ DevelopingYour Financial Plan – 9 to 10 a.m., Jan. 28. ■ Evenings with Army Family Team Building – 6 to 8 p.m., Jan. 28. Registration is required. ■ Job Search Strategies – 10 to 11 a.m. on Mondays. ■ Military Knowledge for Military Spouses – 9 a.m. to 3:15 p.m., Jan. 29; 9 a.m. to 2:45 p.m., Jan. 30; and 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Jan. 31. Registration is required. ■ Play Mornings Play Group – 10 to 11:30 a.m. on Wednesdays at 1102 Pershing Ave. Unless noted, classes and briefings will take place in Bldg. 650, Monroe Ave. For more information, call 878-3638.

Family Advocacy Program The Family Advocacy Program is offering the following classes at 213 Calhoun St.: ■ Active Parenting forTeens – 9 a.m. to noon, Feb. 21 and 28; March 7 and 14. ■ Anger Management – 1 to 2:30 p.m., March 18. ■ Family Advocacy Safety Education Seminar – 9 to 11 a.m., Feb. 20 and March 27. ■ Five Love Languages – 3:30 to 5:30 p.m., Feb. 13, and 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Feb. 14. ■ Journey to Strength – 1 to 2:30 p.m. onThursdays. ■ Stress Management – 3 to 4 p.m., Jan. 28. For more information or to register, call 878-0807. No children please.

The Fort Eustis School of Knowledge, Inspiration, Exploration and Skills offers the following instructional programs for children and youth. ■ Gymnastics – Class types and times vary. Mondays and/ or Wednesdays, ages 3-18; $35 tuition. ■ Taekwondo – 5:30 to 6:15 p.m. (beginners); 6:15 to 7 p.m. (advanced),Tuesdays andThursdays, ages 6-18; $45 tuition. ■ Piano and/orViolin – Class times vary,Tuesday through Friday, ages 5-18, $60-$120 tuition. Classes will take place at the Youth Center at 1102 Pershing Ave.The programs are open to children of active-duty military, retirees, Department of Defense civilians and contractors at Fort Eustis. To register or for more information, call 878-4025/5882 or visit www.eustismwr.com.

Fort Eustis USO events The Fort Eustis United Service Organization is offering the following events at 833 Monroe Ave. ■ Super Bowl XLVIII Party – 5 p.m., Feb. 2. Light refreshments will be served. ■ Family Movie Night – 7 p.m., Feb. 7.The PG movie“Epic” will be shown and parents must stay with their children. Crafts will be provided and light refreshments will be served. ■ Winter OlympicsViewing – 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., Feb. 7-15. Light refreshments will be served. ■ Movie Marathon – noon to 6 p.m., Feb. 15-17. The “Hangover” movie trilogy will be shown on a rotating basis and light refreshments will be served. The events listed above are open to all military identification card holders and their families. RSVP at Facebook.com/ USOHRCV/Events. For more information, call 878-2415.

Privately-owned weapons range The Fort Eustis privately-owned weapons range is now open at the installation weapons range on Mulberry Island Rd. All participants must complete a range safety class to obtain a Certificate of Competency (AF IMT 483) and register their weapons with the 733rd Security Forces Squadron at 648 Washington Blvd. Range cards can be purchased at the Pines Golf Course Pro Shop at 3518 Mulberry Island Rd. The annual fee is $30 and the facility is open to active-duty Service members, retirees, and Department of Defense civilians and their family members. Authorized users can sponsor one non-affiliated guest. Hours are 8 a.m. to 30 minutes prior to sunset, Monday through Saturday. For more information, call 878-2610.

Fitness Center Annex The Fitness Center Annex features male and female locker rooms with showers and daily-use lockers. Fitness equipment includes treadmills, medicine balls, adjustable abdominal benches, individual exercise mats, rowers, pull-up station, 14 weight machines, aerobic steps and risers, balance boards and more. Services are available to all authorized patrons. Hours are 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday, and closed Saturday, Sunday and holidays.The Fitness Center Annex is located at 1501 Lee Blvd. For more information, call 878-8080/8085 or visit www.EustisMWR.com.


22

www.peninsulawarrior.com

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

OutsideTheGate

JANUARY 24, 2014

Submit Outside The Gate announcements to pw1@militarynews.com

Salute to Tuskegee Airmen The Virginia War Museum will host a “Salute to the Tuskegee Airmen” from noon to 3 p.m. Feb. 1 at 9285 Warwick Blvd. Tuskegee Airmen will discuss artifacts on display from noon to 1 p.m. “The Tuskegee Airmen” movie will be shown from 1 to 3 p.m. followed by guest speakers relating their wartime military experiences. Admission is $6 for adults, $5 for active-duty military and senior citizens ages 62 and older, $4 for children ages 7-18, and free for children ages 6 and under. For more information, call 247-8523 or visit www. warmuseum.org.

Admissions open house Saint Mary Star of the Sea School will host an Admissions Open House for prospective students and their parents from 2 to 4 p.m. Jan. 26 at 14 N. Willard Avenue in Hampton. Saint Mary’s educates students of all faiths including pre-kindergarten through eighth grade. The school’s academic curriculum core includes science, mathematics, language arts, social studies and religion, with enrichment programs in Spanish, physical education and performing arts. The marine science program features a waterfront classroom and living shoreline. For more information, contact Maritza Davila at 723-6358.

‘DMV2Go’ at Yorktown Library The Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles’ “DMV2Go” mobile office will visit the Yorktown Library from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jan. 28 at 8500 George Washington Memorial Highway. Visitors can conduct full-service DMV transactions, including applying for or renewing driver’s licenses and identification cards. The mobile office will also issue veteran identification cards if an official copy of the D214 is provided. For more information about the DMV2Go mobile office, visit www.dmv.virginia.gov/webdoc/citizen/dmv_2go.asp.

‘The Battle of Smithfield’ The Isle of Wight County Division of Historic Resources and Sesquicentennial Committee will host the 150th anniversary of the 1864 “Battle of Smithfield” Jan. 31 and Feb. 1 at the Isle of Wight County Museum. The commemoration will feature free activities including re-enactors, guided tours along Church Street, Virginia Historical Society exhibits. The events scheduled for Jan. 31 are open to students with reservations, while the Feb. 1 events are geared toward the public. Teachers, homeschoolers and other educational professionals may download the teacher packet with standards of learning guides at www.historicisleofwight.com/battle-of-smithfield-sequicentennial-commemoration.html. Guests can also visit the museum’s free exhibits featuring prehistoric fossils, Native American and Colonial artifacts, a country store and the world’s oldest edible cured ham. The museum is located at 103 Main Street in Smithfield. Hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Satur-

day and noon to 4 p.m. Sunday. For more information, call 356-1223 or visit www.historicisleofwight.com.

Program for Caregivers TheYork County Special Programs Division, in cooperation with Riverside Center for Excellence in Aging and Lifelong Health, will sponsor the “Caring for You, Caring for Me” education and support program for caregivers of middle-aged and older adults. The 10-hour program will be held from 4 to 6:15 p.m. Feb. 6 through March 6 at the Senior Center of York at 5314 George Washington Memorial Highway. The cost is $35 per participant and scholarships are available. For more information or to register, contact Christy Jensen at 220-4751 or cjensen@excellenceinaging.org. Caregivers can also register at the senior center or by calling 898-3807.

Military Appreciation Night The Norfolk Admirals hockey team presents Military Appreciation Night at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 7 at the Norfolk Scope at 201 E. Brambleton Ave. The Admirals will play the Hartford Wolf Pack, an affiliate of the New York Rangers. Single game tickets purchased at the Scope Box Office are $11 with valid military identification. Group tickets are $9 each for 15 or more (purchased through the Admirals Group Sales office seven days in advance).To purchase tickets, contact Charlie Colon at charlie@norfolkadmirals.com or call 640-1212, ext. 23.

Cabin Fever Concert Series York County will sponsor the sixth annual winter “Cabin Fever Concert Series” at 7 p.m. inside the Freight Shed located at Riverwalk Landing in historic Yorktown. The concerts are free and open to the public. Audience members will have the opportunity to interact and engage with local musicians throughout each concert. The schedule is as follows: ■ Feb. 6 – The Winds of Grass (bluegrass band) ■ March 6 – Poisoned Dwarf (traditional Celtic music) Advance tickets and reservations will not be offered. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m. and seating is on a firstcome, first-served basis. For more information, call 8903500 or visit www.visityorktown.org.

Peninsula Fine Arts Center Registration is open for the following winter art classes and workshops: ■ After School Clay Camp – 4 to 5:30 p.m. on Wednesdays, beginning Feb. 12 through March 5. Students ages 9-12 will have the opportunity to play with different forms of hand building, ranging from pinch pots to assembly of slab pieces.Tuition includes a $10 materials fee.The cost is $85 for members and $95 for non-members. ■ American Impressionists Painting – 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Feb. 19 and 20 or 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. March 15 and 16. The classes will begin with drawing in the American Impressionism gallery followed by studio painting or drawing. Bring your own painting supplies, pastels or any other material. Paper and drawing materials for gallery work will be provided. The cost is $85 for members and $100 for non-members. ■ Exploring Encaustic Painting – 10:15 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Feb. 8 and 1:15 to 3:30 p.m. Feb. 9. Students will learn how to paint with wax including creating their own encaustic medium and paints. Tuition includes a materials fee. The cost is $100 for members and $120 for non-members. ■ Origami Time – 6 to 8:30 p.m. on Thursdays from Feb. 20 through March 13. Come join us and learn how to make decorative boxes, animals, flowers and jewelry using the art of Japanese paper folding. The class is open to ages 17 and older, and all materials are included. The cost is $90 for members and $105 for non-members. ■ Papermaking Workshop – 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Feb. 22 – Students can create handmade papers from materials found in nature. Art and recycling will be combined to produce papers suitable for framing, journaling, sculpting, mixed media and printmaking. Bring a bagged lunch. The cost is $70 for members and $85 for non-members. ■ Surface Design and Decoration – 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Fridays from Jan. 31 through Feb.28. Learn how to decorate pottery using brushwork, slip trailing, stenciling, layering and resist techniques. The cost is $120 for members and $140 for non-members. ■ Watercolor on Gesso: Energize Your Paintings – 9:30 a.m. to noon on Tuesdays Feb. 4 through April 22. Classes will focus on the techniques of painting on gessoed paper with an emphasis on creating original designs. The cost is $210 for members and $230 for non-members. The Peninsula Fine Arts Center is located at 101 Museum Drive in Newport News. To register, call 596-8175 or for more information, visit www.pfac-va.org.

Fort Boykin walking tours Visitors to Fort Boykin will be offered a walking tour of the site at 3 p.m. Feb. 9 at 7410 Fort Boykin Trail in Smithfield. The event is free and open to the public, and reservations are not required.The tour will last approximately 45 minutes and visitors should wear comfortable walking shoes. Fort Boykin, built to protect the Jamestown colonists, is on the Virginia Birding and Wildlife Trail and is home to Virginia’s second oldest black walnut tree.The fort is open daily from 8 a.m. to dusk. For more information, call 357-0115 or visit www.historicisleofwight.com.


JANUARY 24, 2014

â&#x20AC;˘ The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

â&#x20AC;˘

Classifieds TO PLACE AN AD...

BY PHONE:

BY FAX: (757) 853-1634

MILITARY NEWSPAPERS OF VIRGINIA

Call: (757) 222-3990 Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Furniture-Household

For Rent-Rooms

Living Room Elegant Table purchased from Haverty's - $300 (Hampton). Brand New, tags still on 63"L x 34W" glass top stunning table. Call 201-803-3482

Newport News, , Unfurnished room Near Ft. Eustis. $525/mo 757-746-5580 Available 15 Feb

Furniture-Household Brand New

Killington, VT Timeshare $600 8-15 March 1 brdrm, slps 4, 1 mi to Resort Call 757-869-2397

For Sale-Timeshare

Layaway Available MATTRESS SETS Full- $99, Queen- $129, King- $169 40% Military Discount on all other sets!

Can deliver. 757-706-3667 Accounting & Tax Service Tax return preparation for individuals and small businesses by highly experienced accountant with over 20 years of related experience. Fixed fee pricing. No per page charge. 757-325-9635

BY MAIL:

23

www.peninsulawarrior.com

DEADLINE: Reader & Display Thursday 5:00 p.m. (week prior)

BY EMAIL:

PENINSULA WARRIOR adswork@militarynews.com CLASSIFIEDS 150 W. Brambleton Ave. Norfolk, VA 23510

Call 222-3 990 today!

go red. anyway you want... eat red - apples, cherries, tomatoes. leave red kisses on someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cheek. laugh so hard your face turns red. but whatever you do, do it for your heart. take a moment everyday and put your hand on your heart. and then make your own promise to be heart healthy. www.goredforwomen.org 1-888-MY-HEART

!!                              

For Rent-House (All) Hampton, , 3bd 2.5bth 1600 Sqft 10M from JBLE,fenced yard $1400 Ph:268-9209

Free!

Get online! Submit your classified ad and advertise for FREE Restrictions do apply see below for details

Qualifications:

Fast! Easy!

YOU JUST BLEW $10,000. Buzzed. Busted. Broke. Get caught, and you could be paying around $10,000 in fines, legal fees and increased insurance rates.

Buzzed driving is drunk driving. buzzeddriving.adcouncil.org

Submit online at: www.peninsulawarrior.com

â&#x20AC;˘

For active-duty, retired military, their eligible family members and active or retired civil service employees If you are retired military or retired DOD civilian, include current employer and work phone number on the application.

Restrictions: â&#x20AC;˘ Only 5 ads per week, per household â&#x20AC;˘ Renewals, corrections and cancellations cannot be taken by phone and must be resubmitted â&#x20AC;˘ Illegible, too long or otherwise do not conform to instructions will not be published and must be resubmitted for the next issue â&#x20AC;˘ Automotive ads must begin with make, model and year â&#x20AC;˘ Real estate ads must begin with name of city, neighborhood and must be your primary residence. â&#x20AC;˘ Ads will not be accepted via official mailing channels such as guard mail or postage and fees paid indicia. â&#x20AC;˘ Free ads cannot be of a commercial nature (i. e., business opportunities, help wanted, etc) and must be personal property of the eligible member. Should not represent a sustained income or business or listed through agents or representatives. â&#x20AC;˘ When advertising a home for rent or home for sale, the home must be THE PRIMARY RESIDENCE. (All rental properties are considered paid ads.) WE DO NOT ACCEPT CALLS FOR FREE CLASSIFIED ADS Deadline Thursday, 5 p.m. for the following weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s publications


24

www.peninsulawarrior.com

• The Peninsula Warrior - Air Force

ERITAGE HMOTOR COMPANY www.autohmc.com 1.800.605.9258 ‘07 & ‘10 DODGE CHARGER RT and XT

‘07 - ‘08 SCION TC 5-Speed, A/C, P/L, P/W, Cruise, Tilt Miles starting at 63,000

‘10 - ‘12 HONDA ACCORD EX & LX Cruise, Tilt, 6 Speaker Sound, CD, P/W, P/L, P/D 4 to Choose From!

‘10 LEXUS GX 460 PREMIUM LOADED Navigation, Rear Entertainment 59,000 Miles

‘07 CHEVROLET CORVETTE 6-Speed, P/W, P/L, P/S 64,000 Miles

JANUARY 24, 2014

ALL

ALL RANKS! $0 DOWN! Credit union financing available ‘06 & ‘07 ACURA TL

‘03 - ‘08 BMWs 9 to Choose From! 325, 328, 330, 335, 535, 745

‘10 DODGE CHALLENGER RT Auto, A/C, P/W, P/S, P/L, Sunroof 29,280 Miles

‘12 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY

Power Sunroof, P/W, P/L, P/S, Leather, Tilt, Cruise, Heated Seats, CD

Touring, Rear Entertainment 34k Miles

‘07 TOYOTA FJ CRUISER

‘06 CADILLAC ESCALADE ESV

4X4, Automatic, A/C, V6 Loaded!

4WD, Tow Package, Power Sunroof, Luggage Rack

‘09 SRT8 Also Available

‘08 HONDA CIVIC SI 2-DR & 4-DR 6-Speed, LOADED Miles Starting at 57,000

‘03 FORD MUSTANG COBRA SVT Leather, 6-Speed, Cruise, Tinted Glass

‘09 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE SPYDER GS A/C, Power Windows, Locks, Mirrors, Cruise, Tilt 2008 Also Available

‘07 & ‘08 FORD F150 XLT

‘06 ACURA MDX

4x4 Miles Start at 71,000

Auto, A/C, V-6, A Leather, L Loaded 51,000 Miles

‘65 - ‘09 CHEVROLET IMPALA SS

‘07 & ‘10 DODGE RAM 1500

7 to Choose From Miles Starting at 41,000

Must See!

‘07 - ‘09 NISSAN ALTIMA S & SL

‘05 - ‘08 JEEP WRANGLER

A/T, P/W, P/DL, Tilt, Cruise 4 to Choose From!

5 to Choose From!

LAND ROVER RANGE ROVER HSE

MERCEDES-BENZ CLS550

Navigation, Leather, Rear Entertainment 70,000 Miles

Power Sunroof & Navigation LOADED 64,000 Miles

Over 200 Vehicles Available Full Service Department Call for Details and Pricing!

‘06

VADLR

MILITARY APPROVED

‘07

5151 SHORE DRIVE

VIRGINIA BEACH

Peninsula Warrior Jan. 24, 2014 Air Force Edition  

Langley Air Force Base

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you