Page 1

Hundreds attend ‘Paint the Town Pink’ run to increase Breast Cancer Awareness SEE PAGE 16

LEAVING IT ON THE FIELD Post teams compete in ACS kickball tournament to close out Domestic Violence Awareness Month SEE PAGE 17

Fort Lee

SERVING THE COMMUNITY OF FORT LEE LEE, VIRGINIA VIRGINIA, SINCE 1941

November 7, 2013 | Vol. 73, No. 44

YOUTH COACHES ORGANIZE FIRSTTIME PEP RALLY The level of excitement at the Post Field House Friday evening was high as families and players celebrated the positive aspects of team sports SEE PAGE 23

COMMANDER’S CORNER The commanding general shares his views about the current installation workforce and their many accomplishments SEE PAGE 2

FLU SHOTS AVAILABLE Kenner Army Health Clinic lists days, times, locations for people to get inoculated

SEE PAGE 22


2 | Traveller | November 7, 2013 | www.fortleetraveller.com

COMMANDER CORNER | FORT LEE UPDATE

CG offers Lee update, highlights success Maj. Gen. Larry D. Wyche CASCOM and Fort Lee Commanding General

Greetings Team! I continue to be in awe of your dedication and commitment and how the Team at the Army’s Sustainment Think Tank works tirelessly to execute the mission. Over the past 16 months at the Army’s premier learning institution, we have stayed the course when appropriate, adjusted when needed, broke new ground and continuously delivered game-changing professionals and solutions to support the war-fighter. None of this would have been possible without the outstanding and unmatched efforts of the Team, who through their expertise, abilities and dedication make this the best place to live

and work in the Army. I have a firm belief that high standards, with consistency, are the marks of true professionals and all are trademarks of Team Lee! Unfortunately, this year our civilian members of the Team have been through significant stress and hardship due to administrative and emergency furloughs. The furloughs were in no way reflective of the hard work, commitment and dedication put forth by these great Americans. Please know that we couldn’t have been successful this year without their unequivocal support! Our accomplishments this year have been impressive, despite challenges and budgetary constraints. I have witnessed everyday a Team who is committed to help shape and prepare a globally responsive sustainment force for the next fight.

This commitment led to the development of the Globally Responsive Sustainment white paper that takes a critical look to the future and identifies a wide-range of implications. Today, sustainers around the globe can access the paper on the Sustainment Knowledge Network and provide their comments. At the same time, we continue to focus our energy on the fight to prevent suicide and sexual assault and sexual harassment in our ranks. Each has a direct bearing on our mission readiness and our ability to function as a Team. We launched the “what can I do? NOT what I should have done” campaign to extend a helping hand to those who may be suffering. The campaign and the overall educational awareness program has proven to be quite valuable. Also, we have all hands on deck in combating sexual assault and sexual harassment in our ranks. It is our number one priority. We must protect America’s sons and daughters, as well as family members and Department of Army Civilians by maintaining an environment and command climate

that is consistent with our Army values. To this end, we relooked the process of selecting individuals to serve as sexual assault response coordinators and unit victim advocates, improved interaction with victims and their care, conducted a stand-down day and rolled out a SHARP Dashboard. We must ensure leaders build the trust and accountability necessary to eradicate sexual harassment and assault, while eliminating predators and the culture that enables them from our ranks. While we addressed these two critical issues facing our Army, at the same time, we embraced the policy change of allowing women into jobs that were previously closed. Today, we have successfully integrated the first females into three Ordnance Military Occupational Specialties – 91A (M1 Abrams Tank System Maintainer), 91M (Bradley Fighting Vehicle System Maintainer) and 91P (Artillery Mechanic). A total of 44 women have either graduated and reported to their first unit or are in class. SEE UPDATE, PAGE 8

Of mighty shoulders and the muscle behind them T. Anthony Bell Senior Writer/Special Projects

Young people being guided by service dogs and restricted to wheelchairs may not be a pleasant sight but are stark reminders that military service and sacrifice are invariably linked. Veterans Day gives us pause to understand that linkage. It honors the mil-

lions of men and women, past and present, who raised their hands, vowed to defend and sacrificed above all else. Arguably, veterans are our greatest national treasure. They are the gems that stand out among the masses of the American public, rising to the courage and resolve required to set aside differences and

Fort Lee

Commanding General .............Maj. Gen. Larry D. Wyche Garrison Commander ....................... Col. Paul K. Brooks Public Affairs Officer...................................D.R. Bingham Command Information/Managing Editor...Patrick Buffett Senior Writer/Special Assignments ......... T. Anthony Bell Production/News Assistant Editor.................. Amy Perry Family/Community Life Reporter ..........................Vacant Production Assistant .............................. Ray Kozakewicz To reach the Traveller Staff, call (804) 734-7147.

fight for common causes. While Veterans Day affords Americans opportunities to celebrate those who have donned uniforms, veterans should acknowledge there are no better people to serve. The American public is the impetus behind our armed forces and its support is particularly essential to winning wars.

In short, Veterans Day is a reflection of who we are as Americans – people willing to step toward the front lines of battle and those willing to support them back home. Our popular sentiments about military service are not an overnight phenomenon. Vietnam, for one, allowed us to retrospectively examine the critical rela-

The Fort Lee “Traveller” is printed by offset process every Thursday as a civilian enterprise in the interest of personnel at the U.S. Army Combined Arms Support Command and Fort Lee, Va. 23801, by Military Newspapers of Virginia, 114 Charlotte Avenue Suite A, Colonial Heights, Va. 23834, in accordance with Department of the Army Regulations 210-20 and 360-1. This publication receives armed forces material and civilian newspapers are authorized to reprint such material without specific clearance except material specifically designated as copyrighted. Liaison between the printer and the commanding general, Fort Lee, is maintained by the Public Affairs Office, Fort Lee. Circulation: 13,000. This Civilian Enterprise newspaper is an authorized publication. Contents of the “Traveller” are not necessarily the official view of, nor endorsed by, the U.S. Army Combined Arms Support Command and Fort Lee. Advertising in this publication including inserts or supplements does not constitute endorsement by the Department of the Army or Military Newspapers of Virginia. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non merit factor. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the printer shall refuse to print advertising from that source until violation is corrected. The “Traveller” is an unofficial publication authorized by AR 360-1, and printed by the Military Newspapers of Virginia, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Army Combined Arms Support Command or Fort Lee. The editorial content is prepared, edited and provided by the Public Affairs Office of Headquarters, U. S. Army Garrison, Fort Lee.

tionships between popular support, troop morale and success on the battlefield. Undoubtedly, it set us on a corrective path that has resulted in future successes. Today, the American military and veterans enjoy unprecedented popularity and support, and its collective approval has resulted in honor and treatment commensurate with their

ON

THE

service. That’s to say veterans above all should feel pride in their service but feel even better about serving such a great nation, one that by and large stands behind them. Together, the two are just as potent as any weapons system and likely the most important elements in the world’s most advanced military machine. So, on this Veterans Day, SEE VETS, PAGE 21

COVER

Mary Ann Lobdell, ACS team, kicks the ball during a preliminary game at the “Kick Domestic Violence” kickball tournament versus 832nd Ordnance Battalion Oct. 31 at Williams Stadium. For more photos, see page 17.

Amy Perry


www.fortleetraveller.com | November 7, 2013 | Traveller | 3

CASCOM civilian earns award for leadership through excellence Shelley A. Richardson, programming and analysis evaluation chief, Combined Arms Support Command, was awarded the Advancing the Role of Women in the Army: Leadership through Excellence Award Oct. 30. It is presented annually to one military and one civilian leader who have made a positive impact through their involvement, leadership and contributions in affecting policy and promoting diversity in the Army. It also honors the visionary leadership of people whose ideals and dedication help foster a positive work environment and furthering the integration of women in the Army. Richardson received this honor for her 33 years of support to the Army. She spent 30 years on active duty, and after her retirement, continued her service as a Department of the Army Civilian. “I am honored to receive this award,” Richardson said. “I have had great assign-

ments and wonderful people to work with in every one of them. The Army is a great career, both in uniform and as a civilian.” Some of the highlights of her career include: graduating in the first class to include women at the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1980; becoming the first female Soldier to command the Army and Air Force Exchange Service – Europe and Southwest Asia; first woman to serve as commandant of the Army Logistics Management College; and the first Army Logistics University president. Throughout her career, as noted in the citation, Richardson has always strived to set the example for her Soldiers. “Be your best every day. You should appreciate your opportunities and make the most of them,” she said. “If you are open to new experiences and remain flexible, there are many opportunities out there.”

Henry S. Block

aj. Gen. Larry D. Wyche, Combined Arms Support Command and Fort Lee commanding general, presents Shelley A. Richardson, programming and analysis evaluation chief, CASCOM, the Advancing the Role of Women in the Army: Leadership through Excellence Award Oct. 30. It is presented to military and civilian leaders, who have made a positive impact through their involvement, leadership and contributions in affecting policy and promoting diversity in the Army.

– CASCOM Public Affairs

6H[XDODVVDXOWYLFWLPVQRZ HQWLWOHGWRWKHLURZQODZ\HU C. Todd Lopez Army News Service

WASHINGTON – Victims of sexual assault now have the option to request civilian legal representation while seeking justice. During criminal proceedings in a courtroom, the defendant has a lawyer. The state is also represented by its own lawyer, the prosecuting attorney. But the victims of sexual assault have historically not had the benefit of a state-provided advocate as they are interviewed, as they testify on the witness stand, and as they move through the other complexities of the criminal justice system. This is no longer the case.

As of Friday, Soldiers who report that they have been the victim of a sexual assault are able to have a Special Victims Counsel assigned to them. A SVC is an active duty Army attorney, provided at no charge to the victim, who will represent the victim’s interest throughout the course of the legal proceedings that might follow the report of a sexual assault. Col. Jay McKee, a lawyer with the Army’s Office of the Judge Advocate General, serves as the program manager for the Army’s Special Victims Counsel program. “Once the crime happens, or alleged crime happens, and the victim is seen by a victim advocate, or at the hospital or by a Victim

Witness Liaison – however the victim is taken into the system – they are notified that they have a right to an SVC.” It is a misconception, McKee said, that the prosecuting attorney in a criminal case represents the victim of a crime. The prosecutor represents the government’s interests or society’s. But McKee added that in almost all cases those governmental interests are the same as the victim’s – to see that justice is done. “The prosecutor wants justice. He or she is serving the community and is serving the military justice system for good order and discipline of the force,” McKee said. “And 99 percent of the

time, that interest is aligned with the victim’s. They want the same thing.” But sometimes, McKee said, the victim might have concerns that require the assistance of an attorney. For example, the defense attorneys might also want to bring into the trial a victim’s medical records or past sexual history. That might possibly damage a victim’s reputation or embarrass him or her. “They can try to get that introduced on the record,” McKee said. “The defense is there to represent the defendant, the accused; they are going to put on the best case for the accused. Sometimes that is not in the best interest of the victim to undergo cross examination in a public trial about her past sexual history or to have her personal medical records be reviewed by parties to a courtsmartial.”

The SVC can help the victim make sense of the ramifications of trial, and help him or her understand what will happen. McKee also said that while the SVC will not participate in the “adversarial portion” of a trial – in that there will not be a third table in the courtroom for the SVC and the victim – the SVC will be able to make motions on behalf of the victim, talk to the Special Victim Prosecutor, the trial council, trial defense attorney, and the staff judge advocate “in terms of what justice looks like for the victim.” Right now, there are about 45 SVCs in the Army, across the United States, and in Europe. There will soon be an SVC in Afghanistan as well. The total number of SVCs the Army will ultimately need will be determined after a year of evaluating manpower needs for SVCs, McKee said.


4 | Traveller | November 7, 2013 | www.fortleetraveller.com

Linda Miles

Lucille Martin, 102 years old, holds a flag presented to her by a Fort Lee color guard. Nov. 1.The flag commemorates her 10 months of service as a government employee at Camp Lee in 1946. Martin is a resident of the Dunlop House Assisted-Living and Specialized Alzheimer’s Care facility in Colonial Heights.

Reflections of a centenarian Former Camp Lee worker recalls early Army days T. Anthony Bell Senior Writer/Special Projects

Lucille Martin seen a lot in her 100-plus years, and she is able to extract a good bit of detail about her experiences and observations. Got a question about the Model T Ford? She can tell you that they wouldn’t start without the magneto posts. Need a firsthand account of what the German POWs were like at Fort Lee? They were not the bad guys they were made out to be, even though she barely understood them. How about wanting to know the best way to advertise for a business? Don’t get her started about word-of-mouth, the best means for promotion, she’s certain, even in the age of the Internet That’s plenty of evidence for her sidekick Ann Harrison. She is convinced of her friend’s keen

sense of recollection. “‘Give her an hour,’ she says, ‘and she can tell you anything from 1911 to 2013,’” said Harrison with a playful, sarcastic chuckle. A bit of an overstatement? Not so much as it is fact, considering Martin was born in 1911 and probably sharp enough to provide details – as they were told to her – about life in rural South Carolina where she was reared. Harrison said she also has exceptional wisdom among other attributes. “She’s quite the lady,” said the retired Fort Lee civilian, now an employee at the Dunlop House Assisted Living and Specialized Alzheimer’s Care facility in Colonial Heights. “I’ve never seen her get upset. She presents herself well.” Martin has resided at Dunlop four four years. A Fort Lee color guard recently presented the centenarian with a U.S. flag for

service to the nation as a government employee. That period of service began in 1946. During that time, Camp Lee was a training center and hundreds of thousands of Soldiers had occupied its confines during World War II. More than 30,000 were still here after it ended. They lived in wooden barracks that dotted the landscape and scenes of them marching in formation were more of a common sight than cars since most Soldiers didn’t own one. And dirt, not asphalt, covered most of the roads since the installation still held a temporary status. Martin would have been in the midst of it all as a 27-year old. That’s when the self-proclaimed country girl took a job as a commissary cashier here. During the latter part of World War II, she accompanied her husbandSoldier, John, to Camp Lee on permanent assignment. Her stint

of employment also included her most satisfactory job in, of all places, the motor pool. “I grew up on a farm and wasn’t afraid to get dirty,” she said. “I would get up sometimes at 5 or 6 o’clock in the morning and drove water for the stock – cows, horses, mules and pigs. I always kept clean, though. That was one thing my mother taught me – wash your hands, sit up straight and be nice to everybody.” During the WWII era, the installation’s motor pool was located near Hopewell “above the blacktop” she said. That would mean it was situated among the facilities that currently occupy the Shop Road area. Her use of the word “blacktop” surely meant that Route 36 was paved and most of the installation roads were not. Her memory of the motor pool and adjacent areas, however, doesn’t end with the blacktop. “Well, they had the motor pool up there, and it was fenced in a little bit,” she recalled. “Across the street was a huge place where they had all the tanks for gasoline, and they had a lot of secretaries in there. That’s where they did all the work on the motors.” Martin was familiar with motors from her days on the farm. She learned much about automobiles, especially the Ford Model A “with the rumble seat” and a stripped-down Ford Model T with the crank start. “I’d get up there and drive it,” she said of the latter. “I learned how to put the magneto posts down in the bottom. It wouldn’t run if you took the magneto posts out.” Rumble seats were fold out seats that sat near the trunk of the Model A. Magnetos were small electric generators that used magnets to produce alternating current. As a chauffeur, Martin’s duties consisted of driving dignitaries around post and to the surrounding areas as well as transporting goods. She also performed dispatcher duties. When she wasn’t doing either, she was soaking up knowledge about au-

tomobiles and everything related to them. That begs the question, “As a woman, did she feel out of place working in a profession dominated by men? Did she feel alone or isolated? The answer is neither. “There were a lot of WACs working there,” said Martin, implying that Soldiers in the Women’s Army Corps gave her a sense of inclusion and her personality enabled her to easily make friends. Martin also remembered the sizable numbers of foreigners who worked in the motor pool and who she transported around post. There were Italian and German prisoners of war. Roughly 1,400 were shipped to Fort Lee and hundreds of thousands more were sent to camps throughout the country during the war. “We would take the German prisoners out to where the golf course is now,” she recalled. “At the golf course, they would pick up ‘zooka shells, take them back and make beautiful lampshades out of them.” The area adjacent to the Cardinal Golf Club was a bazooka range, said Luther Hanson, Quartermaster Museum curator. Though the Germans were largely antagonized in the media, Martin said she didn’t see them that way. “I saw them differently than in the movies – I guarantee you that,” she said, noting she was taken by the way they talked. “They were nice young men, and everybody got along well at Fort Lee. I can’t remember any trouble.” Martin spent roughly 10 months at Fort Lee. She had the option of staying on as a civil servant but declined the offer. “I just wanted to do something else,” she said. Martin instead went to work at retailers like J.C. Penny and Lerners in Petersburg. She also sold furniture, selling enough at one retailer to win a trip to Bermuda. SEE CENTENARIAN PAGE 6


www.fortleetraveller.com | November 7, 2013 | Traveller | 5

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KAHC Veterans Day Holiday Closures Kenner Army Health Clinic and Troop Medical Clinic 1 will be open Nov. 8 (training holiday) for patient care. The Mosier Consolidated Troop Medical Clinic will be closed Nov. 8. All Kenner services will be closed Nov. 11 in observance of Veterans Day. To schedule appointments, call the Kenner Appointment Line at 1-866-LEEKAHC (866-533-5242). To speak with a KAHC medical provider after hours or on weekends, contact the AOD at 734-9000. This must be done before seeking care at an urgent care center. For medical emergencies, go to the nearest ER or call 911.

DANTES Test Funds Available Funding is available for DANTESfunded exams including computer and

paper-based testing and transcript services. The program provides up-front funding of first-time exams for eligible military and civilians at national test centers. Funds are no longer available for retesting on a previously funded exam of the same title. The exams include the DANTES Subject Standardized Tests and the College Level Examination Program. Interested test-takers should contact their local or virtual education center. For details, visit http://www.dantes. doded.mil.

A Thanksgiving Community Service will be held Nov. 27, 11 a.m., at Memorial Chapel. A light lunch will be served following the service. For details, call (804) 734-0968 or 734-0970.

AAFES Family Photo Contest

Thanksgiving Dinner at Lee Club

The Army and Air Force Exchange is offering a “Mom and Baby Photo” sweepstakes with an opportunity to win a diamond pendant through Nov. 14. Ten shoppers, 18 years and older, will win the prize valued at $329. Participants can enter by submitting a photo of mom and baby to patriotfamily@aafes.com with “Mom and Baby Photo Sweepstakes” in the subject line.

A Thanksgiving Buffet will be served Nov. 28, 1 p.m., at the Lee Club, building 9009, at the corner of Mahone Avenue and Battle Drive. In addition to roasted turkey with cornbread stuffing and cranberry sauce, the offerings will include carved ham and sliced roast beef, Atlantic salmon, Cajun shrimp, red-skin mashed potatoes, candied yams, baby carrots, fresh fruit,

CENTENARIAN | Employee recalls

time at installation 67 years ago Continued from page 4 Martin eventually opened her own business in the early 1950s. Lighthouse Furniture, a Petersburg institution, has served thousands of customers in the Tri-Cities area and

beyond, she said. She retired from the appliance company four years ago, about the same time she was admitted to Dunlop. Longtime customers still call for advice, she said of the business run by her son.

“Everybody is my customer,” she said. “I’m loyal to all of them, and I treat them all alike.” Martin said her success in business – amid the age of big box retailers like Best Buy – is partly due to

Winners will be announced on or about Nov. 15. For details, visit www.shopmyexchange.com/patriotfamily.

Thanksgiving Service at Chapel

an unyielding emphasis on customer service as a way to gain loyalty with old customers and lure new ones. “Word-of-mouth is the best advertising,” she said. “We worked very hard at it.” Today, Martin is wheelchair bound but is lively and jovial. She likes spending time in her room and bowled and played other games at

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Dunlop until a few years ago. Harrison said her day wouldn’t be the same without her. “She’s like a fixture here,” she said. And a prominent fixture in the Tri-Cities area for more than 67 years. Martin said she doesn’t have answers for her longevity but figures faith, respect for humankind

and good, satisfying work are important as well as “being out in the public and trying to smile as much as you can,” she added. Harrison said Martin does that with ease and hopes she’ll keep doing it. “I just want her to live to be 110 and then she can come to my retirement party,” she said.

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www.fortleetraveller.com | November 7, 2013 | Traveller | 7

AMERICA’S MILITARY | SPOTLIGHT

63&$/)5('2+(51$1'(= Unit: 111th Quartermaster Company MOS: 92M – mortuary affairs specialist Age: 37 Time in service: three years Hometown: Weslaco, Texas Marital status: married with three children Personal strengths: “My strengths are my weaknesses. With an outgoing personality, I can sometimes take on too many tasks and overwhelm myself.” Pastimes: “I love football and love watching America’s team, the Dallas Cowboys. I also love working out.” Dream car: “A 1966 Ford Mustang – I love old, muscle cars and the Ford Mustang, to me, is the most attractive car around.” One place you would go on vacation: “Somewhere in Europe.” Favorite music artist: “Kenny Chesney – his songs are about life. It feels likes he’s singing about me.” Worst fear: “Losing my family.” Pet peeve: “When I see Soldiers and their uniforms are jacked up. It bothers me because that’s part of your job – being squared away and looking the part.” One lesson you learned that you like sharing with others: “To take your time; be careful; think everything through. Don’t say, ‘Oh well, I was young and dumb.’ That’s everybody’s favorite phrase, and it’s now becoming everybody’s excuse.” You’re older than most of your peers. How do you relate to them?: “I try to lead by example. I’m just an E-4, but I try to do the right thing.” One defining moment: “When I joined the Army. I decided to enlist at 35, and I thought I had done and seen it all. The Army introduced me to a whole other world.” One thing about you that nobody knows: “I am a Christian man, but I don’t go to Church as often as I would like to. I don’t have time.” Talk about childhood: “My father was a hard-working man, and we (his children) all got jobs as soon as we turned 16. It was very difficult growing up. I’m a first-generation American. My parents are from Mexico, and they both have grade-school educations. We grew up a very close-knit family, and we helped each other out. I love my brother and sisters, and they love me.” The celebrity or historical figure you admire: “Probably George Washington. Since joining the Army, I have a different outlook. The challenges he was faced with are the chal-

lenges I would love to tackle.” Why you joined the Army: “For financial reasons. The economy took a toll. I had been working for 10 straight years and had been laid off.” Your reasons for staying in the Army: “Part of it is comfort – my family is very well cared for – and part of it is there are a lot of misguided young people here, and I want to lead them.” What you like about your MOS: “I like the fact that everybody here works together. It’s very close-knit.” What people don’t know about 92Ms: “That the people who do this work actually like it. We feel that we make a difference and we do.” You deployed within the past year: talk about your experiences: “When I was deployed, my wife was pregnant. I had to experience the birth of my child on Skype. Shortly thereafter, we had some babies come through our morgue. I felt uneasy about it. I hadn’t held my newborn child in my arms, and to think that if something had happened to me, I would have never got to hold him. That experience brought out that notion. I get goose bumps all over my body thinking about it even now.” What it takes to be a Soldier: “It’s a lot of hard work, and its not for everybody. You have to go to bed early, work late and go without seeing your family.’ Best thing about the Army: “The benefits and the fact that you’re going to see places you otherwise would not be able to see.” Worst thing about the Army: “The fact that you have to spend so much time away from family.” Goals: “I want to do this as long as I can – until they kick me out – and also take advantage of benefits like education.” ±&RPSLOHGE\7$QWKRQ\%HOO

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8 | Traveller | November 7, 2013 | www.fortleetraveller.com

UPDATE | CASCOM, Fort Lee CG

offers information about state of post Continued from page 2 CASCOM leads the DA effort to develop occupational credentials, licenses and apprenticeships. Our Soldier for Life credentialing efforts enhance Army readiness by validating technical knowledge and widening a Soldier’s skill sets. Also, we will expand by 18 additional MOSs over the next 16 months. We stood up the Soldier for Life office to manage this critical effort that requires regular coordination between our proponent schools, Army Logistics University, Soldier

Support Institute, Forces Command and the Training and Doctrine Command. As we work to accomplish our many tasks, we have not forgotten or lost sight of our commitment to provide the very best for our military, civilians, retirees, family members, installation partners and the local communities. In pursuit of our commitment, the largest Army lodging facility in the continental United States opened in late December 2012 and will open an on-site restaurant in 2014. Also, the state-of-the-art Brig. Gen. Terence J. Hildner Training Support

Center opened and can accommodate training for approximately 1,000 Soldiers a week at peak operation. The facility offers a digital classroom, weapon simulator and training aids. Additionally, a 21,000square-foot state-of-the-art youth center was completed in June and will provide safe and inviting alternatives in a campustype environment for Fort Lee’s middle school youth and teens. I truly have come to appreciate the special partnership and bond that we share with our installation partners and the local communities. Each has been with us every step of the way and that truly has made a difference. The relationship that Fort Lee shares with the surrounding communities began more than nine decades ago and continues to flourish. The teamwork and

cooperation that radiates from both communities is invaluable and will become even more critical as we move forward. The months ahead will be demanding and challenging, but I am confident that the Sustainment Team will continue to excel while producing excellent results for our customers. I thank each member of the Team for your hard work and dedication. Your commitment each day ensures the Army Sustainment Think Tank is leading the way! On the eve of two special holidays, Veterans Day and Thanksgiving, Denise and I salute all veterans, yesterday and today, and wish everyone a safe and enjoyable Thanksgiving. Support Starts Here!

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www.fortleetraveller.com | November 7, 2013 | Traveller | 9

OFF DUTY IN THE COMMUNITY | VISIT WEEKEND GETAWAYS

Discovering Virginia If you’ve been giving thought to your weekend itinerary and searching for something unique to do, then look no further. Quick getaway opportunities are abundant in Virginia, and they range from a calming scenic drive down historic byways to weekend retreats for the entire family. A journey through the Commonwealth’s Shenandoah Valley starting with your arrival at the world famous Luray Caverns and its array of attractions, is sure to delight any age. Eastern America’s largest and most popular caverns is famous for its variety of formations and natural color. It’s also the place where you can hear the sounds of the world’s only Stalacpipe Organ. Experience the history of America in the Car and Carriage Caravan Museum with more than 140 original items dating from 1725. Children of all ages will have fun winding their way through the Garden Maze and will likely enjoy the rescue animals at the Luray Zoo. Check out Virginia’s Skyline Drive, a National Scenic Byway that runs 105 miles along the crest of the Blue Ridge Mountains starting in the north of the Shenandoah Valley at Front Royal to Waynesboro, where it meets the Blue Ridge Parkway. Experience southern-style recreation as you explore the beauty of Lake Gaston, Clarksville on the Lake and South Boston. Grab your hiking boots, life jacket and sense of adventure as you explore scenic drives. Visit local wineries, incredible eateries and fall foliage on nature hikes and around the lake in Virginia’s only lakeside town in Clarksville. Then order up a gourmet picnic basket from local taverns. Only four blocks away at Clarksville Marina, you can board your private pontoon boat and spend the day exploring Kerr Lake followed by a hike just one mile away in the Occoneechee State Park. Continue your drive to MacCallumMore Gardens in Chase City to visit the botanical gardens, arboretum and wildlife sanctuary. Make it a family getaway to the mountains and breathe in the fresh mountain air in Roanoke Valley. Walk around the historic Roanoke City Farmer’s Market for shopping, dining and sightseeing. Check out the planetarium at the Science Museum of Western Virginia and enjoy the hands-on exhibits. Check in at the Holiday Inn Valley View and receive a welcome basket to the Roanoke Valley along with a disposable camera. At Peaks of Otter, just 35 minutes from Roanoke off the Blue Ridge Parkway, you can hike or take the shuttle to some incredible views. Stop at Mill Mountain Zoo for a fun visit and ride on the ZooChoo. Spend the day taking in the railroad at the O. Winston Link Museum and discover how the steam era influenced much of the region. Stroll along the railwalk, an interactive display of rail artifacts that will lead you to the Virginia Museum of Transportation, which houses one of the largest collections of rolling stock in the east including the 1218 and J611 historic steam engines. For more information on these interesting places and many others, visit www.virginia.org/Fall/48hourFallGetaways.

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10 | Traveller | November 7, 2013 | www.fortleetraveller.com

More than 1,200 ordnance troops participate in annual safety runs More than 1,200 military members from the 16th Ordnance Battalion participated in a pair of Halloween Safety Runs on the Ordnance Campus, Oct. 20 and 31. The earlier event was conducted at midnight to accommodate the schedule of night-class Soldiers. Both runs featured costumes, cadence and plenty of camaraderie. The enthusiasm for this annual fun and safety run was reflected in the costumes worn by the command teams, faculty members and the participating students. Some featured battery-operated lights and motion. A couple of groups demonstrated their team spirit by dressing up as Justice League superheroes and characters (thing 1 and thing 2) out of a Dr. Seuss book. Command Sgt. Maj. Cheryl Greene, 16th Ord. Bn. CSM, showed her less-serious side by dressing as a clown for the first run and a jester for the second event.

Lt. Col. Steven Carozza, battalion commander, wore the scary costume from the movie “Scream” for the Oct. 20 run and donned a curly wig and huge “70’s-discoguy” moustache for the Oct. 31 event. During their opening remarks, the command team thanked the service members for their hard work and enthusiasm, and acknowledged the participation of second lieutenants from the Army Logistics University Professional Leader Development Program. They also placed a lot of emphasis on safety as Fort Lee heads into the holiday and winter seasons. Both of the 3.1-mile runs began at Whittington Field and circled the Ordnance Campus. Along the route, Soldiers passed by the equipment they are learning to maintain, including munitions, Humvees, Bradley Fighting Vehicles, Paladins and M1 Abrams Tanks. Cadre members called

Contributed Photo

The “night class” Soldiers of the 16th Ordnance Battalion show off their costumes while posing for a photo following a midnight run on Oct. 20.

cadence, while company guidon bearers circled formations to rouse Soldiers. “It was a truly remarkable sight to see all those Soldiers running in costume, singing cadence,” wrote Capt. Robert Lobdell, commander of Alpha Company,16th Ord. Bn., in a written summary for the Traveller. “While the costumes and team spirt were the centerpiece of the run, I think the efforts of the first sergeants and cadre members is another true story of leadership that should be highlighted. Understanding the nightshift Soldier’s difficult sched-

ule and conducting two separate runs to accommodate them is a good example of their efforts to stay engaged with their Soldiers and provide opportunities for max participation. “Building camaraderie and esprit de corps in every ordnance Soldier is a focus of the Ordnance School,” Lobdell also noted. “Investing time, through engaged leadership, is the principle method ordnance leaders use to convey this critical message.” – 16th Ordnance Battalion

VETERAN’S DAY November 11, 2013

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www.fortleetraveller.com | November 7, 2013 | Traveller | 11

Earn a University of Richmond degree on your terms.

Pledging your time, talents and life to your country can make focusing on your educational goals challenging. At the University of Richmond, we offer degree programs that work with your busy personal and professional life. And your budget. Earn your degree part time in the evenings. Choose from several undergraduate or graduate programs. Attend class with other adult students. Be part of a vibrant and inspiring college campus. And do it all for much less than you might think.

ATTEND OUR NEXT INFO SESSION TO LEARN MORE! Great options for working adults, including active duty, military spouses, those preparing to leave active duty and civilian base personnel.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14• 6–7:30 PM UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND’S JEPSON ALUMNI CENTER RSVP: spcs.richmond.edu/returntoschool or (804) 289-8133


12 | Traveller | November 7, 2013 | www.fortleetraveller.com

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www.fortleetraveller.com | November 7, 2013 | Traveller | 13

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(TOP) As Security Specialist Benessa Hubbard (partly obscured) stands by, U.S. Army Garrison Command Sgt. Maj. Shelia Nelson, Deputy to the Garrison Commander Melissa Magowan and Fort Lee Garrison Commander Col. Paul K. Brooks work together to answer security questions during the Installation Security Office Open House Oct. 23. The Department of Plans, Training, Mobilization and Security element opened its doors to all installation security and assistant managers in an effort to network, share business practices and keep managers abreast of the latest program updates. (ABOVE) Lead Security Specialist Selena Hamilton assists Andy Haugland, CASCOM security manager, with a security question.

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14 | Traveller | November 7, 2013 | www.fortleetraveller.com

EMO offers steps for successful recycling National Recycling Week runs Nov. 1115, and the Environmental Management Office encourages all Fort Lee members to participate in recycling efforts. Recycling is a way to ensure that items we’ve finished using are returned to the resource pool to be turned into something useful or cleaned and reused. It conserves raw materials and saves additional energy that manufacturers would otherwise use in producing new products from scratch. Recycling also reduces the amount of reusable material taking up vital landfill space, which is a growing issue across the United States. In addition, recycling can decrease pollution that results from waste disposal and reduce the consumption of raw materials which conserves our natural resources. Not everyone feels motivated to recycle, and indeed, it can sometimes seem like a complex undertaking. After understanding the benefits and getting into the habit of recycling, many realize it’s not that hard and it soon becomes second nature. Making the commitment to recycle in your household or workplace is a large benefit to our country and our environment. Make a commitment to recycle as much as you can. When reducing your family’s consumption and reusing all that you can, recycling can help to reduce the amount of items going into your garbage each week. This



At participating McDonald’s. ©2013 McDonald’s. • 641793.1

practice will ensure that you are contributing to a sustainable and long-term commitment to your community by making the most of our environmental resources. By recycling regularly, you show other people that it is possible. Recycling can offer lasting results that make a difference in your community. Get informed. The majority of households in Virginia’s urban areas are becoming part of a municipal or similar recycling collection program. If this is the case for you, you’ll already have a grasp on the basics of recycling your materials. Even with programs available to you, there can be some confusion as to what is recyclable and what is not. Each program can be different depending on your state or county. Much of it is dependent on the availability of nearby recycling facilities. And if you’ve moved around a bit, you might be surprised to learn that something you could recycle in one place cannot be recycled somewhere else. Be sure to read the accompanying information associated with your household recycling collectors, which may be printed on your recycling container, printed in brochures, and on websites. If you can’t find the information anywhere, call your recycling collector for questions. On Fort Lee, you can call Directorate of Public Works Environmental Division at (804) 734-4798

per delicious.

or 734-3766 for recycling guidance. Know what can be recycled. Many items are recyclable and over time, more items are added to the list of what can be recycled. Recycling is dependent on the community you live in or the military installation that you work at. Fort Lee’s Mandatory Recycling Policy is located at www.lee.army.mil under the Services Tab; click Fort Lee Policies, Next click the Tab with Environmental in the Title, then click on Policy 19-03 Fort Lee Recycling Policy. As a general rule these items can be recycled: • All cardboard, paper board boxes etc. • All paper, white copier paper including phone books, magazines, newspapers and waste office paper • All metals, aluminum cans; and any scrap metal to include steel food cans, coffee tins • Plastics with recyclable symbols on them; usually PET or type “1” plastic and H.D.P.E or type “2” plastic • Plastic bags (these should be recycled at local plastic bag drop-off points – AAFES has one at the Main Exchange) • Glass bottles • Yard waste must be place in clear bags • Toner/Ink cartridges can be recycled on Fort Lee; take to Building 7121 • Electronic waste – but not hand-receipt items – by taking it to recycling center • Used light bulbs, batteries, oil/antifreeze and hazardous waste can be recycled by calling (804) 734-3811 Set up your own personal recycling system that works best for your area. Recycling requires space in the home or

workplace, so it’s important to work out how to deal with this in a way that doesn’t negatively impact living or working space or create a hazard. There are a lot of great options that you can either purchase or make to keep recycling sorted and safe within your home and work before putting it out for collection. Some of your choices may depend on the preferences of the collector – in some areas, mixing recyclables is acceptable, while in others, they will only collect separated recyclables or even collect different types of recyclables on different weeks. At Fort Lee the recycling is commingled. Commingled recycling means customers can place all recyclable materials together and it is sorted after it is collected. Commingled recycling makes it easier for the customer. The recycling process on Fort Lee should follow the aforementioned policy. Be a clean and thoughtful recycler. Before adding some items to recycling, ensure that they’re clean. Rinse food or drink residues out of bottles and cans. Cleaning recyclables will prevent odor and pest infestation. Spread the word. Become a champion for recycling by motivating neighbors, influencing work groups, getting leadership inspired and spreading the recycling attitude! During National Recycling Week, Recycling Action Teams will review the recycling process here at Fort Lee. When they visit your building, ask recycling questions or give them new ideas for improving the Fort Lee recycling process. – Environmental Management Office


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WK2UGQDQFH6ROGLHUVVXSSRUW 0DWRDFD(OHPHQWDU\)HVWLYDO Forty-five Soldiers from Bravo Company, 16th Ordnance Battalion, earned high praise from Matoaca Elementary School administrators and its Parent, Teacher Association after an evening of volunteer work at the facility’s annual fall festival on Oct. 25. The ongoing partnership between Chesterfield County schools like Matoaca and the ordnance battalion at Fort Lee has been nurtured over the past year by frequent volunteer projects and special events in which Soldiers and students interact. For the festival, the Bravo Bulldogs – led by 1st Lt. Emily White, company executive officer, and Sgt. 1st Class Moses Torres, platoon sergeant – helped with the setup and operation of 17 game stations throughout the

school. The sounds of laughter and cheering as students competed for candy and prizes clearly showed the impact of their work. Pvt. Jonai Henderson, a 91-Charlie (utilities equipment repair) advanced individual training student, said she “enjoyed every moment” of the evening and found it to be rewarding from personal and professional standpoints. “This is a great way to interact with children in the community and show the partnership that the Army shares with its neighbors,” she said. “It also is fun just being back in a (grade) school environment. I was able to play some of the games with the students, and it just made us feel like kids again.” As the event drew to a close at

MILITARY AND GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES

around 8:45 p.m., PTA President Sheila Camacho and other parents and teachers thanked each of the Soldiers. Their smiles and expressions of gratitude were accompanied by a smorgasbord of deserts that the volunteers brought back to share with their fellow Soldiers in the barracks. “When I asked one group how they felt about the volunteer event, the response was overwhelmingly positive,” Torres wrote in a note to the Traveller. “They indicated that they all want to continue volunteering and stay involved in their community when they return home or move on to their next assignment. “That’s great to hear,” he continued. “It means we not only contributed to the strong bond between Fort Lee and the sur-

ALWAYS APPRO O ED E

FOR CREDIT

Contributed Photo

Privates Jesus Resendez and Crystal McMillian from Bravo Company, 16th Ordnance Battalion, watch as a student tosses bean bags at a tic-tac-toe board during the Oct. 25 Matoaca Elementary School Fall Festival. Forty-five members of the Fort Lee battalion volunteered for the event and helped with the setup and operation of 17 game stations throughout the school.

rounding community, but also showed some young Soldiers how valuable their assistance can be and the impact it can have

on youngsters and families.” – Bravo Company, 16th Ordnance Battalion

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www.fortleetraveller.com | November 7, 2013 | Traveller | 17

16 | Traveller | November 7, 2013 | www.fortleetraveller.com

Š’—ȱ‘Žȱ˜ —ȱ’—” (ABOVE LEFT) Command Sgt. Maj. Clifton Johnson, commandant of the Logistics Noncommissioned Officer Academy, shouts “no shame” in unison with the 600-plus participants of the Oct. 31 Paint the Town Pink Breast Cancer Awareness Month Run and Walk that began and ended at Williams Stadium. The NCO Academy organized the early morning event in recognition of the October observance of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. “This is a serious issue,” Johnson noted during his opening remarks. “Thus far in 2013 alone, 232,240 individuals have been diagnosed with breast cancer ... It truly underscores the importance of awareness and regular screening.” (ABOVE) First Sgt. Charles Badgley, Ordnance first sergeant for the NCOA, proudly sports a pink ensemble while participating in the awareness run.

(ABOVE) Capt. Matthew Schade, a Quartermaster Basic Officer Leaders Course instructor, jogs down B Avenue while participating in the Oct. 31 Paint the Town Pink Breast Cancer Awareness Run and Walk at Fort Lee. More than 600 students and faculty from the Army Logistics University participated along with personnel from other organizations on post. (RIGHT) Command Sgt. Maj. Sheila Nelson, U.S. Army Garrison Fort Lee CSM, shares her enthusiasm while taking part in the awareness walk. Nelson said she was participating in memory of a friend, Tammy Taylor, who passed away as a result of breast cancer. Several other individuals also stepped forward to mention who they were running for during the opening ceremony. They included Staff Sgt. Johnny Lunn who was running on behalf of his mother, a four-time breast cancer survivor, and Staff Sgt. Andre Corbin, who ran in support of his grandmother who had a mastectomy this week.

Photos by Patrick Buffett

(ABOVE) Capt. Jonathan Kalczynski leads his Bravo Company (71st Transportation Battalion) troops back into Williams Stadium after the breast cancer awareness run. (LEFT) Lt. Col. Kevin Holton, commander of the Army Logistics University’s 71st Transportation Bn., thanks the many students, faculty members and civilian employees who participated in the event.

Photos by Amy Perry

KICKIN’ OUT VIOLENCE

(CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) Master Sgt. Troy Baylis, 16th Ordnance Battalion, rounds third base during one of the early games of the Oct. 31 “Kick Domestic Violence” kickball tournament at Williams Stadium. The 16th Ord., team won the game, 6-2, over the Family and MWR Directorate. • Dan Gauvin, FMWR team, slides into second base before Staff Sgt. Albert Victor, 832nd Ord. Bn., can tag him out during the championship game. FMWR edged out the 832nd team during the final game, 7-6. • FMWR team members Devin Robinson, left, and Mark Masi collide while attempting to catch a ball for an out during the championship game. • Staff Sgt. Larry Lloyd, 832nd Ord. Bn., slides into home plate during one of the preliminary games of the kickball tournament. In that contest, the 832nd defeated the Army Community Service team, 13-5. • Staff Sgt. Albert Victor attempts to tag out Tameika Rutherford, ACS team, at first base in a preliminary game. According to the organizers, the kickball tournament was a “fun and positive way” to close out the October observance of Domestic Violence Awareness Month. In all, about 50 Fort Lee military and civilian employees participated. For more photos of the games, visit the Fort Lee Traveller website at www.ftleetraveller.com.


18 | Traveller | November 7, 2013 | www.fortleetraveller.com


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John M., 10 Year Veteran, Navy

Blondell P. 10 Year Veteran, Air Force

Kathy W.R., 8 Year Veteran, Coast Guard

Rev. John L. 13-Year Veteran, Air Force

Alberto O. 12-Year Veteran, Marine Corps

Betty H. 32-Year Veteran, Navy

Rufus T. 21-Year Veteran, Army

H O W D O YO U P I C T U R E A H E R O ? No matter the era, branch, or duty, every man and woman who served has contributed to an honorable and heroic legacy. This Veterans Day, join USAA and veteran combat photographer Stacy Pearsall in celebrating that legacy through the Veterans Portrait Project.

We invite you to see more of the Veterans Portrait Project at usaa.com/veteransday USAA means United Services Automobile Association. Š 2013 USAA. 148444-1113


20 | Traveller | November 7, 2013 | www.fortleetraveller.com

‘Dancing’ at the Playhouse should not to be missed Terrence Phillip Williams FMWR

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Enjoy the Warmth of a Colonial Williamsburg

Christmas.

Step back into a season colored with the excitement of festivities surrounded by dearest friends and family. Hundreds of joyous events, grand and intimate, fill Colonial Williamsburg’s buildings with music, dance, merriment, and sumptuous banquets. Share with your loved ones this holiday of our founders— a season to celebrate the gifts of the past year and the promise of a bountiful new year. Plan now to join Colonial Williamsburg for our holiday season of Yuletide festivals.

Visit your local MWR/ITT office for details and discounts.

© 2013 The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

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Contributed Photo

Organization leaders and advanced individual training Soldiers from the 23rd Quartermaster Brigade pose for a photo during the Oct. 27 Military Appreciation Day service at Greater Faith AME Zion Church in Petersburg. About 50 members of Romeo Company, 262nd QM Battalion, and Golf Company, 244th QM Bn., attended the event that included a worship service and a luncheon. Among those pictured are Dr. Audrey Jones (wearing scarf), the pastor of Zion Church; Capt. Rodney Milbourne (black shirt), commander of Romeo Co.; Staff Sgt. Lakeshia Whitmore (center), a Golf Company platoon sergeant; and 1st Lt. Daniel Salley, assistant S-1 for the 23rd QM Bde.

VETS | Supportive public is the muscle

behind our fighting men and women Continued from page 2 thank you veterans, for accepting the challenge of service in blind faith. Your actions are the hefty shoulders upon which freedom stands. Furthermore, thank you America, for honoring those with the mighty shoulders; those souls who decidedly risk their lives for the wellbeing of others. Thank you for telling them you stand steadfastly in their corners, no matter how much you agree or disagree with their mission; For showing them their sacrifices are worthy of your hopes, thoughts and prayers. Thank you for sending them off to foreign lands

with swelled chests, confidence and assurance; for resisting the urge to abandon the whole when some of the parts fail. Thank you for brightening their days with care packages, letters and other goods as they face daunting challenges in unfamiliar lands; for consoling and assisting them when they’ve suffered the loss of a buddy. Thank you for understanding that war produces terrible tragedies – the loss of limbs and eyesight and invisible wounds that are slow to heal; for celebrating every hill taken, battle won and enemy defeated; for showing your gratitude and pride in

their accomplishments upon returning home. Thank you for providing services and assistance to their family members in their absence; for realizing military service makes it difficult for veterans to find jobs, buy homes, get an education and raise families; for recognizing that military service is our nation’s most distinct honor and one none should ever take lightly. Thank you for understanding that a pledge to serve is a pledge to die, if necessary, to preserve our way of life; and for knowing that mighty shoulders have to be strengthened – not just on Veterans Day but everyday.

www.fortleetraveller.com | November 7, 2013 | Traveller | 21

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22 | Traveller | November 7, 2013 | www.fortleetraveller.com

KENNER CONNECTION | VACCINES, APLSS

Kenner announces new APLSS slogan Tereasa Wade KAHC Public Affairs OfďŹ cer

When beneficiaries visit Kenner Army Health Clinic, they may notice signs around the building featuring a red apple that has been bitten to the core and the words: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kenner Army Health Clinic is committed to the core! Send your APLSS survey back to keep Kenner on track!â&#x20AC;? What is it all about: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kennerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new campaign slogan to underscore the importance of sending back the Army Provider Level Satisfaction Survey that beneficiaries receive in the mail after a visit to the clinic. The slogan is another way in which Kenner encourages beneficiaries to assist the clinic in improving the quality of care for Soldiers, families and retirees. The satisfaction survey was created by the Office of the Surgeon General. Patients are randomly selected 24 hours after a visit with a physician or other health care provider.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The promotion of the APLSS survey to our beneficiaries is one of the best ways to recognize an agency for providing great care and to enable that care platform to become better resourced over time as a result of these outcomes,â&#x20AC;? said Col. Thomas S. Bundt, commander, Kenner Army Health Clinic. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our staff is dedicated to their work, and to show them how much we appreciate their efforts, there is no better way than through our APLSS survey systems.â&#x20AC;? The survey program selects active duty, family members and other beneficiaries in proportion to the members seen by their providers. Patients are sent a letter that asks them to complete the questionnaire online, on paper (fill out the responses and mail it back), or through a telephonic interactive voice system. Returned surveys are processed every day. All surveys received in the past two weeks are tabulated and posted to the Kenner website and disseminated to various military facilities.

Kenner receives its funding, in part, based on these responses. The higher the score the clinic receives, the more services it can provide for patients. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As a result of these surveys last year, Kenner was able to achieve satisfaction scores that resulted in additional funding provided to our facility that was then used to resource staff, purchase the latest medical equipment and gain recognition to be chosen for additional facilities projects,â&#x20AC;? said Bundt. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All of these actions benefit the consumers of our system of health.â&#x20AC;? While the clinic strives for the highest score possible (which is a five), if you feel it does not merit such a score, speak to the clinic nurse manager or patient advocate before leaving the clinic. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The new slogan, chosen by the staff, demonstrates their commitment to the quality of care provided, and we are grateful for the feedback,â&#x20AC;? said Bundt. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you have any concerns during your visit, please bring those to the attention of the staff and allow them the opportunity to address those prior to leaving the clinic. This is a component of service that can then be reflected in your survey submissions. Thank you for allowing us to serve your health care needs.â&#x20AC;?

ROCK CHURCH OF PETERSBURG

Seasonal ďŹ&#x201A;u vaccine now available at post clinics The best way to prevent seasonal flu is to get vaccinated each year. The Active Duty Clinic offers the seasonal flu vaccine to active duty Soldiers on a walk-in basis Monday through Friday from 1-3 p.m. Troop Medical Clinic 1 will offer the seasonal flu vaccine to the advanced individual training student population from 6-8 a.m. MondayFriday. TMC 1 screens its patient population to ensure all are vaccinated for the flu during sick call hours. The Mosier Consolidated Troop Medical Clinic offers the seasonal flu vaccine to Ordnance AIT students from 1-4 p.m., Monday-Friday. Kenner Army Health Clinic has begun administering the seasonal flu vaccine to eligible family members and retirees enrolled to Kenner for their health care. The Immunization Clinic in the Family Medicine suite will offer the vaccine

LUNCH BUFFET 11:00am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2:30pm www.elephantthais.com

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9:30AM ..................... Sunday School 10:30AM ................... Morning Worship Service

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You know that noise your heart makes when you work out? ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CALLED APPLAUSE.      , ) 2 /(  (,') 1 2  ( 2 /   ( ), 2 "2) 2 ,0% , ),  0 , & (2 " 2 /( ,  1   ),(   ) ,/( ,  , , %  (  ( 1 2) ,  1( 2 /( ()   (, ,,   ),(  0), 111% (  (,% ( (   !33!% ) )"  "( 0 ) "/  )(0%  ! (   (, ))  , 

to walk-ins Monday-Friday, from 7:15 -11:30 a.m. and 1-3:30 p.m. No appointment is needed. The Immunization Clinic in the Wilkerson Pediatric Clinic offers the vaccine to walk-ins Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday, 9-11 a.m. and 1:30-3:30 p.m. The Occupational Health Clinic provides vaccines to DOD Civilians Wednesdays, 9-11 a.m. on the second floor of Kenner, room B203. Civilians should be prepared to present their CAC card. TRICARE covers both the flu shot and the nasal spray vaccine. The flu vaccine also may be obtained from a pharmacist at one of the 45,000 network pharmacies that administer vaccines to TRICARE beneficiaries. To learn more about the flu basics, treatment and prevention, visit www.cdc.gov/flu. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Kenner Army Health Clinic Public Affairs

Make Us Your Home Away From Home While at Fort Lee!

First Baptist Church of Hopewell Where Neighbors Become Family Rev. W. Darrell Boggs, Pastor 401 N. 2nd Avenue Hopewell, VA 23860 Less than 5 miles from Fort Lee â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Corner of Rt. 10 and 2nd Ave. in Downtown Hopewell

Sunday Worship Schedule First Praise Service 8:45 a.m. (Casual/Contemporary)

Sunday School Traditional Worship

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(804) 458-2752 www.fbchopewell.org

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www.fortleetraveller.com | November 7, 2013 | Traveller | 23

3HS7DON Photos by Patrick Buffett

For the strength of the pack is the wolf ... and the strength of the wolf is the pack

The volunteer coaches of the Youth Sports Program football and cheerleading teams at Fort Lee organized a first-time pep rally Friday evening at the Post Field House. The event was a chance to “build excitement among the players and parents, and celebrate the positive aspects of playing team sports,” according to the organizers. One highlight of the evening was the introduction of the Wolf Pack’s new mascot “Rocky” (pictured above and left celebrating with players and family members in the stands). The youth cheerleading squads also performed several routines for the appreciative audience. The show of support fueled the Pee-Wee Wolf Pack players as they toppled the Hampton Devils, 13-12 in overtime, on Saturday. The two teams will meet again this Saturday in Hampton to determine who will play in the championship game on Nov. 16.


24 | Traveller | November 7, 2013 | www.fortleetraveller.com

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STOP BY YOUR LOCAL BJ’s TODAY! To find a Club near you, visit BJs.com/locations. All BJ’s Memberships are subject to BJ’s Membership Terms, ask in-Club or go to BJs.com/terms. *This offer is not available online, may not be combined with other offers, is not redeemable for cash and is nontransferable. Coupon will be emailed, thus requiring your email address at enrollment. Valid military ID required. Available to all active or retired military personnel.

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www.fortleetraveller.com | November 7, 2013 | Traveller | 25

94 cents of every dollar supports programs and services for local military families.


26 | Traveller | November 7, 2013 | www.fortleetraveller.com

LOCAL ACTIVITIES

FOR THE

EVENTS Band Performance at HideAway | Nov. 9 The J.O.B., a Top 40 rock band from central Virginia, will perform a free Veterans Day weekend show, Nov. 9, 8 p.m., at the HideAway, building 15013, 5th Street. Two band members – Jim O’Ferrell and Len Dupilia – served as Army Rangers. For details, call (804) 765-1523.

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FORT LEE COMMUNITY Florida Tech Applications | Nov. 13 Florida Tech’s Extended Studies site will hold information meetings on gaining a master’s degree, Nov. 13, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m., at 2401 Quarters Road. Application fees are waived for new applicants who attend and sign up for classes. To register, visit http://blog.fit.edu/ esd-instant-decision-day-fort-lee. For details, call (804) 734-7147.

Veterans Day Concert | Nov. 10

Cardinal Autumn Wine and Beer Festival | The Fort Lee 392nd Army Band and the Nov. 15

When your child is finding it hard to cope, we are here to help.

Petersburg Symphony will present a free Veterans Day concert, Nov. 10, 1 p.m., at McGuire VA Medical Center, 1201 Broad Rock Blvd., Richmond. The Army’s concert band will perform in an approximate 1-hour outdoor production with the symphony. For details, visit the 392nd Army Band Facebook page.

Holiday Recipe Exchange | Nov. 12 The Family and MWR Fort Lee Community Library is hosting a free Holiday Recipe Exchange, Nov. 12, 10:3011:30 a.m., on the 2nd floor of Army Logistics University, building 12420, 34th Street. Participants should bring a copy of their favorite holiday recipe, and they will gain a collection of recipes. For details, call (804) 765-8095.

Turkey Shoot | Nov. 13

If your child is showing signs of extreme distress, come to us. Our team of behavioral healthcare specialists provides acute care when your child is feeling overwhelmed. With our newly renovated facility and programs that meet the needs of adolescents, we’re here to give young people and their families the tools needed to get through the tough times. We provide free assessments 24/7, at the region’s only freestanding psychiatric facility. And, our evidence-based program is tailored to treat patients dealing with a wide range of emotional issues.

At Poplar Springs Hospital no emergency room visit, or referral, is needed.

For more information visit poplarsprings.com, or call 804-733-6874 or 866-546-2229.

The Fort Lee Provost Marshall Office will hold its 10th Annual Holiday Helper Turkey Shoot Nov. 13, 11 a.m. - 7 p.m., at the Outdoor Recreation Trap Range (adjacent to the HideAway). It will benefit the Holiday Helper program. The cost is $2 for one shot and $5 for three. Hams and turkeys will be awarded to the best shot per group. Personally owned shotguns that are registered in accordance with CASCOM regulation and Fort Lee Policy are welcome. All ammunition will be supplied. The Game Warden’s Office will raffle off a $500 Bass Pro Gift Card. For details, call (804) 652-5979.

The Cardinal Golf Club will host its annual Autumn Harvest Wine and Beer Tasting Festival, Nov. 15, 5 p.m. Participants will enjoy a seasonal selection of wines, beers and light food, and receive a commemorative wine glass. Tickets are $15 for members and active duty Soldiers, and $20 for all others. Participants must be age 21 or older. For registration and details, call (804) 734-2899.

Digital Photo Contest | Nov. 7 -30 Color and monochrome photos by Army personnel are being accepted for entry in the 2013 Army Digital Photography Contest until Nov. 30. There is no fee to enter. Cash prizes will be awarded to winners in several categories. JPG images should be submitted to https://apps.imcom.army.mil/apptracmain. For details, call (804) 734-6137.

Read-2-Rover | Nov. 18 The next Read-2-Rover program is set for Nov. 18, 5-6 p.m., at the Fort Lee Community Library. The event is open to any child in the community up to age 12. Parents should call the library by noon on Nov. 18 to sign up their children. Up to 15 youths will be accepted for each session. The program is offered every third Monday. The library is located on the 2nd floor of Army Logistics University, building 12420, 34th Street. For details, call (804) 765-8095.


www.fortleetraveller.com | November 7, 2013 | Traveller | 27

Calendar, continued Army Education Center Open House | Nov. 21 The Fort Lee Army Education Center will hold its annual Education Fair, Nov. 21, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., at Liberty Chapel. The event is being held in recognition of American Education Week. Participants can meet with representatives from the Army Career and Alumni Program, many colleges and universities, Troops to Teachers, Veterans Administration and more. Individuals should visit the AEC, building 12400, 700 Quarters Road, for information on ACES programs and services. For details, call (804) 765-3570.

CFC Golf Scramble | Nov. 22 The Combined Federal Campaign will sponsor an “Each One, Reach One” golf scramble, Nov. 22, 10 a.m., at the Cardinal Golf Club. The event will have a shotgun start at noon followed by dinner. The cost is $40 for members and $50 for all others. The fee includes golf, a golf cart, dinner and

prizes. Paid entries should be received by Nov. 20 by the club. For details, call (804) 734-7442 or email andrew.r.chaddock.mil@mail.mil.

Troops to Teachers Briefing | Nov. 22 A Teaching as a Second Career Briefing is set for Nov. 22, 10-11:30 a.m., at the Army Education Center, building 12400, 700 Quarters Road. Troops to Teachers pays up to $10,000 in stipends and bonuses. For details, call (804) 765-3570.

Cardinal Turkey Shoot Golf Tournament | Nov. 23 A Turkey Shoot Golf Tournament is slated for Nov. 23, 9 a.m., at the Cardinal Golf Club. Open to all players, the format is a two-person scramble. The cost is $40 for members and $55 for all others. The fee includes golf, a cart, lunch, beverages and prizes. Each player also will receive a frozen turkey. Participants should register and pay by Nov. 20. For details, call (804) 734-2899.

Bike Nights | Every Wednesday

Exceptional Kids Lego Club | Nov. 19

“Bike Nights” are held at the HideAway every Wednesday starting at 4 p.m. Those who have been riding for decades or are just starting out, will surely enjoy this evening of music and “chrome envy.” The HideAway is located on 5th Street next to the Outdoor Recreation Center. For details, call (804) 765-1539.

A 4x2 Club is being formed by the Exceptional Family Member Program. The next meeting is Nov. 19, 6-7 p.m., at Army Community Service, 1231 Mahone Ave. Participants should be at least 4 years old, and all children must be accompanied by an adult. Legos will be provided. For details, call (804) 734-7965.

Relocation Readiness | Ongoing

ACS

Four Relocation Readiness classes are offered by ACS at Fort Lee. The next Overseas Briefings are set for Nov. 20 and Dec. 18, 9 a.m. - noon, at the Soldier Support Center. The other classes are 10 a.m. - noon at the ACS building. ESponsorship and Application Training will meet Nov. 26. Immigration and Citizenship will meet Dec. 3, and Hearts Apart will meet Dec. 6. ACS also holds a newcomers’ briefing every Monday at 2 p.m. at the Soldier Support Center. Spouses are welcome. For details or registration, call (804) 7346388.

Autism Support Group | Nov. 7 The Autism Support Group, sponsored by the Exceptional Family Member Program, will hold a dad’s and mom’s session, Nov. 7, 6-8 p.m., at Mount Pleasant Baptist Church, 3110 Greenwood Ave., Colonial Heights. Dr. David Gordon, father of a grown son with autism, will speak with the dads. Bathroom battles and bunco will be discussed in the mom’s session. Dinner and child care will be provided. For details, call (804) 734-7965.

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28 | Traveller | November 7, 2013 | www.fortleetraveller.com

Calendar, continued SPORTS Get Fit, Stay Fit | Daily A variety of weekly fitness classes are available through the Family and MWR Sports Office. The cost is usually $4 per class, and a fitness card may be used for most. The 10-class punch card costs $20. Some classes are free. Yoga (Iyengar) is free for active duty military and spouses of deployed troops. Classes with a fee include Aerobics, Boot Camp, INSANITY, Pilates, Spinning, Spin Intervals, Yoga (Inyengar), Yogaworks (Vinyasa), Zumba and Zumba Toning. Workout with Weights in the House of Pain is free to all patrons, however, individuals must complete a fitness assessment. For details, call (804) 734-6198.

YOUTH Fall Festival | Nov. 9 The Fort Lee Youth Fall Festival, spon-

sored by Family and MWR, is set for Nov. 9, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., at the Post Field House, 16th Street at A Avenue. Free activities will include pumpkin decorating, sand arts and crafts, Chesterfield Children’s Theatre and more. All children must be with an adult. For details, call (804) 765-3176.

CYSS Basketball and Cheerleading Registration | Nov. 7-29 Child, Youth and School Services is holding registration for basketball, ages 4-15 years; and for cheerleading, ages 5-13; Nov. 7-29, 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., at CYSS Parent Central Services, building 10624, Yorktown Drive. The cost is $40 for military, DOD Civilians and contractors, and $55 for all others. A sports physical is required at the time of registration. For registration and details, call (804) 765-3852 or 765-3196.

INSTANT DECISION DAY •Information session •Meet & greet with faculty/staff •Food and drinks •Easily apply and enroll* Just bring a copy of your unofficial transcript(s).

SpringClasses Begin Jan. 6

Club Beyond programs for middle and high school students are offered each Monday at Memorial Chapel. The middle school group meets from 5:45-7:15 p.m., and the high school program is set for 7-8:30 p.m. Each session will have games, food, music and more. Friends can have fun and share their faith together. For details, call (518) 225-2965.

OUTSIDE

THE

GATE

Poetry, Prose, Pizza at Library | Nov. 7 An evening of “Poetry, Prose, and Pizza” is set for Nov. 7, 6 p.m., at the Prince George Library, 209 E. Cawson St., Hopewell. Nathan Richardson, a Virginia author and poet from the Suffolk area, will host this free community gathering for all

I AM NO

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Application Fee Waived!

ages. Luca’s Italian Restaurant will provide pizza and beverages will be available from the Friends of the Library. An open mic session will be offered to participants to share their own poetry or prose or recite favorite selections from other writers. For details, call (804) 458-6329 or visit www.arls.org.

Epilepsy Awareness Walk | Nov. 10 The Annual Epilepsy Awareness Walk is set for Nov. 10, 1-3 p.m., at the Swift Creek Reservoir in Brandermill, 4602 Millridge Parkway, Midlothian. Sponsored by the Epilepsy Foundation of Virginia and Bon Secours, free refreshments and entertainment will be provided during the noncompetitive event. Medical experts will be on hand to dispel myths and demonstrate first aid for seizures. For details, call (804) 549-9875.

At Colorado Technical University, our mission is to make quality degrees flexible, accessible and rewarding to the military, their spouses and veterans. We can help you find the right Bachelor’s, Master’s or Doctoral degree to achieve your goals.

#1 BEST FOR VETS

Military Times ranks CTU as the #1 BEST FOR VETS.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 13 10 A.M.–3 P.M.

Call: 888.617.1555 Visit: coloradotech.edu/military

2401 Quarters Road Fort Lee,VA 23801-1705

(804) 765-4665 | www.fit.edu/fortlee | fortlee@fit.edu 2401 Quarters Road, Fort Lee,VA 23801-1705 Florida Institute of Technology does not discriminate on the basis of race, gender, color, religion, creed, national origin, ancestry, marital status, age, disability, sexual orientation,Vietnam-era veterans status or any other discrimination prohibited by law in the admission of students, administration of its educational policies, scholarship and loan programs, employment policies, and athletic or other university sponsored programs or activities.Florida Institute of Technology is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award associate, baccalaureate, master’s, education specialist and doctoral degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of Florida Institute of Technology.Florida Institute of Technology is certified to operate by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia.

OC-708-913

*Admittance is contingent upon receipt of official academic records.

Find disclosures on graduation rates, student financial obligations and more at www.coloradotech.edu/disclosures. Not all programs are available to residents of all states. CTU cannot guarantee employment or salary. 131-35726 0460550 10/13


www.fortleetraveller.com | November 7, 2013 | Traveller | 29

Calendar, continued Virginia Veterans Day Ceremony | Nov. 11 Governor Robert F. McDonnell will be the keynote speaker at the Commonwealthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Veterans Day Ceremony, Nov. 11, 10 a.m., at the Virginia War Memorial, 621 South Belvidere St., Richmond. The event is co-hosted by American Legion District 11. The American Legion Memorial Rifles will perform a rifle salute and music will be provided by the St. Andrewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Legion Pipes and Drums. For details, visit www.vawarmemorial. org.

ChesterďŹ eld Veterans Day Ceremony | Nov. 11 Col. Thomas Rivard, commander, 59th Ordnance Brigade, will be the keynote speaker at the Annual Chesterfield County Veterans Day Memorial Ceremony, Nov. 11, 2 p.m., at the county courthouse on Iron Bridge Road. Representatives of veterans organizations will lay wreaths along the Veterans Memorial Wall. Veterans will be invited to take part in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Veteranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s March.â&#x20AC;? The ceremony will include a memorial to Army Sgt. Aaron Wittman, who died in the

BRAND

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line of service this year, and his name will be placed on the wall. A presentation of pictorial banners of Chesterfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fallen Heroes in Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan will be part of the program. For details, call (804) 796-7131.

Colonial Heights Veterans Day Ceremony | Nov. 11 The Colonial Heights American Legion Post 284 and other local veterans organizations will host a Veterans Day commemoration ceremony, Nov. 11, 11 a.m., at the Colonial Heights War Memorial on the Boulevard. The event will include a wreaths-laying ceremony and a 21-gun salute by Soldiers from Fort Lee. All members of the community are welcome. For details, email adj.post284@verizon. net.

JTCC Veterans Day Ceremony | Nov. 11 A Veterans Day ceremony will take place at the Midlothian campus of John Tyler Community College, Nov. 11, 11 a.m., 800

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Charter Colony Parkway. Maj. Michael Booker, deputy commander, 34th Civil Support Team, Virginia Army National Guard, will be the keynote speaker. The program will include a preview of the documentary, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Honor Flight,â&#x20AC;? the story of four living World War II veterans and how their Midwestern community came together to give them the trip of a lifetime. For details, call (804) 594-1527.

Veterans Weekend | Nov. 15-17 A veterans weekend is being held for North Carolina and Fort Lee area veterans and their families, Nov. 15-17, at the UNC Coastal Studies Institute, Roanoke Island, N.C. Participants will take part in the national â&#x20AC;&#x153;Veterans Writing Project,â&#x20AC;? led by Joseph Bathanti, North Carolina poet laureate. The workshops both days are free but space is limited. To register, visit www.darearts.org. Participants can enjoy a concert featuring Molasses Creek and Jonny Waters and Company, Nov. 15, 7 p.m., at the Roanoke Island Festival Park. Tickets are $12 in advance and $15 at the door for veterans. For reservations and details, call (252)

473-5558.

Fall Bazaar | Nov. 16 A host of special gifts and festive ornaments from more than 60 vendors will be available at the Chesterfield Employee Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fall Shoppers Bazaar, Nov. 16, 9 a.m. - 3 p.m., at the County Fairgrounds Exhibition Building, 10300 Courthouse Road. The items for sale range from handcrafted jewelry and quilts to homemade jellies and jams. For details, call (804) 717-6325 or 7514429.

Disposal of Old Flags | Nov. 7-15 The Virginia War Memorial is teaming up with American Legion Post 84 to collect and properly dispose of old, worn and soiled American flags, Nov. 7-15, 621 South Belvidere St., Richmond. The flags will be collected by members of the American Legion who will burn them as part of a proper public ceremony conducted by the military veterans. For details, call (804) 786-2060 or visit www.vawarmemorial.org.

FAITH AND HOPE TEMPLE CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST

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 !  #  #(

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SCHEDULE OF SERVICES Sunday: Worship Services: 10:00am Saturday: Intercessory Prayer 9:00am Tuesday: Church School 7:00pm

(%  ! % 

Radio Broadcast â&#x20AC;&#x153;Greater Anointingâ&#x20AC;? by Pastor Crockett can be heard everyday on 97.7 FM and WGGM 820 AM from 11:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.

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AGES 2 - 12 YEARS FULL-DAY PROGRAMS FOR AGES 2 YEARS - JUNIOR KINDERGARTEN HALF-DAY PROGRAMS FOR PRE-SCHOOL & JUNIOR KINDERGARTEN

AGES 5 - 12 YEARS â&#x20AC;˘ BEFORE/AFTER SCHOOL: CC WELLS, HARROWGATE, CURTIS, ECOFF ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS â&#x20AC;˘ SUMMER CAMP PROGRAMS Classroom Video Monitoring â&#x20AC;˘ Educational Curriculum â&#x20AC;˘ Computers Nationally Accredited â&#x20AC;˘ Now Accepting NACCRRA Families 13600 Happy Hill Road in Chester â&#x20AC;˘ www.childcareinchesterfield.com

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30 | Traveller | November 7, 2013 | www.fortleetraveller.com

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Call: (804) 526-8656 Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

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(Free Classifieds Only Active Duty, Retired, Spouse) TRAVELLER CLASSIFIEDS 150 W. Brambleton Ave. Norfolk, VA 23510

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MR. JAMES JENKINS Cell: 804-898-2534 • jenkinsje@comcast.net

804-894-8248 Convenient to Fort Lee (804) 526-0502 1001 Blvd. Colonial Heights, VA 23834 Aimee Bradley Property Manager APARTMENTS

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For Rent-Other City Apts Southern Chesterfield Home for Rent 3BR, 1BA home convenient to Fort Lee. Move in ready in quiet nbhd. All appliances provided, including new w/d. Only $950/month. Call Mark at 804-898-5502. See more details at TJProperty Investments.com.

For Rent-House (All) Hopewell, $625 2BD, move in 1 Dec 13; 4 mile to FT Lee renovated. call Oliver@ 915-241-0571

Call KELLY COX at 804-305-8852

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ON ANY SWEARINGEN OWNED APTS. Our 1,000 sqft., 2BR, 1.5BA townhomes offer a great living room, eat-in kitchen, deep linen closet, large pantry, & private patio. Close to the Interstate, Ft. Lee, Shopping & more. Rent includes water, trash & sewer. At Swearingen Owned Apts only!

ASK ABOUT OUR MILITARY SPECIALS! APARTMENTS Colonial Heights On Special $675/month 1500 Concord Ave. 1,000 sqft., 2BR, 1.5BA, walk-in pantry.

HOUSES Petersburg $695/month 2572 Pinehurst Dr. 3BR, 1BA, All electric. Move in ready! Petersburg $850/month 1816 Chuckatuck Ave. 3BR, 1.5BA, large living rm, dining rm & renovated kitchen. Washer/dryer hookups, large fenced back yard. Great front porch, all electric, no fridge. Disputanta $1100/month 8406 Holdsworth Rd. 3BR, 2BA, Open layout, living rm, kitchen, laundry rm w/washer & dryer. Completely renovated.

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CRATER SQUARE APARTMENTS 1025 S. Crater Rd. Apt. 13A • Petersburg, VA 23805 Call (804)733-6298 • www.cratersquareapartments.com


www.fortleetraveller.com | November 7, 2013 | Traveller | 31

CROSSWORD | BY SGT. MCGILLICUDDY

$2,000 SIGN ON BONUS Linde, the world’s leading global gases and engineering organization is currently hiring Bulk Truck Drivers in the Chester, VA area. Excellent Pay – World Class Benefits – Annual Bonus Opportunity Consistent Start Times – Two Consecutive Days Off Duties Include: • Making liquid carbon dioxide deliveries to tonnage customers. Requirements: • High School Diploma or equivalent • Class A CDL License with Hazmat and Tanker endorsements • Minimum 3 years verifiable CDL driving experience with the last 3 years accident free If you are motivated and driven to succeed, please bring your current Motor Vehicle Report and attend our

Linde Truck Driver Career Event Saturday, November 9, 2013 • 7am to 5pm HYATT PLACE • 13148 Kingston Ave., Chester, VA 23836 If you are unable to attend, please apply online to: lindejobs.com/us/ click on Job Opportunities and apply to Job ID 907099

Join a World Leading Team Today!

FREE CLASSIFIED AD Advertising Policy & Deadlines QUALIFICATIONS FOR FREE ADS: • Eligibility: Active duty or retired military, their eligible family members and active or retired civil service employees • Free ads cannot be of a commercial nature (i.e., business opportunities, help wanted, etc.) and must be personal property of the eligible member. They also should not represent a sustained income or business or be sold or listed through agents or representatives. • When advertising a home for rent or home for sale, the home must be THE PRIMARY RESIDENCE. (All rental properties are considered to be paid ads.) • When advertising animals for sale, the ad will only be considered free if there is only one animal being sold. (LITTERS BEING SOLD ARE CONSIDERED PAID ADS) • The classified editor reserves the right to edit or refuse ads based on advertising policies.

HOW TO SUBMIT:

• No more than 5 ads per week, per household. • Free ads will not be accepted via official mailing channels such as guard mail or postage and fees paid indicia. Free ads will be accepted by fax, mail, delivery or Web site. See end of this ad for details. • We cannot accommodate phone inquiries regarding free classified ads. • Renewals, corrections and cancellations cannot be taken by phone and must be resubmitted. • Copy for free classified ads should be typed or printed legibly. • Ads which are illegible, too long or otherwise do not conform to instructions will not be published • Automotive ads must begin with make, model and year (in this order). • Real estate ads must begin with the name of the city, followed by the neighborhood. DEADLINE: 5pmcode___________________________________________________________________ Thursday the week prior to publication. Address and phone number must be included on form. City, state, ZIP Name of Person Placing Ad: Work phone# Home phone# ______________________________ Mailing Address: City, State, ZIP Code: Sponsor Rank/Rate/Grade____________________ Work Phone #: Home Phone #: Command: __________________________________________________________________________ Sponsor: Rank/Rate/Grade: Command: Include home # and/or address within text of ad. Approximately 25 characters (including spaces) per line.

Clip and Fax to: (757) 853-1634 or mail or deliver to:

MNV Classifieds • 150 W. Brambleton Ave. • Norfolk, VA 23510 • Free ad form •

)$02869(7(5$16 T. Anthony Bell Senior Writer/Special Projects

ACROSS 1. He co-starred with Joan Crawford eight times and also enlisted in the Army 2. This veteran owned a guitar he named “Lucille” (last name) 3. Famous rock guitarist who wasn’t cut out for military service 4. Former vice president who served as a journalist (last name) 5. Retired as U.S. Army Reserve colonel after his presidency 8. This actor was initially rejected for service because he was underweight but later became a major general 9. He wrote “The Raven” but was also an Army sergeant major (last name) 10. A negro league star who spent most of the Korean War playing baseball at Fort Eustis 11. Vice president who was a sergeant in the Indiana National Guard (last name) 12. Famous boxer who enlisted

in the Army during World War II 14. The U.S. Naval Academy graduate who became president 15. This Tupelo, Miss., native and singer brought an extra pair of fatigues for everyone in his Army unit 16. He broke baseball’s color barrier but was also a tanker in the Army DOWN 1. The veteran known for the line, “Go ahead, make my day” 2. This veteran and “60 Minutes” correspondent worked for Stars and Stripes 6. Trained as a military policeman, this actor’s trademark is his haircut and plenty of bling 7. This former president made promotional films for the Army 13. Pat Tillman was an NFL player who gave up his career to join the Army _____ For this week’s answers, visit www.ftleetraveller.com/ community_life/puzzle/.


32 | Traveller | November 7, 2013 | www.fortleetraveller.com

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