Page 1

J O I N T

B A S E

L A N G L E Y - E U S T I S

ARMY EDITION | 10.18.2019 | Vol. 09 | No. 41

JBLE participates in CBRN exercise PG 8

For more online content, check out www.JBLE.af.mil

Airmen inspired to see beyond the stars with NASA visit PG. 4

School violence exercise empasizes training and collaboration PG. 6

P u b l i s h e d i n t h e i n t e r e s t o f p e r s o n n e l a t J o i n t B a s e L a n g l e y - E u s t i s • w w w. p e n i n s u l a w a r r i o r. c o m


2

www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • October 18, 2019

JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS EDITORIAL STAFF Joint Base Langley-Eustis Commander Col. Clinton A. Ross Joint Base Langley-Eustis Public Affairs Officer Capt. Sara Harper • Sara.Harper@us.af.mil Joint Base Langley-Eustis Editor Aliza Reisberg • aliza.reisberg@us.af.mil Per Air Force Instruction 35-101/Army Regulation 360-1, only stories and photos submitted by members of the Department of Defense community and DOD news services may be printed in The Peninsula Warrior. Any stories, photos or announcements must be submitted eight days prior to publication. Stories and photos should be submitted to the editor and/or assistant editor at 633abw.paedit@us.af.mil or Public Affairs Office, 601 Hines Cir., Fort Eustis, VA 23604. Announcements for the Community Section should be submitted to fteustismain@gmail.com. Announcements for the Outside the Gate Section should be submitted to fteustismain@gmail.com. For more information call 878-4920. Authors’ names may be withheld, but all letters must include the authors’ signatures and telephone number. The Peninsula Warrior is an authorized publication for all the members of the U.S. military. Contents of The Peninsula Warrior are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, Department of the Air Force or the Department of the Army. The Peninsula Warrior is printed every Friday by offset as a civilian enterprise newspaper for the Public Affairs Office, U.S. Air Force by Military Newspapers of Virginia at 150 W. Brambleton Ave. Norfolk, VA 23510 under exclusive written contract with the commander, Joint Base Langley-Eustis. MNV is a private firm in no way connected with the Department of the Air Force or Department of the Army. Printed circulation: 25,000. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. A confirmed violation or rejection of this policy of equal opportunity by any advertiser will result in refusal to print advertising from that source. All editorial content of The Peninsula Warrior is prepared, edited, provided and approved by the Public Affairs Office Joint Base Langley-Eustis. All photographs are Air Force or Army photographs unless otherwise stated. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts and supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense or MNV of the products or services advertised.

MILITARY NEWSPAPERS OF VIRGINIA Home Office: 150 W. Brambleton Ave., Norfolk, VA 23510; 222-3990 Advertising Sales: Pam Bullock, 446-2795 728 Blue Crab Road, Suite C, Newport News, VA 23606.

Wayne Clark

Barbara Barrett was confirmed by the Senate Oct. 16, to be the 25th Secretary of the Air Force. As an experienced pilot, former ambassador and senior government official, Barrett was praised for her wide experience and long history with aviation and the United States military.

Senate confirms Barrett to be Air Force secretary By Charles Pope

SECRETARY OF THE AIR FORCE PUBLIC AFFAIRS WASHINGTON

The Senate overwhelmingly confirmed Barbara Barrett to be the 25th Secretary of the Air Force, Oct. 16, clearing the way for the experienced pilot and former ambassador to lead the service as it faces new threats globally and in space. The 85 to 7 vote makes Barrett the third consecutive woman confirmed to lead the Air Force and its 685,000 total force Airmen. Barrett replaces Heather Wilson who resigned in May. Undersecretary Matthew Donovan served as acting secretary in the interim. “I can think of no position that offers more excitement, challenge and meaning than the secretary of the Air Force,” Barrett said, after the vote. “Our Air Force is the best in the world because of extraordinary Airmen and civilians with whom I am now proud to serve.”

Barrett’s lopsided confirmation was largely expected. She earned praise from senators in remarks prior to the vote that summarized her extensive background in public service as ambassador to Finland, as a senior official at the Federal Aviation Administration, as an instrument-rated pilot and as someone certified as an astronaut for space travel. “Ambassador Barrett has had an impressive career both inside and outside of government,” said Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., the chamber’s second-ranking Republican, prior to the vote. Barrett’s experience as a senior official with the FAA and most recently as chairwoman of the Aerospace Corporation gives her “a deep understanding of the United States Air Force,” Thune said. Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David L. Goldfein offered his praise as well. “This is an exciting day for our Air Force,” he said. “Secretary

Barrett brings an incredible background and a level of strategic understanding that will propel us into the future. We won the lottery…again!” Any questions about Barrett’s confirmation were largely erased in September when she appeared before the Senate Armed Services Committee. Barrett echoed a set of priorities that have been often described by the Air Force’s civilian and military leadership. She emphasized the need for robust modernization to recover from budget cuts in previous years. She offered unequivocal support for expanding the fleet of F-35 Lightning II aircraft. “The F-35,” she told senators, “is our future and we need it. And we need it sustainably.” She offered support for an Air Force analysis calling on the service to expand to 386 squadrons from 312. That number is needed, the analysis says, to meet all demands and challenges posed in today’s world. That target was unveiled last year after extensive review and is captured in shorthand as “the Air Force we need.”

We want to hear from you. Contact us at 633abw.paedit@us.af.mil, or call 878-4920 or 764-5701.


www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • October 18, 2019

3

Fort Eustis Fire Department hosts open house

A firefighter with the Fort Eustis Fire Department escorts families out of a simulated smoke-filled house.. The purpose of the simulation was to educate families how to safely escape from their house in recognition of National Fire Prevention Week.

Senior Airman Delaney Gonzales

A child reaches to hug Sparky, the Fort Eustis Fire Department’s mascot, during the fire department’s open house at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Oct. 12. The event featured free food, giveaways, fire truck tours, simulations for escaping a smoke-filled room and more.

A firefighter teaches a child how to use a fire extinguisher. This event was used as an educational tool to teach parents and children how to properly extinguish a fire in honor of National Fire Prevention Week.

Fort Eustis Education Office

Our Mission: Your Education A leading educator for veterans, active-duty, guarrd, reservists and military families, Saint Leo University provides flexible undergraduate and graduate programs to help advance your career. As a top 10 military-friendly school, Saint Leo is proud to educate our military and all those who play a role in supporting our service members. Take advantage of: • Flexible and affordable education • Discounted tuition for military

• Online and on-ground classes • Military-friendly programs and support

Fort Eustis | 757.887.1166 Jeb Little Creek-Fort Story | 757.464.6449 Certified by SCHEV

Fort Lee | 804.861.9634 NS Norfolk | 757.489.0969

Apply now | saintleo.edu

GI BILL® is a registered trademark of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). More information about education benefits offered by the VA is available at the official U.S. government website at http://www.benefits.va.gov/gibill.


4

www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • October 18, 2019

AIRMEN INSPIRED TO SEE BEYOND THE STARS WITH NASA VISIT A1C Sarah Dowe

U.S. Air Force Col. Clinton Ross, 633rd Air Base Wing commander, and Chief Master Sgt. Gregory Peterson, 633rd Air Base Wing command chief, talk to personnel at the Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va., Oct. 9. Ross and Peterson, along with others, received a tour of the facilities at the LaRC which served as an indoctrination to NASA’s mission in the Hampton, Virginia community.

By A1C Sarah Dowe

633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, VA.

The NASA Langley Research Center has been a staple of the Hampton Roads, Virginia community for over 100 years and has directly impacted the daily lives of not just Americans but of the world with their research and development of new technology. Still, hidden in the forest terrain behind the protection of the Langley Air Force Base fence line, it’s hard to imagine what happens behind the scenes. Separated only by a small unmanned gate, visitors from Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, and representatives from local government offices recently ventured next door to get a firsthand look for themselves. U.S. Air Force Col. Clinton Ross, 633rd Air Base Wing commander, Chief Master Sgt. Gregory Peterson, 633rd ABW command chief, Senator Mark Warner’s military liaison, Charlotte Hurd and Senator Timothy Kaine’s military liaison, Diane Kaufman were part of the facility tour Oct. 9. Clayton Turner, director of NASA’s LaRC, welcomed his neighbors and gave an overview of the mission and goals of the LaRC. “NASA has achieved great things in the last 100 years,” said Turner. “We

are looking forward to the next 100, as we explore our Earth more and prepare to extend human exploration deeper into our solar system—first to the moon and then to Mars.” Visitors toured one of NASA LaRC’s newest state-of-the-art facilities, the Flight Dynamic Research Facility, viewed the historic aircraft hangar where astronauts prepared for the first lunar expeditions, and met with researchers and developers from NASA’s City Environment for Range Testing of Autonomous Integrated Navigation, or CERTAIN, program. According to Turner, the mission of NASA’s LaRC is to make revolutionary improvements toward aviation, science, education and innovation, develop technology for space exploration and improve economic vitality and stewardship of the Earth. “We have a huge mission to inspire the next generation the way we were inspired,” said Turner. “We do that with our outreach and education programs.” Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, or STEM programs, which provide opportunities for students, educators and institutions to connect with NASA experts to learn about exciting missions through innovative and informative educational resources, were also discussed. Along with educating the commu-

nity, the LaRC team stressed the importance of educating those a little closer to the action. “It’s important for us to be good neighbors and support each other’s missions,” said Ross. “The impact of JBLE and NASA are felt beyond the gates and we must continuously work together to maintain that relationship.” In 2018, NASA LaRC supported approximately 7,000 jobs in the Hampton Roads community and approximately 8,000 jobs in the state of Virginia alone. Creating work environments where both Airmen and researchers can thrive and grow for tomorrow is a shared sentiment of both agencies who face aging infrastructure, encroachment issues and for Langley AFB, changes in water levels which cause potential damage to systems and infrastructure. JBLE leadership were also introduced to the Vibrant Transformation to Advance LaRC or the ViTAL program, an ambitious revitalization plan to change the face of the center that promises to boost capabilities, save energy, and ensure that Langley remains a vital asset for the nation well into the 21st century. “We have great facilities, but it’s our employees—smart, resourceful, passionate people—who make it all

possible,” said Turner. “Langley AFB is a huge part of our success from providing us security, aviation support assistance, and even protection of key facilities during natural disasters.” Langley AFB and NASA LaRC’s shared flightline isn’t the only way the two agencies cross paths. JBLE Airmen provide resources such as fuel and maintenance support, when needed, to NASA’s LaRC aircraft as they perform research missions. “It’s important that we remember our mission success is closely tied to the support we get from both our military and community partners to continue advances in the Health and Medicine, Public Safety, Transportation, Consumer Goods, Energy and Environment, Industrial Productivity and Information Technology realms,” said Turner. All sides agreed about the significance of working together and becoming more educated and involved in the other’s mission to reach a common goal and improve the effectiveness of support they each provide to the community and the world. “This was a great opportunity to see and learn, while fostering lasting partnerships,” said Ross. “I’m looking forward to seeing what other ways we can integrate our Airmen to support NASA’s mission.”


www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • October 18, 2019

5

Military exchanges extinguish vape sales By C. Todd Lopez DEFENSE.GOV WASHINGTON

The Army and Air Force Exchange Service and the Navy Exchange have stopped selling vape-related products. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention statistics report that 1,299 lung injury cases and 26 deaths are related to e-cigarette or vaping product use. AAFES removed vape-related products from its shelves Sept. 30. Navy Exchange Service Command removed products from NEX retail shelves and directed NEX concessionaires and vendors to discontinue the sale of vaping products after Oct. 1. Vape products, including e-

cigs, e-cigarettes, vapes and e-hookahs, are electronic nicotine delivery devices that heat a sometimes flavored nicotine-infused liquid into a vapor that users inhale. In recent months, there have been reports of illnesses and deaths that are believed to be associated with the use of vape products. “The vapor that users inhale can contain ultrafine particles, carcinogens, volatile organic compounds and heavy metals,” said Public Health Service Capt. Kimberly Elenberg, director of Total Force Fitness for the undersecretary of defense for personnel and readiness. “Vaping is not harmless, and researchers are still trying to understand the long-term impacts and health effects from inhaling the va-

Eric Pilgrim

Sgt. 1st Class Bryson Briles and Staff Sgt. Jorge Flechas enjoy a relaxing moment vaping before heading to class at U.S. Army Recruiting and Retention College, Sept. 5.

por.” NEXCOM officials said Navy exchanges carried two vape-related products in the tobacco sale area of their stores. Those products, “ecigarettes,” have been removed from shelves. Additionally, NEXCOM directed Navy Exchange concessionaires and vendors to discontinue the sale of vaping products in any NEX location.

AAFES officials said their stores’offering of vape-related products already was limited, and that its exchanges had already stopped offering flavored vape liquids because of Food and Drug Administration concerns with the appeal of the products to underage customers. By the end of September, that AAFES had removed products from two manufacturers from kits

shelves. While proponents of vape products argue that vaping is safer than using traditional tobacco products such as cigarettes, Elenberg said it’s actually too early to tell. “E-cigarettes generally contain less chemicals compared to traditional products like cigarettes, but since the longterm effects of vaping are unknown and not understood, there is not enough information at this time to make a determination on whether it is safer or healthier than other tobacco products,” she said. Even if the ingestion of nicotine is deemed safer though vaping than through traditional products, nicotine itself is still a dangerous chemical said Dr. Donald Shell, the director of disease prevention, disease management and population health policy and oversight in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Services Policy and Oversight.


6

www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • October 18, 2019

School violence exercise clarifies roles during emergency situations By Beverly A. Joyner

JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS

Joint Base Langley-Eustis inspection and emergency response teams, in partnership with Newport News Public Schools conducted a school violence exercise at Fort Eustis’ General Stanford Elementary School Oct. 8. Team members held their tabletop exercise in the school library where they met to review and clarify their roles and responsibilities in managing responses during potential emergency situations. “We use a scripted scenario to evaluate and validate training and knowledge of the Integrated Defense Plan, Emergency Management Plan and All Hazards School Crisis Management Plan,� said Randall Renaud, exercise program

manager, 633rd Air Base Wing Inspector General. “The scenario allows us to evaluate the logistics and relationships between Newport News school personnel and installation first responders, and command and control personnel.� Renaud described the complexities involved in communicating information between parents and guardians, installation and school personnel should a school violence incident occur. Renaud said the relationship between JBLE and Newport News Public Schools is crucial to effective communication in order to minimize panic and frustration among stakeholders. According to Amelia Hunt, General Stanford Elementary School principal and school staff members have access to a comprehensive school crisis

and emergency response plan that provides guidance to teachers and other school employees on how to respond to a variety of emergencies. “This is my very first year at General Stanford and it’s the most substantial training that I have participated in with my staff since I became an administrator,� said Hunt. “I am appreciative of this collaborative effort which will reveal any gaps in our knowledge. This is going to be a real time of learning for us and our new teachers.� When discussing the school system’s threat assessment teams, Hunt said General Stanford’s crisis response team members are the same individuals responsible for threat assessment strategies. School staff are trained to monitor the behavior of children and

Senior Airman Delaney Gonzales

Joint Base Langley-Eustis inspection and emergency response teams, in partnership with Newport News Public Schools conduct a school violence exercise at Fort Eustis’ General Stanford Elementary School, Virginia, Oct. 8.

adults, while looking for signs of instability or challenge that could lead to situations of a violent nature, she added. Throughout the years a number of changes have been made to help prevent or mitigate school violence, Hunt explained. Examples include entrance buzzers, visual identification cameras, doors that lock automatically, and bus evacuation and lockdown drills. “We are going to take every precaution,� said Hunt. “We are going to do everything we

can to ensure that we have made this space as safe as it can possible be for our children, families and staff.� To assist JBLE community members in understanding how school violence exercises help to prepare school personnel and first responders for emergencies, Renaud said the primary purpose of any inspection or exercise is to improve, and preparation and training are key to ensure personnel are ready to react in a given situation.

8

0(% '    ("  % !  % -) 

         

  3)%3)%!!

 %# &$ !  #  & % )  

+% &-& -% ( &! & %&(  ( &%  ( & ,%  !( .%&$ & % %. /

                                 !               "

& , +&+

 

A> 7$-)-#&)  BE >- -+ 7 9$&/C7(9 9A7BE - >C- &B&)     +%(&.  !(

   

       

  

 

BE *7(  + >$ 22 D/&>&-+ >-+  >C-%E 797$ - >C- 9A+(+ 9A7BE >$ -+&>&-+ $B 79> -+ >$ &B&) 7 B99)9 >$> &B7 &+ */>-+ 9!--7 - >$ *9 E79 A+ @;2 -9 -7 +7)E . G 9-+7 >$+-)% 9&+# 9>>%-%>$%7> 797$79 C&)) -#E >- 3A&7 > */9 - >$ 7> >$7%&*+9&-+) A*7)+ + >C- 9$&/C7(9  >$&7 A77+>  )-7& >- +)EF A+79>+ >$ -+&>&-+9 + >>7 - >$ >&*2 >$+-)-#&) &++-B>&-+9  A*7% 4$ 7*&+9 - >$ /797B &+ >$ )-7&  + )+ 7*&+ A9 - C>79 - */>-+ -9 >$ &B&) 7 A7&+# * >$ 97&9 + 77 -//-7>A% + #&B A9  A+&3A $/>7 &+ -A7 +&>E >- D/)-7  /&B->) B& )7# +>&-+69 $&9>-7E5 9& 69 -+&>-7 9A/7&+>++> - 4  >&-+) 7&+ +>A7E2 -  /7-'> >$> &9 /)9 >-  /7> +# - *7&69 &+799 A+79>+& *7&>&* $7&>#25 )-9> -+ 7$  A*7)+ C9 - */>-+  .<@ A7&+# >$ >>) &+ >$ 22 -9 C$7 9$ 97B )-(&+# BE69 -7>$ >)+>& &+# 7** 3A7-+2 $ 9+( >7 &7-+)  &7% E >$ -+7>

77&*(1 + #&+& 0-7*7)E  >$+ .@. *+2 C+> -C+ C&>$ *-7 -*%  )-7& C9  -+7> $ + />A7 *7 7&7 C$&$ 7F&)2 -C >E >$ 22 BE &+ 9/&> 7F&)69 +&> >>9 9  /7&F -+ -B2 ., .<" /7->9>9 &> C9 )-9> C&>$  22 BE -))-C&+#  -))&9&-+ >7--/ 77E2 E 7) ->$ B99)9 7 /7->>

&)&>7E 7> )C A+7 >$ A+(+ $&/C7( > - @GG  >$ +-+ 77&>-7&) )A9 > - .,; + >$  C$&$ #&B9 - >$ 22 -+9>&>A>&-+ D)A9&B 7&#$>9 >>$ 22 #-B7+*+> &>9 -C+ /7-/7>E2

$% $

  !  "   $ $ '% '  , + * *$ *', $ '% $' ' ' *% '$ $ $  $   *%'$  %%# * )#

* " # % -





           

                          

   

 

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

We take your business seriously.           

  

    

    



C-7( $ ( &)) &)-79 9&%E%9& C&>$ )-A9>769 -7(9 /7>*+> - A)& 01 C$- C7 //7&>&B

 ( - >$ 99&9>+2 $B $)/ C&>$ B7) &)-79 7-* 4$+B7 C &+  -*% &)) 0  .1 >--( /7> >$ 7 &> $)/9 A9 0  1 *&+>&+&+# *A+&>E 7)>&-+9 (+-C&+# >$> >$7 + &*%  #7> ) 7 -A> >$9 /7-'> E *&+>&+&+# -7) 7 >$-9 >$> /7-B&+# >$ )-A9>7 *A$ 9 C -5 9& )-A9>7 /)9 9 7 *-7&) &+

- &-+-   C-7(72

992 A+ @"2 *72 B& A7 -**+% * $+ >$ -//-7>A+&>E - ( &)) )--( > 7 &+#  $&9>-7&) /7-'> -7 &)-79 >- &*/7-B >- >$ -**A+&>E 7)>&-+9 &+>7> &)-79 >*-+A*+> >$E B-)A+>7 $&9 -7 CE -**A+&>E2 9  *( + &*/> &+ >$ >- - C&>$ >$ -**A+&>E2 B+>9 7 4 >69 9- B7E &*/-7>+> 4$9 (&+9 - +- *>>7 9-*>$&+# /-9&>&B &)-79 + A9 &> $)/9 >- C$> *E C$7 C #- A9 >$* >- +-> -+)E 9 C C+> >- &> ))-C9 - >$ 22 A> 9$-C >$ /A)& >$> >$> &7+> /7>9 -**A+&>E -  >/7>9 &7+> #&B ( C #-5 >$9 >$* C)-*9 A9 C$7B7 +>&-+69 7&$ >7&%

&$) -A7 #7> 9& -*+ @+ )99 $&-2 >&-+95 9& A72 -7# 7-* 7E9B&))



 

 

              

Contact our dedicated team and reach over 92,500 readers each week throughout the Hampton Roads military community.     

 (

    

      

/ ."" '+ '( '( + + 1  +/+2  '+0(+ #$ / "+ +'   +  '2 +( '+ +'"%  /+ 0 .+  '   .+ +' " + ' '    " "  "(%

     

'+ % +( ( + 2  + + ' + +0 "'(+(  ( "'/  ('/ ('+'2  (%

  

         

            ' (   0 ,3 +  '/ . ' + + +&( 

/ '+2%   

    (

        

 2 .' + +  / /2 0(""' /'  ' ' '+ + 2 .'  '

"

  ! 

CONTACT US TODAY TO START ADVERTISING!

757.222.3990 | MILITARYNEWS.COM

MilitaryNews.com | MILITARY NEWSPAPERS OF VIRGINIA


www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • October 18, 2019

7

A DAY OF FREE FAMILY FUN!

PRESENTING SPONSOR

SILVER SPONSOR

GOLD SPONSOR

BRONZE SPONSORS Dave and Busters, Dominion Energy, Feld Entertainment, GEICO, Kroger, Navy Mutual, Omni Financial, United Concordia

HOSTED BY MilitaryNews.com | MILITARY NEWSPAPERS OF VIRGINIA

MILITARYFAMILYFESTIVAL.COM


8

www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • October 18, 2019

Luke Calip, an emergency management specialist, dons his protective equipment.

www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • October 18, 2019

Michael A. Evans, Fort Eustis Fire Department firefighter, prepares a fire truck. The exercise was a joint operation between the Fort Eustis Fire Department and the 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron Emergency Management flight.

9

Luke Calip tests the simulated contaminated substance.

Firefighters with the Fort Eustis Fire Department set up a decontamination station. The decontamination station was used during the Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear exercise to hose off those who entered into the simulated contaminated area.

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Luke Calip, an emergency management specialist, and Staff. Sgt. Brian Tripp, an Emergency Management noncommissioned officer, both with the 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron Emergency Management flight, prepare to exit a simulated contaminated area Calip and Tripp worked together to test an unknown substance to determine if it was a Chemical, Biological, Radiological or Nuclear agent.

JBLE PARTICIPATES IN CBRN EXERCISE By Senior Airman Delaney Gonzales 633D AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, VA.

Members from the Fort Eustis Fire Department and the 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron Emergency Management flight receive a briefing prior to entering a simulated contaminated area during a Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear exercise at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Oct. 10. The exercise included donning protective gear, identifying an unknown substance, going through a denomination station and more.

Senior Airman Delaney Gonzales

A firefighter with the Fort Eustis Fire Department sprays water on a simulated contaminated firefighter during a Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear exercise at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Oct. 10. The exercise was a joint effort between the Fort Eustis Fire Department and the 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron Emergency Management flight.

The Fort Eustis Fire Department and the 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron Emergency Management flight participated in a Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear exercise to enhance their skills to work together as a team. The exercise included donning protective gear, identifying an unknown substance, going through a denomination station and more.


10

www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • October 18, 2019

Airman 1st Class Marcus Bullock

With the emergence of new health reports, electronic cigarettes and other vaping products have been called into question nationwide regarding their effects on the human body. According to the CDC, 1,299 lung injury cases have been reported and 26 confirmed deaths have been associated with the use of e-cigarettes or other vaping products as of Oct. 8.

By Airman 1st Class Marcus Bullock JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS

With the emergence of new health reports, electronic cigarettes and other vaping products have been called into question nationwide regarding their effects on the human body. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 1,299 lung injury cases have been reported and 26 confirmed deaths have been associated with the use of e-cigarettes or other vaping products as of Oct. 8, 2019. Many patients have reported a history of using vaping products containing tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which have been linked to most of the cases, playing a huge role in the outbreak. A major concern is that

these products are being purchased from non-credible sources, or off-market products. Since e-cigarettes and other vaping products are a new class of tobacco, regulation of these products are attempting to play catch-up. “Depending on where people are getting these non-regulated products, there is a chance that these members do not know what is in them,” said U.S. Air Force Maj. Jasmine Simmons 633rd Aerospace Medicine Squadron public health flight commander. “It could be causing some of the issues because there’s no way to know what is in these products.” Vaping products containing nicotine may have played a role in the outbreak as well and the CDC is recommending people don’t use them

“Depending on where people are getting these nonregulated products, there is a chance that these members do not know what is in them. It could be causing some of the issues because there’s no way to know what is in these products.” Maj. Jasmine Simmons either. According to Jimmy Ruiz, 633rd AMDS public health officer, it’s unclear where some people are buying these products or what type of proc-

ess is used to create them. Since it is not regulated, companies are able to put whatever they want in these products. The Food and Drug Administration along with the CDC have been working to identify the cause, or causes, of lung disease in these cases. As of now, the only factor linking these cases is the use of e-cigarettes or other vaping products. According to Simmons, research is still being done to determine what exactly is causing these lung illnesses. With research being in the early stages, the use of e-cigarettes or other vaping products containing nicotine cannot be ruled out as a cause of the illnesses. Some of the symptoms patients reported have been: ■ Cough, shortness of breath, or chest pain ■ Nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, or diarrhea ■ Fatigue, fever, or weight loss “If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, go and see your provider and be forthcoming with your information,” Simmons said. “Let them know you use e-cigarettes so the providers can conduct the proper screening and testing to identify the cause of your illness.” Some patients have reported developing these symptoms over a few days while others have reported developing symptoms over several weeks. If you need help to quit vaping products or other tobacco products, there are several programs offered on Joint Base Langley-Eustis to help kick the habit. According to Ruiz, Health Promotion offers programs such as smoking cessation, which helps educate people on how to quit using tobacco products. Providers can also offer medication to help people quit smoking. E-cigarettes and other vaping products may present hazards to users so it’s important to do research. Whether you are thinking about starting to use e-cigarettes or other vaping products, or if you already use them, make sure you are as informed as possible to ensure you stay healthy. For more information, you can visit the CDC website at www.cdc.gov or call Public Health at (757) 764-6731 or (757) 225-3552.


www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • October 18, 2019

11

Delaney Gonzales

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Galicia Castillo, Air Combat Command A3 Operations Division command and control manager, poses in a traditional Mexican outfit at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Oct. 11. Castillo learned how to do the Mexican Folk dance when she was only 12 years old.

Ballet Folklorico: an Airman’s culture expressed through dance By Senior Airman Delaney Gonzales 633D AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

The U.S. Air Force core value of excellence in all we do explains that Airmen must strive for continual self-improvement and in doing so, propel the Air Force to achieve greater accomplishments for not only themselves, but their community as well. Senior Airman Charles Essel expresses this through the time he spends helping his community. Whether it’s volunteering at the USO, bringing meals to people through Meals on Wheels, organizing blood drives or helping at juvenile centers, Essel does his best to help people in need. “I always want to see people happy,” Essel said. “During my free

time I’ll go out to the community and try to do something, either during my lunch time, weekends or holidays. I’m trying to do something that at the end of the day is going to impact someone’s life.” Originally from Ghana, Essel moved to New York in 2010 with the idea of going to school and earning a degree in business administration with a concentration in healthcare management. “When I got here I was working in a Dollar Tree store in the Bronx and at the same time I was going to school,” Essel said. “It was kind of hard. So, when I finished my associate’s degree I decided to look into the military.” Once he enlisted and graduated basic training, Essel went to technical training to become a surgical technician.

“When I went into phase two [of technical school] for the hands-on training, I realized that I wasn’t good with blood,” Essel said. “The first time I went into the operation room – I threw up.” Even though he wasn’t able to finish technical training as a surgical technician, he did go on to become a contract service manager in the medical field, later, coming to Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, and joining the 633rd Medical Support Squadron. “Within the medical field not everybody will [directly deal] with patients,” Essel said. “We have people behind the scenes who get the job done. When I looked into my [current] job, I knew that I wouldn’t [directly] interact with patients, but my impact would still be great.” Between finishing his doctorates, spending time with family and being an Airman, Essel still manages to make time to help in the community. Essel spent more than 70 hours of

his own time this year volunteering throughout the community, winning him the Virginia Peninsula Chamber of Commerce 2019 Military Citizen of the Year for the Air Force. The award has been presented annually since 1955 to recognize the military citizen who has made the most significant contribution of community service in the area. The VPCC names one local representative, E-6 and below from each branch of the military, who have demonstrated active participation in off-duty community activities, as well as exceeding military standards. “It’s a passion of helping people,” Essel said. “I don’t just like to volunteer to volunteer. I look at what I’m going to do and what is the impact on people? To me, it’s all about the people.” Showing true excellence in all we do, Essel took his own time to help people not for an award but to better his community.


12

www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • October 18, 2019

Airman 1st Class Alexandra Singer

Three graduates of the Interservice Physician Assistant Program take a professional oath at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Oct. 3. The IPAP is a 29-month course to train individuals of all services to become physician assistants for the military.

Langley IPAP prepares future PAs for success By Airman 1st Class Alexandra Singer 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, VA.

Langley Air Force Base hospital is one of seven facilities chosen for the clinical phase two of the Interservice Physician Assistant Program, due to its steady pace of patients and size of the military treatment facility. The IPAP is a course for prior enlisted, newly commissioned and previously commissioned officers. It’s open to all branches of service in the military, and teaches future PAs what they need to know to enter the force and succeed. This training began at Langley back in 1997. “One huge benefit to Langley compared to other Air Force Medical Centers is that while we do have a dental residency program, there are no other full time medical residencies at Langley,” said U.S. Air Force Maj. Jennifer

Middlebrooks, 633rd Medical Group, IPAP program director. “This means, the Physician Assistant students do not have to compete with other medical students, interns and residents for training time.” The 29-month long program includes two phases. During phase one, which is 64 weeks long, students are taught at the U.S. Army Medical Center of Excellence at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. This is the didactic phase, which prepares students with the essential cognitive foundations to function as PAs. This includes written and practical exams. Phase two is 57 weeks long and is called the clinical phase. During this phase, individuals already in the field actively educate and supervise the students learning both inpatient and outpatient procedures. There are 11 medical specialty rotations, plus four electives.

According to Middlebrooks, Langley is also very close to Naval Medical Center Portsmouth (NMCP) and Fort Eustis, which are available for any potential gaps in training due to deployments or Permanent Change of Station of the IPAP staff. Every year in October, National Physician Assistant (PA) Week is recognized, aligning with Langley’s recent graduating class, Class 17-2. Langley’s graduates were U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. Jessica-Nicole Grogan, 1st Lt. Carmen A Maffucci and U.S. Coast Guard Lt. j.g. Christopher Perkins. “[The week] recognizes the PA profession and its contributions to the nation’s health,” said Middlebrooks. “This week is also an opportunity to raise awareness and visibility of the profession.” According to Middlebrooks, being accepted into the program for some is a long-term goal. For others, it was presented as an opportunity they took advantage of. U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. Cindy Yie, Air Force Academy graduate is one of those Airmen who took advantage of the program.

“I was lucky enough to have mentors that pushed me into things that I liked to do as I didn’t necessarily know what I wanted to do,” Yie said. “I think I knew I wanted to pursue a medical field, but I didn’t really have a big desire to go to medical school.” Prior medical training isn’t necessary to apply for the IPAP. “I came into this program basically having zero medical experience, and I think that’s how it is for most of us,” Yie said. “A lot of us leave here being like ‘Oh yeah, I think I know what that is.’ There’s still a lot to learn, but to even get to say I’m comfortable with walking in and talking to a patient and giving them a diagnosis and prescription is really cool.” The IPAP is available to military applicants under the age of 42 who are compassionate and strive for leadership excellence, model integrity and are committed to continuous learning. For more information on applying for the IPAP and requirements, visit the Interservice Physician Assistant Program tab on the U.S. Army Medical Center of Excellence website at www.cs.amedd.army.mil.


www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • October 18, 2019

JBLE Community

Air Force Senior Submit Eustis Community announcements toU.S. pw@militarynews.com Airman Charles Essel, 633rd Medical Support Squadron contract service manager, won the Virginia Peninsula Chamber of Commerce 2019 Military Citizen of the Year for the Air Force due to his military excellence and more than 70 hours of volunteering in the community. The VPCC names one local representative, E-6 and below from each branch of the military, who have demonstrated active participation in off-duty community activities, as well as exceeding military standards.

EMBODYING EXCELLENCE: AN AIRMAN’S SERVICE TO COMMUNITY

By Senior Airman Tristan Biese JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS

The U.S. Air Force core value of excellence in all we do explains that Airmen must strive for continual selfimprovement and in doing so, propel the Air Force to achieve greater accomplishments for not only themselves, but their community as well. Senior Airman Charles Essel expresses this through the time he spends helping his community. Whether it’s volunteering at the USO, bringing meals to people through Meals on Wheels, organizing blood drives or helping at juvenile centers, Essel does his best to help people in need. “I always want to see people happy,” Essel said. “During my free time I’ll go out to the community and try to do something, either during my lunch time, weekends or holi-

13

days. I’m trying to do something that at the end of the day is going to impact someone’s life.” Originally from Ghana, Essel moved to New York in 2010 with the idea of going to school and earning a degree in business administration with a concentration in healthcare management. “When I got here I was working in a Dollar Tree store in the Bronx and at the same time I was going to school,” Essel said. “It was kind of hard. So, when I finished my associate’s degree I decided to look into the military.” Once he enlisted and graduated basic training, Essel went to technical training to become a surgical technician. “When I went into phase two [of technical school] for the hands-on training, I realized that I wasn’t good with blood,” Essel said. “The first

Senior Airman Tristan Biese

time I went into the operation room – I threw up.” Even though he wasn’t able to finish technical training as a surgical technician, he did go on to become a contract service manager in the medical field, later, coming to Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, and joining the 633rd Medical Support Squadron. “Within the medical field not everybody will [directly deal] with patients,” Essel said. “We have people behind the scenes who get the job done. When I looked into my [current] job, I knew that I wouldn’t [directly] interact with patients, but my impact would still be great.” Between finishing his doctorates, spending time with family and being an Airman, Essel still manages to make time to help in the community. Essel spent more than 70 hours of his own time this year volunteering throughout the community, winning

him the Virginia Peninsula Chamber of Commerce 2019 Military Citizen of the Year for the Air Force. The award has been presented annually since 1955 to recognize the military citizen who has made the most significant contribution of community service in the area. The VPCC names one local representative, E-6 and below from each branch of the military, who have demonstrated active participation in off-duty community activities, as well as exceeding military standards. “It’s a passion of helping people,” Essel said. “I don’t just like to volunteer to volunteer. I look at what I’m going to do and what is the impact on people? To me, it’s all about the people.” Showing true excellence in all we do, Essel took his own time to help people not for an award but to better his community.


14

www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • October 18, 2019

JBLE Community

Submit Eustis Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com

fessional development seminar 10 a.m. – noon, Oct. 22, at Quesada Hall. Come and share real stories by real people of strength resiliency and courage.

■ Week 5- Identity Theft & Internet Scams / Insider

Threat

Family Meal Nights Hosted By Langley AFB Chapel Protestant Community Please join the Langley AFB Chapel Protestant Community for a meal at Langley Chapel Annex on Tuesdays at 5:15 p.m., or at Bethel Manor Chapel on Wednesdays at 5p.m. Both meals are free, and all ID cardholders are welcome! For more information call the Langley Chapel at 764-7847.

Sewer Line Replacement Harvest Faith Fest

Come out and enjoy the Langley Chapel Annual Harvest Faith Fest Oct. 25, 6p.m. – 8 p.m., at the Bethel Manor Chapel. This event will feature food, games bounce houses, magic, balloon creatures, face painting and much more. For more information, contact Liz Hedger at 7647879.

Invisible Wounds Flu Vaccination Line/POD

Come out and get your flu shot at the annual Langley Air Force Base Influenza (Flu) Vaccination Line at the Community Commons from 7 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., November 5-7. November 5 will be open to all dependents and retirees. November 6 & 7 will be for Active Duty members only. For more information, contact the Immunizations clinic at (757) 764-6985.

JBLE Commander’s Cup Golf Tournament

Come out and enjoy the JBLE Commander’s Cup Golf Tournament for a great day of camaraderie and competition October 25 at the Eaglewood Golf Course. There will be range balls, food, prizes and great times. For more information or to register, call the Eaglewood Golf Course 764-4547.

Owning Your Story

Come out and take part in the Owning Your Story pro-

Maintenance has begun to replace sewer lines and will require closing the section of the running path at Weyland Rd. near LTA traffic circle. Completion of the sewer line replacement is slated to be in Dec. but more information will become available as the project progresses. For more information, contact Matthew Kennon at (757) 764-4926.

Come out and have an in depth discussion with the local Wounded Warriors Ambassadors for an Invisible Wounds Round table Talk 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m., the 1st Thursday of every month and 3rd Monday of every month, at the Chapel Annex. This is a safe place to talk and have lunch with people who currently or previously have been affected by invisible wounds. For questions, contact Staff Sgt. Sims at (757) 225-4360.

Toastmasters Club

National Cybersecurity Awareness Month

Home Buying and Selling Seminar

October 1 kicks off the National Cybersecurity Awareness Month. A series of 10 cyber bulletins will be sent out this month with basic information on how you can better protect yourself online. Please see below for information on the upcoming topics and how you can help improve JBLE’s Cybersecurity posture!! ■ Week 1- Social Media / Ransom Ware ■ Week 2- Mobile Security / Cloud Computing Security ■ Week 3- Cookies / Spyware ■ Week 4- Insider Threat / Digital Signatures

Interested in becoming a better speaker, leader or just want to improve your conversation skills? Well so are we! The Old Point Toastmasters Club meets 11:40 am to 12:40 pm the first and third Wednesday of each month, Soldier Support Center, 650 Monroe Ave, Rm 106. Visitors are always welcome. For more information, visit oldpointcomfort.toastmastersclubs.org or call 878-5579/2977. The next meeting is Oct 2.

Free Home Buying and Selling Seminar presented by four Expert Industry Representatives including a real estate attorney, realtor, a mortgage lender, and a home inspector. Learn and ask questions about the process, requirements, and Virginia state laws and procedures. Sessions are held 2nd Tuesday of each month from 5-7 pm, Soldier Support Center, 650 Monroe Ave, Rm 106. The next Seminar (and last one for 2019) is Oct 8. Call 878❯❯ See

JBLE | 15


www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • October 18, 2019

JBLE Community Continued from14 5579 to register. We will restart the monthly seminars in January 2020.

Spaatz Drive Closure

Spaatz Drive, located north of the Hospital, between the Base Exchange and the north entrance to the Hospital, will be closed for 45 days. Both lanes will be blocked to install new electrical vaults and underground conduit, to support the Hospital Addition and Central Utility Plant construction.

Submit Eustis Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com

18 Oct ... BTRAC, R1, R2, R3 ... 0700-2200 *19 Oct ... R1 ... 0800-1400 *20 Oct ... R1 BOW HUNTING ... 0400-1900 21 Oct ... BTRAC, R1, R2, R3 ... 0700-2200 22 Oct ... BTRAC, R1, R2, R3 ... 0700-2200 23 Oct ... BTRAC, R1, R2, R3 ... 0700-2200 24 Oct ... BTRAC, R1, R2, R3 ... 0700-2200 25 Oct ... BTRAC, R1 ... 0700-2200 *26 Oct *27 Oct 28 Oct ... BTRAC, R1, R2, R3 ... 0700-2200 DATE ... MOUT/ UOS SITE ... TIMES CLOSED TO ALL TRAINING ... TA 20, TA 21 -------------15, 17, 22-24 ... TA 28 UOS ... 0001-1700

Did You Know…New Transition Assistance Program Curriculum & Requirements

There are new requirements/changes coming to the Congressionally Mandated Transition Assistance Program (TAP) beginning 1 October 2019. Members who have completed the Pre-separation Counseling and signed the e-form by 30 September 2019 are grandfathered in the FY19 curriculum. If the e-form is not signed by 30 September 2019, service members must re-accomplish the Pre-separation Counseling and complete applicable new requirements (FY20 curriculum). For a detailed explanation of what those requirements are, per individual, please call the Airman & Family Readiness Center (A&FRC), 764-3990/94 for guidance.

Weekly Live Fire Schedule for 15-28 Oct 2019

Attention Fort Eustis Community: The JBLE Water Fowl Hunting Season opens on 22 September 2019. Deer Hunting Season opens on 27 September 2019. Please do not enter any range, training area or facility unless you have signed in at Range Operations and received authorization to enter. Entering training areas without proper authorization during hunting season could result in serious injury or death. Range Operations is located on, Mulberry Island Road, Building 2432, JBLE Range Operations can be reached at (757) 878-4412. Hunters: If military training, government work or other non-hunting activity occurs around you; make yourself seen and heard, vacate the area, and contact SFS Game Warden immediately @ (757)-878-4556 / 4557. IAW ASA Regulation 350-1, the Range Safety OIC/RSO Certification brief is conducted every Friday at Range Operations (Bldg. 2432 Mulberry Island Rd). Start time is 0900. A Commander’s certification Memorandum is required. For hunting and private owned firearms range requirements contact Outdoor Recreation at 757-878-2391. There is construction in progress vicinity TA 20, 21 and 28. Expect large commercial trucks and use caution DATE ... RANGES ... TIMES ... 15 Oct ... BTRAC, R1, R2, R3 ... 0700-2200 16 Oct ... BTRAC, R1, R2, R3 ... 0700-2200 17 Oct ... BTRAC, R1, R2, R3 ... 0700-2200

15

JBLE Base Operating Status Hotline

In the event of inclement weather or other emergencies impacting base, JBLE personnel are strongly encouraged to check the most up-to-date base operation status using the many JBLE social media options. Check the status on the JBLE website at www.jble.af.mil, on Twitter by following @JBLEstatus, on the free JBLE smartphone application (available in Google Play and the Apple App store), and on the Joint Base Langley-Eustis Facebook page. In addition, the Joint Base Langley-Eustis Base Operating Status hotline features updated information of the installation's operating status. The hotline number has recently changed to 764-7550. Please update records.

DISCLAIMER

The appearance of hyperlinks does not constitute endorsement by Joint Base Langley-Eustis, the United States Air Force or the Department of Defense, of the external website, or the information, products or services contained therein. Although Joint Base Langley-Eustis may or may not use these sites as additional distribution channels for information, it does not exercise editorial control over the information you may find at these locations or the privacy and user policies of these locations. Such links are provided consistent with the stated purpose of the website. References to non-federal entities do not constitute or imply Department of Defense or Air Force endorsement of any company or organization.


16

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII

www.peninsulawarrior.com • Peninsula Warrior - Army • October 18, 2019

PER PERFECT WEBSITE for a military family!

INTRODUCING

MILITARYNEWS.COM ATTENTION MILITARY FAMILIES: now there’s a regional website just for you! MilitaryNews.com assists active duty military and their families, both during their transition and throughout their residence here in Hampton Roads. There’s an abundance of information at your fingertips!

H RELOCATION INFO All the resources you need to make Hampton Roads your home.

M I L ITA RY

H DISCOUNTS & DEALS

Great deals are easy to find with MilitaryNews.com’s list of military discounts and military-only coupons and contests!

H EVENTS & CALENDAR

Looking for fun, military friendly events for the whole family? Check out our events and calendar pages for all the military happenings.

H MILITARY NEWS & BLOGS Find information for military families by military families. Our slate of bloggers are all connected to the military and want to help you make the most of your time in Hampton Roads.

PLUS SO MUCH MORE. CHECK OUT MILITARYNEWS.COM TODAY!

Profile for Military News

Peninsula Warrior Army 10.18.19  

Vol. 9 | No. 41

Peninsula Warrior Army 10.18.19  

Vol. 9 | No. 41