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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, November 4, 2021 1

IN THIS ISSUE

National Public Lands Day Naval Support Activity (NSA) Hampton Roads’ Public Works Environmental Department celebrated National Public Lands Day (NPLD) Oct. 28 at Lafayette River Annex. PAGE A4 November 4-November 10, 2021

VOL. 28, NO. 44, Norfolk, VA| flagshipnews.com

Back to the Future – Doubling Down on Visual Information in Naval Aviation By MC3 Bayley Mcmichael

USS George H.w. Bush Public Affairs

single-day volunteer event for public lands. Established in 1994 and held annually, this celebration brings out thousands of volunteers to help restore and improve public lands around the country. NPLD 2021 will maintain and build on the theme of “More Ways to Connect to Nature.” NNSY’s Natural Resources Manager, Hayley Becker stated, “NEEF offers a variety of grants and awards to help organizations engage their local community to improve the environment, increase diversity, and expand their work locally. The NPLD DoD Awards provides funding to selected installations to implement natural resources management, restoration, and/or enhancement projects and NNSY’s NPLD was a great success! Ten volunteers including our River Star Business Partner, The Elizabeth River Project, came out to plant

NORFOLK, Va. — Even before the designation of aircraft carriers nearly a century ago, visual information (VI) — still imagery and later video — was a core element of naval aviation’s mission. And while VI expanded to other warfighting communities, as well - consider its utility to Lt. Arleigh Burke as the officer in charge of the Battle Force Camera Party for fleet training in the mid-1930’s and Capt. John Ford as he supported the WWII war effort using motion pictures such as Midway to inform the public of the war effort — its operational significance in an ever expanding digital information environment continues to grow. Today the Navy’s warfighting communities are re-investing in their public affairs (PA) and visual information (VI) assets to restore a historical, operational role for PA/VI professionals to support fleet and strike group commanders. This is no more apparent than in Naval aviation and the A18A, or Aerial Cameraman, Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) for Mass Communication Specialists (MC). “Aerial photographers have been vital assets to the HSC community, the Carrier Air Wing team, and the Navy for ages,” said Cmdr. Thomas “Princess” Van Hoozer, commanding officer of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 5. “The increased capability aerial photographers provide us to showcase the talent and spirit of our hardworking Sailors and the combat effectiveness of our Navy is a powerful tool that can help win over partner nations, deter potential competitors, and improve the morale of the Force and their families are invaluable to today’s global efforts. They are the force multipliers that enable our dominance of the information environment.” Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Novalee Manzella, Naval Aircrew Warfare Specialist assigned to USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) frequently works with Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 5 (HSC-5), one of two rotar y-wing squadrons within Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7. Both CVW 7 and GHWB report to Commander, Carrier Strike Group 10 - the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group — on their next deployment. “Before I became an Aerial Photographer I didn’t fully understand the critical role that MC’s played in the military,” said Manzella. “Photography and videography offer the truth of operating in an active environment, while also telling the stories of the men and women that serve in the military.” The continued integration between the aviation and MC communities offers a

Turn to NNSY, Page 7

Turn to Aviation, Page 7

Norfolk Naval Shipyard’s (NNSY) Natural Resources Program office and NNSY volunteers participated in the National Environmental Education Foundation’s (NEEF) National Public Lands Day (NPLD) by planting native trees at the Craddock Little League Fields. (COURTESY PHOTO)

NNSY Demonstrates Environmental Stewardship In Commemoration of National Public Lands Day By Jason Scarborough

Norfolk Naval Shipyard Public Affairs

PORTSMOUTH, Va. — Norfolk Naval Shipyard’s (NNSY) Natural Resource Program is the recipient of the National Environmental Education Foundation’s (NEEF) National Public Lands Day (NPLD) Department of Defense (DoD) Award. NNSY was honored for its commitment to the workforce, community and environment. The National Environmental Education Foundation (NEEF) is the nation’s leading organization in lifelong environmental learning, creating opportunities for people to experience and learn to improve their lives and the health of the planet. Congressionally chartered in 1990 as a nonprofit organization to complement the work of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), NEEF is a non-partisan, non-ad-

vocacy organization working to make the environment more accessible, relatable, relevant, and connected to people’s daily lives. NEEF routinely highlights individual and group commitment to nature through education and service. In commemoration of this year’s NPLD, the DoD, through the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Energy and Installations, and the Legacy Resource Management Program, funded projects on military lands that are open for recreation. This year’s NPLD DoD Award to NNSY was for natural resources management, restoration, and/or enhancement projects in commemoration of National Public Lands Day on September 25. To support this initiative, native trees were planted at NNSY’s St. Juliens Creek Annex to help increase biodiversity, reduce heat islands and increase water absorption. NEEF’s NPLD is the nation’s largest

Ford Celebrates Halloween 2021 during Maintenance Availability By MC2 Zachary Melvin

USS Gerald R. Ford Public Affairs

NEWPORT NEWS, Va. — USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) held a pumpkin carving contest and a costumed 5K run in celebration of Halloween, Oct. 28, while executing a maintenance availability at Huntington Ingalls Shipyard in Newport News, Virginia. Ford Sailors were invited to submit their personally carved pumpkins to a panel of judges for a chance to win prizes and to be featured in Ford’s weekly newsletter. “We are just trying to break up the daily routine of being in the shipyard environment by providing a safe and fun way to divert Sailors’ attention away from what can

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be a gloomy environment,” said Scott Reed, Ford’s fun boss. The costumed 5K run was held at the Huntington Hall track in Newport News, Virginia. Sailors who participated were rewarded with a Halloween-themed ‘Warship 78’ t-shirt. “Command events are fun,” said Aviation Ordnanceman 1st Class Josh Maddox, from Houston, assigned to Ford’s weapon’s department. “It was a fun and exciting 5K. We had a couple of people dress up, but we could always use more participation at events like this.” The event was sponsored by Ford’s Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive DeciTurn to Celebrate, Page 7

Sailors assigned to USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) participate in a Halloween run sponsored by Ford’s morale, welfare and recreation at Huntington Hall in Newport News, Virginia, Oct. 28, 2021. (MC2 ZACHARY MELVIN)

Commander

Nursing skills

Maintenance

U.S. Marine Corps Maj. Gen. Michael E. Langley took command of Fleet Marine Force Atlantic (FMFLANT), Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM), and Marine Forces Northern Command (MARFORNORTH) from Lt. Gen. Robert F. Hedelund during a succession of command ceremony PAGE A3

Navy Medical Center Portsmouth (NMCP) held its Nursing Skills Fair, Oct. 18-22. More than 400 registered nurses, licensed nurses and Navy hospital corpsmen participated. PAGE A2

The aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) completed its Maintenance and Material Management Inspection (3MI) Oct 22. PAGE A6

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, November 4, 2021 1

IN THIS ISSUE

National Public Lands Day Naval Support Activity (NSA) Hampton Roads’ Public Works Environmental Department celebrated National Public Lands Day (NPLD) Oct. 28 at Lafayette River Annex. PAGE A4 VOL. XX, NO. XX, Norfolk, VA | flagshipnews.com

November 4-November 10, 2021

Back to the Future – Doubling Down on Visual Information in Naval Aviation By MC3 Bayley Mcmichael

USS George H.w. Bush Public Affairs

single-day volunteer event for public lands. Established in 1994 and held annually, this celebration brings out thousands of volunteers to help restore and improve public lands around the country. NPLD 2021 will maintain and build on the theme of “More Ways to Connect to Nature.” NNSY’s Natural Resources Manager, Hayley Becker stated, “NEEF offers a variety of grants and awards to help organizations engage their local community to improve the environment, increase diversity, and expand their work locally. The NPLD DoD Awards provides funding to selected installations to implement natural resources management, restoration, and/or enhancement projects and NNSY’s NPLD was a great success! Ten volunteers including our River Star Business Partner, The Elizabeth River Project, came out to plant

NORFOLK, Va. — Even before the designation of aircraft carriers nearly a century ago, visual information (VI) — still imagery and later video — was a core element of naval aviation’s mission. And while VI expanded to other warfighting communities, as well - consider its utility to Lt. Arleigh Burke as the officer in charge of the Battle Force Camera Party for fleet training in the mid-1930’s and Capt. John Ford as he supported the WWII war effort using motion pictures such as Midway to inform the public of the war effort — its operational significance in an ever expanding digital information environment continues to grow. Today the Navy’s warfighting communities are re-investing in their public affairs (PA) and visual information (VI) assets to restore a historical, operational role for PA/VI professionals to support fleet and strike group commanders. This is no more apparent than in Naval aviation and the A18A, or Aerial Cameraman, Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) for Mass Communication Specialists (MC). “Aerial photographers have been vital assets to the HSC community, the Carrier Air Wing team, and the Navy for ages,” said Cmdr. Thomas “Princess” Van Hoozer, commanding officer of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 5. “The increased capability aerial photographers provide us to showcase the talent and spirit of our hardworking Sailors and the combat effectiveness of our Navy is a powerful tool that can help win over partner nations, deter potential competitors, and improve the morale of the Force and their families are invaluable to today’s global efforts. They are the force multipliers that enable our dominance of the information environment.” Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Novalee Manzella, Naval Aircrew Warfare Specialist assigned to USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) frequently works with Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 5 (HSC-5), one of two rotar y-wing squadrons within Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7. Both CVW 7 and GHWB report to Commander, Carrier Strike Group 10 - the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group — on their next deployment. “Before I became an Aerial Photographer I didn’t fully understand the critical role that MC’s played in the military,” said Manzella. “Photography and videography offer the truth of operating in an active environment, while also telling the stories of the men and women that serve in the military.” The continued integration between the aviation and MC communities offers a

Turn to NNSY, Page 7

Turn to Aviation, Page 7

Norfolk Naval Shipyard’s (NNSY) Natural Resources Program office and NNSY volunteers participated in the National Environmental Education Foundation’s (NEEF) National Public Lands Day (NPLD) by planting native trees at the Craddock Little League Fields. (COURTESY PHOTO)

NNSY Demonstrates Environmental Stewardship In Commemoration of National Public Lands Day By Jason Scarborough

Norfolk Naval Shipyard Public Affairs

PORTSMOUTH, Va. — Norfolk Naval Shipyard’s (NNSY) Natural Resource Program is the recipient of the National Environmental Education Foundation’s (NEEF) National Public Lands Day (NPLD) Department of Defense (DoD) Award. NNSY was honored for its commitment to the workforce, community and environment. The National Environmental Education Foundation (NEEF) is the nation’s leading organization in lifelong environmental learning, creating opportunities for people to experience and learn to improve their lives and the health of the planet. Congressionally chartered in 1990 as a nonprofit organization to complement the work of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), NEEF is a non-partisan, non-ad-

vocacy organization working to make the environment more accessible, relatable, relevant, and connected to people’s daily lives. NEEF routinely highlights individual and group commitment to nature through education and service. In commemoration of this year’s NPLD, the DoD, through the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Energy and Installations, and the Legacy Resource Management Program, funded projects on military lands that are open for recreation. This year’s NPLD DoD Award to NNSY was for natural resources management, restoration, and/or enhancement projects in commemoration of National Public Lands Day on September 25. To support this initiative, native trees were planted at NNSY’s St. Juliens Creek Annex to help increase biodiversity, reduce heat islands and increase water absorption. NEEF’s NPLD is the nation’s largest

Ford Celebrates Halloween 2021 during Maintenance Availability By MC2 Zachary Melvin

USS Gerald R. Ford Public Affairs

NEWPORT NEWS, Va. — USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) held a pumpkin carving contest and a costumed 5K run in celebration of Halloween, Oct. 28, while executing a maintenance availability at Huntington Ingalls Shipyard in Newport News, Virginia. Ford Sailors were invited to submit their personally carved pumpkins to a panel of judges for a chance to win prizes and to be featured in Ford’s weekly newsletter. “We are just trying to break up the daily routine of being in the shipyard environment by providing a safe and fun way to divert Sailors’ attention away from what can

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www.facebook.com/ The.Flagship

www.twitter.com/ the_flagship

be a gloomy environment,” said Scott Reed, Ford’s fun boss. The costumed 5K run was held at the Huntington Hall track in Newport News, Virginia. Sailors who participated were rewarded with a Halloween-themed ‘Warship 78’ t-shirt. “Command events are fun,” said Aviation Ordnanceman 1st Class Josh Maddox, from Houston, assigned to Ford’s weapon’s department. “It was a fun and exciting 5K. We had a couple of people dress up, but we could always use more participation at events like this.” The event was sponsored by Ford’s Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive DeciTurn to Celebrate, Page 7

Sailors assigned to USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) participate in a Halloween run sponsored by Ford’s morale, welfare and recreation at Huntington Hall in Newport News, Virginia, Oct. 28, 2021. (MC2 ZACHARY MELVIN)

Commander

Nursing skills

Maintenance

U.S. Marine Corps Maj. Gen. Michael E. Langley took command of Fleet Marine Force Atlantic (FMFLANT), Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM), and Marine Forces Northern Command (MARFORNORTH) from Lt. Gen. Robert F. Hedelund during a succession of command ceremony PAGE A3

Navy Medical Center Portsmouth (NMCP) held its Nursing Skills Fair, Oct. 18-22. More than 400 registered nurses, licensed nurses and Navy hospital corpsmen participated. PAGE A2

The aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) completed its Maintenance and Material Management Inspection (3MI) Oct 22. PAGE A6

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2

The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, November 4, 2021

Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III speaks at the change of command at U.S. Southern Command, Doral, Fla., Oct. 29, 2021. Army Gen. Laura J. Richardson assumed command from retiring Navy Adm. Craig S. Faller. (LISA FERDINANDO)

Austin Emphasizes Importance of Working With Partners in Central, South America By David Vergun DoD Public Affairs

U.S. Southern Command’s work is vital to American security, American interests and American values. When there’s instability or a crisis nearby, it can echo here at home, the secretary of defense said. Lloyd J. Austin III delivered remarks today during a change of command ceremony where Army Gen. Laura J. Richardson assumed duties as commander of Southcom from Navy Adm. Craig S. Faller at Southcom headquarters in Doral, Florida. The COVID-19 pandemic, natural disasters and the impacts of climate change, cybersecurity threats, drug trafficking and transnational criminal organizations are some of the examples Austin cited that have led to crises or instability. “We have to tackle these challenges together, as neighbors and friends. And, Southcom is building and strengthen-

ing true partnerships, rooted in respect, communication and candor. True partnership means deepening the ways that we work together,” he said. In this region, comprising South and Central America, as well as most of the Caribbean islands, that means helping neighbors strengthen their capabilities. It means sharing information. And it means working closely with partners to combat malign influences, he said. “Our network of alliances and partnerships are a force multiplier that no competitor can match,” Austin added. The secretary provided examples of partnership successes that were led by Faller’s team. On Aug. 14, a 7.2 magnitude earthquake hit the southwestern area of Haiti, causing extensive damage. Helicopters from Joint Task Force-Bravo and Puerto Rico’s National Guard delivered food and aid and other aircraft surveyed the damage. “Working together with USAID, you saved hundreds of

lives,” he said, referring to the U.S. Agency for International Development. When Hurricanes Eta and Iota struck nearly a year ago, pummeling Central America, Southcom was there providing assistance, he said. When the COVID-19 pandemic spread to the region, Southcom secured more than $90 million for medical equipment, field hospitals, cold-storage containers and more for Southcom partners, he said. Additionally, the U.S. government donated nearly 34 million vaccine doses to the region. Spotlight: Coronavirus: DOD Response “We’re going to keep on fighting COVID in the region because that’s what friends do. We understand that a threat to global health anywhere is a threat to security everywhere,” Austin said. Other areas of cooperation, he said, include: disrupting criminal organizations, stopping the flow of drugs into the U.S., expanding security cooperation. “Our partnerships are based on much

more than proximity. They’re based on our shared values of equitable growth and prosperity. And they’re based on our common commitment to human rights and human dignity. And they’re based on the region’s long standing consensus in favor of democracy,” Austin said. Southcom will be in capable hands under Richardson’s leadership, the secretary said. For the better part of three decades, the Army has benefited from her professionalism and dedication. During the war in Iraq, Richardson commanded an assault helicopter battalion and flew missions to support troops on the ground, he mentioned. She later commanded U.S. Army North. Now, she is the first woman to lead Southcom. “There isn’t a crisis that she can’t handle,” he said. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Army Gen. Mark A. Milley also provided remarks at the change of command. Many of the countries in the region have fought shoulder to shoulder with the U.S. military in various campaigns from World War II to Korea to Vietnam and throughout not only this region but elsewhere, he said. “That has been incredibly significant to our country. This is in fact, a neighborhood of neighbors of the Western Hemisphere,” he said. “This hemisphere belongs to us and to no one else, and we’re all shoulder to shoulder in that common cause to protect our hemisphere from any international threats,” he said, mentioning potential adversaries China, Russia and Iran.

NMCP holds nursing skills fair By MC2 Donald White

Naval Medical Center Portsmouth Public Affairs

PORTSMOUTH, Va. — Navy Medical Center Portsmouth (NMCP) held its Nursing Skills Fair, Oct. 18-22. More than 400 registered nurses, licensed nurses and Navy hospital corpsmen participated. Consisting of online training followed by hands-on training taught by CNSs, For eight hours each day, the fair offered the nursing staff an assessment and validation of their nursing competencies in seven areas including medication safety and central line-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI), along with the opportunity to practice skills in blood administration that ensure patient safety. The nursing skills event also helped fulfill learning requirements for the Joint Commission and human resources. “The Nursing Skills Fair is an annual competency event for nurses and hospital corpsman. The event is led by the Clinical Nurse Specialists (CNSs) and Nurse Practice Council,” said Lt. Cmdr. Anna Schlenker, a medical-surgical clinical nurse specialist and one of the lead organizers for this year’s event. Hospitalman Dalton Gilmore, a hospital corpsman at the medical center, said the fair

was a great way to brush up on skillsets he hadn’t utilized recently, while learning new tools for treating patients. “Working in the ward, I see different situations every day,” said Gilmore. “Coming here reassured me I am providing the best care I can and also taught me some new things I didn’t even know I could do.” Attendance also came with a tangible incentive for participants in the form of five contact hours. This, along with the enthusiasm of the facilitators, made for a productive learning environment. “The instructors made it so that the staff were excited about this and wanted to get involved. It’s fun for them. It is fun for us,” said Gilmore. As the U.S. Navy’s oldest, continuously-operating military hospital since 1830, Naval Medical Center Portsmouth proudly serves past and present military members and their families. The nationally-acclaimed, state-ofthe-art medical center, along with the area’s 10 branch health and TRICARE Prime Clinics, provide care for the Hampton Roads area. The medical center also supports premier research and teaching programs designed to prepare new doctors, nurses and hospital corpsman for future roles in healing and wellness.

Editorial Staff Military Editor | MC1 Maddelin Hamm, maddelin.hamm@navy.mil Managing Editor | Ensign James Caliva, james.caliva@navy.mil Graphic Designer | Trisha Irving, trisha.irving@virginiamedia.com

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Navy Medical Center Portsmouth (NMCP) held its Nursing Skills Fair, Oct. 18-22. More than 400 registered nurses, licensed nurses and Navy hospital corpsmen participated. Consisting of online training followed by hands-on training taught by CNSs, For eight hours each day, the fair offered the nursing staff an assessment and validation of their nursing competencies in seven areas including medication safety and central line-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI), along with the opportunity to practice skills in blood administration that ensure patient safety. (MC2 DONALD WHITE)

Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic (CNRMA): Rear Adm Charles W.“Chip”Rock Regional program manager for Navy Region Mid-Atlantic (NRMA): Public Affairs Director | Beth Baker The Flagship® is published by Flagship, Inc., a private firm in no way connected with the Department of Defense (DOD) or the United States Navy, under exclusive written contract with Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic. This civilian enterprise newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the military services. Contents of the paper, including advertisements, are not necessarily the official views of, nor endorsed by, the U.S. Government, DOD, or the Department of the Navy (DON). The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts and supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the DOD; DON; Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic or Flagship, Inc. of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase,use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user, or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. Editorial content is edited, prepared and provided by the Public Affairs Department of Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic. Stories may be submitted via email to news@flagshipnews.com. The Flagship® is published every Thursday by Flagship, Inc., whose mailing address is located at PO Box 282501, Norfolk, Va. 23510. © 2021Flagship, Inc. All rights reserved


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, November 4, 2021 3

U.S. Marine Corps Maj. Gen. Michael E. Langley took command of Fleet Marine Force Atlantic (FMFLANT) from Lt. Gen. Robert F. Hedelund during a succession of command ceremony October 25 at Naval Support Activity Hampton Roads, Virginia. (COURTESY PHOTO)

MARINE FORCES WELCOME NEW COMMANDER Courtesy Story NORFOLK, Va. — U.S. Marine Corps Maj. Gen. Michael E. Langley took command of Fleet Marine Force Atlantic (FMFLANT), Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM), and Marine Forces Northern Command (MARFORNORTH) from Lt. Gen. Robert F. Hedelund during a succession of command ceremony October 25 at Naval Support Activity Hampton Roads, Virginia. Langley is a native of Shreveport, Louisiana and a graduate of the University of Texas at Arlington. He was commissioned in the Marine Corps in 1985, and served most recently as Commander, Marine Forces Europe and Africa. “Marines, stand ready for new challenges,” Langley declared. “Even during COVID, Marines stood ready because we are a force of readiness and will continue to do so. Thank you for putting your trust in me, I will not let you down.” Hedelund, also commissioned in the Marine Corps in 1985, is a native of Pompano Beach, Florida and graduate of Florida Atlantic University. Following his relief, he is retiring after nearly 40 years of service. “As my career of nearly 39 years comes to a close and I step over the side, each of you should know that it has been a humbling experience and a true honor to serve alongside you all,” said Hedelund in his farewell comments. “Service to our nation, no matter how long, is a cherished treasure which we will always share.” Due to COVID-19 mitigation efforts, attendance was limited to a small group of invited guests. Ceremony imagery is available at www. marforcom.usmc.mil. Media interested in amplifying information should contact the office of Communication Strategy and Operations at (757) 836-4376.

Marines and SME from MCSC discuss setup and capabilities of the Global Broadcast Service suite. (SSGT BRITTNEY VELLA)

‘Pressurized’ Training Prepares 22nd MEU By Jacky Fisher

NAVIFOR Public Affairs

SUFFOLK, Va. — The Deploying Group Systems Integration Testing (DGSIT) team from Naval Information Forces (NAVIFOR) N4, in close partnership with Marine Corps Systems Command and other Marine Corps program offices, recently supported Marines from the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU). The collective team provided technical assessments and highly valuable hands-on training at Bogue Field and Camp Lejeune, N.C. As part of pre-deployment preparations, DGSIT enables and delivers readiness by conducting comprehensive Command, Control, Communications, Computer, Combat Systems, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C5ISR) Information Warfare integration test events in the field and afloat for deploying groups preparing for advanced training and ultimately deployment. Mr. Darryl Davis, NAVIFOR’s DGSIT Atlantic Marine Air Ground Task Force (LANT MAGTF) Coordinator, led the MIT (MAGTF Integration Test) team that put the 22nd MEU through the paces of rigorous testing and evaluation of C5ISR operability and interoperability in advance of their upcoming deployment. Testing and evaluation was concurrent with 22nd MEU Realistic Urban Training (RUT), and included 22nd MEU command element

(CE), 2nd Battalion 6th Marines Ground Combat Element (GCE), Combat Logistics Batallion-22 (CLB-22), and the Air Command Element (ACE). Davis led a team of 36 Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) that comprised the MIT. “Our team was on the ground at Bogue Field for six days. Subject Matter Experts, working 22nd MEU personnel, corrected 35 of 43 interoperability issues identified,” said Davis. “Working over the shoulder with the Marines, the collective team conducted more than 300 hours of mentoring while executing a comprehensive test plan covering all elements of Marine Corps C4I systems integration.” DGSIT is a vital testing and evaluation program that concentrates on Carrier Strike Groups (CSG), Amphibious Ready Groups (ARG), and MEU’s final hardware and software deployment configuration, and evaluates fielded C5ISR systems with respect to operational employment, integration and interoperability. In a forward deployed environment, whether it is day-to-day operations or a real world response mission, this is not the time to hope that all elements of the group have operational and interoperability connectivity. DGSIT, as a process, provides the deploying group commander an increased familiarity and confidence by demonstrating C5ISR system crew-driven performance. DGSIT NAVIFOR team coordinators, who execute the process,

are located on both the east and west coast. Despite the onset of the COVID-19 worldwide pandemic, DGSIT remained engaged with fleet readiness processes, conducting 7,800 hours of technical and operational mentoring and training for approximately 1,230 Sailors and Marines. Through a rigorous follow-up process, the program resolved approximately 93 percent of more than 900 interoperability issues. As directed by Commander United States Fleet Forces, Commander Pacific Fleet and Headquarters Marine Corps, the DGSIT process supports deploying groups across Atlantic and Pacific-based CSGs, ARGs and MEUs. Additionally, the program reaches the Forward Deployed Naval Forces-Japan CSG, ARG and MEU. As a validation of the C5I modernization process, DGSIT assesses interoperability and integration in an operational environment to support the Optimized Fleet Response Plan (O-FRP) and USMC Pre-Deployment Training Plan (PTP). Results of this formal quality assurance process not only aids the CSG, ARG and MEU Commanders, the formal report becomes a vital feedback loop to the program offices to improve hardware / software developmental processes. NAVIFOR’s mission is to generate, directly and through our leadership of the IW Enterprise, agile and technically superior manned, trained, equipped, and certified combat-ready IW forces to ensure our Navy will decisively DETER, COMPETE, and WIN. For more information on NAVIFOR, visit the command Facebook page at https://www. facebook.com/NavalInformationForces/ or the public web page at https://www.navifor.usff. navy.mil.

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4 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, November 4, 2021

Naval Support Activity (NSA) Hampton Roads Public Works Environmental Department celebrated National Public Lands Day Oct. 28 with volunteers from Naval Facilities Engineering Systems Command Atlantic, NSA Hampton Roads 1st Lieutenant Division, Norfolk Naval Shipyard and the Elizabeth River Project. The installation applied for and received a grant from the National Environmental Education Foundation to plant native switch grass, little blue stem and several species of trees on the Lafayette River Annex. (KATISHA DRAUGHN_FRAGUADA)

Naval Support Activity Hampton Roads celebrates National Public Lands Day By Katisha Draughn-Fraguada

Naval Support Activity Hampton Roads Public Affairs

Naval Support Activity (NSA) Hampton Roads’ Public Works Environmental Department celebrated National Public Lands Day (NPLD) Oct. 28 at Lafayette River Annex. NPLD is the nation’s largest singleday volunteer event for public lands. The National Environmental Education Foundation (NEEF) coordinates National Public Lands Day. Volunteers from Naval Facilities Engi-

neering Systems Command Atlantic, NSA Hampton Roads 1st Lieutenant Division, Norfolk Naval Shipyard and the Elizabeth River Project, participated in this year’s NPLD event by planting native switch grass, little blue stem, and several species of trees on the Lafayette River Annex. “The main focus was the pavilion, where switch grass and little blue stem were planted around the perimeter,” said Taylor Austin, Natural and Cultural Resources Manager for NSA Hampton Roads, who coordinated the event. “These plants both absorb pollutants from runoff and provide

habitat and food for birds, pollinators and many other species.” The installation applied for and received a grant from NEEF on the project. Darrell Cook, Community Planner for Naval Facilities Engineering Systems Command Atlantic, was happy to participate in his first NPLD event. “I wanted to support the environment and the beautification of our property here,” he said. “I hope this event promotes teamwork and spurs additional future projects.” Pam Boatwright, River Star Business Project Manager with Elizabeth River Proj-

ect, participates in various stewardship projects with the installation throughout the year. “We love this base and working with the businesses. It is so rewarding as what we are doing today instantly transformed this pavilion here,” she said. “It is instant gratification for what we do.” NPLD brings together individuals to help restore the country’s public lands at the federal, state, and local level. NSA Hampton Roads has been participating in NPLD for eight years. “Once well established, the switch grass and little blue stem should form a hedgerow, with the hopes of preventing Canada geese from picnicking under the pavilion as well,” said Austin. “That is our goal and I am very appreciative of all of the volunteers who were able to come out and help with such an important project.”

(COURTESY GRAPHIC)

TOGETHER WE WIN $

52,000 IN 52 WEEKS TO 52 WORTHY CHARITIES

“We truly appreciate the generous support from Rosie’s! This donation will help us provide specially adapted bikes for children in our community with disabilities. Thank you!”

James Howard

President | REACHcycles Every week in 2021 we will award a local charity from a community in which we operate a donation of $1,000. Helping those communities around us is at the core of our operational philosophy. We truly believe that high tides raise all ships and we are determined to add value to the communities in which we operate. Through the charitable program, Rosie’s Gives Back, Colonial Downs Group has made monetary and in-kind donations of more than $1,369,500, and has logged over 2,500 service hours in Virginia communities.

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, November 4, 2021 5

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(From left to right) Commanding Officer of Naval Support Activity Hampton Roads; Rear Adm.(Ret) Robert J. Bianchi and Chief Executive Officer, Navy Exchange Services Command; Maxine Bell-Culley, are shown with the award at the Naval Support Activity Hampton RoadsNorthwest Annex NEX Bingham Award Ceremony on Oct. 29. (KATISHA DRAUGHN-FRAGUADA)

Naval Support Activity Hampton Roads-Northwest Annex Navy Exchange wins the Bingham Award By Katisha Draughn-Fraguada

Naval Support Activity Hampton Roads Public Affairs

CHESAPEAKE, VA — Teamwork. Dedication. Excellent customer service. Those were a few sentiments used to describe the Navy Exchange (NEX) at Naval Support Activity (NSA) Hampton Roads-Northwest Annex at a ceremony where they received the prestigious Bingham Award. Maxine Bell-Culley, NEX Store Manager, and her team were recognized during a ceremony Oct. 29 for all of their efforts over the past year. “Maxine, what more can I say about you and your team? You all went above and beyond, during a worldwide pandemic, for this community,” said Rear Adm. (Ret) Robert J. Bianchi, Chief Executive Officer of Navy Exchange Services Command (NEXCOM). “On behalf of your customers, Bravo Zulu for a job very well done.” The Bingham Award was established in 1979 to recognize excellence in customer service, operations and management at NEX activities. The award is presented to the best of the best NEXs in nine sales categories for overall financial results and customer service.

The Northwest Annex NEX won in Sales Category 6 ($2.4 million - $4 million) for the third time in a row, which typically does not occur very often for the same store. This is their eighth win since the award was established in 1990. “Our NEX down here is small but mighty,” said Capt. Matthew Frauenzimmer, Commanding Officer of NSA Hampton Roads. “Thank you for pushing through some of those struggles and challenges that you had no idea would face you during the past year. You and your team did a great job staying open at the height of this pandemic and taking care of this military community.” The NEX provides support to a wide range of customers to include military members, tenant command personnel, and military families. The Northwest Annex NEX has had many accomplishments over the past year to include winning the Tidewater District Store of the Quarter several times; maintaining the highest web survey scores in the Tidewater District; accepting orders and making products available for purchase in Chesapeake when customers could not travel to larger stores; leading the district in total operational results across the board; and receiving an Associate Satisfaction Index score of a 99, which was the highest in the entire NEXCOM enterprise.

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6 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, November 4, 2021

A jet flies over the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) during a missing man formation fly-over. (COURTESY PHOTO)

GHWB Completes Maintenance and Material Management Inspection (3MI) By MC3 Novalee Manzella

USS George H.w. Bush Public Affairs

NORFOLK, Va. — The aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) completed its Maintenance and Material Management Inspection (3MI) Oct 22. C ommander, Nava l Air Forces’ ( C O M NAVA I R F O R ) Ma i nt e n a n c e and Material Management (3M) team completed more than 250 supervised maintenance checks with Sailors from each of GHWB’s 20 departments as part of the inspection. “We overcame a lot of challenges after coming out of a Docking Plan Incremental Availability and the team did very well,” said Lt. Cmdr. David Jefferson, the 3M Officer on board GHWB. “We saw significant, consistent improvement in our 3M program between the 3M Assessment and the 3MI.” 3MI inspections examine the planning,

scheduling and performance of shipboard maintenance. Aircraft carriers have a projected life span of 50 years, and all of the equipment aboard needs to be well maintained in order to be operationally ready. Stewardship of the ship is an important facet of each Sailors’ effort, and 3MI scores are a litmus test of their work. “With a final score of 93.3 percent I couldn’t be more proud of the work everyone has put in, from our leadership down to our most junior Sailor,’ said Jefferson. “I was very impressed,” said Capt. Robert Aguilar, commanding officer of GHWB. “We were above standards. Out of the 250 spot checks, we only down checked on nine of them. In damage control we had 90 spot checks and only down checked on one. Outstanding job to the DC team specifically, but across the board all divisions put in the time and effort to be excellent. Spot checks went very well and our level of

knowledge tests went very well. Division officer interviews were 42 out of 42. Everyone passed and GHWB received very high marks across the board. I’m very proud of this crew and look forward to deploying with them soon.” 3MI is an all-hands evolution, and as such, everyone from the commanding officer to the most junior enlisted Sailor has a part to play. 3M work center supervisors confirm the work center maintenance manual and workspaces are well maintained, properly managed, and that people in their work center are qualified to the necessary level. Each qualified person must understand the materials in front of them and ask questions when they don’t. Every Sailor needs to do their maintenance efficiently and correctly each time. “For each Sailor to take ownership of their equipment and understand how they affect other programs around the ship

shows pride and ownership,” said Jefferson. “For example, when a distinguished visitor takes a tour of our spaces, the pride and ownership that a Sailor had when performing maintenance is able to be seen by an untrained eye.” While this inspection went well, GHWB has many more inspections to prepare for its Tailored Ship’s Training Availability and Final Evaluation Problem next year. “The crew did an excellent job in preparing,” said Aguilar. “The inspection team is going to be back to look and see how we have maintained our program, and I am confident that we will keep this program rolling forward in a manner that will ensure the ship’s material condition remains high for years to come. This was just a moment in time, and we can certainly be proud of our success, but we can be even more proud when they come back and we are still executing above standard.” GHWB provides the national command authority flexible, tailorable warfighting capability as the flagship of a carrier strike group that maintains maritime stability and security in order to ensure access, deter aggression and defend U.S., allied and partner interests.

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, November 4, 2021 7

Aviation from Page 1

unique opportunity for the Navy to optimize workforce capability and mission effectiveness. “The H-60 community has the privilege to work alongside aerial cameramen routinely,” Van Hoozer said. “I am constantly impressed with our aerial MC’s skill and look forward to each opportunity to fly with them as part of my crew.” Since 2019, aerial photographers undergo a rigorous training pipeline in order to become the asset the Navy intends them to be. After finishing MC “A” School, where they learn the basics of being a Navy Mass Communicator, they move straight to Naval Aircrew Candidate School where they learn the basics of being a Naval Aircrewman and complete a water survival class. From there they must complete Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape (SERE), a training program that prepares U.S. military personnel to survive and “return with honor” in life-threatening scenarios. The Navy Aircrewmen still have much more training and testing to go through before finally earning their wings. After the completion of all training evolutions, A18A’s are expected to be proficient in mission effectiveness, Operational Tasking and Visual Information (OPTASK VI), and how Naval Aviation supports all aspects of the Naval Doctrine. Mission effectiveness is defined as the probability of successfully completing an assigned mission, and an appropriate measure of effectiveness for the military system. One example of how A18A’s are now increasing mission effectiveness is by documentation of missions. By getting the Navy’s story out first, we limit the spread of misinformation from adversaries both foreign and domestic. Mission effectiveness is increased when A18A’s come into play because they allow the public to see firsthand the truth of the operational environment. “I was lucky enough to document HSC-5 during their Helicopter Advanced Readiness Program (HARP) exercise on Naval Air Station Key West’s Boca Chica Field. HARP is an essential tactical training that MH-60S squadrons undergo to prepare for missions performed in a hostile environment,” said Manzella. “The prepara-

tion for HARP ensures each Sailor is fully qualified and prepared to successfully complete the mission. Over the course of a week, I captured photos and videos of the crewmen and pilots demonstrate their skills with escape and evasion strategies, ground recovery element evolutions, and Humanitarian Aid and Disaster Relief tactics.” Another key aspect of the fleet-wide optimization of the MC rating is OPTASK VI. OPTASK VI is a mission to visually document key moments of unsafe, unprofessional or abnormal interactions by vessels and aircraft of other nations against U. S. assets. This applies to naval aviation because of the inherent nature and enduring principles of naval forces. The PA and VI community have supported intensive training for this in recent years. Media has become a weapon adversaries try to use against the U.S., but MC’s and now A18A’s are trained in fighting back quicker with the most accurate documentation. Maintaining a sharp focus on the Navy’s global operations is a top priority for PA, as the need to effectively communicate what the Navy does to various audiences increases. As the world shifts to a digital form, the PA community helps to keep naval operations on the forefront in the information age. Media points the way for intelligence support in meeting the requirements of both regional conflicts and operations other than war. PA also develops doctrine to reaffirm the foundation of U.S. Navy expeditionary maritime traditions. Overall, MC’s and A18A’s alike have made strides using their knowledge and skills in an effective way for the mission. The PA and VI community is moving forward and taking action in an increasingly fast and complex battlefield of information. The A18A’s today are paving the way for the future, and media will only become more necessary. “The Aerial Cameramen continue to show the growing capabilities they bring to the HSC community and overall mission of the Navy,” Van Hoozer said. A18A’s will continue to be a warfighting capability in naval aviation.

Celebrate from Page 1

sions (CSADD). Members and officers in CSADD helped pass out t-shirts and encouraged runners to the finish. “We came out here to support our command’s MWR program,” said Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Marilyn Mejia-Sanchez, from Alexandria, Virginia, assigned to Ford’s supply department and CSADD’s vice president. “It’s always great to have fun with our shipmates and encourage them to make positive and productive choices.” Ford is in port at Newport News Shipyard in support of her Planned Incremental Availability (PIA), a six-month period of modernization, maintenance and repairs. For more news from USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78), visit www.dvidshub.net/unit/CVN78

NNSY from Page 1

trees at the Craddock Little League fields. We planted 20 native trees: 10 red maples, four red oaks, three eastern redbud, and three cypress. There are numerous benefits to planting trees, including improving air quality, reducing and storing excess carbon, stabilizing soils, providing shade, and increasing native biodiversity. Our efforts with the help of these volunteers will have a lasting impact in these public spaces. NNSY’s natural resources goal is to support more environmental stewardship events and opportunities to help protect and improve the environment. Being that this is the first year NNSY Natural Resources has participated in this event, I believe each year will build upon the next!” The event was open to the Public and all DoD personnel and Hampton Roads residents were invited to join in planting these native trees to benefit our communities, providing clearer air and absorbing excess water.

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8 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, November 4, 2021


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 2 | Thursday, November 4, 2021 1

uarterdeck

Bilateral exchange USS America, the Navy’s only forwarddeployed amphibious assault ship, welcomed friends and partners from the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force destroyer JS Ise for a bilateral visit aboard America, Page B6

Sailors greet family members as the San Antonio class amphibious transport dock ship USS San Antonio (LPD 17) returns to its homeport. San Antonio returned to its homeport at Naval Station Norfolk Oct. 8, following a six-month deployment to the U.S. 5th and U.S. 6th Fleet areas of operation. (COURTESY PHOTO)

DOD Celebrates ‘National Veterans and Military Families Month By David Vergun DoD Public Affairs

November is National Veterans and Military Families Month. The Defense Department recognizes that military families have important roles to play in supporting a strong and ready force. “Our nation’s service members do not serve alone. Alongside them are the dedicated members of their families, whose commitment and

resolve strengthen our nation. Your support and resilience help strengthen our force,” said C. Eddy Mentzer, acting director of military community support programs. “The department recognizes that readiness depends on a strong and resilient home front, and we honor those who make it possible — our nation’s nearly 3 million military family members,” said Mentzer, whose spouse is an active-duty Air Force colonel.

Every military family is unique and could consist of not just immediate family members, but also partners, caregivers, extended family members and friends. “Each one of you is important.” Military life has its own unique challenges and rewards, and the department wants to ensure family members have support and access to resources they can use, said Mentzer. The entire suite of these resources is available on the Mili-

NAVFAC Southwest’s Select 2022 Military & Civilian Engineers, Designer of the Year Announced

tary OneSource website. “Military OneSource should be the first stop for any military family when facing adversity,” said Mentzer. “Service members and their families can visit the website, call Military OneSource at 800-3429647 to speak with a Military OneSource consultant, or start a live chat. Our team will listen to your needs and lead you to the resources you need. “Military OneSource is not

Naval Information Warfare Systems Command Public Affairs

By Mario Icari

Naval Facilities Engineering Systems Command Southwest Public Affairs

SAN DIEGO — Naval Facilities Engineering Systems Command (NAVFAC) Southwest Commanding Officer Capt. Michael Oestereicher announced Lt. Cmdr. Carl Chase and Jacqueline Oravitz were selected as NAVFAC Southwest’s military and civilian engineers of the year, and Suzanne Duffy was selected as NAVFAC Southwest’s designer of the year, Oct. 27 in San Diego. “ These exceptional civilians and officer represent all the superb professionals of the NAVFAC Southwest team and have earned this distinction through dedicated and sustained superior performance,” said Oestereicher. Chase is a civil engineer serving as a NAVFAC Southwest

Assistant Operations Officer. He has swarmed course-corrections on multiple military construction (MILCON) projects across four of the Navy’s most dynamic installations. He proposed and implemented a joint execution of the project with Seabee labor and heavy horizontal construction specialty support to enable award of P-762 Combat Aircraft Loading Area on San Clemente Island, Calif. He has also served as the Facilities Engineering and Acquisition Division Director for Naval Base Point Loma Public Works Department, where he tracked design engineer workloads and stakeholder priorities to ensure project packages were technically sound and met Navy mission needs prior to solicitation. His efforts to achieve 100 percent execution of fiscal year projects by end of Q3 enabled thorough technical analyses of contractor proposals while

simultaneously capturing 20 percent in additional funds to support critical, but previously unfunded, facility requirements. Oravitz is a civil engineer serving as the Utilities Water Program Manager at the Naval Air Station Lemoore where she oversaw the design, management and operation of the Water Treatment Plant (WTP), distribution systems projects, and most notable is the WTP Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition System. She earned a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering and a master’s degree in civil engineering, but her education did not stop there. She has continuously taken workshops and courses related to her career and utilized her skills and knowledge to train, manage and lead. Oravitz has conducted hundreds of hours of training for WTP Turn to NAVFAC, Page 7

Turn to DOD, Page 7

NAVWAR Discusses Future Business Opportunities with Defense Industry at NDIA Fall Forum By Elisha Gamboa

(COURTESY GRAPHIC)

just for currently serving military families, but also for transitioning service members and their families. They have access to all Military OneSource has to offer up to 365 days post transition.” That website provides helpful information and guidance on topics, such as: Nurturing and growing friendships and relationships to help

Naval Information Warfare Systems Command’s (NAVWAR) leaders and contracting experts engaged with industry professionals at the National Defense and Industrial Association (NDIA) San Diego Fall Forum, October 25 and 26, at the Town and Country Resort and Convention Center, providing candid insights into current and future Navy objectives and identifying areas in need of industry support. The NDIA San Diego Fall Forum is an annual two-day event that promotes shared dialog between government and the defense industry, with opportunities to network and engage with leaders from Navy organizations. K i c k i n g of f t h e e ve nt , NAVWAR Assistant Chief Engineer for Mission Architecture Nick Freije discussed the current strategic environment and how NAVWAR is working with its partners across the Navy and defense industry to develop and implement a single information warfare enterprise architecture, consolidating all Navy networks under a single enterprise construct. Also focused on the importance of partnerships, NAVWAR’s

Small Business Programs Director Dan Deconzo emphasized the critical role small business plays in NAVWAR’s mission to deliver and sustain information warfare capabilities and services, including the information warfare enterprise architecture, for the U.S. Navy and its partners. “This forum provides a collaborative space for us to connect with current and future defense industry partners on high priority fleet requirements,” said Deconzo. “It allows us to leverage industry’s specialized experience and capabilities to meet near term operational demands and provide innovative, agile and affordable solutions for long-term threats.” NAVWAR’s Command Information Security Officer Mark Compton continued the conversation by identifying organizational challenges and areas in need of industry support. During his discussion, he highlighted the importance of acquiring and delivering effective, secure and reliable information technology resources and capabilities now and for the future, focusing on his team’s priorities for 2022 including: driving data informed decision-making and digital transformation, enhancing NAVWAR cybersecurity Turn to NAVWAR, Page 7


2

The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 2 | Thursday, November 4, 2021

Heroes at Home

Q: I am the sponsor of an Exception Family Member (EMF) registered in the EFMP. Is special consideration given to this circumstance for my control date? A: Possibly. Family members designated as Categories IV and V EFMs are severely disabled, and Navy Housing strives to provide permanency in living arrangements. As a result, EFM Categories IV and V are placed directly below the freeze zone. When two or more members are waiting for assignment, the higher of the EFM categories will be given priority in assignment. If members are designated in the same EFM Category, the actual control date will determine the priority of assignment unless written notification is provided by the medical authority indicating unique circumstances.

NAVY HOUSING (Istock)

Still serving after the service By Lisa Smith Molinari It’s been almost five years since my husband wore his uniform. But in that time, we’ve continued to be a military family, first and foremost. We can’t help it. After 28 years of service, it’s engrained, rooted, part and parcel of who are. Francis’ Navy uniforms may be hanging in a storage closet (and may not fit anymore), but we’ll always wear our service-mindedness on our sleeves. For some, transitioning out of the military can be challenging. There have been many moments in the last five years when we longed for the camaraderie of our base housing neighbors; clear hierarchies; mutual respect; a strict sense of duty, order and responsibility. At first, it was difficult for us to understand corporate America. We learned that, “I’ll email you next week” actually means “I may contact you in a month or two, but you probably won’t hear from me again.” A big smile, a hearty handshake, and a promise to hit the links for a round of golf is meaningless posturing. Unfortunately, some who say “thank you for your service” have no real interest in what an active duty military family experiences. Fooled many times, we believed naively in civilian professional and social opportunities, until we discovered they were empty rabbit holes. As a result, we sought connections with people and organizations with familiar military values and experiences. Since transi-

tioning to civilian life and establishing a permanent home in a New England village, Francis joined the local VFW and American Legion to be with other veterans. We’re members of USAA, MOAA and the Naval War College Foundation. We still use the base gym, exchange, pharmacy, clinic, commissary, package store, gas station, and thrift shop. However, last week, we stepped out of the cozy confines of our military comfort zone. A neighbor, Winn, invited Francis and I to attend a Rotary Club breakfast meeting. When the alarm went off at o-dark-thirty, I groaned. “Why do I have to go? Isn’t it a men’s club?” I asked Francis, who insisted on being fifteen minutes early for everything. “Because I told Winn we’d be there,” Francis barked, “and no, Rotary’s been open to women since 1987, so jump in the shower, would you please?” Thirty minutes later, we were in St. Matthews Church rectory, hands on hearts, reciting the Pledge of Allegiance with fifteen local Rotary Club members. The club’s blue banner hung in the corner. Dog-eared song books lay on folding tables before us. “Winn, pick one for us to sing this morning,” the club president asked our host. At Winn’s command, we turned to page 58 and sang “I’ve Been Working on the Railroad,” a tune which hadn’t crossed my windpipes since middle school. “Fie, fi, fiddly i o … fie, fi, fiddly i ohohoh!” we belted, as the sky outside the rectory windows heralded another windy

New England day. Dinah hadn’t blown her horn, but we filled paper plates with a hot cooked breakfast in the rectory kitchen, then the meeting commenced. The visiting Rotary District Governor peppered members with questions, and volunteers took turns describing local charity bike races, Thanksgiving baskets for needy families, Scout troop sponsorships, a grant-funded composting toilet project, donations to the Martin Luther King Center, thousands raised to help local villagers experiencing food insecurity during the pandemic. Impressed by the significant impact this tiny clutch of volunteers had made on the community, I whispered, “We should join.” Francis nodded enthusiastically. We hadn’t known much about the club’s mission prior to attending the breakfast meeting. But it was clear that this group, much like our cherished military affiliations, felt an innate duty to serve. We realized that the military isn’t the only place where one can serve their community, and veterans aren’t the only citizens who serve. Civilian service organizations such as Rotary, Lions, Kiwanis, Shriners, Circle K, Elks, Moose Lodge, Jaycees, and others benefit millions of people worldwide through service initiatives. Leaving the church rectory that morning, we noticed a familiar motto written on the Rotary keychain given to us by the District Governor — “Service Above Self.” We smiled, because we understood completely.

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There are federal and state programs committed to providing additional assistance for families with special needs. As a military family, you also can count on the support of the Exceptional Family Member Program, or EFMP, and Military OneSource special needs specialty consultants. Learn about the benefits available to you and use them to take good care of your family. Supplemental Security Income Supplemental Security Income, or SSI, is a federal program that helps to covers the basic needs for people with disabilities who have little or no income. SSI provides cash payments that can be used for food, medical and dental care, home improvements and other personal needs. To qualify, you or your family member must meet certain requirements: • Income and other financial resources can’t exceed the limits set for your state. However, as a military family, combat pay, hostile fire pay and imminent danger pay don’t count towards the limits. Check with your local Social Security office to learn more. • You must have medical evidence of a severe physical or mental impairment that limits your family member’s ability to function for a continuous period of at least 12 months. • If the parent is a member of the U.S. military and stationed overseas, children under 18 with special needs can receive benefits while overseas. Check your family member’s eligibility by completing the SSA Benefit Eligibility Screening Tool and learn everything you need to know before applying. Title V Programs In every state, you’ll find services for children under 18 with special heath care needs, which are funded by Title V of the Social Security Act. Eligibility is determined by age, medical criteria and income. Title V programs assist with: • Delivery of health services: Organization and delivery of health care services that meet the emotional, social and developmental needs of children. • Development of health care plan: Integration of families into all aspects of developing and updating the health care plan. • Support for families: Assistance in

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(COURTESY PHOTO)

finding alternatives and choices that meet the needs of your family. • Facilitation of professional collaboration: Assisting in the planning, implementing and valuating programs and related policies. State Maternal and Child Health agencies maintain a toll-free hotline for information about Title V programs and providers. Check here to locate your local Title V program or call the national Title V toll-free number at 800-311-2229. The Fair Housing Act and other housing programs If you or someone in your family has special needs, your home may need specific modifications such as a wheelchair ramp or wider doorways to make it accessible for daily living. The Fair Housing Act protects your family with special needs from discrimination when renting or buying property. Under this law, property owners are required to make reasonable accommodations for disabilities, as well as allowing residents to make their own modifications. If you live in privatized housing on a military installation, your property managers are required—at no cost to you—to make reasonable accommodations that abide by the Americans with Disabilities Act. Families with special needs have the right to accessible housing. Your installation housing office or your Exceptional Family Member Program coordinator can help you look for affordable housing on

and off the base. Visit MilitaryINSTALLATIONS to find contact information. Medicaid benefits for individuals with disabilities Medicaid is a federal program that covers basic health and long-term care services. This benefit is available for military family members with special needs that require medical attention beyond what is available through TRICARE. Every state has its own Medicaid program with income restrictions and criteria for eligibility. Check this site for your state to see if you qualify and for more information. You can also find more information through the Military OneSource eLearning module on government assistance. Medicare Medicare could also help provide health care coverage and save you money in the process. Children and adult children with disabilities may be eligible for services. Learn more at Medicare.gov. You can also contact your installation’s Exceptional Family Member Program office or a Military OneSource special needs consultant. Additional government programs Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and the Women, Infants and Children program are designed to aid children with special needs. More information about these benefits is provided at https:// www.usa.gov/, an official government website search engine that links to government agencies, programs and services.


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 2 | Thursday, November 4, 2021 3

U.S. and Indonesian military personnel join during the opening ceremony for Cooperation Afloat and Readiness at Sea Training (CARAT) Indonesia 2021. (COURTESY PHOTO)

U.S., Indonesia commence bilateral exercise CARAT Indonesia By Lt. Cmdr. Lauren Chatmas

Command Destroyer Squadron 7 Public Affairs

SURABAYA, Indonesia — Military personnel from the U.S. and Indonesia kicked off Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) Indonesia virtually, in Surabaya and in the waters and airspace of the Java Sea, Nov. 1. The 11-day engagement focuses on the full spectrum of naval capabilities and features cooperative evolutions that highlight the ability of U.S. and Indonesia to work together towards the common goal of ensuring a free and open Indo-Pacific maritime security environment. “Strong relationships are built on trust, and developed through demonstrated actions and consistent and thoughtful discourse. These strong relationships are the foundation on which security, stability, and prosperity flourish,” said Capt. Tom Ogden, commodore of Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 7. “CARAT Indonesia is a perfect venue for the U.S. and Indonesia to address mutual maritime security concerns, and to expand our cooperation in Southeast Asia.” The at-sea phase will take place in the Java Sea, where U.S. Navy assets will join with ships

and aircraft from Indonesian Navy, known as Tentera Nasional Indonesia - Angkatan Laut (TNI-AL), for partnered training focused on building interoperability and strengthening relationships. U.S. Navy ships and aircraft include Independence-variant littoral combat ship USS Jackson (LCS 18), embarked MH-60S Seahawk helicopter of Helicopter Sea Combat (HSC) Squadron 23, Spearhead-class expeditionary fast transport ship USNS Millinocket (T-EPF 3) and a P-8A Poseidon aircraft assigned to Commander, Task Force (CTF) 72. The exercise will feature complex at-sea training to demonstrate the bilateral force’s ability to work together through numerous events including divisional tactics designed to enhance communication as ships sail together in complex maneuvers. It will also consist of a tracking exercise aimed at increasing both navies’ ability to track and pursue targets through the coordinated deployment of surface ships and maritime patrol aircraft. Other focus areas include surface warfare, visit, board, search and seizure drills, mobile dive and salvage training, a gunnery exercise, maritime patrol operations, and exchanges between Explosive Ordnance

Disposal technicians. “CARAT 2021 is a forum for military-to-military cooperation between Indonesia and United States, especially the Indonesian navy and United States seventh fleet bilateral program,” said TNI-AL First Adm. Rachmad Jayadi, Second Fleet Command Chief Of Staff, during the opening ceremony. “This joint exercise aims to improve the capabilities of the navy personnel in the field of warfare capability and become a place for sharing our knowledge and enhancing the skills of naval warfare as well as interoperability in facing maritime security challenges in the two countries.” Involved U.S. personnel include staff from U.S. 7th Fleet, Marine Forces Pacific, CTF 72, CTF 73, CTF 75, CTF 76, DESRON 7, U.S. 7th Fleet Band and U.S. Embassy Jakarta. Virtual subject matter expert exchange events will feature a variety of joint training opportunities, to include dive/salvage training, aviation and information sharing, force protection, maritime domain awareness, medical best practices and legal symposium. Intergovernmental organization personnel from United Nations Office on Drugs

and Crime (UNODC) and the European Union’s Critical Maritime Routes Indo-Pacific (EU-CRIMARIO) initiative will provide subject matter expertise, aimed to aid in understanding of the operational environment and U.S. 7th Fleet desires to continue this approach in future iterations. This year, CARAT Indonesia has resumed with safety mitigation measures after being cancelled in 2020 for the COVID-19 pandemic. Indonesia has been part of the CARAT exercise series since it began in 1995. After 27 years of annual training events between the armed forces, CARAT Indonesia remains a model for cooperation that has evolved in complexity and enables both navies to refine operations and tactics in response to both traditional and non-traditional maritime security challenges. As the U.S. Navy’s forward-deployed destroyer squadron in Southeast Asia, DESRON 7 serves as the primary tactical and operational commander of littoral combat ships rotationally deployed to Singapore, functions as Expeditionary Strike Group 7’s Sea Combat Commander, and builds partnerships through training exercises and military-to-military engagements. Under Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet, 7th Fleet is the U.S. Navy’s largest forward-deployed numbered fleet, and routinely interacts and operates with 35 maritime nations in preserving a free and open Indo-Pacific region.

Naval Surface Warfare Center, Port Hueneme Division Implements Navy Continuous Training Environment Tool for Live Virtual Constructive Training with the Fleet By Latasha Ball

Naval Surface Warfare Center, Port Hueneme Division Public Affairs

To meet Naval Surface Warfare Center, Port Hueneme Division’s (NSWC PHD) North Star of digital transformation that seeks to eliminate onboard technical assists to ships by 2030, and advance the Navy’s training capabilities, the command has connected to the Navy Continuous Training Environment (NCTE). Connectivity with NCTE enables warfighters to conduct Live Virtual Constructive (LVC) training with live and synthetic systems around the globe. NSWC Corona Division in Corona, California develops, manages, operates and maintains the NCTE on behalf of Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command and Commander, Pacific Fleet. The NCTE consists of networks, simulations, simulation routing equipment, data translation devices and live training range systems used together to create a realistic LVC training environment. “The ability to properly train or conduct training on a simulated threat that has the actual capability of the real threat, provides us with some knowledge of what our weapons can and cannot do,” said William Gieri, NSWC PHD Surface Warfare Engineering Facility (SWEF) manager. “It also provides training to fleet operations on what its people can expect in terms of how our systems would react to various threats.” NCTE enables sailors to experience an integrated and secure training environment that can generate a variety of situations that might not be available in a live exercise but should be expected at sea, including scenarios with multiple ships and aircraft, according to Gieri. “Instead of having real-life aircraft like

The Navy Continuous Training Environment (NCTE) enables Live Virtual Constructive (LVC) training with live and synthetic systems around the globe. The Navy recently utilized NCTE during the Large-Scale Exercise (LSE) 2021 to execute LVC events with forces from across the United States Fleet Forces Command, U.S. Pacific Fleet, and U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa. The above graph show how the program communicates using networks, simulations, simulation routing equipment, data translation devices and live training range systems used to create a realistic LVC training environment. (COURTESY GRAPHIC)

commercial airlines, we can put simulated aircraft up there flying commercial routes and also aircraft from hostile countries that gives operators on the ship a much more realistic threat environment they’re more likely to encounter in various areas of the world they couldn’t otherwise experience in a sterile fleet environment or in an ocean where they don’t have aircraft routes,” Gieri said. Gieri said he saw the tremendous potential to improve the command’s capabilities by connecting to NCTE. While NCTE was developed specifically for conducting fleet training, the command is exploring options to support events such as Combat Systems Ship Qualification Trials (CSSQT) and Combat System Assessment Team (CSAT) events using the NCTE capability. “With the CSSQT events that we conduct, we can’t always provide real-world threats to the ships conducting them, so we are exploring using the NCTE and its capabilities to augment physical targets that we throw at the ships,” Gieri said. Recently, USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) was the first ship to visit NSWC PHD that participated in the Single Ship Synthetic Training, using NCTE to develop and deliver a complex scenario of multiple antiship cruise missile vignettes to help DDG 62’s training requirements. And, the Navy recently used NCTE during the Large-Scale Exercise (LSE) 2021 to execute LVC events with forces

from across the United States Fleet Forces Command, U.S. Pacific Fleet, and U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa. LSE 2021 was a globally integrated exercise that spanned multiple fleets across 17 different time zones connected using NCTE—executing new warfighting concepts and technology. NSWC PHD’s use of NCTE is in the early stages, according to Gieri, and the team is learning what its full potential is and the different ways it can be used in training the warfighter and supporting the fleet. “If you do the crawl, walk and run phase, you can throw simple threats at somebody, and once they become proficient at simple threats, you can throw more complex scenarios at them—much like you’d expect in the real world,” Gieri said. “So, it gives them the ability to learn from past experiences and become more proficient than if they were in an actual hostile engagement.” In addition to providing enhanced training, NCTE is a cost-effective way to conduct complex training scenarios. Sailors can also learn, while in a LVC training environment, how to tell the difference between a threat and a non-threat, as well as see how current weapons and combat systems may react to a potential threat. “You can also recreate past scenarios, with different combat system baselines, which NSWC PHD is working toward right now with virtual test beds (VTBs) in the SWEF, so you can have a crew sitting at a combat information center with a combat

system it has on its ship and see what real ships are doing on the range and see how that crew would react,” Gieri said. Kanoko Esheim, NSWC PHD LVC lead, worked alongside Gieri to connect SWEF to NCTE. “By coupling NCTE integrating architecture with the other digital transformation initiatives that are underway, the command is determined to activate a modernized capability to enhance the toolkit and workforce development activities,” Esheim said. Gieri added that his team is exploring different ways the Navy can use the NCTE. “We are working toward that end right now,” Gieri said. “We haven’t gotten there yet, but that’s the next generation, which is how to bring a land-based test site and marry it with a ship at sea to look at different combat systems and evaluate older or future combat systems with the combat systems on a ship on a training range.” While NCTE was developed primarily for fleet training purposes, NSWC PHD is also exploring options for using it to support CSATs and CSSQTs. “We’re working on use cases (that outline the purpose and likely uses) and presenting them to Pacific Surface Fleet leadership to see if there’s any buy-in or if the leaders can support that,” Gieri said. “This first test with NCTE during a CSAT at the end of September will be a proof-of-concept to evaluate if NCTE can be used in a CSAT environment.”


4 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 2 | Thursday, November 4, 2021


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 2 | Thursday, November 4, 2021 5

Naval Air Station Sigonella Commanding Officer Capt. Kevin Pickard speaks with Pizzarotti housing contractors regarding clogged drain during the early hours of an expected storm hitting NAS Sigonella, Oct. 29, 2021. (MC1 KEGAN KAY)

Naval Air Station Sigonella Community Jumps into Action Amid Historic Flooding By NAS Sigonella Public Affairs Office SIGONELLA, Italy - After intense, unexpected rains flooded portions of Naval Air Station Sigonella, the community came together to support those impacted on base. Forecasters predicted rain Sunday, Oct. 24, but they didn’t expect it to fall as quickly as it did. In fact, from Sunday through Monday more than 23 inches of rain fell, dumping the equivalent of a year’s worth of rain in 48 hours. At the Letini weather station near base, rain fell at a rate of 6 inches per hour during the height of the storm. As the water rose, the base lost power, causing several pumps to fail around the base’s Marinai housing complex. Throughout the region, roads flooded making transportation impossible. Several homes were without power, and out of precaution the Public Works Department turned off the water treatment and wastewater facilities as the waters continued to rise. By Monday, the base had restored full operational capability, but more than 60 homes in Marinai were flooded and a majority of the

housing complex remained without water or electricity. The base was already hard at work to help the community. Emergency Management and Public Works focused on pump and power restoration, returning power to all nine substations and procuring additional pumps to remove water from critical areas. Community members jumped into action as well. Maranai residents broke out their grills to cook food for their neighbors and NAS Sigonella Installation Command Master Chief Anna Wood and her family hand-delivered meals via canoe, cleared debris, and offered assistance to those in need. “During times like these, we have such a grand opportunity to teach our own children how to care for others,” CMC Wood said. “I am so very proud of our Sigonella family community as they continue to reach out to help those in need.” Soon, Morale, Welfare, and Recreation and USO were on scene to hand out coffee and food as well, bringing those affected by the storm some much needed relief. The housing depart-

ment worked quickly to move more than 90 people into temporary housing, ensuring their safety and comfort and begin inspections to start the process of remediating damaged houses. By Monday evening, NAS Sigonella’s commanding officer Capt. Kevin Pickard and executive officer Cmdr. Ronald Cappellini toured Marinai, assessing damage and talking to residents. “I’ve lived through floods as a kid and it’s the worst thing ever, having to dig your life back out of them,” said Pickard. “We can’t replace those kind things people own but we can restore their homes and their livelihoods. While everyone was caught off guard by the strength of the storm on Sunday, we are committed to ensuring we are better prepared in all ways for any future floods and protecting the people and property within our Sigonella community.” As Monday drew to a close, forecasters warned the rain wasn’t over. On Tuesday, flash flooding made many roads impassable, leaving drivers and cars stranded. Emergency Management alerted all personnel to stay off the roads for their safety, and the base offered shelter to

anyone on NAS I and NAS II but could not get home due to driving conditions. Forecasters noted the rain would continue to fall as the weather system advanced. In anticipation of more flooding later in the week, NAS Sigonella hosted a town hall in Marinai and livestreamed the event on Facebook. Pickard, Housing Director Pete Faulk, Public Works officer Cmdr. Jason Christensen, and several other leaders updated the community on preparation measures for the upcoming storm. “We will never be able to completely predict or control the weather, and at times, no matter what we do, we are going to be taken by surprise,” Christenson said. “However, we are doing everything we can to prepare for and mitigate against heavy weather events.” Emergency management, public works, and housing implemented several measures with an eye to the impending storm this weekend. Additional pumps were placed in strategic locations in Marinai along with extra generators, sandbags were delivered to residents whose homes were in danger of further flooding, and storm drains were inspected and cleared of any debris. A shelter was established on NAS I for anyone who felt unsafe in their homes, and a storks’ nest was enabled for anyone close to a term pregnancy who chose to stay at the hospital. Fortunately, with the pumps fully restored, additional rainfall had no adverse impacts to the base. Known as the “Hub of the Med,” NAS Sigonella’s strategic location as the Navy’s only overseas air station enables U.S., allied, and partner nation forces to deploy and respond as required to ensure security and stability in Europe and Africa.

NAVSUP’s Office of Small Business Programs sets the bar in fiscal year 2021 By Matthew Morrison

Naval Supply Systems Command Public Affairs

During a year full of challenges, Naval Supply Systems Command’s (NAVSUP) Office of Small Business Programs (OSBP) not only met, but exceeded all five of its fiscal year 2021 (FY21) small business goals while also being awarded the FY21 Acquisition Excellence Award Secretary’s Cup. “The work of NAVSUP’s Office of Small Business Programs is vital to our ability to build industry partnerships, optimize our communication with them and sustain readiness across the fleet by promoting small business participation at both the prime and subcontracted level,” said Mr. Kurt Wendelken, NAVSUP vice commander. “This team’s work during FY21 was phenomenal and represented a huge amount of overall work in the small business arena across Navy and I couldn’t be prouder of their accomplishments and the recognition they’ve received for their FY21 efforts.” NAVSUP small business awards accounted for over 40% and exceeded $2.1 billion in obligations. Additionally, NAVSUP’s Small Business FY21 performance reached 27%, exceeding the assigned performance goal of 23.19%. Every year, each Navy head contracting activity (HCA) is required to establish five small business goals for their command. These goals then roll up to an overall agency goal between the Department of the Navy and the Small Business Administration. NAVSUP OSBP’s FY21 goals included a small business (SB) overall goal of 23.19%; small disadvantaged business (SDB) goal of 8.58%; service disabled veteran owned small business (SDVOSB) goal of 6.14%; woman owned small business (WOSB) goal of 6.29%; and a historically underutilized business zones (HUBZone) goal of 1.07%. NAVSUP OSBP exceeded their SB overall goal by 3.81%; SDB goal by 1.79%; SDVOSB goal by .17%; WOSB goal by .9%; and their HUBZone goal by .02%. FY21 also marked the highest recorded

obligations in NAVSUP history for the following categories: 1. Small Business: $2,088,768,262.13 2. Small Disadvantaged: $797,713,431.90 3. Woman Owned: $553,986,826.27 4. HUBZone: $84,438,750.13 “NAVSUP meeting all five small business goals and exceeding historical obligations across four of five small business targets is the direct result of strong advocacy by the dedicated professionals within NAVSUP’s Small Business Program and their counterparts within contracting,” said Chris Espenshade, director of NAVSUP Office of Small Business Programs, while praising the unwavering commitment of his team. “They are committed to expanding small business participation and providing a competitive landscape.” Because of their achievements, NAVSUP’s OSBP was also selected for the FY21 Acquisition Excellence Award (AEA) Secretary’s Cup. The AEA Secretary’s Cup is awarded to the HCA command that exemplifies the highest examples of small business acquisition excellence and whose achievement brings significant credit to the Department of the Navy acquisition community. “Three years ago NAVSUP established its first command small business strategy, which focused on reforming our approach to engaging with industry and utilizing small business as a tool for improved operational readiness,” said Espenshade. “The FY21 metrics are a great indicator that we’re making tremendous strides within expanding small business across NAVSUP’s diverse contracting mission.” The mission of NAVSUP’s OSBP is to ensure small business advocacy leads to a lasting impact on the quality of our products, economic market competitiveness and mission effectiveness for years to come. The focus of NAVSUP’s Small Business Program centers around three major lines of effort: building partnerships in the acquisition process, optimizing communications, and improving small business participation at the prime and contracted level.

The mission of NAVSUP’s OSBP is to ensure small business advocacy leads to a lasting impact on the quality of our products, economic market competitiveness and mission effectiveness for years to come. (COURTESY GRAPHIC)


6 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 2 | Thursday, November 4, 2021

Capt. Ken Ward, commanding officer of the forward-deployed amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6), speaks to sailors assigned to the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force ship destroyer JS Ise (DDH 182) during a tour of the ship. (MC2 WALTER ESTRADA)

USS America hosts sister ship JS Ise for bilateral exchange By Lt. John Stevens

USS America (LHA 6)

SASEBO, Japan — USS America (LHA 6), the Navy’s only forward-deployed amphibious assault ship, welcomed friends and partners from the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force destroyer JS Ise (DDH 182) for a bilateral visit aboard America, Oct. 27. Officers and Sailors from Ise and Commander, Escort Flotilla 2 (CCF 2) enjoyed a command brief, VIP tour and

“Burger Wednesday” lunch as part of America’s first major in-port tour since the COVID19 pandemic began. “We were honored to welcome Captain Miyazaki and several of his outstanding crew aboard America,” said Capt. Ken Ward, America’s commanding officer. “Our relationship with our JMSDF sister ship Ise is the cornerstone of our alliance and partnership with our host nation, and we sincerely look forward to many more exchanges and opportunities to grow that relationship, whether we’re pier-

side in Sasebo, or operating together at sea to preserve a free and open Indo-Pacific.” During the tour, guests visited America’s vehicle storage area, flight deck, hangar bay, pilot house, primary flight control station, combat information center, medical facility, crew mess, and ship’s store. “It was my honor and pleasure to visit our sister ship USS America, receive a brief, look around inside of the ship and enjoy ‘Burger Wednesday,’ said Capt. Koji Miyazaki, Ise’s commanding officer. “This was also a very

good opportunity for our crews to enhance understanding USS America’s capability and U.S. Navy culture. We’re still in a challenging environment under COVID-19, however I strongly believe that our relationship between ships is a symbol for the JMSDF and U.S. Navy’s strong relationship.” America Sailors visited Ise on Oct. 7, experiencing a Japanese curry lunch and comprehensive ship tour. Last December, Ise conducted a traditional kadomatsu (gate pine) exchange with America to celebrate the New Year. America, lead ship of the America Amphibious Ready Group, along with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, is operating in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility to enhance interoperability with allies and partners, and serve as a ready response force to defend peace and stability in the Indo-Pacific region.


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 2 | Thursday, November 4, 2021 7

NAVWAR

NAVFAC

from Page 1

readiness and resiliency, and improving user experience. Following Compton, NAVWAR Director of Contracts Nancy Gunderson joined Naval Information Warfare Center (NIWC) Pacific Director of Contracts Sharon Pritchard and NIWC Atlantic Director of Contracts Steve Harnig in a hybrid in-person/virtual panel providing a year in review of fiscal year (FY) 2021 contracts and a look into FY 2022, displaying the cumulative impact of all the contract actions and dollars awarded by the command’s contracting offices to the defense industrial base. “Forums such as these enable us to discuss the many tools we use to shape our contracting strategies around each requirement, and ultimately achieve business solutions for our programs that enable industry to deliver the capabilities and solutions our fleet needs,” said Gunderson. In addition to leadership briefs, representatives from Program Executive Office Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence (PEO C4I) provided attendees with updates on Navy programs. Participating program offices included: • Battlespace Awareness and Information Operations Program Office (PMW 120) • Command and Control Systems Program Office (PMW 150) • Tactical Afloat Networks Program Office (PMW 160) • Communications Program Office

from Page 1

NAVWAR Director of Contracts Nancy Gunderson engages with industry professionals at the National Defense and Industrial Association (NDIA) San Diego Fall Forum, October 25 and 26. (ELISHA GAMBOA)

(PMW/A 170) • International C4I Integration Program Office (PMW 740) • Carrier and Air Integration Program Office (PMW 750) • Ship Integration Program Office (PMW 760) • Shore and Expeditionary Integration Program Office (PMW 790) This year’s Fall Forum provided program representatives the opportunity to safely engage with industry face-to-face, for the first time in 20 months, allowing for in-person collaboration in the development and delivery of the most advance capabilities available, to compete and win the wars of the future.

Operator personnel and served as the WTP Lead Operator for six months. Her expertise has led to multiple consultation requests on advanced water issues. Oravitz resolved design failures and water quality issues at Jim Creek Facility from 2018-2020, resolved a persistent Legionella issue at a hospital in Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, conducted process analysis and calculations for Naval Facility Deveselu in Romania, and provided plant design and filtration consultation at Naval Air Station Sigonella in Italy from 2020-2021. Oravitz also served on the Navy’s Water Quality Oversight Council Technical Assessment Board. Duffy is a senior Interior Designer for the China Lake Earthquake Recovery Program, which has an estimated $70 million in furniture, fixtures, and equipment (FF&E) for MILCON repair projects and support projects. She has worked with Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) to establish standards for NAVAIR facilities and worked to accelerate design and construction schedules. Duffy also represented Navy

DOD

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maintain important connections. Navigating parenting and caregiving. Planning for and working through different

Interior Design in the General Services Administration Acquisition Group and helped establish procurement avenues and strategies for acquisition and design groups across federal service, served as liaison to Naval Supply Systems Command during the development of the furniture criteria for the blanket purchase agreements, and continues to be a technical expert in FF&E performance requirements. “We have so many talented and motivated engineers and designers to choose from and it is with great pride to recognize these individuals for their embodiment of the NAVFAC Southwest legacy of excellence,” said John Coon, NAVFAC Southwest chief engineer and Design & Construction Business Line leader. The NAVFAC Southwest annual awards program recognizes engineers, architects, landscape architects, and interior designers who portray excellence in engineering achievements, civic and humanitarian activities, as well as professional and technical activities. NAVFAC Southwest personnel selected as engineers of the year are entered into a national awards program associated with the National Society of Professional Engineers. transitions in military life. Parenting, relationship support and child care help. Programs for youths. Spouse employment opportunities. Permanent change of station and deployment assistance.


8 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 2 | Thursday, November 4, 2021

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 3 | Thursday, November 4, 2021 1

Holidays Meals Reconnecting with family and friends over the holidays means food takes center stage. PAGE C4

BUSCH GARDENS® WILLIAMSBURG’S CHRISTMAS TOWN™ OPENS NEXT MONTH

(Courtesy of Busch Gardens® Williamsburg)

This year’s Christmas Town event opens withone of the largest light displays in America, new shows and fan favorites By Busch Gardens® Williamsburg WILLIAMSBURG, VA. — Busch Gardens® Williamsburg is trimming the tree and hanging the lights for the full return of Christmas Town™ beginning on November 12. Voted the World’s Most Beautiful Theme Park every year since 1990, Busch Gardens® Williamsburg will transform into a stunning holiday wonderland with over 10 million twinkling lights, one of the largest light displays in North America. Along with a return of fan favorite shows, bites and delights, this year’s must-see event will appeal to guests of all ages with new performances and activities including: • Celtic Fyre®: A Christmas Celebration – Celtic Fyre returns for the first-time ever during Christmas Town™. Voted USA Today’s #1 Theme Park Entertainment, this iconic fan favorite show celebrates Irish culture with step dancing at Abbey Stone Theatre. The encore performance adds Christmas flair with a new twist on a Killarney classic. • Up on the Haus Top – It’s the most wonderful time of the year! Warm up with

(Courtesy of Busch Gardens® Williamsburg)

modern-day Christmas classics in a festive performance in Das Festhaus. • Unto Us – A choral celebration of the

greatest story ever told. The first Christmas comes alive in this inspiring new show takes place in the open-air Il Teatro di San

Marco Theatre. • Holiday Scavenger Hunt presented by Coca-Cola© – Spot the special holiday ornaments around the park and you could receive a Coca-Cola prize while supplies last! • North Pole Nightcap Bar – Grab your swizzle stick and make a toboggin run to the all-new bar featuring specialty holiday cocktails! Guests can renew holiday traditions by enjoying fan favorite Christmas Town™ classics including Santa’s Workshop, the Christmas Town Express, and ‘Twas that Night ice skating show featuring Champion figure skater Elvis Stojko who brings the magic of Christmas Eve alive in a spectacular performance. Other popular returning fun includes: •Elmo’s Christmas Wish - Join Cookie Monster, Rosita, Grover, and Zoe as they help Elmo find his Christmas wish! Families are sure to be singing and dancing along while watching this fun holiday show. Visit the Sesame Street Forest of Fun outdoor stage to enjoy this show! Turn to Christmas Town, Page 3

First time ever Friday Night SmackDown Live comes to Norfolk Scope November 12th Interview Conducted By Yiorgo FINALLY!!! The WWE is coming home to Norfolk after two long years. SevenVenues is proud to announce that the first ever Friday Night SmackDown Live on FOX for the Hampton Roads area will take place at the wrestling historic Norfolk Scope, Friday November 12th. Its pure excitement at its finest. There is no better rush for true wrestling fans than to see wrestling live and in person. Knowing that it is being broadcast live all over the world adds to the thrill of the night. Several of the amazing matches scheduled include: Former WWE World Champion Drew McIntyre and former RAW Tag Team Champions the Viking Raiders taking on current Universal Champion Roman Reigns and current SmackDown Tag Team Champions The Usos. Former WWE Women’s Grand Slam Champion Sasha Banks will wrestle another former WWE Women’s Grand Slam Champion and current SmackDown Women’s Champion Charlotte Flair. Some of the great SmackDown superstars set to see action are: King Woods, Kofi Kingston, Happy Corbin, Natalya and

so many more. The only place to be Friday night November 12th is at the Norfolk Scope. You can get your tickets now at https:// www.sevenvenues.com/events/detail/ wwe-friday-night-smackdown Former WWE World Champion Drew McIntyre spoke exclusively with us a few days ago. Yiorgo: Why should people come to Friday Night SmackDown? What should they expect to see and do there? Drew McIntyre: I am very excited to get back to Norfolk, and I know the fans are very excited for us to return because Norfolk has such passionate, passionate WWE fans. The fans attending can expect that they are going to have an evening they will never forget. Those that know, I don’t have to tell you how exciting and interactive it is live. For those that are new fans or lapsed fans, this is the show to get you back into things. With WWE we have something for everybody. From the youngest kids to the oldest adults, for the young at heart. We are not just for males. Forty percent of our audience are females. Our female wrestlers are so talented and well represented on our

Drew McIntyre. (WWE)

roster. Our show is such a spectacle and interactive product. You are truly a part of the show. There is such a back and forth between the superstars and the fans. Plus you may get yourself on television.

Y: About six months ago your first book “A Chosen Destiny: My story” was released. Why did you decide to

Turn to SmackDown, Page 3

INSIDE: Check out Flagship Values, your source for automobiles, employment, real estate and more! Pages C6-7


2

The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 3 | Thursday, November 4, 2021

Community Submit YOUR events, news and photos

The Flagship welcomes submissions from our readers online. Please submit events here: www.militarynews.com/users/admin/calendar/event/ Please submit news and photos here: www.militarynews.com/norfolk-navy-flagship/submit_news/

(COURTESY PHOTO)

Free Admission for Military Families, Special Programs Offered Veterans Day Weekend By Colonial Williamsburg WILLIAMSBURG, Va. — Colonial Williamsburg continues its tradition of honoring American military service by offering free admission during Veterans Day weekend, Thursday through Sunday, Nov. 11-14, to all active-duty military, reservists, National Guard members, veterans, retirees and their dependents. Special military-themed programming including a military march and a commemoration honoring America’s veterans will be offered on Thursday, Nov. 11. The “Honoring Service to America” program, which provides complimentary passes to military guests on Veterans Day and Memorial

Day, is made possible once again by a generous $100,000 grant from The Home Depot Foundation as part of its ongoing commitment to improving the homes and lives of U.S. military veterans and their families. Since 2015, the program has distributed nearly 45,000 tickets to military families. Colonial Williamsburg will host a series of special events honoring veterans on Thursday, Nov. 11, including the following: • A 60-minute Veterans Day Proclamation Ceremony beginning at 10 a.m. on Palace Green presented in partnership with the Williamsburg Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution. • Visit a Nation Builder with George Wash-

TCC Theatre presents ShakesFeare in the Grave “The Tragedy of Macbeth” By Laura J. Sanford Tidewater Community College Theatre department presents ShakesFeare in the Grave “The Tragedy of Macbeth” on Friday, Nov. 5 and Saturday, November 6 at 7:30 p.m. at the Chesapeake Campus, 1428 Cedar Road. The play is a condensed, one-hour, production and will take place on the Black Box Theater patio, outside the Chesapeake Academic Building, weather permitting. The play begins with a Scottish lord, Macbeth, becoming convinced by a trio of witches that he will become the next king of Scotland. His ambitious wife supports his plans of seizing power. Macbeth kills the king and becomes the new king and kills more people out of paranoia. The result is a civil war erupting to overthrow Macbeth. Guests are invited to enjoy open seating on a first-come, first-serve basis. The show is “pay what you can” and everyone is welcome. For more information, email Matt Gorris, assistant professor of Theatre at mgorris@tcc.edu.

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ington (11:45 a.m.) and Marquis de Lafayette (2:45 p.m.) at the Charlton Stage. • Military March Honoring America’s Veterans at 3:30 p.m. featuring the Colonial Williamsburg Fifes & Drums, Military Programs staff, and members of Williamsburg community veterans’ groups. The march will begin at Capitol Circle and conclude at Market Square with a ceremony behind the Courthouse featuring an address by Nation Builder George Washington. • End of Day Salute at 4:40 p.m. performed by a lone bagpiper from the roof deck of the Governor’s Palace. • In Defense of our Liberty evening program offered at 7 p.m. at the Magazine. Separate tickets at an additional cost are required.

During their visit, military families are encouraged to visit the Liberty Lounge, a complimentary space for ticketed military guests to relax and recharge in the Historic Area that has served more than 205,000 military guests and their families since opening. Free “Honoring Service to America” singleday passes are available at all onsite ticket locations with proper ID. Minor dependents must be accompanied by an adult, and dependents ages 10 and over must present valid dependent ID. Service members need not be present for qualifying guests to receive free Honoring Service to America tickets, which are provided to dependent family members of currently deployed troops with appropriate identification. Veterans who separated before retirement can bring a copy of their honorable discharge paperwork, form DD 214, as identification of service. Colonial Williamsburg is also proud to offer military discounts on Colonial Williamsburg hotels, dining, retail, golf and spa. Additional information on the “Honoring Service to America” program and other military offerings is available by visiting colonialwilliamsburg.org, by calling 855-296-6627 toll-free and by following Colonial Williamsburg on Facebook and @colonialwmsburg on Twitter and Instagram.


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 3 | Thursday, November 4, 2021 3

SmackDown from Page 1

write it and what are you hoping those who read it get out of it? DM: It was not a case of me deciding to write a book. I am not so egotistical that I thought the world needs that 35 year old Scottish wrestler’s story. A third party reached out to WWE and asked them since Drew is very open with his story with his ups and downs with not just his career but his life, we really think he could help people with his story. Would he be willing for us to put a book together? WWE brought it to me, my wife and I sat down and we talked about it and we said absolutely let’s do this. I’m not going to hold back, I’m going to be completely open with the object being: wrestling is what I do, that’s the foundation of the book, but it’s more about the lessons i’ve learned and showing everybody, hey you may have come through some difficult times, things are going to get dark but there is a light at the end of the tunnel. I’m trying to tell everybody whatever your dreams are, the crazier they are, trust me you can truly achieve them. Y: What is a story that is in the book that you are most proud of ? DM: A story I am proud of is telling my mother’s story. My mom Angela was my hero. I started appreciating her when I got a bit older. She was afflicted with a rare genetic disorder that kicked in her early 20’s. She essentially lost the balance portion of her brain. It ceased to exist. It’s called cerebellum metaxium and she was told basically, you will never have a normal life, you will never have kids. Your brain is going to deteriorate to the point that you will be non-functioning as a human being anymore. She saw the best doctors, neurologists all across the UK and got it somewhat stabilized. She was told she would not have any kids. She met my dad, got pregnant with me, was advised not to have me, she said I don’t care, I would rather die. She had me then had my brother. Growing up she did everything every other mother would do even though she could not balance herself and was in a wheelchair a lot of the time. She did absolutely everything: made our dinner, cleaned the house, did the laundry, nothing held her back, all the way to the point that she had cancer, she never complained and she always said that somebody else had it worse off than she did. I truly had a superhero for a mother. So to tell her story in book form, it’s going to immortalize her and that’s the coolest thing. Y: Tell us the story behind the Claymore sword, since its named Angela after your mom. DM: It was not my idea to be honest. They wanted to name the sword and I assumed I would have to name it something stereotypical like Bloody Bonnie. It was Mr. McMahon that said, “What’s your mother’s name?” He knew her story. I said Angela, and he said, “That’s exactly the

sword’s name.” As soon as he said it, I said that is exactly thes word’s name. It’s really cool because every time I hear Drew and Angela heading to the ring, or I hit a spot kick, Angela will start getting revenge on everybody and to hear my mom’s name on WWE programming is really cool. Y: It’s also very obvious in all of your interviews that you love your wife Kaitlyn very much and you give her a lot of credit for supporting you. DM: These days I don’t really play a character on TV, I play me, and we link it to my real story, real ups and downs that the fans have watched my entire career including getting fired, hitting rock bottom. The reason I was able to come back wasn’t just my knowledge of wrestling, it was also the fact that Kaitlyn stood by my side. I achieved so much more as a person and together we got me back on track to reach my potential. Y: What was it like growing up in Ayr and Prestwick, who were the American wrestlers that you enjoyed watching and what made you decide at such a young age to become a pro wrestler? DM: I was a big fan of Bret “The Hit Man” Hart when I was a kid and my dad likes to tell the story that I was about 6 years old when I got the family together for a family meeting and I announced to my mom and dad and my brother who is one year younger than me, that one day, I am going to be a WWE wrestler. They were like ok sure. Kids say the darndest things. Like one day I am going to play professional football (European soccer) or be an astronaut or be a wrestler. Obviously you get older and get more serious but I never deviated from the plan. I used to go over to my cousin’s house, they were 10 years older and my brother and I used to hide behind the sofa when they were watching wrestling. It was almost forbidden for us to watch. It was always so captivating, these larger than life characters, I just knew from the moment I laid eyes on it, something told me, that’s what you got to do. I spent my childhood trying to figure out how to possibly do it. I sent away to America for all the inside secrets to wrestling books when I was 9-10 years old, I would read about the backstage workings. Finally when I was 15 my mother let me go to the one wrestling school in the UK that was a 24 hour round trip. I lived in Scotland and it was 12 hours there to do my training then 12 hours back. I did it as often as I could afford and I was completely obsessed with making it happen. At 16 years old I started the Scottish wrestling scene and we started putting on shows. We had an adult help us out because there is only so much a 16 year old could do. I would train the guys with what I was learning in England then put on shows. Eventually, I am 21 years old. I am very fortunate that I got my degree from the university in criminology and was signed by the WWE the same year. I am the first Scotchman signed by WWE. Y: What are some fond memories from your times at Ohio Valley Wrestling (OVW) and Florida Championship Wrestling (FCW)? DM: I was on board for about six months

Courtesy of Busch Gardens® Williamsburg

Christmas Town from Page 1

• O’Tannenbaum - Gather in front of Festhaus for a Christmas light show unlike any you’ve ever experienced • Scrooge No More - The ghosts of Christmas past, present, and future will be swept away at the Globe Theatre this season • Holiday Flavors to Savor – Find the tastes of the season throughout the park with the return of fan-favorite beverages, including the decadent Salted Caramel Hot Chocolate and the extrajolly After Dinner Mint Hot Chocolate, perfect for after the kids nestle snug in their beds. The ever-popular Christmas Turkey Dinner returns to the Festhaus, the perfect meal while guests enjoy the all-new show Up on the Haus Top! Over 20 thrilling rides and coasters, festive treats, and holiday shopping complete the immersive experience with Christmas fun for the whole family. “Christmas Town is a one-of-a-kind opportunity to create unforgettable memories in an incredible park setting and we are thrilled to feature its full, park-wide return this year,” said park President Kevin Lembke. “With more than ten million lights and all new shows, 2021 promises to be our best holiday celebration ever. From the meticulously decorated trees to the beautifully choreographed new shows, this year’s Christmas Town gives us all a reason to celebrate the season again with friends and family. Not even Scrooge himself

will be able to resist joining in on the festive holiday cheer.” Christmas Town™ will run on select dates through January 2, 2022. Give the Gift of Unlimited Visits and Unbeatable Benefits with a Busch Gardens Membership Embracing the season of giving, guests can give or receive a year of joy by purchasing a Busch Gardens Membership. For as low as $11.75 a month, with no down payment, guests get unlimited access to the world’s best thrill rides, including the fastest multi-launch coaster Pantheon opening in March 2022, along with seasonal and special event celebrations like Christmas Town, Winter Weekends, Mardi Gras, St. Patrick’s Celebration, Food & Wine Festival, Summer Nights, Bier Fest, and Howl-O-Scream, plus amazing perks, and exclusive offers. Members receive 12 months of visits with the best benefits ever, including FREE parking, up to six free guest tickets, and special savings on merchandise, Quick Queue, and more. Visit www.BuschGardensWilliamsburg.com for more information and to purchase tickets, Fun Cards, or Memberships. Fans can stay up to date with park events, attractions and more by following Busch Gardens Williamsburg on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Busch Gardens Williamsburg is committed to the health and safety of our guests, employees, and the animals in our care. To learn more about our health and safety guidelines visit https:// buschgardens.com/williamsburg/parkinfo/park-safety/.

when WWE ended their working relationship with OVW so my OVW memories are brief. I got there and it just so happened that the WWE writers were there my first week. They were looking at some of the talent that were on the WWE roster and they needed a body to get in the ring so they just said, “Hey kid, do you mind jumping in with this guy to show what he’s got?” I was just a body and I got in there, rolled around, cut a little promo. I guess the timing was right because Wade Berrett was getting in after me. By the time he arrived, I was already competing on Smackdown at 22 years old, and I had just arrived in America so I didn’t spend too much time in OVW. I went to FCW in Florida. I came back off the road because there was so much I still needed to learn about the American style, working the cameras, the WWE style etc. When I was in FCW, that’s when I truly learned. There was Steve Keirn, Dr. Tom Prichard, Billy Kidman, Norman Smiley and to help with my speaking ability which was non existing at the time, one of the best ever, Dusty Rhodes. You can’t help but learn from those guys. That was way much more fun than I was supposed to have. That was truly my college right there. Y: You have worked the Independent pro wrestling scene all over the world and have seen them first hand up close and personal. What advice can you give upcoming talent working for the Independents whose goal is to work for a major promotion? DM: First of all I would say get your reps in and keep working shows and start thinking outside the box. Watch WWE and all other major promotions and see what they got and what makes you different then everybody that you see on the screen right now. How can I stand out? It’s not the same as it used to be. I’m 6’5” and 370 lbs. You don’t have to be that size anymore. As long as you are unique and stand out, are different and have the passion to give it everything, you will get your opportunity. Keep doing those reps and keep your buzz going. Social media is such a big tool these days and if you use it correctly you can really get some serious buzz going. When I was released from WWE, I used social media to take the whole world with me, rebuild my name, re-educate the people to who I was. If you use it the right way, think outside the box, work your butt off, you truly can achieve your dream. Y: Can you pick a couple of WrestleMania memories, such as winning the World Title for the first time and competing in your first WrestleMania and share them with us? DM: Winning my first World Title at WrestleMania was obviously a very unique situation. It was at the height of the pandemic, no fans were there, and beating Brock Lesner in five minutes. Competing in my first Wrestlemania, I remember walking out in front of the fans, at 24 years old as the Intercontinental champion, the same title Bret Hart used to have when I was a kid,

looking around and seeing 80,000 people in the stadium. I’m the Intercontinental Champion at 24 and about to wrestle there. I can still close my eyes and see that moment. Y: Who are some of your favorite opponents to work with that you know you will tear the house down? DM: Ohh (exhaling), I got a few there. Seth Rollins is one, Roman Reigns is one, but if I was going to pick somebody that I know I can tear the house down with, take the match and show a new or lapsed fan, would be myself and Sheamus because when we get in there together, we do not hold back whatsoever. Whatever you think you know about wrestling, if you start to question it, we have known each other for 20 years, we are not afraid to lay it in. We have that chemistry because of that history and our relationship. Y: Can you share a fun story about Sheamus? DM: Ha ha, there are so many of them. If you ask him this question, he would take this opportunity to say horrible things about me. That’s the kind of friend he is. He has always been like a big brother to me through my entire life. Always looked out for me my entire life. I always like to say that we met when I was 19 and he was 43 years old, but seriously he is a little bit older than me. A good memory for him and I, without throwing him under the bus like he would do to me, is the night I won the Intercontinental title, he beat John Cena to become WWE champion and we both sat in the hotel room afterwards, taking it all in. After doing the Independents together, coming up together, in Florida Championship Wrestling developmental together, we are both sitting in the hotel room together, looking at each other, with the IC title and the World title saying, what’s going on, we were just wrestling each other in Europe and suddenly we are Intercontinental Champion and World Champion. This is absolutely insane. That’s really a good memory. Y: Why did you never give up following your dream? DM: I would be lying if I didn’t say I questioned myself, but the truth is when I sat down and looked at myself in the mirror all those times, there was still that voice in the back of my head that said, this is what you are always going to do. Don’t know how yet, but you are going to show the world you can do this. Thankfully, I had Kaitlyn, my girlfriend at the time, now my wife, by my side saying, “I believe in you.” So because of her lifting me up and knowing inside I had so much more to give then the world had seen in my first run, I was able to get out there and as time went on, grow my confidence, be around everybody and they believed more in me then I believed in myself at the beginning. As a leader back in the UK, they lifted me up, my wife lifted me up and everyone else’s belief in me allowed me to believe in myself. Yiorgo is an arts, entertainment and sports writer. A stage, TV and movie actor, he is also a sports entertainer, educator, motivational speaker, writer, storyteller and columnist.


4 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 3 | Thursday, November 4, 2021

Food

Vegan Stuffed Mushrooms. (COURTESY PHOTO)

Add Cheer to the Holidays with Cheesy Plant-Based Appetizers By Family Features Reconnecting with family and friends over the holidays means food takes center stage. Perhaps nothing says “happy holidays” quite like a plate of seasonal appetizers. Make your traditional recipes extra special this year with a plant-based twist that starts with cheese. Holiday plant-based cheese dishes combine cheesiness that people love with fresh vegetables so your hors d’oeurve tray can be enjoyed by everyone no matter their lifestyle or dietary needs. Start holiday eating with a batch of Vegan Stuffed Mushrooms loaded with a colorful assortment of vegetables like onions, zucchini, tomatoes and spinach, and generously topped with plant-based cheese shreds to make an especially cheesy, indulgent and satisfying snack. Or try frying up a plate of Vegan Brussels Sprouts Fritters stuffed with melty, creamy plant-based cheddar cheese for a delicious bite of seasonal comfort.

Try the full range of Violife vegan cheeses to bring these party starters to life. There is no sacrificing taste to enjoy delectable holiday recipes made with melty, stretchy and flavorful vegan cheese. These cheeses are free from dairy, soy, nuts, gluten, preservatives and lactose and are non-GMO. They are made with plant-based ingredients and come in a variety of savory shreds, smokey slices, wedges, blocks or as a cream cheese alternative. Plus, these vegan cheeses are perfect for including in plant-forward holiday spreads and starting new holiday traditions. Visit violifefoods.com to find more appetizers and snacks for your holiday gatherings. Vegan Stuffed Mushrooms Prep time: 20 minutes Cook time: 20 minutes Servings: 4 12 button mushrooms 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided 1 large sweet onion, diced

2 medium zucchinis, diced 4-6 sun dried tomatoes, chopped 2-3 garlic cloves, minced 1 large handful spinach 1 pinch rosemary salt, to taste freshly ground black pepper, to taste 1 pack Violife Just Like Cheddar Shreds finely chopped chives Preheat oven to 350 F. Use damp kitchen towel to clean mushrooms. Remove stalks from mushrooms. Rub with 1 tablespoon olive oil and place on lined baking sheet with empty sides up. In frying pan, saute onions in remaining olive oil until soft then add zucchinis, tomatoes and garlic. Add spinach until wilted. Remove from heat and add rosemary, salt, to taste, and pepper, to taste. Stuff each mushroom with vegetable mixture and sprinkle with cheese shreds. Bake 15-20 minutes. Sprinkle with finely chopped chives.

Vegan Brussels Sprouts Fritters Prep time: 20 minutes Cook time: 10 minutes Servings: 8 35 ounces Brussels sprouts 3 green onions, finely chopped ¼ cup gluten-free all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons salt 1 teaspoon black pepper pink pepper 1 teaspoon paprika ¼ teaspoon garlic powder 1 flax egg (2 tablespoons flax and 2 tablespoons water) 1 pack Violife Just Like Cheddar Shreds 2-4 tablespoons olive oil mint, roughly chopped Wash Brussels sprouts and finely slice. Place in bowl with green onions. In separate bowl, whisk flour, salt, black pepper, pink pepper, paprika and garlic powder. Add dry ingredients and flax egg to Brussels sprouts mixture then add cheddar shreds. Mix well and let rest in refrigerator 10 minutes. In frying pan, heat olive oil. Use hands to make one patty with 2 tablespoons of mixture. Shallow fry 4 minutes on each side. Remove and place on plate with paper towels to drain excess oil. Repeat with remaining mixture. Garnish with mint.

A Family Meal Worth Celebrating By Culinary.net When you are hungry and searching for something filling, juicy and rich, turning to your pantry for on-hand ingredients can make dinner a breeze. Dodge snack cravings and avoid the temptation to swing by the drive-thru; instead, you can have a homemade meal ready in a matter of minutes by putting your skillet to work. Call your loved ones to the dining room to share time together while trying these Smothered Pork Chops in Mushroom Sauce. It’s a dish the entire family can dig into without questioning the substance of the meal as it’s a filling option that requires just a few ingredients you likely already have at home. It all starts with the pork chops, which are thick and seared to perfection. The mushroom sauce is a beautiful blend of earthy and creamy textures. Bring it to a simmer then smother your pork chops and garnish with fresh parsley for a pop of color. The best part is this recipe doesn’t take much time to accomplish. The pork chops are seared for 3-5 minutes per side then simmered in the mushroom sauce for another 2-3 minutes until thoroughly cooked. Don’t waste time with complicated recipes, dirtying an array of kitchen utensils and multiple trips to the store for ingredients you may not use again. This recipe requires one bowl and a single skillet. Cleanup is a breeze, which means there is more time to spend around the table with those who mean the most. Find more savory recipes at Culinary.net. If you made this recipe at home, use #MyCuli-

Smothered Pork Chops in Mushroom Sauce. (COURTESY PHOTO)

naryConnection on your favorite social network to share your work. Smothered Pork Chops in Mushroom Sauce Servings: 4 1 teaspoon mild chili powder 1 teaspoon garlic powder ¼ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon pepper 4 pork chops 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons butter

Mushroom Sauce: 2 ½ cups brown mushrooms, sliced 5 garlic cloves, smashed 1 tablespoon parsley 1 teaspoon Italian seasoning ½ cup chicken broth 1 ½ cups heavy cream fresh parsley, for garnish In small bowl, whisk chili powder, garlic powder, salt and pepper until combined. Pat pork chops dry. Season generously with spice mix. Set aside.

In skillet, add olive oil and butter. Add pork chops; sear 3-5 minutes per side. Transfer to plate. To make mushroom sauce: In same skillet, add mushrooms. Stir fry until golden brown. Add garlic, parsley and Italian seasoning. Stir fry 2 minutes. Add broth and heavy cream. Stir to combine. Simmer 5 minutes until slightly thickened. Return pork chops to sauce. Simmer 2-3 minutes until pork chops are cooked through. Garnish with fresh parsley and serve.


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 3 | Thursday, November 4, 2021 5

Health

(COURTESY PHOTO)

COVID-19: Lifestyle Tips to Stay Healthy By: Janet A. Aker

MHS Communications

As we move toward a third year of the COVID-19 pandemic, the virus has changed many of our daily routines in ways no one anticipated and that have become the new normal. Many of us are still spending a lot of time at home to minimize exposure to the virus that causes COVID-19. A day that may have previously included many physical activities — like walking to and from your car, shopping for groceries, outings with the family or visiting shopping malls — are still absent for those who are not vaccinated or who are otherwise still hesitant to go to crowded places. Also, children under age 12 who are not vaccinated may be in quarantine or doing virtual learning. There are booster shots for those 65 and older and additional shots for those with immune systems that are compromised. These boosters and additional shots increase antibodies that are protective against COVID-19. Yet with all these COVID-driven precautions, new health hazards may emerge. With this unprecedented lifestyle shift, there is a potential for a more sedentary lifestyle packed with activities like watching television, sitting while reading for long periods, or sitting at your computer for longer-thanusual periods of time. Isolation and being at home also can elicit the temptation to eat snacks high in sodium, junk food and low-quality meals that provide instant gratification for our taste buds rather than nutrient-dense whole foods. This is a challenge for many in these times of social distancing and self-isolation. We must stay proactive, and, in some cases creative, to maintain an active lifestyle in the era of social distancing. Even if you are not directly affected by COVID-19 or have never

had it, the pandemic no doubt has had a drastic impact on your day-to-day routine, which could negatively affect your overall health. What are some things we can do to maintain a healthy and active lifestyle while the world around us has adapted to limiting exposure to COVID-19? Get Vaccinated and Mask Up Get vaccinated first and foremost. All military service members are mandated to get COVID vaccinations, and Military Health System (MHS) beneficiaries have ample opportunities to get vaccinated if they are 12 or older or are part of groups that can get booster shots or additional protective shots. Vaccines not only protect you but those around you. Wear a mask when indoors with unvaccinated people and at venues such as grocery stores or move theaters. As winter approaches and people in colder climates are spending more time indoors, masks are increasingly important. Additionally, getting a flu shot, wearing masks, and washing hands frequently may lessen the impact influenza and COVID-19 may have together. (It’s important to reduce the risk of catching both COVID-19 and the flu at the same time.) Stay Active Gyms are open again but some people are still hesitant to return to them. There are many safe alternatives to getting physical activity without going against the preventive best practices recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) like social distancing and avoiding large crowds. Aerobics can be done at home. Push-ups, sit-ups, jumping-jacks and more exercises are great ways to stay fit away from the gym. Other ideas include: • Walk briskly around the house or up and down the stairs for 10-15 minutes 2-3 times per day. • Dance to your favorite music.

• Join a live exercise class on YouTube. Find ways to do simple muscle strengthening exercises around your house such as: • Squats or sit-to-stands from a sturdy chair • Push-ups against a wall, the kitchen counter or the floor • Lunges or single leg step-ups on stairs Avoiding crowds does not mean avoiding nature. Going for a brisk walk or jog outside in uncrowded areas outdoors is still considered relatively safe. • Walk or jog around your neighborhood (maintain the recommended six-foot physical distancing). • Go for a bicycle ride. • Do gardening and lawn work. Adequate Sleep Good sleep is essential to overall health. According to The National Institutes of Health (NIH): “Immune system activation alters sleep, and sleep in turn affects the innate and adaptive arm of our body’s defense system.” While the amount of sleep needed for good health and optimum performance mostly depends on the individual, the CDC recommends adults age 18-60 get seven or more hours of sleep per night. Diet and nutrition It is imperative to practice self-discipline and avoid “emotional eating” due to stress that may be related to the drastic changes surrounding the pandemic. According to the CDC, whole foods like dark, leafy greens, oranges and tomatoes—even fresh herbs— are loaded with vitamins, fiber and minerals. Make it a habit to try to eat more whole nutritious foods instead of processed snacks or fast food. Self-Care Make time to take care of yourself. Be supportive and suggest the same for those close to you. Meditation, relaxation, quality time with family or friends, and personal care promote overall wellness. If you need professional help for your mental well-

ness, there are many ways to seek counseling. Health Care Maintenance If you have medications prescribed for any condition, be sure to take them as directed by your provider. Chronic conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, asthma, and many others should be kept in check by taking your medications as prescribed. Be sure to reach out to your health care team with any concerns. Many service members and beneficiaries have put off check-ups for fear of COVID exposure at military medical treatment facilities, leading in some cases to missed diagnoses of cancers or later diagnoses of serious health care conditions. In the age of COVID-19, telehealth solutions are available. Coping with Stress and Anxiety Positively cope with stress and anxiety induced by the precautions we must all take to combat the spread of COVID-19 in our communities. Positive coping mechanisms may include exercise, meditation, reading, or further developing certain skills or hobbies. Use this time to increase your daily repetition of these positive activities and develop new or even better routines than you may have adhered to prior to the pandemic. Stay Connected Talking with loved ones while in isolation can help reduce the anxiety and instances of feeling down. Take time to use the multitudes of technologies and apps (many free) that can help you stay in touch with those you love. Our busy lives before the COVID-19 pandemic may have limited how often we connected with distant loved ones. Now’s the time to fully exploit these modern capabilities for fellowship, companionship, and camaraderie. Taking all these steps may improve overall health and wellness. Although eating nutritious foods, physical activity, adequate rest, and taking care of our mental health makes us more resilient, it’s not a cure nor does it guarantee immunity from contracting COVID-19. Once again, the top priority is to get vaccinated.

Listen to Your Body: If It Doesn’t Feel ‘Good,’ It Probably Isn’t By: Jacob Moore

MHS Communications

Whatever you call it — training, working out, exercise, PT — some level of intense physical activity at regular intervals is part and parcel of being in the military. This could include anything from rucking several pounds of combat gear, running, or playing sports to lifting weights. One of the keys to a service member’s ability to stay physically fit and avoid undue long-term damage to their body is knowing the difference between “normal” aches and pains and what may be signs of something more serious. “There are several indicators that your body will give you when determining whether you are experiencing normal discomfort or ‘good’ pain, in a way, versus pain that needs to be addressed,” said Air Force Capt. Kameryn Corcoran, a physical therapist at David Grant USAF Medical Center at Travis Air Force Base in Fairfield, California. Some of the key indicators, she said, are: Pain during activity Duration, or pain that continues after ending an activity Pain that limits the duration or intensity of your activities “These are the things you want to look for when thinking about whether to push through or stop,” said Corcoran. Running injuries, specifically, are usually recurrent or nagging aches or pains that start and progress without obvious injury, said Navy Lt. Cmdr. Aaron Stoll, a physical therapist at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, Florida. Stoll said these injuries normally fall into two categories: training errors or overuse, and lack of preparation. “The first category can result in aches,

pains, and declining performance and can be signs that you’re overloading and need a couple days off to recover,” he said. “The latter can cause plantar fasciitis, hamstring tightness, patellofemoral pain syndrome, ‘runner’s knee’ or IT (iliotibial) band syndrome. Others may develop hip or back pain with running due to stiffness of the leg muscles or trunk.” While these types of conditions are not usually a sign of serious injury, they can and should be dealt with to prevent the symptoms from worsening and to optimize continued performance, said Stoll. It’s essential to understand the difference between “good” and “bad” pain. Good pain or soreness is a normal response to pushing your body past its current level of tissue load tolerance. Stiffness and aches after working out can be completely normal, said Corcoran. “If you push past that soreness and overload the capacity your body has at that point, that’s when you start to get closer to a risk of injury,” she said. “Often, I’ll tell patients to adhere to a 10% progression rule. If you’re increasing your activity more than 10% per week, you are at risk for overloading your tissues or structures at a rate faster than what they are able to adapt or recover at properly. If any pain persists longer than three to five days, it’s likely a good idea to consult a medical professional as this may be a sign of potential injury. In terms of pain levels, “Try not to overthink it,” Corcoran said. A good analogy — and a simplified version of the Defense and Veterans Pain Rating Scale — is to think of a stoplight. “Green light is if you’re experiencing pain between a zero and a three. If you’re between a four to a six, you’re more in the yellow light range and you should start to slow down

Army Pfc. Victor Vasquez and Spc. Christian Kerkado-Colon run with Spc. Alexander Haydon as he finishes the two-mile run portion of the Army Combat Fitness Test at Camp Atterbury, Indiana, July 26. (SAMANTHA TYLER)

and think about what may be causing your discomfort — technique, posture, etc. Seven to 10 means you should stop and potentially seek medical attention, especially if it’s acute pain,” said Corcoran. Signs that an injury or pain may be serious include sharp pain that prevents your normal range of motion or prevents a part of your body from moving altogether, pain associated with a significant amount of swelling, deformity or bruising, or pain that lasts past the five-day threshold, especially if a person hasn’t put any stress on that part of the body since the pain began. You should also seek help if the pain is constant, gets worse or keeps you awake at night. Regardless of whether or not the pain is something serious, giving your body time to recover is always recommended. “The key to building strength is the time during which your body is recovering,” Corcoran said. “That’s when your muscles rebuild. That’s when your structures get stronger and adapt.” If you’re not allowing for that recovery

time, she said, we’re breaking down our body without getting the positive benefits. In the event that an injury is serious, the quicker the intervention, the higher the likelihood of a quick recovery. A sprained ankle for example, can turn into chronic pain or may place undue stress on other parts of your body surrounding the ankle due to overcompensation if left unaddressed. “We can get you back to full function a lot faster than if you ignore the signs of overtraining and push through the warning signs,” said Corcoran. When it comes to running, Corcoran recommended changing your running shoes every three to six months or every 250 to 500 miles, depending on how frequently you run. “Running is a high impact sport, so you want to make sure your body is ready for that impact and you’re loading it in a way in which it’s able to adapt properly without exposing yourself to an increased risk of injury,” she said.


6 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 3 | Thursday, November 4, 2021

Good news.

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Early home delivery

Misc. Merchandise For Sale

ESTATE SALE Oct 30/31 & Nov 6/7 12:00 - 3:00pm 306 Baron Blvd, Suffolk Living/bed/dining room sets,high-end glassware,artwork,tools,landscaping equipment. Items priced to liquidate the Estate quickly, everything must go. HUNTING DECOYS Assorted Ducks & Geese. 120 for $400 OBO. Call 757-483-6716

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Good news.

Early home delivery. 757-446-9000 PilotOnline.com

Early home delivery 757-446-9000 PilotOnline.com

Early home delivery.

Early home delivery.

Early home delivery.

Early home delivery.

757-446-9000 or PilotOnline.com

757-446-9000 or PilotOnline.com

757-446-9000 PilotOnline.com

757-446-9000 or PilotOnline.com

757.622.1455 | placeanad.pilotonline.com AIR DUCT CLEANING UNIVERSAL DUCT CLEANING FREE INSPECTIONS MEMBER BBB. 757-502-0200

Hauling (A) FAMILY TRASH MAN-HOUSEHOLD, Demo inside & out, construction sites, dumpster drop off, backhoe work. We haul it all! 20 yrs. exp., lic & ins. 485-1414

Concrete/Asphalt Estate Sales DRIVEWAY & MASONRY WORK Landscaping, Grading, Top Soil, Yard Clean Up & Tree Removal. 757-714-4848

S & H ENTERPRISE 20 YRS. Concrete Exp. All types of concrete work driveways, stamped & exposed. We accept credit cards. 757-652-4050. www.shabazznva.com

B & J MOVING Reasonable Rates, Licensed & Insured. bandjmoving.com 757-576-1290

Home/Office Cleaning RESIDENTIAL CLEANING Relocated to Virginia Beach area. Openings available; Please call Candy (804) 572-4924

Home Improvements ADDITIONS, SUNROOMS, ROOFS, Decks, more. Member BBB. 757-986-3777. www.builderscorporation.com

ALL HOME IMPROVEMENTS Custom Home Repairs & Renovations. Patrick Ellis Ent. Inc. Lic. & Ins. BBB A+ 757-635-6609 BEST PRICE EXTERIORS 757-639-4692 Siding, Windows, Trim, Roofing. FREE ESTIMATES! Lic. & Ins’d. Lowest Prices & Top Quality Work. No Repairs. BBB A+ Rating BRICK AND STONE REPAIRS Steps, Walls, Foundations, etc. Virginia Beach Native. Masonry Contract. 40+ yrs Known As Stone Smith USA. Semi-Retired - A Legend In His Own Mind! Earl Smith 757-270-0578. Please Leave Message. You Won’t Find A Better Man! FRANK’S SIDING & REPAIRS Repairing Siding & Trim. Small jobs. Lic/Ins. Low Prices. BBB A+ RATING 757-227-8964

YOUR PERFECT

JOB

IS WAITING

Lawn and Tree Service ★★★AFFORDABLE TREE SERVICE★★★ Josh 757-998-5327 Theo 757-515-6933 LEAF RAKING & CLEANUP Weed Control, Mulching & Trimming, Planting & Transplanting. 25 yrs exp. 918-4152 PARKER TREE SERVICES Mulch, trim shrubs, landscaping. Free Estimates. 757-620-9390 YARD CLEAN UP - GRASS CUTTING, WOOD FENCE REPAIR & BUSHES Weed Eating, Blowing, Mulch. Reasonable prices. Call 757-477-2158

Professional Services BANKRUPTCY Free Consultation. Payment Plans Available. We Can Pull Your Credit Report For You. Reasonable Fees. “We Are A Federally Designated Debt Relief Agency. We Help People File For Bankruptcy Relief Under The Bankruptcy Code.” Thomas B. Dickenson. Attorney-at-Law. 489-1300

COUNSELING Licensed Clinical Psychologist accepting new patients. 20 years of experience. Private and confidential. Phone/text: 804 3661652, Email: Judy.silberg@vcuhealth. org. Virtual sessions available.

CALVIN’S ROOFING REPAIR LLC Specializes in roofing repair, also guttering, Free estimates, roofing of all types, reasonable prices, Shingles, metal, slate, rubber. Over 30 yrs-business, BBB 757-377-2933 FREE ROOFING ESTIMATES JAYHAWK EXTERIORS 757-963-6559 www.jayhawkext.com

Roofing

A ROOFING SALE

30 Yr. Architect Shingles $1.99 sq ft. Labor & Material included, repair, siding. Class A Licensed & Insured. 757-234-5522

ROOF REPAIR Shingles/Rubber/Slate/ Metal/Chimney Flashing. 757-718-1072

Miscellaneous Services

Subscribe to The Virginian-Pilot today. Call 757-446-9000 or go to PilotOnline.com

SEWING CLASSES For Beginners & Advanced. 757-944-7316

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 3 | Thursday, November 4, 2021 7 AntiquesSales & Collectibles Estate

AMERICAN ANTIQUE BUYER

Dogs, Cats, Other Pets BULLMASTIFF/ITALIAN MASTIFF PUPS

Room For Rent VIRGINIA BEACH Master bedroom. Wifi, cable, can be furnished. No smoking/No pets. $700/mo. weg4772@gmail.com

RAY HIGGINS

Woody. Complete restoration, 350 V-8 auto, disc brakes, tilt wheel, show winner, runs & drives great. $32,900. 757-675-0288. Va. Dlr.

3/4 Bullmastiff 1/4 Italian Mastiff, family loved and raised, parents on site 252-916-0923 Nichol Creek Bullmastiffs on Facebook $950

CHOW CHOW

25 YEARS EXPERIENCE FREE ESTIMATES

757-617-4043

Wanted To Buy CARDS, COMICS, RECORDS Collectibles. Etc. Cash Paid Today. Please Call 757-636-5466 Thanks!

Looking to re-home our 8 week old chow chow. She’s utd on all vaccinations, microchipped, and very loving. She’s family raised with my 5 year old son. Feel free to follow us on Instagram @eclusivechowchow Call or text 240-516-4091 PUG

6 black 1 fawn pug puppies. Vaccinated and dewormed. Available now 757-358-4100

Dogs, Cats, Other Pets

(and every day).

Travel/Camping Trailers

Trucks and SUVs

CONSIGNMENTS WANTED! Let us clean, sell, & finance your RV. Snyders RV 499-8000.

CHEVROLET 1951

1991 HARLEY DAVIDSON Soft Tail Custom. Motor 81.6 CI, Model FXSTC. We did a very extensive restoration by Leonard at Hampton Roads Harley Davidson in 2007. Lost interest in riding, stored in climate controlled garage, lots of spare parts. Must see show bike! $9,250. Contact: 757-373-3332

Autos for Sale

4400 Farm Truck 12ft Factory Body, holds 5-6 tons. $6k. OBO 757-4266035

DODGE 2008 RAM 1500

Red, really good condition - gorgeous w/ great cloth interior! Matching fiber glass bed cover & bed bug liner, 4WD. $15,500 Neg. Call: 757-621-2509

FORD 2017 F350

King Cab Diesel, 4X4, 52K mis., XLT Pkg., tow pkg., bedliner, all service & state insp just done, showroom new, $48,500. 757-620-7570. Va. Dlr.

TOYOTA 2021 TUNDRA

Red with black top convertible. Needs some work. $1,000 OBO. 757-672-9376

MAZDA 1991 MIATA MX-5

Crew Cab, TRD Pro Pkg, 12K mis., 4WD, Lunar Rock color, factory warranty, loaded, leather, looks new. $62,900. 757-675-0288. Va. Dlr.

MERCEDES-BENZ 1996 220

Wanted Automotive AUTOS ACCEPTED-ANY YEAR Make or Model. Top Dollar, Fast, Free Towing. 757-737-2465, 252-232-9192

YORKIE Female, 9wks. $1,800. 757-567-2687

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AKC GOLDEN RETRIEVERS 8 weeks old. Mother and Father on site. Call or text 434-594-5440

Shop smart. Save big! Sunday

Listen to our top news stories for free.

We will purchase your collectible, classic, late model autos, we will come to you. Call 757-675-0288.

Motorcycles and ATVs

LICENSED, 7 DAYS A WEEK

www.raymondsantiques.com

4 door sedan, 56,000 miles, 1 owner, 2.5S. $15,999 Call: 757-673-1226 or 757-913-9530

FORD 1929 STATION WAGON

ESTATES, ITEMS OF VALUE

VINTAGE ARTWORK

ALL COINS

NISSAN 2014 ALTIMA

Classic, Antique Cars

BUYING ANTIQUES &

STERLING FLATWARE VINTAGE WRIST WATCHES ANTIQUE FIREARMS OLD DECOYS OLD TOYS COSTUME JEWELRY

Autos for Sale

4cyl,great on gas,no dents or rust ,inside like new,126k,cold,ac,new,tires, new,inspection,Runs,&Drives,excelle nt$4850,757-237-5757

Room For Rent VB 23455 SHORE DR GATE 4 Sm furn room w/ lrg fenced outside patio. $650/mo + sec. 757-818-4872

MERCEDES-BENZ 2011 E-CLASS

Convertible 41k mi like new svc recs black/beige new tires. 919-324-4391

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Fun & Games

Sudoku

CryptoQuip

Last week’s CryptoQuip answer

If a thieving villain needs an adhesive material, I imagine his first choice is robber cement.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

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8 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 3 | Thursday, November 4, 2021

WINDOWS • ROOFING • SIDING & TRIM • GUTTER PROTECTION

SINCE 1991

Celebrating

30YEARS 2021 Paramount Builders celebrates 30 years serving the East Coast with over 7 locations, 350 employees and over 75,000 happy homeowners!

2018 Paramount Builders continues to expand, opening an office in Jacksonville, Fl.

2013

Outgrowing our previous facility, Paramount moves to Richmond’s West End

2004 Paramount Builders grows again, opening an office in Fredericksburg

Paramount Builders expands operations to Central Virginia opening an office in Richmond

1997

Paramount Builders opens their Chesapeake office, third Tidewater location

1996

Anniversary Savings

No Payment and No Interest for 36 Months

PLUS

30

% OFF

Paramount Builders breaks ground on its current Corporate Office on Central Dr. in Virginia Beach

1994 Paramount Builders opens second location in Newport News

Paramount Builders opens first location on Cleveland St. in Virginia Beach

As we celebrate 30 years, we want to thank you for choosing Paramount Builders as your Hometown Exterior Remodeler!

GET YOUR HOME READY FOR WINTER

1998

1991

THANK YOU, VIRGINIA!

LABOR

Schedule Your FREE Estimate! (757) 210-4425 (757) 942-4209 WWW.PARAMOUNTBUILDERS.COM/PARAMOUNT-PILOT WWW.PARAMOUNTBUILDERS.COM/PARAMOUNT-PILOT

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