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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, September 16, 2021 1

IN THIS ISSUE Legacy

Twenty years after 9/11,Tom Othmer, continues his father’s legacy as USS New York’s Port Engineer. PAGE A6

VOL. 28, NO. 37, Norfolk, VA | flagshipnews.com

September 16-September 22, 2021

(BROCK VERGAKIS)

Navy Region Mid-Atlantic volunteers at Boys and Girls Club of Southeast Virginia for 9/11 National Day of Service and Remembrance

By Brock Vergakis

Navy Region Mid-Atlantic Public Affairs

VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. - About a dozen personnel from Navy Region Mid-Atlantic volunteered at the Boys & Girls Club of Southeast Virginia on Sept. 11 as part of the National Day of Service and Remembrance. Civilian and military personnel helped clean up the Rosemont club’s parking lot and give it a new paint job, which the club staff said is greatly appreciated because it’s one of the projects they haven’t had time to complete with a limited staff. “It’s one of those things that kind of just gets put on the backburner when you’re looking at working with the kids every day and feeding them and doing the programs that we have for the Boys and Girls Club,” said Tanisha McGaughey, director of community engagement at the Boys & Girls Club of Southeast Virginia. “The reason (having volunteers) is so important is, being a nonprofit, the generosity of other people is our lifeline.” The Boys and Girls Club’s Rosemont location where Navy Region Mid-Atlantic staff volunteered is the largest facility within the

(BROCK VERGAKIS) club’s Southeast Virginia district. Before the coronavirus pandemic, it provided afterschool programs and care for more than 200

children a day. Since the pandemic, it has capped attendance to 75 children. Many of the children who go to the Boys

NMCP reestablishes COVID-19 testing tents By Seaman Ariana Torman

Naval Medical Center - Portsmouth

PORTSMOUTH, Va. (Sept, 10, 2021) — Naval Medical Center Portsmouth (NMCP) reestablished its outdoor COVID-19 testing tents. An outdoor COVID-19 testing site was first created at NMCP in March 2020 when large white tents were put up to triage, test and treat low-acuity patients who suspected they had COVID-19, and to protect the medical staff by allowing them to test in an open-air environment. On June 15, the original tents were taken down and testing was moved to primary care locations within NMCP and at some of

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the medical center’s outlying clinics. “We are moving the testing site out of the medical center because we have had an increase in individuals needing testing, and not due to safety concerns of having the testing site location inside,” said Cmdr. Tarail Vernon, NMCP’s Public Health Services director. Due to the recent spikes in COVID-19 infection numbers, attributed to the highly-contagious Delta variant and the large number of unvaccinated individuals, the decision was made to move the testing back outside to a new location on the base. “Reestablishing the drive-thru testing site allows us to accommodate more people,” added Vernon.

& Girls Club have parents who serve in the military that don’t have typical 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. jobs. McGaughey was one of them. Her father served in the Navy and she grew up going to the club after they relocated to Virginia from South Carolina. Now, she’s giving back to children who come from families like hers. “Being the only child, it kind of wasn’t safe for me to be home alone, so they put me into the Boys & Girls Club,” she said. “It literally has helped our family so much.” The volunteer project was sponsored by Navy Region Mid-Atlantic’s Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Committee. Lee Walker, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic Equal Employment Opportunity Officer Deputy Director, said the idea behind volunteering is to show that Navy Region Mid-Atlantic is a part of the community and to provide military and civilian personnel an opportunity to get to know each other in a non-formal setting. Popular music blasted on a speaker as volunteers painted parking lot lines, handicap spaces and curbs. Turn to Remembrance, Page 7

USS New York undocks on 20th anniversary of 9/11 From Marmc Public Affairs Office

A sign directs traffic to the COVID-19 testing site at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth (NMCP), Sept. 10.(SEAMAN ARIANA TORMAN)

NORFOLK, Va. - On the 20th anniversary of the terrorist attacks of September 11, USS New York (LPD 21) undocked ahead of schedule at General Dynamics NASSCO-Norfolk. The San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship is currently in a Dry-docking Selected Restricted Availability managed by Mid-Atlantic Regional Maintenance Center (MARMC). New York has significant ties to the tragic events that occurred two decades ago as seven and a half tons of steel salvaged from the collapsed World Trade Center were used Turn to USS New York, Page 7

Vaccination effort

Humanitarian mission

dry dock

USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) and PCU John F. Kennedy (CVN 79) hosted a joint vaccination evolution aboard Ford, vaccinating over 110 Sailors in accordance with Department of Defense guidance to maintain mission readiness. PAGE A3

The San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS Arlington returns to Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia after deploying to U.S. 4th Fleet area of operation to support a humanitarian assistance and disaster relief operation in Haiti PAGE A4

Portsmouth Naval Shipyard held a groundbreaking ceremony Wednesday, September 8, for the multi-mission dry dock project. PAGE A5

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The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, September 16, 2021

Information Systems Technician 2nd Class, Martin Lavelle, holds a box of donated food on the last day of Naval Station Norfolk’s Feds Feed Families food drive. 2021 marked the 12th annual food drive event hosted by the NAVSTA Norfolk Chapel. (MC2 EMILY CASAVANT)

Naval Station Norfolk celebrates 12th annual food drive By Operation Specialist 2 nd Class Yelayza Rivera Torres Naval Station Norfolk Public Affairs

NAVAL STATION NORFOLK — Tuesday, August 31, 2021 marked the end of Naval Station Norfolk’s annual Feds Feed Families food drive for 2021. The event began June 13th and was organized by the staff at the Naval Station Norfolk Chapel. The annual food drive was established in 2009 and every year it runs from the middle of summer through the end of August. This 12-year tradition has been a labor of love from NAVSTA Norfolk with the goal of

giving back to the community of Hampton Roads and surrounding areas southeast of Norfolk. “The goal from the beginning was to collect as many meals as possible,” said Information Systems Technician 2nd Class, Martin Lavelle, who coordinated this year’s event and helped with last year’s food drive as well. This year, COVID did not stop IT2 from continuing the Chapel’s tradition. Every week on Wednesday and Thursday, IT2, with the help of Sailors from NAVSTA’s Transient Personnel Unit, would collect food donations from boxes placed at different drop off

points around the base. The areas included the Norfolk Navy Exchange (NEX), Mini NEX’s, the Commissary and other buildings throughout the NAVSTA Norfolk. “Our current Leading Petty Officer was on maternity leave and I felt like someone needed to step up and handle the challenge,” said IT2, when asked by his chain of command if he could lead this year’s food drive. “So I went ahead and took some weight off the shoulders of RP1 [Religious Program Specialist 1st Class] to help the community.” IT2 Lavelle’s first time coordinating the event was more than successful, collecting

7,367 pounds of food, equalling about 4,911 meals for the community. Last year, during 2020, only 20 pounds of food was donated due to low staffing and other effects of COVID-19, making this year’s large collection even more monumental. The Chapel at NAVSTA Norfolk does many other events to help and assist the community, such as holding an annual toy drive for Christmas where they collect toys and donate them to those families in need with kids, a holiday assistance program that takes place in the months of November and December, where they give junior Sailors gift cards so they can buy meals and other needs for the holidays. “We love helping our junior Sailors,” said Religious Program Specialist 1st, Class Christopher Atwood. “This can be the first time away from home for them. Being there for them is about making their time here a little better.” For more info contact the Franzier Hall (chapel) administration at 757-444-7361

Navy posthumously advances Sailor killed in Afghanistan By Office Of The Secretary Of The Navy WASHINGTON - As a result of his brave actions in support of fellow service members, the Navy posthumously advanced Navy Corpsman Maxton W. Soviak to the rank of Hospital Corpsman Third Class. He was also awarded the Purple Heart and Fleet Marine Force Corpsman warfare badge. Soviak, a Berlin Heights, Ohio native, who was assigned to the 1st Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, was killed Aug. 26 during an attack at the Abbey Gate of Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, Afghanistan while supporting Operation Allies Refuge. “Petty Officer Soviak gave the ultimate sacrifice in service to this country,” said The Honorable Carlos Del Toro, Secretary of the Navy. “While this promotion and the Fleet Marine Force Corpsman warfare badge are awarded posthumously, I have no doubt his dedication to this nation, his displayed skill as a Hospital Corpsman, and devotion to the mission at hand warrant this recognition.”

WASHINGTON (Aug. 28, 2021) An undated portrait of Navy Corpsman Maxton W. Soviak during recruit training released by his family. (COURTESY PHOTO)

Editorial Staff Military Editor | MC1 Maddelin Hamm, maddelin.hamm@navy.mil Managing Editor | Ensign James Caliva, james.caliva@navy.mil Graphic Designer | Trisha Irving, trisha.irving@virginiamedia.com

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Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic (CNRMA): Rear Adm Charles W.“Chip”Rock Regional program manager for Navy Region Mid-Atlantic (NRMA): Public Affairs Director | Beth Baker The Flagship® is published by Flagship, Inc., a private firm in no way connected with the Department of Defense (DOD) or the United States Navy, under exclusive written contract with Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic. This civilian enterprise newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the military services. Contents of the paper, including advertisements, are not necessarily the official views of, nor endorsed by, the U.S. Government, DOD, or the Department of the Navy (DON). The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts and supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the DOD; DON; Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic or Flagship, Inc. of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase,use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user, or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. Editorial content is edited, prepared and provided by the Public Affairs Department of Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic. Stories may be submitted via email to news@flagshipnews.com. The Flagship® is published every Thursday by Flagship, Inc., whose mailing address is located at PO Box 282501, Norfolk, Va. 23510. © 2021Flagship, Inc. All rights reserved


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, September 16, 2021 3

Hospital Corpsman Sabrina Moncada, right, from Vineland, New Jersey, assigned to PCU John F. Kennedy’s (CVN 79) medical department, administers a COVID-19 vaccine to Electrician’s Mate (Nuclear) 3rd Class Joshua Patti, from San Diego, assigned to Kennedy’s reactor department, during USS Gerald R. Ford’s (CVN 78) joint vaccination evolution with Kennedy in Ford’s aft weapon handing area, Sept. 9, 2021. Ford is inport at Newport News Shipyard executing her Planned Incremental Availability (PIA), a six-month period of modernization, maintenance, and repairs. (PETTY OFFICER 3RD CLASS ZACHARY MELVIN)

Ford and Kennedy hold joint vaccination evolution to further vaccination effort By Petty Officer 3rd Class Zachary Melvin USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78)

NEWPORT NEWS, Va. - USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) and PCU John F. Kennedy (CVN 79) hosted a joint vaccination evolution aboard Ford, vaccinating over 110 Sailors in accordance with Department of Defense guidance to maintain mission readiness. Unvaccinated Sailors from both ships, or those that had not completed the two shot vaccination cycle received the vaccine in Ford’s aft weapons handling area, Sept. 9-10, 2021. Both ship’s medical departments set up tables with marked paths for Sailors to follow and to help streamline the vaccination process. “I planned the last shot exercise and took lessons learned from other carriers around the fleet on what worked and what did not,” said Lt. Marisa St. Clair, from Williamsburg, Virginia,

Kennedy’s ship’s nurse. “I wanted to make it easy to follow and streamlined. We wanted to have one way in and one way out in order to track everyone through the process.” During the two-day event, more than 110 Sailors received either their initial or final dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. This round of vaccinations will result in 100% vaccination for Ford Sailors without a religious or medical accommodation. Medical professionals were on hand to answer any remaining questions Sailors may have had about the vaccine’s effectiveness, safety and side effects. “Once Sailors get checked into medical, they go through the quality assurance table to get their paperwork checked,” said Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Ana Benitez, from Harlingen, Texas, assigned to Ford’s medical department. “After that, we have a table set up to answer any last minute questions that the Sailors may have.”

The decision was made to combine Ford and Kennedy’s medical departments while utilizing Ford’s spaces in order to facilitate the maximum amount of vaccinations during the two day time period. “Navy leadership encouraged Ford and Kennedy to combine manning and spaces for the joint vaccination evolution,” said Lt. Cmdr. Susi Murphy, from Modesto, California, Ford’s ship’s nurse. “There is a lot that goes into holding a vaccination onboard. By combining forces, manning and spaces, we have worked smarter and not harder.” The joint vaccination process allowed Kennedy Sailors to receive the vaccines at the same time to support the ship sending Sailors to other ships and squadrons to do training and attain qualifications necessary for the command once the ship is commissioned. “For Kennedy, a lot of our Sailors are being outsourced to other ships to do training and

to get qualifications so that they are ready to go when we do move onboard,” said St. Clair. “Having them fully vaccinated allows us to have the maximum number of people who can fulfill the missions that they are required to do. It is important that we have all hands ready and healthy to go for that. Having everyone vaccinated helps the whole fleet.” The joint effort furthered the vaccination effort aboard Ford as the command conducts maintenance and repairs in preparation for returning to Naval Station Norfolk following the six month Planned Incremental Availability (PIA). “Our Sailors our working extremely hard throughout the ship,” said Murphy. “To send them somewhere else to get the vaccine when we can bring the service to them, should be our job. Medical’s job is to serve our ship’s force. COVID-19 can be very debilitating to a command. We should all be healthy and take precautions to stay healthy. Part of those precautions is getting vaccinated so that we are not spreading it to our friends, our shipmates or our families.” Ford is inport at Newport News Shipyard executing her six-month period of modernization, maintenance and repairs.

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4 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, September 16, 2021

USS Arlington returns from humanitarian mission in Haiti By Petty Officer 2nd Class John Bellino USS Arlington (LPD 24) Public Affairs

NORFOLK, Va. — The San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS Arlington (LPD 24) returns to Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia after deploying to U.S. 4th Fleet area of operation to support a humanitarian assistance and disaster relief (HADR) operation in Haiti, Sept. 8. Arlington was underway participating in the U.S. Navy’s Large-Scale Exercise 2021 (LSE 2021) when tasked to support U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) following a 7.2-magnitude earthquake that struck Haiti Aug. 14. Within 24 hours, Arlington offloaded LSE 2021 personnel and equipment, and embarked HADR assets to include MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopters, attached to the “Chargers” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 26; a landing craft, utility (LCU), attached to Assault Craft Unit (ACU) 2; Fleet Surgical Team (FST) 2; Tactical Air Control Squadron (TACRON) 22; and Marines assigned to 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment. “It was a tremendous team effort by multiple commands pulling all of the resources the Navy could muster,” said Capt. Eric Kellum, commanding officer of Arlington. Arlington directly contributed to USAID’s distribution of almost 600,000 pounds of cargo to include food, medical supplies and other critical relief supplies; the transportation of approximately 200 aid workers to support the mission; and supplied 25,000 gallons of JP-5 aircraft fuel to support flight operations. “In a single day we were able to distribute over 100,000 pounds of food with an LCU to the remote area of Jérémie, which

CARIBBEAN SEA (Aug. 31, 2021) Sailors assigned to the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS Arlington (LPD 24) walk food and water down to a landing craft, utility (LCU), assigned to Assault Craft Unit (ACU) 2, in Arlington’s well deck prior to delivering humanitarian aid to the Port of Jérémie, Haiti, Aug. 31, 2021. Arlington is deployed to U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet to support humanitarian assistance and disaster relief (HADR) efforts in Haiti following a 7.2-magnitude earthquake, Aug. 14, 2021. (MC2 JOHN BELLINO)

has been cut off from Port-au-Prince due to damage caused by the earthquake,” said Kellum. “Team Arlington came to Haiti with the goal of saving lives and easing suffering and that is exactly what we were able to do.” The mission consisted of three core tasks: Provide a ready flight deck for refueling and conducting flight operations for over 16 joint task force helicopters; provide a command and control platform for the Joint Forces Maritime Component Commander and the U.S. Marine Corps Task Force; and provide a sea-basing logistical hub for quick and efficient aid distribution to Haiti. “All of our missions provide the president and secretary of defense multiple options to respond to global threats to our national

security,” said Kellum. “However, Arlington is ideally suited for humanitarian missions because we can respond rapidly anywhere in the world and be ready to save lives immediately upon arrival.” Arlington coordinated efforts with other U.S. Southern Command components and U.S. Coast Guard ships in addition to allies and partners from the Netherlands, France and United Kingdom. French and Dutch Sailors visited Arlington to enable the exchange of best practices as they worked together toward the common goal of supporting the humanitarian relief efforts. Rear Adm. Keith Davids, Joint Task Force-Haiti commander, and Tim

Callaghan, USAID disaster response team lead, also visited Arlington prior to Arlington’s departure from the U.S. 4th Fleet area of operation and expressed their appreciation for the humanitarian assistance provided. “You are making a difference,” said Davids. “I can’t thank you enough for your service and your help to the people of Haiti,” said Callaghan. “The amount of support provided, we could not have done it without the DoD.” Arlington is in the advanced phase of deployment training and will continue to maintain readiness levels for a scheduled 2022 deployment with the USS Kearsarge amphibious readiness group.

Retired Chief Warrant Officer 3 runs 48 Miles in 48 hours to honor career and other service members By Mass Communication Specialist 2Nd Class Emily Casavant Naval Station Norfolk Public

NORFOLK, Va. - On August 27, 2021, Chief Warrant Officer 3 (CWO3), Selena Aponte, retiring from her position as the Administrative Department Head for Naval Station Norfolk, honored her last day in the Navy by beginning the daunting challenge of running 48 miles in 48 hours. Aponte decided that, because she could not have a retirement ceremony, she would commemorate and celebrate her time in the Navy by doing something meaningful for herself and her career. “I’m being medically retired so you never know your end date,” said CWO3. “I didn’t want to end my career and legacy by just leaving Naval Station Norfolk and going home. I wanted to do something that really captured the essence of my career in the Navy. This endurance challenge allowed me to face a lot of barriers that I was unable to break through while I was in the service and I was finally able to let go during these runs.” Aponte began her 48 miles Friday afternoon on Naval Station Norfolk. After that, she continued to run 4 miles every 4 hours until Sunday afternoon, where she finished her challenge at the top of Mount Trashmore in Virginia Beach. During her first and last run, she carried the American flag with her, folded in a tactical vest adorned with patches from her time in the Navy. In

between, she ran at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek, Naval Air Station Oceana, Dam Neck Naval Base and the area around her home. “I wanted to pay tribute to those who have not been able to have a retirement ceremony, but more specifically to the lives that have been lost with the 13 service members that died in Afghanistan on Friday,” said CWO3. “That hit close to home for me, so every time I was on the Naval bases, that particular run was for them.” While serving active duty in the Navy, Aponte was also a student. Before retiring, she completed her Master’s degree in addiction counseling and is planning a new career in that field. “I hope to serve the community as well as our active duty and veterans through counseling because I know there’s a lot of us, myself included, that struggled with some sort of addiction and that’s going to be my opportunity to give back,” said Aponte. During her 22.5 years in the Navy, CWO3 served at 8 different commands in multiple countries and states including Italy, El Salvador, California, Hawaii and Virginia. “The Navy saved my life in so many ways and allowed me to travel in so many ways,” said Aponte, who joined the service at age 18 out of south Chicago. “ It allowed me to serve the global war on terrorism in Afghanistan. It had challenges but also a lot of triumphs and I met good people along the way. I’ve served with many good Sailors. It’s

Chief Warrant Officer 3, Selena Aponte, makes it to the top of Mount Trashmore with the American flag, marking the end of her 48 miles in 48 hours running challenge. CWO3 began running on Naval Station Norfolk on Friday, Aug. 27 and continued to run four miles every four hours for 48 hours on multiple naval bases and other locations near Virginia Beach to honor her retirement from the Navy. (MC2 EMILY CASAVANT)

been truly a rewarding experience. I would not change it for the world.” Aponte stated that she will miss her Sailors more than anything and that she will always be there for other service members in need

of help. The staff and crew of Naval Station Norfolk wishes CWO3 Aponte a fulfilling life outside of the Navy and the best of luck in all of her future endeavors.

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, September 16, 2021 5

KITTERY, Maine (Sep. 8 2021) The shipyard hosted a groundbreaking ceremony for the P-381 multi-mission dry dock project. Secretary of the Navy Carlos Del Toro served as the keynote speaker. The $1.7-billion construction projected was awarded Aug. 13 to Omaha, Nebraska-based 381 Constructors. This seven-year project, a key part of the Navy’s comprehensive Shipyard Infrastructure Optimization Program, will expand and reconfigure the shipyard’s Dry Dock 1 area, to increase the capacity to maintain, modernize, and repair the Navy’s attack submarines and return them to the fleet on time. (JIM CLEVELAND)

Navy breaks ground on new multi-mission dry dock From Portsmouth Naval Shipyard PORTSMOUTH NAVAL SHIPYARD, Maine — Portsmouth Naval Shipyard held a groundbreaking ceremony Wednesday, September 8, for the multi-mission dry dock project. Secretary of the Navy Carlos Del Toro served as the keynote speaker. United States Senators Susan Collins and Angus King of Maine, and Jeanne Shaheen, and Maggie Hassan of New Hampshire attended the

ceremony, along with United States Representative Chris Pappas (NH-01). The Dry Dock 1 area was originally built during World War II to supplement submarine production, and this $1.7 —billion, 7-year construction project will modernize the historic dry dock, enabling Portsmouth Naval Shipyard to meet the Navy’s needs for decades to come. The multi-mission dry dock provides increased capacity for accommodating three Los Angeles or Virginia-class attack submarines at once for repair, maintenance,

and modernization. “Our Sailors and Marines put themselves in harm’s way every day to protect our national security interests … we owe it to them to be the best prepared and equipped force in the world,” said Del Toro. Emphasizing the growing threats around the world, Del Toro expressed how a robust Navy plays a vital role today and in the future. “This is a significant investment by the American people, and because of this investment, they can sleep more securely, because they’ll

know our attack fleet can rely on quick and available maintenance and repair.” Portsmouth Naval Shipyard’s Commander Capt. Daniel Ettlich emphasized the significance of the contract as the “largest and most complex project ever” awarded by Naval Facilities and Engineering Systems Command (NAVFAC). “Today’s groundbreaking cements the future of Portsmouth Naval Shipyard and the future of our submarine force.” The project is part of the Shipyard Infrastructure Optimization Program (SIOP), which is a joint effort between Naval Sea Systems Command, NAVFAC, and Navy Installations Command to recapitalize and modernize the infrastructure at the Navy’s four public shipyards. The agenda includes repairing and modernizing dry docks, restoring shipyard facilities and optimizing their placement for efficiency, and replacing aging and deteriorating capital equipment.

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6 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, September 16, 2021

Capt. Jason Rimmer, center, prospective commodore of Amphibious Squadron (PHIBRON) 8, looks at a piece of steel from the 9/11 attack on World Trade Center in New York City with Lt. Nhan Nguyen, left, and Ensign Evan Akins, right, both assigned to the amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21), in the well deck aboard the New York, July 9, 2020. New York is operating in Atlantic Ocean in support of Naval operations to maintain maritime stability and security in order to ensure access, deter aggression and defend U.S., allied and partner interests. (MC2 LYLE H WILKIE III)

Son carries on father’s 9/11 legacy aboard USS New York (LPD 21) By Lt. J.g. Eleonore Mikalchus

Uss New York Public Affairs

NORFOLK, Va. - The asymmetrical steel slab with its crimson and blue background looms over USS New York’s (LPD 21) amphibious well deck. Like the city it came from, it is a visual presence impossible to ignore. Its creator, Richard Othmer, meant it to be so. With help from several others, the retired New York City fireman, recovered the symbolic steel from the remnants of Ground Zero and engraved upon it the names of all first responders who gave their lives to rescue those trapped inside the

World Trade Center towers. Othmer served the majority of his career in Ladder 41, located in the Bronx. Before that he served as a Boatswain’s Mate from 1976 to 1980 aboard USS PONCE (LPD15). He later became a member of the Navy League and in 2009, part of USS New York’s commissioning committee. As such, Richard was recognized as an “Honorary PlankOwner,” a title given to members of society who have provided a unique service to the ship and its legacy. Twenty years after 9/11, Richard’s son, Tom Othmer, continues his father’s legacy as USS New York’s Port Engineer — coor-

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dinating and overseeing corrective repairs throughout maintenance availabilities. “For me it’s a constant reminder of my responsibility to do my job to the utmost every day,” said Tom Othmer. “It’s fulfilling an important work.” Born and raised in Carmel, New York, just north of New York City, Tom graduated from the US Merchant Marine Academy in 2010 and spent the next five years as an engineering officer in the Merchant Marine. He became a US Navy Port Engineer in 2015 and was assigned to the USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109) for five years until returning to USS New York in December.

As USS New York commemorated the 20th Anniversary of 9/11 with a historic undocking after six months in Norfolk’s NASSCO drydock facility, Tom makes a point to speak with words the same spirit his father has harnessed with memorialized steel. “People tend to forget that the freedoms and quality of life we enjoy in this country were obtained by the sacrifices of its citizens and service members,” said Tom. “Every day I try to ensure I maintain USS New York in a superior material condition and contribute my small part in sustaining those privileges.” His efforts in overseeing New York’s repairs while in port help ensure its operability at sea as a floating symbol of American perseverance. With 7.5 tons of World Trade Center steel in her bow, the ship’s motto, “Strength forged through sacrifice. Never forget” is a motto come to life for the Sailors who work and live aboard USS New York.


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, September 16, 2021 7

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Sep. 8, 2021) An F/A-18E Super Hornet aircraft assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 136“Knighthawks”launches from the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). GHWB is operating in the Atlantic Ocean in support of naval operations to maintain maritime stability and security in order to ensure access, deter aggression and defend U.S., allied and partner interests. (PETTY OFFICER 3RD CLASS BRYAN VALEK)

GHWB completes flight deck certification By Seaman Bayley Mcmichael

USS George H.w. Bush (Cvn 77)

ATLANTIC OCEAN — USS George H. W. Bush (CVN 77) and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7 completed the ship’s postdrydocking planned incremental availability flight deck certification (FDC) on Sept. 10. The certification was the culmination of more than 28 months of hard work to ensure the GHWB remains combat ready for the next 40 years. GHWB and CVW-7 — Team JACKPOT (777) — commenced a training schedule that will result in worldwide combat capability whenever and wherever needed.

It was the first time that CVW-7 and GHWB worked together at sea as major commanders under Carrier Strike Group 10 after a strike group realignment. “Flight deck certification means our warship and our flight deck are open for business to support Fleet training, and that we have the level of proficiency required to commence our next OFRP [Optimized Fleet Response Plan] cycle,” said Capt. Robert Aguilar, the ship’s commanding officer. “The crew is excited to be underway and out of the shipyard environment. Ships belong at sea, and Sailors belong on them. This week was a big step for USS George Herbert Walker Bush and our partners in

CVW 7 as we began our relationship in Carrier Strike Group 10.” FDC is a requirement for aircraft carriers to complete after a maintenance availability. It is a time of rebuilding the skills, leadership, and proficiency necessary to operate in day or night, all-weather conditions. Integration between the air wing and ship is crucial to the success of carrier operations. Flight operations take detailed coordination between ship’s crew and the squadrons. This FDC was the first step in putting Team JACKPOT back on the line in service to the nation and the Navy. “Everyone was at the top of their game during this underway,” said Capt. Nathan

A. Ballou, commander of CVW-7. “The FREEDOM FIGHTERS and ship teams integrated well, and we appreciate the hospitality provided by the GHWB team. The completion of these certifications is a testament to our commitment to excellence and willingness to work hard together to support the strike group.” Commander, Carrier Strike Group 10 is led by Rear Adm. Rick Cheeseman. The ship and air wing will be joined by the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruisers USS Leyte Gulf (CG 55), USS Vicksburg (CG 69), and Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 26 to enable the full range of combat capability resident in a Carrier Strike Group. The squadrons of CVW-7 are Strike Fighter Squadron 143 “Pukin’ Dogs,” Strike Fighter Squadron 103 “Jolly Rogers,” Strike Fighter Squadron 86 “Sidewinders,” Strike Fighter Squadron 136 “Knighthawks,” Electronic Attack Squadron 140 “Patriots,” Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron 121 “Bluetails,” Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 5 “Nightdippers,” Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 46 “Grandmasters.”

USS New York from Page 1

in construction of the ship’s stem bar, part of the ship’s bow, which was laid in September 2003. “It’s a unique privilege to serve on a ship that has the actual uniforms of the firefighters who assisted in the rescue from the World Trade Center,” said New York’s Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class (HM3) Danielle Good. “The fact that we have portions of steel from the World Trade Center as part of the ship’s superstructure and I get to serve on board is a great honor.” During it’s time in dry-dock the ship began the cleaning and pumping of all tanks and voids, completed the cleaning of auxiliary sea water and generator sea water piping systems, as well as conducted underwater hull preservation. “Throughout New York’s dry-dock period our crew, NASSCO and MARMC teams adopted the same sense of teamwork that engulfed our Nation following the 9/11 attacks,” said New York Commanding Officer Capt. Javier Gonzalez. “This mindset allowed us to expedite significant repairs in order to undock successfully on the anniversary of those tragic events that impacted the nation and our namesake.” The sailors onboard USS New York continue to show support and commitment to the families associated with their namesake ship. In late August, the New York crew, MARMC and NASSCO personnel began collecting donations for the September 11th Families’ Association which supports victims of terrorism. “We are proud of the progress on USS New York as well as the contributions for the September 11th Families’ Association that will help support the families forever changed by that day,” said NASSCO-Norfolk General Manager, Kevin Terry. “There has been a lot of positive energy in the

Remembrance

from Page 1

“I consider this to be like a team-building event. It gives us an opportunity to dress down. No one’s in their normal Monday through Friday attire. No one is worried about operations and taking care of business,” Walker said. “So we’re able to, so-tospeak, put your hair down and get to know folks on a more personal level. … That’s a big deal for CNRMA. We’re a people organization.” Walker said being at the club brought back fond memories of going to a Boys & Girls Club during summers as a child in south Georgia. After the volunteers received a tour of the Virginia Beach facility and learned about all the programs the club offers, he said he envisions a lot more volunteer opportunities for Navy Region Mid-Atlantic military and civilian staff in the future. The next opportunity is tentatively scheduled for the Navy’s birthday on Oct. 13. “It’s just a great moment to do something

NORFOLK, Va. (Sept. 9, 2021) Members of Mid-Atlantic Regional Maintenance Center’s (MARMC) Waterfront Operations team stand below USS New York (LPD 21) before preparations begin for undocking on the 20th anniversary of September 11. The San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship is in the final stages of a Dry-Dock Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) managed by MARMC and executed by General Dynamics NASSCO-Norfolk. MARMC provides surface ship maintenance, management and oversight of private sector maintenance and fleet technical assistance to ships in the Mid-Atlantic region. (Douglas Denzine).

shipyard around USS New York as there is a sense of service to both those directly impacted by the events and to returning this warship back to Fleet — it has been a special project for everyone involved.” The USS New York is scheduled to

complete its maintenance availability in 2022. MARMC, a field activity under Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA), provides surface ship maintenance, management and oversight of private sector mainte-

in the community to connect CNRMA to our community,” Walker said. “We are also part of the community. So it’s also like giving back to our own organization in a way.” Chief Machinist’s Mate Regie Villanueva said he chose to volunteer, in part, so he could get to better known civilians at Navy Region Mid-Atlantic. He said his office is staffed entirely with military personnel, making it difficult to interact with civilians who aren’t checking in or out of the command. The opportunity to volunteer on 9/11 was too good to pass up, he said. “You definitely want to go out and do something. You don’t want to lounge around and do nothing for a memorable day like this,” Villanueva said. He said he’d definitely encourage military personnel to come out and volunteer in the future. “Come on out. It’s a great thing. The civilians don’t bite and they’re great people,” he said. “And you always feel good at the end when you get done doing something like this. You always feel good about it.”

(COURTESY PHOTO)

nance and fleet technical assistance to ships in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States and provides support to the fifth and sixth Fleet Areas of Responsibility. They are also responsible for the floating dry-dock Dynamic (AFDL-6).


8 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, September 16, 2021

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 2 | Thursday, September 16, 2021 1

uarterdeck

New task force U.S. Naval Forces Central Command established a new task force, to rapidly integrate unmanned systems and artificial intelligence with maritime operations in the 5th Fleet area of operations. Page B6

CNRC wants you to join the Sea Cadets By Petty Officer 3rd Class Cody Anderson Navy Recruiting Command

said Grady. “You have seen first-hand the capability of our adversaries and the threats that await us just over-the-horizon, and sometimes even nearer to home. In this era of multi-domain, multi-phase, multi-regional threat, your capability and capacity to protect our national interests at home and abroad is at a premium. We are counting on you to adapt with a sense of urgency, to be prepared to close with the enemy swiftly, to fight, and to win.” Caudle will be promoted to four-star admiral when he takes command of U.S. Fleet Forces Command, which trains, certifies and provides combat-ready Navy forces to combatant commanders that are capable of conducting prompt, sustained naval, joint and combined operations in support of U.S. national interests. “To everyone here, and those watching virtually, I want to thank you for attending,” said Caudle. “I am proceeding on to be commander of U.S. Fleet Forces, and I truly look forward to that assignment. While the scope of the job may change, the dedication, energy and passion I bring to our mission will not. I look forward to continuing our work together to ensure peace and prosperity continues to bless the United States in the years to come.” Upon assuming command, Houston thanked Caudle and the Submarine Force Atlantic (SUBLANT) staff for a seamless

MILLINGTON, Tenn. — Commander, Navy Recruiting Command (NRC) Rear Adm. Dennis Velez recently released his 15 priorities for his second year in charge of NRC. Chief among those focuses is more engagement with the U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps. “We recognize that the Sea Cadets is a youth organization dedicated to developing individuals with a high propensity to serve,” said Velez. “Through presence and engagement with local Naval Sea Cadets units, we hope to serve and strengthen the bonds within our communities.” The U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps is a nationally recognized military youth leadership development program with more than 400 units throughout the United States, Alaska, Puerto Rico, Hawaii, and Guam. The organization’s core values mirror those promoted by the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Coast Guard and reflect their mission and vision. The organization also actively trains its participants in the customs and courtesies of the Navy along with basic seamanship, watch standing protocol and fitness standards. The Naval Sea Cadet Corps program, sponsored by the Navy League, is for youth ages 13 through 17. Also included under the Naval Sea Cadet Corps umbrella is their junior program, the League Cadet Corps, for youth ages 10 to 13. Basic acclimation to the military is one of the many benefits that participation in the Sea Cadets provides. Cadets who enlist in the armed services are often eligible for military advanced pay-grade programs, which can result in advancement of two pay grades in some services. The Sea Cadets program has also had a positive impact on some prospective special programs’ applicants, with more than 10 percent of the midshipmen at the U.S. Naval Academy being former Sea Cadets. Sailors are already answering Rear Adm. Dennis Velez’s call to volunteer for the Sea Cadets. Sonar Technician (Surface) 1st Class Shea Fehringer, a member of NRC’s First Class Petty Officer Association (FCPOA), began volunteering with the local Sea Cadet division, BB-43, shortly before NRC announced the Sea Cadets as a top priority. She said she initially got involved because she was looking for a way to have a positive impact on teenagers and possible future Sailors. “The reason I reached out to the Sea Cadets as a CNRC FCPOA member was to give our Sailors an opportunity to volunteer in a leadership role with the possibility of becoming more involved as a drill instructor within the program,” said Fehringer. “Through volunteering, the Sea Cadets can learn about what the actual Navy is like. We can tell them what deployments are like, what the different rates are and what opportunities and experiences Sailors get from being active duty.” While many who have served might be more likely to volunteer with the program, prior service is not a requirement, leav-

Turn to Change of Command, Page 7

Turn to Cadet, Page 7

Adm. Christopher W. Grady, commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, left, Vice Adm. Daryl Caudle, center, and Vice Adm. William Houston, right, stand at attention during the Commander, Submarine Forces change of command ceremony in Norfolk, Va., Sept. 10, 2021. During the ceremony, Houston relieved Caudle as Commander, Submarine Forces/Submarine Force Atlantic/Allied Submarine Command. (PETTY OFFICER 2ND CLASS CAMERON STONER)

Submarine Force holds change of command By Petty Officer 2nd Class Cameron Stoner Submarine Force Atlantic

NORFOLK, Va. - Vice Adm. William Houston relieved Vice Adm. Daryl Caudle as Commander, Submarine Forces/Submarine Force Atlantic/Allied Submarine Command during a change of command ceremony on Naval Station Norfolk, Sept. 10, 2021. Since taking command in August 2018, Caudle shaped the future of the Submarine Force and led the fleet through the unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic. As Commander, Submarine Forces, he focused his efforts on ensuring the Navy maintains undersea superiority today and into the future. As Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic, he had operational command of all U.S. submarines home ported on the Atlantic coast, as well as supporting shore activities. As Commander, Allied Submarine Command, he acted as the principal advisor to NATO on submarine plans, operations, and doctrine. “Despite the global challenges and threats we face each day, we will continue to confront the future from a position of great strength,” said Caudle during his remarks. “Our Navy will continue to be the best equipped, the best trained, and the best led force in the world. The strength of our Nation is our Navy; the strength of our Navy is our Sailors; the strength of our

Sailors is our families. This is what makes our Submarine Force so special and so successful.” Adm. Christopher Grady, Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, was the guest speaker during the ceremony. After welcoming and recognizing the many distinguished guests in attendance, Grady took the time to highlight Caudle’s key leadership of the Submarine Force. “Your exceptional strategic vision, unrelenting focus on mission execution, and profound expertise formed through years of experience have inspired everyone you encounter, and I truly believe that maximized the efficiency, effectiveness and lethality of the entire Submarine Force,” said Grady. “You uniquely understand the challenges of the persistent proximate threats posed by our Nation’s adversaries, you understand the importance of maritime homeland defense, and the importance of a strategic deterrent. And you certainly grasped the overt challenges to our long held concept in the Navy of ‘defend far forward’ in this era of renewed strategic competition.” Grady continued by recognizing the efforts of the Submarine Force Atlantic staff during their time under Caudle and offered words of encouragement going forward. “You all know too well that the world is ever-more dynamic and complex in this infinite game of Strategic Competition,”

Navy establishes new medal to honor fallen civilians By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ford Williams WASHINGTON — Department of the Navy (DON) civilian employees who are killed or sustain serious injury through considerable personal sacrifice in the performance of their duties are now eligible to receive the Angela M. Houtz Medal for Fallen Civilians. The award honors the fidelity and essential service of civilian employees who were killed or sustain serious injury in the performance of their official duties as a result of criminal act, natural disaster, terrorist act, or other circumstances as determined by the Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV). “While Department of the Navy civilians may not be on the front lines, they do face many of the same dangers as our uniformed personnel because of where they work and what they do,” said Mr. Garry Newton, the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Civilian Personnel. “It was long past time to make it possible for commanders to fully recognize the service of all department personnel.” The medal is named for Angela M. Houtz, a DON Intelligence Analyst, who perished during the terrorist attack on the Pentagon on September 11, 2001. “The recognition the Navy is giving Angie by naming this medal in her honor

is an unexpected and overwhelming gift to our family,” said Julie Shontere, Houtz’s mother. “Twenty years after she was killed her presence is still being felt, her spirit and dedication still remembered, her contributions to the Navy as a civilian still recognized.” Shontere said she and her husband Joe Shontere, Houtz’s father, were thankful to the Navy “and everyone involved in the process of establishing such a special remembrance of our incredible Angie.” Houtz’s dedication to service and outstanding moral character are exemplified in a written note found in her desk which highlighted the way she lived her life: Always give 100% Listen. Care about each other as individuals. Be loyal. Do not tolerate sloppy, lazy or incomplete work. Support your boss. Think ahead. Remember your actions reflect on your office as a whole. Always strive to be of service. Reject an “it’s not my lane in the road” attitude. Work hard, play hard. Laugh. Be quick to praise. Be honest. Turn to Honor, Page 7

WASHINGTON (Sept. 10, 2021) Photo of the Angela M. Houtz Medal for Fallen Civilians.The new award aims to honor Department of the Navy (DON) civilian employees who are killed or sustain serious injury through considerable personal sacrifice in the performance of their duties. (MC1 FORD WILLIAMS)


2

The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 2 | Thursday, September 16, 2021

Heroes at Home

Q: How does the Landlord collect rent? A: The Service member must initiate rent payment by allotment or EFT.

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Grabbing the brass ring: Can Noom end yo-yo diet ride for good? By Lisa Smith Molinari There are few things in life I’ve shown more dedication to than yo-yo dieting. It all began in ninth grade, when I got tired of being referred to as “chunky” and put myself on a limited eating regimen of saltines, apples and hard-boiled eggs. I lost weight, but I had no idea that I would catch and release that same ten pounds for the next forty years. In that timespan, I tried the Cleveland Clinic Diet, the Zone Diet, Slim Fast, Weight Watchers, Adkins, the Grapefruit Diet, the Dukan Diet, South Beach, the Cabbage Soup Diet, Sugarbusters, the Carbohydrate Addicts’ Diet, the Fast Metabolism Diet and several short-term “cleanses.” A couple of weeks into every diet, I’d be five pounds of water weight down, and other than extreme constipation and debilitating fatigue, I felt fabulous. However, the needle on my scale would eventually screech to a halt. I could eat more egg whites and grilled chicken breasts than Cool Hand Luke at a Brazilian meat festival, but the only thing I’d lose was motivation. Without the stimulus of weight loss, I’d inevitably binge. The next morning, bloated and guilt ridden, I’d

contemplate my dietary fate over coffee and Pop Tarts. I could blame military life. Who eats healthily during a PCS move when you’re living on lousy hotel continental breakfast buffets and take out? How can we be expected to cut calories during deployments when a military spouse’s best friends are wine, Thai food and Dove Bars? How are we to cope with the unpredictability of military orders if we can’t drive through Krispy Kreme when the “Hot” light is on? Through all my years of yo-yo dieting, I never gave up completely. I’ve always believed that, with the right diet, it’ll happen. I recently signed up for Noom. I’d heard about it from friends, and seen the ads that pop up during phone solitaire. I didn’t believe the testimonials, because every diet I’d ever tried professed “permanent” weight loss. “Yeah, right,” I thought, skeptically. But something about this plan seemed different. Rather than focusing on what I eat, Noom was all about WHY. I was apprehensive at first, knowing that a psychological approach could tap into deep-seeded insecurities that I wasn’t prepared to face. I was afraid to relive being called “Chunky Dinners” on the school bus and

the shame of trying to cover my stomach rolls at the community pool. Down deep, however, I knew psychology might be the key to end my 40-year ride on the yo-yo diet carnival ride. Noom requires about ten minutes a day using its phone app, reading lessons and logging food and weight. There is no eating program to follow and no forbidden foods, but you are encouraged to stay within a personal calorie budget and do any exercise. You can use low carb, low fat, intermittent fasting, paleo, vegetarian, or no plan at all — whatever you’re comfortable with. The daily lessons teach you how to combat “thought distortions” that lead to overeating, how to eat mindfully, how to cope with stress in healthy ways, and other tips for long-term weight control success. As a life-long yo-yo dieter, this reasonable approach to dieting is utterly foreign to me. Tell me I’ll lose ten pounds by eating pork rinds and butter for a month, and I’m ready. But teach me to have eating healthy habits and feel no guilt, and I’m completely lost. So far, I’ve only lost two pounds on Noom; however, if there is an exit ramp off of the yo-yo diet carnival ride, this is it. A personalized Noom plan with optional personal coach can cost up to $59 per month (Tip: find coupons online), but military spouses who deal with weight gain during moves, deployments, separations, and other stressful situations may find Noom worth the price. Only time will tell if Noom will end my 40-year ride on the yo-yo diet carnival ride. At the very least, I’ve learned that I need a healthier relationship with food if I want to stop reaching for a second (or third) donut, and grab the brass ring instead.

Leaving Your Children With a Caregiver During Deployment

FUNCTIONS AND/OR SERVICES FFSC PROVIDES:  ClinicalCounseling(Individual, Couples,a nd Child Counseling)  Personal Financial Management  Information & Referral  Family Employment Assistance  Transition Assistance  Family Advocacy Program  Deployment and Mobilization Support  Ombudsman Support  Relocation Assistance  Parenting Programs  Stress and Anger Management  Command Support  Crisis Support  SuicidePrevention  SAPR Support

By Military Onesource If you are a service member leaving your child with a caregiver during deployment, doing some planning and organizing in advance can help make adjustments easier for everyone. The following tips can increase the chance of a successful transition and help things run smoothly while you’re away. Cover the basics: • Establish a family care plan. A family care plan is a required deployment readiness document that lists the child’s caregivers during a single or dual-military parent’s deployment. It should include necessary information and documentation such as powers of attorney and other legal forms, health records and medical information, financial and logistical arrangements, details on how to access installation services, and any other information a caregiver might need to manage the household and care for children while the service member is away. • Prearrange your child’s finances. Don’t forget some extra cash for unexpected items like new toys, prom pictures or other fun money. You can set up an allotment or direct deposit to the caregiver’s account with the pay clerk at your unit’s personnel office or use the myPay online service. • Explain how relationships change. Talk to the caregiver and your child about how their relationship will change. At first, it may be difficult for your child to see the caregiver as a confidant or authority figure, especially if they are not used to seeing each other often. • Keep your child at home. Deployment may be easier for children if they can stay in their own home. A non-military caregiver may move into your military housing to care for your child during your deployment. Discuss this option early in the process to prepare your child and the caregiver for changes and adjustments. • Track behavioral changes. Let the caregiver know your child may have behavioral changes while you are gone that are normal. Younger children may become clingy and fearful. Older children may act out, have trouble paying attention or experience sleep problems. Make sure your child’s extended family, teachers, coaches and religious leaders know about your deployment so they can offer support. If these behaviors don’t go away over time, the caregiver may want to seek help from Military OneSource, installation Child and Youth Behavioral Military Family Life Counselors, the

Mid-Atlantic Fleet and Family Support Centers (FFSC) programs and services are designed to help you make the most of your military experience, and they’re all available to you at no cost.

(COURTESY PHOTO)

installation Military and Family Support Center or civilian support services within the local community. • Make notes about routines. Knowing what the normal routines are can help your caregiver get settled and prevent unnecessary conflict. Maintaining normal routines can help provide a sense of stability for children during transitions. • Check in often. Establish a regular time for phone calls and internet chats for the caregiver and for children. Let the caregiver know how to reach you if your children need to talk to you. This is important for maintaining relationships during and after deployment. Moving a child to the caregiver’s home If moving your children is necessary, the following tips can help make the transition easier. • Make the new home child friendly. A safe place for youngsters to play or a quiet study zone for older youth are just two ways to help your child adjust to a new home. • Find out about school admission requirements. When children change schools during a parent’s deployment, they may need their immunization records or may make a move up to the next grade in a certain class. Learn more about available support for helping children change schools, from school liaison and special education support to the Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children. You can also read more about ways to stay connected to your child’s teachers during your deployment. • Look for similar programs in the new location. If your child has special needs, make sure a move doesn’t disrupt services by accessing services such as an Individualized Education Program or a 504 plan. Learn more about military special education and child care resources such as the Exceptional Family Member Program, or EFMP. Your installation school liaison can assist you with making your child’s transition a smooth one. • Make sure your high school student doesn’t miss graduation. Your local installation school liaison can help with all of your education-related questions and issues, including making sure your teen stays on track for graduation. Work with your

installation school liaison to verify the out-of-state high school’s graduation requirements. Contact the new school’s administrative office before your senior enrolls to ensure your teen has taken all the required courses, or can be registered for the necessary classes, to graduate on time. • Emphasize equal treatment. Caregivers may have their own children at home. If the caregiver’s children get sent to their rooms for disobeying, the caregiver might want to establish similar consequences for your child to be fair and avoid resentment. Discuss this with your child and the caregiver. • If possible, introduce your child or teen to people in the new environment to make the transition easier. It’s always nice to know someone when you move. Ask your installation school liaison about the youth sponsorship program, and check out more ways to help your children cope with moving. Tips for a sudden deployment Planning is especially important when deployment happens suddenly. In this case: • Choose an interim caregiver. Ask a trusted neighbor or close friend to fill in as an interim caregiver until your child’s predetermined caregiver can take over. Be sure to name the interim caregiver in your family care plan and include a special power of attorney for the interim caregiver. • Maintain an emergency fund. To be sure you have immediate funds for your child should a deployment pop up quickly, create an emergency fund. Speak to a financial counselor through your installation Personal Financial Management Services office located at the Military and Family Readiness Center. You can also call Military OneSource at 800-342-9647, schedule a live chat or find OCONUS/international calling options. Planning ahead and preparing as a family can help everyone adjust a little more easily to the changes that deployment brings. Whether you’re on your first tour of duty or your fourth, Plan My Deployment helps you, your family members and loved ones prepare for — and stay strong and connected — through every phase of deployment.


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 2 | Thursday, September 16, 2021 3

Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin visits U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (NAVCENT) headquarters on board Naval Support Activity Bahrain, Sept. 8. NAVCENT is the U.S. Navy element of U.S. Central Command in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations and encompasses about 2.5 million square miles of water area and includes the Arabian Gulf, Gulf of Oman, Red Sea and parts of the Indian Ocean. The expanse is comprised of 21 countries and includes three critical choke points at the Strait of Hormuz, the Suez Canal and the Strait of Bab al Mandeb at the southern tip of Yemen. (STAFF SGT JARED FORSYTH)

Defense Secretary thanks troops during NAVCENT visit From NAVCENT Public Affairs NAVA L S U P P O RT AC T I V I T Y BAHRAIN - Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III visited U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (NAVCENT) headquarters, Sept. 8, during his first visit to Naval

Support Activity Bahrain as secretary. Austin met with Vice Adm. Brad Cooper, commander of NAVCENT, U.S. 5th Fleet and Combined Maritime Forces, as well as other personnel from the U.S. military and Bahrain Defense Force to thank them for helping evacuate U.S. citizens and people

from Afghanistan. NAVCENT stood up Task Force 58, Aug. 19, to help temporarily facilitate the safe transit of more than 7,000 evacuees traveling through Bahrain from Afghanistan. The task force included more than 1,400 U.S. and coalition personnel from various units

operating in the 5th Fleet region. Austin praised U.S., interagency, coalition and Bahraini personnel for providing critical assistance during the largest air evacuation of civilians in American history. U.S. Sailors, Marines, Soldiers, Airmen and Coast Guardsmen worked alongside U.S. Embassy, coalition and Bahraini counterparts to provide evacuees meals, short-term lodging and medical services at an intermediate staging base. Prior to departing, Austin met with junior military and interagency personnel who ran day-to-day staging base support. He expressed gratitude for their compassion and commitment to helping those in need.


4 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 2 | Thursday, September 16, 2021

Vice Adm. Kenneth Whitesell, commander, U.S. Naval Air Forces (CNAF), answers questions during the Aviation Flag Panel at the Tailhook 2021 symposium. (DAVID CARDINALE)

Tailhook day 2 features aviation flag panel, naval aviation leaders offer answers on training and readiness By David Cardinale

Naval Aviation Enterprise (NAE)

SPARKS, Nev. — Naval Aviation flag and general officers from around the fleet joined together on September 10, 2021, for the Flag Panel at the annual Tailhook symposium—Hook ’21—to discuss current and future issues in Naval Aviation with naval aviators, industry partners and veterans. Moderated by Vice Adm. Kenneth Whitesell, Commander Naval Air Forces, the Flag Panel also included Lt. Gen. Mark Wise, USMC Deputy Commandant for Aviation; Vice Adm. Frank Morley, Principal Military Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisition); Rear Adm. Alvin Holsey,

Commander, Navy Personnel Command; Rear Adm. John Meier, Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic; Rear Adm. Andrew Loiselle, Director, Air Warfare Division, N98, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations; Rear Adm. Robert Westendorff, Chief of Naval Air Training; and Capt. Max McCoy, Commander, Naval Aviation Warfighting Development Center, who was selected for promotion to rear admiral in June 2021. The members of the panel fielded questions from Hook ‘21 attendees regarding new processes and procedures in Naval Aviation and initiatives that impact the entire Naval Aviation workforce. The panel gave active-duty and reserve naval aviators the opportunity to ask senior leaders questions about the future of Naval Aviation.

One of the topics raised by an attendee centered on how to improve integrated training with the Navy’s Surface Warfare community to better leverage the capability of Naval Aviation platforms. “Over the last couple of years we’ve made major strides in integrating Naval Aviation across the force, but that is spreading out into the surface community,” McCoy responded. “We also work with the submarine force, as well as cyber and space.” McCoy also answered a question about increasing the opportunities for more realistic and combat-informed training events for naval aviators. “As we look at how we’re fighting, ultimately it’s all about integration across the forces. It’s about a carrier strike group that’s integrated, one that can maneuver, fire and work in a distributed

way with another carrier strike group,” said McCoy. The panel discussion also addressed carrier readiness and how the delivery schedule of new carriers impacts the overall readiness of Naval Aviation. Whitesell assured the group that carrier readiness and future deliveries were a top priority. “The readiness of the carriers and the inventory of the carriers is a conversation we have with our industry ship building partners. As they start rolling carriers out, they need to be delivered on time and on cost for us to satisfy the need to be forward. That is the reason we exist as a Navy—to be forward,” said Whitesell. Following the Aviation Flag Panel, Whitesell met with junior officers for a more focused discussion regarding early career opportunities and expectations for junior officers in Naval Aviation. Along with the Flag Panel, Tailhook hosted industry leaders discussing the many ways their companies support Naval Aviation. The Tailhook Symposium is an annual event run by the Tailhook Association— an independent, nonprofit organization supporting aircraft carrier and other sea-based aviation.

Seeking help is a sign of strength, commitment From Don Sexual Assault

Sexual Harassment and Suicide Prevention and Response Office

As the U.S. military unwinds from two decades of war, and the nation observes Suicide Prevention Month, the Department of the Navy is reinvigorating its commitment to year-round suicide prevention efforts. “It is paramount that our service members, veterans and civilian workforce access the mental health support they deserve, and understand that seeking help is a sign of their strength and commitment to each other and our nation,” said Melissa Cohen, Director, DON Sexual Assault, Sexual Harassment and Suicide Prevention and Response Office (DON SAPRO). “I encourage Sailors, Marines, veterans and civilians to treat mental health with the same urgency and normalcy as physical health.” Suicide is a challenge throughout American society, acutely felt within the military and veteran communities. Despite ongoing prevention efforts, the military and veteran communities continue to be impacted by suicide. “We recognize that we need to do more to reach people in need,” said Cohen. “That means assessing everything from our culture to resources and prevention efforts.” Cohen, married to a retired Marine who served for 31 years, is committed to increasing confidence in the Department’s mental health resources. She prioritized hiring the right staff to help her lead these efforts, and welcomed subject matter experts in suicide and sexual assault prevention onto her leadership team in the last year. Andrea Goldstein, assistant director for Force Resiliency at DON SAPRO, served as an active-duty Navy intelligence officer and still serves in the Navy Reserve. She

has served as a strategic planner and policy advisor in both international organizations and in the U.S. House of Representatives. An award-winning published author, she has frequently written and spoken publicly about her own experiences seeking mental health support both in and out of uniform. Dr. Jessica Gallus, Highly Qualified Expert, DON SAPRO, is a subject matter expert in suicide prevention and resilience promotion. She led one of the nation’s largest evidence-based suicide prevention programs, has chaired state-level lethal means safety coalitions, and has provided suicide prevention expertise and training to thousands of individuals in industry, academia, other government agencies, and professional associations. Together, Cohen, Gallus, Goldstein, and their team have set out to provide better access to mental health care, empower a culture of peer-to-peer support, and defeat the stigma associated with mental health care in the Navy and Marine Corps. “We must eliminate the negative stereotypes and perceptions that prevent help-seeking behavior,” said Gallus. “Each of us is the first line of defense in suicide prevention. Team members, friends, and family are often the first to recognize signs that someone may be suicidal. Our service members don’t think twice about recalibrating their weapons after a day on the range or stretching after a long run. Why would we treat our minds any differently? We have to be proactive about recovery if we’re serious about performance.” “And leaders need to set the conditions for this to happen,” notes Gallus, “The skills needed to be an effective leader are the same ones needed to prevent suicide — we have to recognize challenges, have the courage to ask tough questions, the empathy to listen, and the tools to reduce risk.” Throughout the year, DON SAPRO will

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host online discussions centered on mental health literacy, the power of connection, and effective coping skills for adapting to and overcoming stressful experiences. The discussions will feature renowned mental health speakers and influential messengers normalizing mental health maintenance. The DON SAPRO message to the Department of the Navy community is clear: You are not alone. Support is within reach. These resources are available right now: The Military Crisis Line: 800-273-8255

(press 1) or Text 838255 / www.veteranscrisisline.net Military OneSource: 800-342-9647 (OCONUS) / TTY: 800-342-9647 / www. militaryonesource.mil Vet Centers: 877-WAR-VETS (877-9278387) / www.vetcenter.va.gov Depar tment of the Nav y Civilian Employee Assistance Program (DONCEAP): 844-DONCEAP (1-844-3662327) / TTY: 888-262-7848 / International: 866-829-0270 / www.magellanascend.com


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Vice Adm. Brad Cooper, left, commander of U.S. Naval Forces Central Command, U.S. 5th Fleet and Combined Maritime Forces, salutes Capt. Michael D. Brasseur, the first commodore of Task Force (TF 59) shake hands during a commissioning ceremony for TF 59 onboard Naval Support Activity Bahrain, Sept. 9. TF 59 is the first U.S. Navy task force of its kind, designed to rapidly integrate unmanned systems and artificial intelligence with maritime operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations. (MASS COMMUNICATION SPECIALIST 2ND CLASS DAWSON ROTH)

U.S. 5th Fleet launches new task force to integrate unmanned systems By Petty Officer 1St Class Roland Franklin

U.S. Naval Forces Central Command / U.s. 5Th Fleet

NAVAL SUPPORT ACTIVITY BAHRAIN - U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (NAVCENT) established a new task force, Sept. 9, to rapidly integrate unmanned systems and artificial intelligence with maritime operations in the 5th Fleet area of operations. Task Force 59 is the first U.S. Navy task force of its kind. The U.S. 5th Fleet region’s unique geography, climate, and strategic importance offer an

ideal environment for innovation. “The bottom line on why we’re doing this is so that we can develop and integrate unmanned systems and AI as a means to do two things,” said Vice Adm. Brad Cooper, commander of NAVCENT, U.S. 5th Fleet and Combined Maritime Forces. “One, enhance our maritime domain awareness, and two, increase deterrence.” Cooper also stated the task force would rely heavily on regional and coalition partnerships. “The launch of Task Force 59 really invigorates our partnerships around this region as

we expand our common operating picture.” Cooper appointed Capt. Michael D. Brasseur, an expert in maritime robotics, as Task Force 59’s first commodore during a commissioning ceremony onboard Naval Support Activity Bahrain, Thursday. Brasseur served as a founding member of the NATO Maritime Unmanned Systems Initiative prior to arriving in Bahrain. “It’s an honor to be named commander of this historic and innovative task force,” said Brasseur. “As we continue to adapt and implement cutting edge technology, I fully expect our talented team will enrich and enhance the

5th Fleet mission.” Brasseur’s staff includes experienced operators with region-specific expertise, including directors for unmanned systems; unmanned exercises; task force integration; cyber, AI and space; and partnership opportunities. In the coming weeks, the task force aims to build trust and confidence in human-machine teaming through a series of operations at sea. International Maritime Exercise (IMX) 22, slated for next year, will provide NAVCENT a real-world opportunity to demonstrate the resiliency and scalability of human-machine teaming technologies. IMX-22 will include more than 60 nations and international organizations and features the extensive use of unmanned systems in various operational scenarios designed to challenge the technology in a dynamic environment and ultimately enhance partner capabilities through manned and unmanned teaming.

Legacy of Navy’s ‘Top Gun’ pilot continues By Ensign Drew Verbis

Naval Air Facility El Centro Public Affairs

EL CENTRO, Calif. — Capt. William Perkins, commanding officer, Naval Air Facility (NAF) El Centro, hosted Marc and Torben Vraciu, the son and grandson of the late WWII Navy fighter ace, Cdr. Alexander Vraciu, during a summer tour onboard NAF El Centro, 2021. A legendary pilot in naval history, Cdr. Alexander Vraciu was a ‘Top Gun’, Navy Cross recipient, and Medal of Honor nominee during WWII. At the end of the war, Vraciu ranked fourth among the Navy’s flying aces, with 19 enemy planes downed during flight and 21 destroyed on the ground. NAF El Centro officially named their airfield “Vraciu Field” in 2019 to honor the hero who had direct ties to the base. “It was an honor to meet members of the Vraciu family as they carry Alexander Vraciu’s legacy forward.” said Perkins. “Throughout NAF El Centro’s 75-year history, our claim to fame has been that nearly every aircraft carrier aviator will spend time at here. Many come back multiple times to use our bombing ranges during critical training for the nation’s missions downrange, and all of them learn the Vraciu legacy.” Marc Vraciu is the youngest son of Cdr. Alexander Vraciau and named after Adm. Marc Andrew “Pete” Mitscher, a pioneer in naval aviation. His son Torben toured the facility of his grandfather’s namesake with aspirations of someday following in his footsteps as a Naval aviator and perhaps attending the Naval Academy. “Torben is proud and inspired by his grandfather’s legacy,” said Marc. “We might have a future flyer in the family if Torben’s path leads to the Naval Academy. He would certainly be the talk of the town. Whatever decision he makes, he now has a better

Capt. William Perkins, commanding officer, Naval Air Facility (NAF) El Centro, left, hosted Torben, center, and Marc Vraciu, the grandson and son of the late WWII Navy fighter ace, Cdr. Alexander Vraciu, during a summer tour onboard NAF El Centro, 2021. NAF El Centro supports joint service air combat training and readiness of the Warfighter. (KRISTOPHER HAUGH)

understanding of his identity and how he can carry this forward in the future.” Vraciu was tagged to the be the skipper of VF-51, assuming command in March 1956. Flying FJ-3 Furies, the “Screaming Eagles” prepared for the annual aerial gunnery meet at NAF El Centro in January 1957. It was the highlight of every fighter squadron’s year. He would continue to train warfighters at NAF El Centro until retiring his helmet on Jan. 1, 1964 after 3,550 hours and

141 carrier landings. “Early in the base’s legacy, the Fleet Air Gunnery Unit, the pre-cursor to ‘Top Gun’, operated from NAF El Centro,” said Perkins. “In addition to learning air-toground bombing skills, air-to-air gunnery was taught in the skies over the Imperial Valley. These skills, exhibited by Vraciu during WWII combat missions and honed at NAF El Centro, are critical in carrier-based airpower’s success during operations

around the globe from the 1940s, until today.” Touring the facilities at NAF El Centro, Torben Vraciu was inspired and stated, “It would be an honor to serve like my grandfather.” The mission of NAF El Centro is to support the combat training and readiness of the warfighter. This includes air operations support to operational fleet and training squadrons as well as squadrons from other services (Marine Corps, Army, Air Force) and international military partners.


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Cadet from Page 1

ing some Sea Cadet squadrons without the real-life experience of Sailors who have been to the fleet. With a new commitment to the program being emphasized by NRC, members of the Sea Cadets are looking forward to more direct engagement with their active-duty components. For Sea Cadet Lt. j.g. Andrea Thomas, the commanding officer of Fort McHenry Division and Training Ship Constellation, the support from headquarters represents an investment in the future. “Sea and League Cadets is an excellent youth organization for both young men and women to learn and demonstrate leadership skills, build confidence within themselves, learn their strengths and receive opportunities for improvement,” said Thomas. “Investing in our young people helps benefit a better future for all of us.” To view whether or not there is a unit in your area, see ways in which you can get involved, or would like to learn more about the volunteering opportunities available with the Sea Cadets, visit www.seacadets.org.

A U.S. Naval Sea Cadets Corps Fort McHenry Division cadet uses the Navy’s virtual reality asset the“Nimitz”during the Navy Promotional Days (NPD) Baltimore. During the event between USNSCC, Navy Recruiting Command and NTAG Philadelphia, cadets participated in physical training with local recruiters, conducted service training and experienced the“Nimitz.” NPDs are a part of the Navy’s national search for the best and brightest students who have what it takes to excel in high-demand, cutting-edge fields. (PETTY OFFICER 1ST CLASS DIANA QUINLAN)

Honor

Change of Command

from Page 1

Houtz was one of several names recommended to Navy leadership by Naval History and Heritage Command Director, retired Rear Adm. Sam Cox, himself a former intelligence officer. “Considered a ‘shipmate’ by her Navy co-workers, Ms. Houtz’s dedication to service and the Navy makes her an appropriate namesake for this award,” said Cox. “I can attest to her reputation as an exceptionally dedicated and talented Intelligence analyst and civil servant, who displayed uncommon potential for senior leadership. She might one day have been a Deputy Director of Naval Intelligence.” For more information see the Secretary of the Navy policy memo entitled, “Department of the Navy Angela M. Houtz Medal for Fallen Civilian Employees,” dated Jan. 15, 2021.

from Page 1

An undated file photo of Angela M. Houtz, a Department of the Navy intelligence analyst killed in the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attack on the Pentagon.(US NAVY PHOTO)

transition. “First, I would like to thank Vice Adm. Caudle and his wife Donna for the welcome you gave us here, and for the SUBLANT staff I thank you for everything you’ve done,” said Houston. “It’s just amazing to lead a group of dedicated professionals like you.” Houston went on to outline his priorities for the Submarine Force as he assumes command. “To the Submarine Force, my priorities are simple: warfighting, people and safety,” said Houston. “Fleet Adm. Nimitz, Pacific Fleet Commander, a submariner, said after World War II that it’s the everlasting glory of the Submarine

Force that they held the line in the Pacific against the Japanese while the rest of the fleet reconstituted. In the hour of need, hour of peril, they held the line. There’s storm clouds right now, and the Western Pacific is eerie similar to what it was in the 30’s. Houston further stressed the importance of the Submarine Force’s lethality and fearlessness in confronting any challenges that may lie ahead. “We will hold that line as a Submarine Force,” continued Houston. “We will not fail America. We are the most lethal, capable Force. We are the apex predator of the sea, and as such we fear nothing. We fear nothing above the sea, nothing in the sea, or nothing on the sea.” Before taking command, Houston served as director, Undersea Warfare Division, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (N97).

For more military news visit FlagshipNews.com


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On iberty

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Health and Wellness There are many contributing factors to wellness such as diet, physical activity,and genetics. All are important, but a first step to wellness is choosing healthy foods to fuel the body every day. PAGE A4

Friday Night SmackDown at the Norfolk Scope

WWE Superstar Dolph Ziggler (COURTESY PHOTO)

WWE Superstar Dolph Ziggler talks Vince McMahon, Ric Flair and more Interview conducted by Yiorgo SevenVenues is proud to announce WWE’s first ever Friday Night SmackDown in the Hampton Roads area will emanate live for the whole world to see, November 12th from the Norfolk Scope in Norfolk, Virginia. Such stars as: The Man Becky Lynch, Roman Reigns, Paul Heyman, the Usos, Dolph Ziggler, Edge, Sasha Banks, Big E, Seth Rollins, Bianca Belair, Ray Mysterio and many more will be there. Tickets go on sale this Friday, September 17th at 10:00 a.m. Be the first to get your tickets, go to https://www.sevenve nu e s . c om / e ve nt s / d e t ai l / w we - f r i day-night-smackdown to join the SevenVenues mailing list or follow SevenVenues on social media for the presale password and details. We were fortunate recently to talk to WWE SmackDown Superstar Dolph Ziggler who will see action November 12th.

Yiorgo: Why should people come to see a live WWE show, and why should they come to SmackDown on November 12th at the Norfolk Scope? Dolph Ziggler: For our fans, it’s an opportunity to see us live after all this time and allow us to entertain you the best way we know how. It’s an awesome show, even if you don’t know what we do or what our product is, because it is so much fun. It’s live, sports theatrics, pyrotechnics, different kinds of super-stars doing unbelievable feats of strength and athleticism. It is such a blast for us to perform these matches and it’s really fun for me to beat people up in front of a crowd. It’s one of my favorite things to do. Y: You wanted to become a wrestler from a very young age, tell us the who, what, and where. DZ: No joke, when I was five years old, a young for my age first grader, my dad took me to a WWF show at the time. We sat in the nosebleeds seats far away. There were

Current WWE Universal Champion Roman Reigns at a past Hampton, Virginia WWE Live event. (JONATHAN MCLARTY)

no big screens back then, just a ring far away that looked so small, and I remember saying, I want to do this. My dad said ok and he got me a singlet, shoes, and I had my gear. I remember he took me to a wrestling tournament that year and at five years old I remember saying to him, Dad there is no ring and no ropes. That genuinely happened, and he said, “It’s different but you start here”. And I busted my butt from that point on to get better. Y: Who did you idolize, as a kid? DZ: My uncle got me very early into Ric Flair when I was like seven or eight years old and I am not supposed to know how cool and good Ric Flair is or the Four Horsemen and I have been following him my whole life. Like Ric, I wanted to be that guy that could go an hour with anybody at some random city, at any point, at any time. Strut into the place, strut out with a Turn to WWE, Page 3

WinterFest on the Wisconsin Set to Open with 300,000 Additional Lights By Nauticus NORFOLK, Va.—Nauticus has revealed its plans for this season’s WinterFest on the Wisconsin, including doubling the holiday lights aboard the battleship (more than 650,000 in total), increasing the number of nights, adding new programming and entertainment, and kicking the celebration off on Veteran’s Day with a special salute to the military. WinterFest on the Wisconsin was launched in 2020 as a safe, outdoor holiday experience for the Hampton Roads community. Each night was sold out, and more than 31,000 guests enjoyed the experience last season. “Based on the overwhelming response we received last year, our team has been planning since February for this season,” said Stephen E. Kirkland, Nauticus’ executive director. “Mark my words, this year the battleship will truly be a showstopper.” Along with more lights and more nights, Nauticus’ creative team is designing several new experiences. Each evening, guests will enjoy a snowfall inside the museum’s Wonder Hall. A live-action animatronic Gingerbread Man is being designed to greet guests in the ship’s historic galley, and families will have a special moment with Santa in a new North Pole experience. The battleship’s fantail (stern of the ship) will feature a new centerpiece — a massive, 32-foot-tall Christmas tree with

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special tree lighting ceremonies throughout the evening. This season’s WinterFest on the Wisconsin will also see the return of some holiday favorites, like the lighted boat parade on the Elizabeth River each Saturday night (Santa arrives by boat), dozens of cheeky elves below deck, an elaborate train display, and of course, Oliver, the talking Christmas tree. WinterFest on the Wisconsin opens on Veteran’s Day (November 11) and tickets are complimentary that evening to all active-duty

service members and veterans, thanks to the generous support of our presenting sponsor, GEICO Military. The event runs through January 2, 2022 and is open each Wednesday — Sunday throughout the holiday season. Pricing varies: Wed-Thurs - $12.50 adult, $10 child general admission, Fri-Sun - $14.50 adult, $12 child general admission. Nauticus members can purchase discounted tickets beginning September 27; general admission tickets go on sale October 1.

Support for WinterFest on the Wisconsin directly benefits the Nauticus Foundation, a 501(c)3 nonprofit. Funding provides interpretation and restoration of the Battleship Wisconsin and allows Nauticus to open new onboard spaces and experiential learning opportunities for students, families and visitors. For more information, visit https://www. winterfestonthewisconsin.com/ or www. nauticus.org

INSIDE: Check out Flagship Values, your source for automobiles, employment, real estate and more! Pages CX-X


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Community Submit YOUR events, news and photos

The Flagship welcomes submissions from our readers online. Please submit events here: www.militarynews.com/users/admin/calendar/event/ Please submit news and photos here: www.militarynews.com/norfolk-navy-flagship/submit_news/

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‘Tis the Season to Swing

From Virginia Arts Festival Featuring Rob Fisher, music director Nadia and Christine DiGiallonardo, singers With The Festival Five Saturday, December 4 at 8:00 pm Sandler Center for the Performing Arts, Virginia Beach Like a champagne toast in song, like a gift you can’t wait to open, Virginia Arts Festival’s Holiday Spectacular ‘Tis the Season to Swing on Saturday, December 4 is destined to be an annual tradition for residents and visitors in Virginia Beach. Designed to appeal to audiences of all ages, this sparkling annual holiday concert is a great way to gather family and friends, business travelers, and tourists for an unforgettable show at Virginia Beach’s premier entertainment venue, the Sandler Center for the Performing Arts. Tickets are on sale now at vafest.org. Broadway’s Nadia DiGiallonardo (Waitress, Pippin, Hair) reunites with sister Christine DiGiallonardo (My Fair Lady, Candide, Guys and Dolls) join Hampton Roads native and prominent Broadway conductor Rob Fisher (Chicago, An American in Paris) for an unforgettable holiday celebration. Fan favorites for years on public radio’s “A Prairie Home Companion,” the DiGiallonardo Sisters and

Rob Fisher know their way around a song and have a gift for making it fun. Featuring holiday music, from Broadway to country, and singingin-church to classics to old-time radio, backed by a festive five-piece combo (the Festival Five) led by Rob Fisher. Guaranteed to kick off the holiday season in style and send you home humming! As the Virginia Arts Festival looks ahead to 2022 and the upcoming 25th Anniversary season, The Holiday Spectacular will remind audiences of the Festival’s 25-year reputation as the region’s most trusted presenter of great performances. Tickets available at vafest.org or by phone at 757-282-2822. About Rob Fisher One of the most sought-after music directors on Broadway, conductor Rob Fisher is a creator and long-time music director of the legendary, Tony Awards-honored ENCORES! concerts in New York; Grammy-winning music director of the long-running Broadway hit Chicago, the Musical; and Founder and Director of the Coffee Club Orchestra, an audience favorite on public radio’s Prairie Home Companion. A longtime friend and favorite of Virginia Arts Festival audiences, Rob has created, hosted, and conducted concerts with Broadway stars Kristin Chenoweth and Kelli O’Hara, and directed the sold-out 2018 Sandler Center show with Brooke Shields celebrating “Bernstein on Broadway.”

About Christine DiGiallaonardo Christine DiGiallonardo is a New York— based vocalist whose performances range from early-music chamber ensembles to jazz and rock bands. She has performed in NY City Center’s Encores! productions of High Button Shoes, I Married An Angel,Me And My Girl, Brigadoon, The New Yorkers,Annie Get Your Gun, Lady, Be Good!, On Your Toes, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes and Fiorello! Her voice can be heard on cast albums for Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, Lady, Be Good!,Brigadoon and The New Yorkers. Concert credits include Candide, The Sound of Music, and Guys & Dolls (Carnegie Hall)as well asCarousel (Live from Lincoln Center with the NY Philharmonic)where she played the role of Arminy Livermore, West Side Story (Verizon Hall) as Francisca, and My Fair Lady (NY Philharmonic). She was a featured soloist on A Prairie Home Companion with Garrison Keillor for 7 years until his retirement in 2016 and continues to perform with Garrison in his solo shows around the country. Christine also sings with her sisters, Daniela and Nadia, as The DiGiallonardo Sisters. They have recorded two albums together, “Shout, Sister, Shout!” and “No Fighting On Christmas”,available on iTunes. She is also a company member of Blake Allen’s “An Evening With…” series, a bimonthly concert at NYC’s Green Room 42 that honors singers and songwriters of the beginning-middle part

of the 20th century. In addition to concerts and theater, Christine’s voice has also been featured on many commercial jingles, including spots for Aquafresh, Mr. Clean, Playtex, and Febreze. Graduate of Vassar College. About Nadia DiGiallonardo Nadia DiGiallonardo is a NYC-based music director, arranger, and singer. She is currently the Music Supervisor and Arranger for the upcoming musical The Devil Wears Prada, with music by Elton John. She was the music director/conductor for Diane Paulus’s Broadway production of Waitress at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre and is thrilled to be reprising that role as part of the re-opening of Broadway this fall! As a member of the original creative team, Nadia collaborated with Sara Bareilles and the Waitress band to develop the score of the show. Nadia was also the music supervisor and dance arranger for the Broadway revival of Pippin, and the music director/conductor for the Broadway revival of Hair. It was Rob Fisher’s mentorship that gave Nadia the opportunity to work on Hair, and also opened the door for Nadia and her sisters to have the incredible experience of being a part of A Prairie Home Companion for the last few years of its run. With Rob Fisher, Garrison Keillor, and the amazing musicians of the APHC band, The DiGiallonardo Sisters released their album Shout, Sister, Shout! Nadia is also currently working on Diane Paulus’s revival of 1776, as well as co-orchestrating Afterwords for Seattle’s 5th Avenue Theatre, and co-producing the music for the animated series Central Park. She graduated Vassar College Phi Beta Kappa with a degree in Urban Planning and lives in Harlem with her two sons, Jack and Charlie.

recently at Nauticus. Funds went toward the development of outreach displays to accompany the exhibit that focused on the negative impacts of single-use plastics. The outreach was also integrated into a virtual platform which reached 138 classes and 4,140 students. “These meaningful experiences are sure to foster a sense of connection between our environment and tomorrow’s leaders,” Eastep said. AskHRgreen.org is now accepting Mini Grant applications for the 2021-2022 school year. Hampton Roads K-12 school teachers, youth leaders and other organizations working with youth are eligible to apply. There is no deadline for applications, which are accepted year-round as funding is available. “We’re encouraging teachers to get creative with the grant program by finding ways to engage students with projects they can do, inside or outside the classroom,” Eastep said. Read up on details about the projects featured here on the Green Living blog

at this link. To access this year’s Mini Grant application, visit https://askhrgreen.org/grants/environmental-education-mini-grant/. About askHRgreen.org Celebrating its 10th anniversary this year, askHRgreen.org is your go-to resource for all things green in Hampton Roads — from recycling tips and pointers for keeping local waterways clean to water-saving ideas and simple steps to make local living easy on the environment. Launched in 2011, the region-wide public awareness and education campaign is administered through the Hampton Roads Planning District Commission and powered by the following members: The cities of Chesapeake, Franklin, Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk, Poquoson, Portsmouth, Suffolk, Virginia Beach, and Williamsburg; the counties of Gloucester, Isle of Wight, James City, Southampton, Surry and York; the town of Smithfield; and HRSD. Like askHRgreen.org on Facebook, follow on Twitter and Instagram, tune in to YouTube and catch the “Let’s Talk Green” blog, written by a team of local experts.

Hampton Roads Students Dig in, Get Messy and Learn through askHRgreen. org Mini Grant Program By askHRgreen HAMPTON ROADS, Va — Lazy summer days have given way to the rush and routine of the school year in Hampton Roads. As families gear up for everything back-toschool, organizers of the askHRgreen.org public awareness and education campaign are recognizing local schools and youth organizations with an A+ for their creative take on green-based classroom projects funded through its Environmental Education Mini Grant program. “Despite the limitations of a pandemic school year, nine innovative groups in Hampton Roads leveraged the virtual learning platform and outdoor class time to create safe, environmental opportunities for their young learners,” said Rebekah Eastep, an askHRgreen.org team leader. “We applaud these instructors who went the extra mile.” The askHRgreen.org Mini Grant Program provides grants of up to $500 for projects that are specifically tied to suggested environmental topics. Highlights of this recent round of grant projects included: • The creation of a bat house and pollinator garden at Thalia Garden Elementary School in Virginia Beach

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• A rain barrel and educational outreach project with a Boy Scouts of America club in Newport News • Water quality testing of local waterways at Booker T. Washington Middle School in Newport News • Using worms to vermi-compost at Heritage Elementary School in Virginia Beach • Food for the Tummy, Food for the Soul, which taught students to grow, harvest and cook their own nutritious food at Newtown Elementary School in Virginia Beach • Caterpillar studies for second grade students in Portsmouth City Schools in partnership with Hoffler Creek Wildlife Foundation. • Renovation of a main entrance garden at Oscar Smith High School in Chesapeake • A “Sweets for Students” project where students learned agricultural and life skills by growing, harvesting, and selling sweet potatoes with the Williamsburg Community Growers in Lightfoot. In addition, the Mini Grant program supported the National Geographic travelling exhibit, Planet or Plastic, staged


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 3 | Thursday, September 16, 2021 3

WWE from Page 1

suit and sunglasses and go to the next town. So I always wanted not just to be the best or ‘The Man’ but the guy who delivered every night and jumped on a plane or helicopter and went onto the next state. And Yiorgo, you’ve told me before how much you love and respect Ric Flair. That’s the right guy to look up to and emulate down the line, not just looking and being the part, but actually delivering that part for 35 years in a row and into today. Y: They say it’s better not to meet your idols. How did your friendship develop with Ric and can you share a cool Ric Flair story? DZ: Ric did not have to be but he was really nice to me when we met. Very early on in my career I was in the Spirit Squad 16 years ago, and we were in there wrestling Ric Flair, Dusty Rhodes, Sargent Slaughter, Roddy Piper and not only is that just learning for you, they did not have to be as kind as they were before and after, telling us what we did wrong, helping us out. As we discussed, I wanted to be the Ric Flair of our generation so I would ask for his help, what I should do and how to do it. We both also have this love for amateur wrestling so that and the work in the ring, started at some point to stand out to him and he said ok this kid is not just saying these things, he is backing them up. We got closer and closer. Anytime he was at RAW he would push for me to do bigger and better things. One time we did a segment on the show where he was giving me a pep talk to go fight Miz, and I remember thinking to myself, well I did that, I had a segment with Ric Flair, that’s pretty great, I got the nod from Ric. And it just got better and better from there. It was pretty cool. A couple of nights afterwards we would hang out. Those are stories that I probably can’t tell but those are my favorite stories, just hanging out with Ric after the shows. Y: You were at Ric’s 70th birthday party a few years ago and what I think is so incredible is when Ric married Wendy, you walked Wendy down the aisle. That is such a great honor. How did that happen? DZ: The party was amazing. As far as the wedding goes, after all these years of bonding, a tradition we would have is when Ric would go into the WWE Hall of Fame or presenting at the Hall of Fame, Wendy needed someone to escort her down the Red Carpet and into her seat. So since we were all hanging out I said, I’ll do it. It happened two years in a row so it like became our

Bianca Belair (COURTESY PHOTO)

thing. And Wendy would say, “See you at WrestleMania”. We would hang out, I would either get dinner or drinks for those guys. So first of all, Wendy thought it would be a good surprise for Ric so we did not say anything. I assumed Wendy told Ric and I remember we are walking down the aisle and Ric is saying, “What the h*** are you doing?” It was so great because I became so close with these two. They are family. Whenever we get a chance to hang out we do. We love wrestling, having a good time, everything just works out. Y: Let’s reminisce a little bit. At 24 years of age you are signed by WWE. Can you talk about that experience and your time at then WWE’s developmental territories of Ohio Valley Wrestling (OVW) and Florida Championship Wrestling (FCW). DZ: I had gotten a tryout and they told me that I was too small. So I started mixing powdered milk with 2% milk and drinking it every two hours. It was not going to make me taller but I was trying to pack five or six pounds and I was walking around with a gut full of milk. So that didn’t work. Six to eight months later I got another tryout and I had read Mick Foley’s book so I was jumping over the hood of my parents car and landing on my back on the lawn, jumping up as fast as I could so I could jump up faster than the other guys trying out, hoping that I would stand out at the tryout camp. First of all, I had like 12 golf size balls on my back from doing this, but it worked. When we did the knockdowns I was jumping up and standing up faster from the other 6 guys that were there. OVW was great. Dr. Tom Prichard and

Becky Lynch (COURTESY PHOTO)

Rip Rogers helped me a lot and I learned a lot from them in the ring but also about outside the ring, behind the scenes, backstage, what you are supposed to do and how to represent yourself and make the matches great. We had practice three days a week, but I practiced six days a week so I can stand out. At FCW I had Dr. Tom again and Steve Kern to teach me the ins and outs of a match and what you can do between the moves that makes you to start and stand out. Also big time, they really helped me behind the scenes on how to represent yourself, what to do in real life to make yourself standout. That is such a huge, huge part of the business. Y: Can you share some wow, pinch me type moments for you in wrestling. DZ: I have a couple of those. Even the little battles backstage that I’ve overcome, where I’ve been told you will never have a tee shirt or when I was told I would never be World’s Champion. And I was like, I can deal with that, trying to change their minds for the next few years and I became World Champion. I mean there was a very clear moment where I cashed in my “Money In The Bank” contract, I had the crowd behind me, it was a crazy moment. For me becoming world champion was an unreal thing because I was told to my face this will never happen and I made it happen. It was above and beyond very cool for me. Y: Was that told to you by Vince McMahon? DZ: Sometimes it was second hand by other people but not in a condescending way. “Hey man Vince doesn’t see it in you”. A few times it was pretty close to the top. “Hey man, we just don’t see it. It just doesn’t work for you”. Everyday it was like I can take it but if I can get just 30 seconds let me try to

prove them wrong. So for the next couple of years something would happen, somebody would get hurt, they would put me in that spot, and I would go out and if they could put me into that spot a little more, after that if I could just win a few times and after that maybe I could just retain. So it was baby steps, little goals all the way through. Somehow the timing worked out and sometimes it happens. I’ve been around WWE for a long time, so I learned to never believe anything until you see it or do it. So even after being told I was going to cash in and become champion, I didn’t believe it until it happened. I never had so many texts in my life afterwards. It was so real because as a group, the fans and myself made it happen in spite of being told it would never happen. Sadly, immediately after I was told, I was more of a placeholder for 2 months. I said, Well I guess that means I have two months to change your mind. Y: Besides winning the WWE World title, what three-four moments would you put on your personal highlight reel? DZ: Getting my first action figure and having a young fan come up and ask me to sign it. Being told I would never be world champion and becoming champion. The match I had against Del Rio when I lost the title on my first defense where we changed roles throughout the match and told an amazing story. And getting a pink tee shirt at a time when everyone else had black ones and I was told it would never sell. It was my highest selling shirt ever. Always stand out and stick to your guns. Y: As a 17 year vet, what advice do you give the young talent? DZ: I say the same thing to everybody whether they are my younger brothers, fans or those in the wrestling business or starting school: To be the first one in and the last one out even if it does not work out. No matter what happens, you gave it everything you had in any kind of work that you do in life. Y: Are you still doing stand-up comedy? DZ: Yes, we just started back up SummerSlam weekend in Las Vegas. The fans were great and we had a sold out show, so we are setting up 20-30 more shows a year and I’m doing a couple of shows with Mick Foley. For more info on Dolph’s standup shows, follow him on Twitter @heelziggler and at realmickfoley.com Yiorgo is an arts, entertainment and sports writer. A stage, TV and movie actor, he is also a sports entertainer, educator, motivational speaker, writer, storyteller and columnist.


4 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 3 | Thursday, September 16, 2021

Food

No-Bake Energy Bites. (COURTESY PHOTO)

Go for Grapes as a Smart Choice for Health and Wellness By Family Features The importance of health and wellness is top of mind for many people. There are many contributing factors to wellness such as diet, physical activity, social engagement and genetics. All are important, but a first step to wellness is choosing healthy foods to fuel the body every day, ideally foods that support health in multiple ways. Consider grapes from California: they are convenient, healthy, hydrating and provide energy to help support healthy and active lifestyles. Eating grapes is also linked to beneficial impacts on the health of specific body parts and systems, including the heart, brain, skin and colon. Most of grapes’ health benefits are attributed to the presence of natural plant compounds known as polyphenols, which help promote antioxidant activity and influence biological processes that support overall health. Grapes of all colors — red, green and black — are natural sources of polyphenols. Fresh California grapes are refreshing by the handful, but they also lend a tasty burst of flavor to a wide range of recipes you can enjoy any time of day. This Heart Smart Smoothie is a deliciously healthy way to start the day; pairing grapes with nuts and seeds in No-Bake Energy Bites delivers a hearty snack to enjoy midday, after school or following a workout; and Quinoa, Cauliflower and Grape Salad is perfect at any mealtime for a powerful combo of both taste and health. Find more nutritious recipes at GrapesFromCalifornia.com. Grapes and a Healthy Brain Research suggests regularly eating grapes as part of a healthy diet and lifestyle may contribute to improved health outcomes, including brain health. In a study of people with early memory decline published in “Experimental Gerontology,” subjects were either fed whole grape powder equivalent to just 2 ¼ cups of grapes

Quinoa, Cauliflower and Grape Salad. (COURTESY PHOTO)

per day or a placebo powder. The results showed consuming grapes preserved healthy metabolic activity in regions of the brain associated with early Alzheimer’s disease, where metabolic decline takes hold. Subjects who didn’t consume grapes exhibited significant metabolic decline in these critical regions. Additionally, those consuming the grape-enriched diet showed beneficial changes in regional brain metabolism that correlated to improvements in attention and working memory performance. No-Bake Energy Bites Prep time: 20 minutes Yield: 8 energy bites ⅓ cup raw almonds ⅓ cup walnuts ½ cup pitted dates

1 ½ teaspoons fresh orange juice or lemon juice 1 pinch sea salt 8 seedless California grapes ⅓ cup chia or hemp seeds In bowl of food processor, pulse almonds and walnuts 5-6 times to coarsely chop. Add dates and process until mixture is finely chopped. Add juice and process until just combined; transfer mixture to small plate. Dry grapes. Pack 1 tablespoon date mixture around each grape, completely covering to seal. Repeat with remaining grapes and date mixture. Roll balls in seeds to coat. Store in covered container in refrigerator up to three days. Nutritional information per energy bite: 120 calories; 3 g protein; 12 g carbohydrates; 7

g fat (53% calories from fat); 0.5 g saturated fat (4% calories from saturated fat); 0 mg cholesterol; 20 mg sodium; 3 g fiber. Heart Smart Grape and Peanut Butter Smoothie Prep time: 5 minutes Servings: 1 1 cup red California grapes, chilled ⅔ cup unsweetened almond milk, chilled ½ cup ice cubes ½ small banana 1 tablespoon peanut butter 1 tablespoon ground flax seed 2 teaspoons cacao powder In blender on high speed, blend grapes, almond milk, ice, banana, peanut butter, flax seed and cacao powder until smooth. Nutritional information per serving: 350 calories; 8 g protein; 53 g carbohydrates; 14 g fat (36% calories from fat); 2.5 g saturated fat (6% calories from saturated fat); 0 mg cholesterol; 220 mg sodium; 7 g fiber. Quinoa, Cauliflower and Grape Salad Prep time: 15 minutes Cook time: 15 minutes Servings: 8 1 cup white quinoa 1 small head cauliflower, trimmed and cut into small florets 1 ¼ cups red California grapes, halved 3 scallions, trimmed and thinly sliced 2 ripe avocados, diced ⅓ inch Dressing: 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar 1 tablespoon lime juice 1 tablespoon honey ½ teaspoon ground cumin ½ teaspoon dried oregano, crumbled ½ teaspoon fine sea salt ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil freshly ground black pepper, to taste Cook quinoa according to package directions and drain on two layers of paper towels. Transfer to mixing bowl. Add cauliflower, grapes, scallions and avocado pieces. To make dressing: In small bowl, whisk vinegar, lime juice, honey, cumin, oregano and salt until blended. Gradually whisk in oil. Drizzle dressing over quinoa mixture and toss gently. Season with pepper, to taste. Nutritional information per serving: 260 calories; 5 g protein; 27 g carbo hydrates; 16 g fat (55% calories from fat); 2 g saturated fat (7% calories from saturated fat); 0 mg cholesterol; 170 mg sodium; 6 g fiber.

Comfort from the South By Culinary.net The star of your next spread can be hidden away in the refrigerator for a surprise delight for your guests. It’s topped with chocolate syrup and chopped pecans, and your loved ones just may vote it to be their favorite dish. It’s an Arkansas Possum Pie, made with three delicious layers and crunchy toppings for a show-stopping dessert. In a saucepan, melt butter. Add flour and stir to combine. Add crushed pecans and brown sugar. Stir to combine and form to the bottom of a pie pan. Bake for 15-20 minutes at 350 F. In a separate bowl, add cream cheese and beat until smooth. Add powdered sugar and heavy cream. Stir to combine. Add to pie pan over cooled pecan crust. Refrigerate. To make the pudding layer, whisk egg yolks in a bowl then whisk in whole milk. In a separate bowl, add sugar, cocoa powder, cornstarch, flour and salt. Whisk to combine. In a saucepan over medium heat, add egg mixture followed by the dry mixture and stir. Add butter and vanilla extract, stirring until butter is melted. Pour pudding mixture into a separate pie pan and cover with plastic wrap. Refrigerate for 30 minutes. Once cooled, add on top of the other layers and spread evenly. Refrigerate pie overnight. To make whipped topping, in a mixer, add heavy whipping cream, powdered sugar and vanilla extract. Beat to combine. Add whipped topping to the top of the chilled pie. Drizzle with chocolate syrup and sprinkle with chopped pecans. Whether it’s a holiday, birthday or reunion, this pie is a perfect conversation starter. It’s sweet, crunchy and filled with creamy, delight-

ful layers of goodness. Find more unique dessert recipes at Culinary. net. If you made this recipe at home, use #MyCulinaryConnection on your favorite social network to share your work. Arkansas Possum Pie Servings: 8 Crust: ¾ cup butter 1 ½ cups flour ½ cup brown sugar 1 ½ cups pecans, crushed Cream Cheese Layer: 12 ounces cream cheese, softened 1 cup powdered sugar 4 tablespoons heavy cream Pudding Layer: 3 egg yolks 2 cups whole milk 1 cup sugar ⅓ cup cocoa powder 3 tablespoons cornstarch 2 tablespoons flour ¼ teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons butter 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Whipped Cream Topping: 1 cup heavy whipping cream 4 tablespoons powdered sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract chocolate syrup ½ cup chopped pecans Heat oven to 350 F. To make crust: In saucepan, melt butter; add flour, brown sugar and crushed pecans. Stir until combined. Press into 9 ½-inch deep pie plate. Bake 15-20 minutes until crust begins to brown. Cool completely. To make cream cheese layer: In medium

Arkansas Possum Pie. (COURTESY PHOTO)

bowl, mix cream cheese until creamy. Add powdered sugar and heavy cream; mix until smooth. Spread over cooled pecan crust. Refrigerate. To make pudding layer: In medium bowl, whisk egg yolks. Add milk; whisk until combined. Set aside. In separate medium bowl, whisk sugar, cocoa powder, cornstarch, flour and salt until combined. In saucepan over medium heat, add egg yolk mixture and flour mixture. Whisk constantly until pudding begins to thicken and bubble. Add

butter and vanilla extract, stirring until butter is melted. Pour chocolate pudding in shallow bowl. Cover with plastic wrap touching pudding to keep it from forming skin. Refrigerate 30 minutes. Pour pudding over cream cheese layer. Cover pie with plastic wrap. Refrigerate overnight. To make whipped cream topping: In stand mixer bowl, add heavy cream, powdered sugar and vanilla extract. Whip until stiff peaks form. Spread whipped cream over pudding layer. Drizzle pie with chocolate syrup and sprinkle with chopped pecans.


4 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 3 | Thursday, September 16, 2021

Food

No-Bake Energy Bites. (COURTESY PHOTO)

Go for Grapes as a Smart Choice for Health and Wellness By Family Features The importance of health and wellness is top of mind for many people. There are many contributing factors to wellness such as diet, physical activity, social engagement and genetics. All are important, but a first step to wellness is choosing healthy foods to fuel the body every day, ideally foods that support health in multiple ways. Consider grapes from California: they are convenient, healthy, hydrating and provide energy to help support healthy and active lifestyles. Eating grapes is also linked to beneficial impacts on the health of specific body parts and systems, including the heart, brain, skin and colon. Most of grapes’ health benefits are attributed to the presence of natural plant compounds known as polyphenols, which help promote antioxidant activity and influence biological processes that support overall health. Grapes of all colors — red, green and black — are natural sources of polyphenols. Fresh California grapes are refreshing by the handful, but they also lend a tasty burst of flavor to a wide range of recipes you can enjoy any time of day. This Heart Smart Smoothie is a deliciously healthy way to start the day; pairing grapes with nuts and seeds in No-Bake Energy Bites delivers a hearty snack to enjoy midday, after school or following a workout; and Quinoa, Cauliflower and Grape Salad is perfect at any mealtime for a powerful combo of both taste and health. Find more nutritious recipes at GrapesFromCalifornia.com. Grapes and a Healthy Brain Research suggests regularly eating grapes as part of a healthy diet and lifestyle may contribute to improved health outcomes, including brain health. In a study of people with early memory decline published in “Experimental Gerontology,” subjects were either fed whole grape powder equivalent to just 2 ¼ cups of grapes

Quinoa, Cauliflower and Grape Salad. (COURTESY PHOTO)

per day or a placebo powder. The results showed consuming grapes preserved healthy metabolic activity in regions of the brain associated with early Alzheimer’s disease, where metabolic decline takes hold. Subjects who didn’t consume grapes exhibited significant metabolic decline in these critical regions. Additionally, those consuming the grape-enriched diet showed beneficial changes in regional brain metabolism that correlated to improvements in attention and working memory performance. No-Bake Energy Bites Prep time: 20 minutes Yield: 8 energy bites ⅓ cup raw almonds ⅓ cup walnuts ½ cup pitted dates

1 ½ teaspoons fresh orange juice or lemon juice 1 pinch sea salt 8 seedless California grapes ⅓ cup chia or hemp seeds In bowl of food processor, pulse almonds and walnuts 5-6 times to coarsely chop. Add dates and process until mixture is finely chopped. Add juice and process until just combined; transfer mixture to small plate. Dry grapes. Pack 1 tablespoon date mixture around each grape, completely covering to seal. Repeat with remaining grapes and date mixture. Roll balls in seeds to coat. Store in covered container in refrigerator up to three days. Nutritional information per energy bite: 120 calories; 3 g protein; 12 g carbohydrates; 7

g fat (53% calories from fat); 0.5 g saturated fat (4% calories from saturated fat); 0 mg cholesterol; 20 mg sodium; 3 g fiber. Heart Smart Grape and Peanut Butter Smoothie Prep time: 5 minutes Servings: 1 1 cup red California grapes, chilled ⅔ cup unsweetened almond milk, chilled ½ cup ice cubes ½ small banana 1 tablespoon peanut butter 1 tablespoon ground flax seed 2 teaspoons cacao powder In blender on high speed, blend grapes, almond milk, ice, banana, peanut butter, flax seed and cacao powder until smooth. Nutritional information per serving: 350 calories; 8 g protein; 53 g carbohydrates; 14 g fat (36% calories from fat); 2.5 g saturated fat (6% calories from saturated fat); 0 mg cholesterol; 220 mg sodium; 7 g fiber. Quinoa, Cauliflower and Grape Salad Prep time: 15 minutes Cook time: 15 minutes Servings: 8 1 cup white quinoa 1 small head cauliflower, trimmed and cut into small florets 1 ¼ cups red California grapes, halved 3 scallions, trimmed and thinly sliced 2 ripe avocados, diced ⅓ inch Dressing: 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar 1 tablespoon lime juice 1 tablespoon honey ½ teaspoon ground cumin ½ teaspoon dried oregano, crumbled ½ teaspoon fine sea salt ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil freshly ground black pepper, to taste Cook quinoa according to package directions and drain on two layers of paper towels. Transfer to mixing bowl. Add cauliflower, grapes, scallions and avocado pieces. To make dressing: In small bowl, whisk vinegar, lime juice, honey, cumin, oregano and salt until blended. Gradually whisk in oil. Drizzle dressing over quinoa mixture and toss gently. Season with pepper, to taste. Nutritional information per serving: 260 calories; 5 g protein; 27 g carbo hydrates; 16 g fat (55% calories from fat); 2 g saturated fat (7% calories from saturated fat); 0 mg cholesterol; 170 mg sodium; 6 g fiber.

Comfort from the South By Culinary.net The star of your next spread can be hidden away in the refrigerator for a surprise delight for your guests. It’s topped with chocolate syrup and chopped pecans, and your loved ones just may vote it to be their favorite dish. It’s an Arkansas Possum Pie, made with three delicious layers and crunchy toppings for a show-stopping dessert. In a saucepan, melt butter. Add flour and stir to combine. Add crushed pecans and brown sugar. Stir to combine and form to the bottom of a pie pan. Bake for 15-20 minutes at 350 F. In a separate bowl, add cream cheese and beat until smooth. Add powdered sugar and heavy cream. Stir to combine. Add to pie pan over cooled pecan crust. Refrigerate. To make the pudding layer, whisk egg yolks in a bowl then whisk in whole milk. In a separate bowl, add sugar, cocoa powder, cornstarch, flour and salt. Whisk to combine. In a saucepan over medium heat, add egg mixture followed by the dry mixture and stir. Add butter and vanilla extract, stirring until butter is melted. Pour pudding mixture into a separate pie pan and cover with plastic wrap. Refrigerate for 30 minutes. Once cooled, add on top of the other layers and spread evenly. Refrigerate pie overnight. To make whipped topping, in a mixer, add heavy whipping cream, powdered sugar and vanilla extract. Beat to combine. Add whipped topping to the top of the chilled pie. Drizzle with chocolate syrup and sprinkle with chopped pecans. Whether it’s a holiday, birthday or reunion, this pie is a perfect conversation starter. It’s sweet, crunchy and filled with creamy, delight-

ful layers of goodness. Find more unique dessert recipes at Culinary. net. If you made this recipe at home, use #MyCulinaryConnection on your favorite social network to share your work. Arkansas Possum Pie Servings: 8 Crust: ¾ cup butter 1 ½ cups flour ½ cup brown sugar 1 ½ cups pecans, crushed Cream Cheese Layer: 12 ounces cream cheese, softened 1 cup powdered sugar 4 tablespoons heavy cream Pudding Layer: 3 egg yolks 2 cups whole milk 1 cup sugar ⅓ cup cocoa powder 3 tablespoons cornstarch 2 tablespoons flour ¼ teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons butter 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Whipped Cream Topping: 1 cup heavy whipping cream 4 tablespoons powdered sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract chocolate syrup ½ cup chopped pecans Heat oven to 350 F. To make crust: In saucepan, melt butter; add flour, brown sugar and crushed pecans. Stir until combined. Press into 9 ½-inch deep pie plate. Bake 15-20 minutes until crust begins to brown. Cool completely. To make cream cheese layer: In medium

Arkansas Possum Pie. (COURTESY PHOTO)

bowl, mix cream cheese until creamy. Add powdered sugar and heavy cream; mix until smooth. Spread over cooled pecan crust. Refrigerate. To make pudding layer: In medium bowl, whisk egg yolks. Add milk; whisk until combined. Set aside. In separate medium bowl, whisk sugar, cocoa powder, cornstarch, flour and salt until combined. In saucepan over medium heat, add egg yolk mixture and flour mixture. Whisk constantly until pudding begins to thicken and bubble. Add

butter and vanilla extract, stirring until butter is melted. Pour chocolate pudding in shallow bowl. Cover with plastic wrap touching pudding to keep it from forming skin. Refrigerate 30 minutes. Pour pudding over cream cheese layer. Cover pie with plastic wrap. Refrigerate overnight. To make whipped cream topping: In stand mixer bowl, add heavy cream, powdered sugar and vanilla extract. Whip until stiff peaks form. Spread whipped cream over pudding layer. Drizzle pie with chocolate syrup and sprinkle with chopped pecans.


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 3 | Thursday, September 16, 2021 5

Health

Military Medical Researchers Honored For Commitment to Warfighters By MHS Communications While the pandemic may have sidelined the 2021 Military Health System Research Symposium, notable accomplishments by military and civilian researchers were recognized by the meeting’s organizers through a number of awards. MHSRS awards honor excellence in medical warfighter-related research at this annual meeting, which is sponsored by the Department of Defense Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs. Normally, the symposium would bring together thousands of health care professionals, researchers, and DOD leaders to review the latest scientific advancements in Warfighter-related, DOD-sponsored medical research pursued across the entire military medical enterprise. However, due to the ongoing national emergency surrounding COVID19, this year’s conference was canceled. “Researchers and medical providers throughout the DOD continue to demonstrate their impressive talents and leadership, responding to the COVID-19 pandemic while continuing to conduct research into the health and well-being of our nation’s warfighters,” said Terry Adirim, acting assistant secretary of defense for health affairs. “Readiness remains our top priority while we remain committed to ensuring the health and welfare of our service members, their families, and retirees. These remarkable individuals and teams are to be commended for their devotion to military medicine.” The following individuals received honors for 2021 Patricia A. Deuster is the recipient of one of two 2021 Distinguished Service Awards for lifetime achievement. Deuster is director of the Consortium for Health and Military Performance at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. Over the past 39 years, Deuster has been a leader in health, nutrition, human physiology, and human performance research. She published more than 260 peer-reviewed papers, shaping performance policy throughout the entire DOD. Her tireless efforts as an educator, collaborator, and mentor built and inspired a generation of human performance leaders. David Tribble is the recipient of the second 2021 Distinguished Service Awards for lifetime achievement. Tribble is science director of the Uniformed Services University’s Infectious Diseases Clinical Research Program, a consortium of military medical centers that is a model for multicenter research in the DOD. Throughout his 34 year career, Tribble led progressive clinical research protocols addressing specific warfighter gaps, resulting in improvements in care and prevention of diseases with significant operational impact. Christopher Connaboy from the University of Pittsburgh received the Outstand-

Members of the COVID-19 Health Action Response for Marines (CHARM) Team at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island supported a study conducted by the Naval Medical Research Center. (NMRC PHOTO)

ing Individual Research Accomplishment/ Academia-Industry award. Connaboy is recognized for contributions related to the prevention and treatment of musculoskeletal injury, specifically, research in the area of ‘movement signatures,’ contributing to a package of behavioral monitoring approaches that can be implemented remotely and economically in order to monitor a warfighter’s health status. This work will ultimately provide military commanders with information to support decision-making related to training, injury risk management, and return-to-duty planning. Navy Lt. Chad G. Peltier, from the Naval Medical Submarine Research Laboratory in Groton, Connecticut, received the Outstanding Individual Research Accomplishment/Military award. Peltier led efforts to modernize the Submarine Force’s psychological screening program and expand new research lines to assess enhanced cognitive performance in the military setting. His work will have lasting fleet-wide impact and ensures the psychological readiness, fitness, and resilience of submariners and nuclear operators. The following teams received honors for 2021 The Concussion Assessment Research and Education (CARE) Consortium Team received the Outstanding Research Accomplishment/Team-Academia-Industry award. The team lead was Thomas W. McAllister from Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis. The CARE Consortium Team is recognized for significant contributions to the identification of diagnostic and prognostic indicators for traumatic brain injury. The team recognized the importance of a large prospective study to advance the understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of concussion and its clinical manifestations. Findings from CARE Consortium studies will have a tremendous impact on this field of science for years to come, with significant implications for the Warfighter. The Integrated Platform for Clinical Assessment and Monitoring (IPCAM) Research Team, Walter Reed National Mili-

tary Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland was one of two recipients of Outstanding Research Accomplishment/Team-Military award. The team lead was Douglas S. Brungart. The IPCAM Research Team developed a comprehensive auditory research tool, which drove increased readiness through the deployment of a completely new, evidencebased Army Hearing Profile Standard. The Green-X Research Team, Vision Sciences Laboratory, Naval Medical Research Unit — Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio was the second recipient of Outstanding Research Accomplishment/Team-Military. The team lead was Michael D. Reddix. The Green-X-Research Team made significant contributions to address ongoing health issues in military high performance flight, successfully leading a public-private partnership team to develop an operational product needed to protect aircrew against low Intensity threats from lasers. In addition, one individual and three teams were recognized for outstanding research accomplishments related to the SARS CoV-2 pandemic. Laura E. Lamb, from Beaumont Health in Detroit, received the Outstanding Research Accomplishment/Individual/COVID-19 Pandemic-related award. Lamb utilized her molecular biology expertise to develop a technique to detect COVID-19 in under 30 minutes, using urine, blood, saliva, or mouth-swab samples. This rapid test is economical and sensitive, and does not require expensive equipment or medically trained personnel. It was provided freely to the world in mid-2020 through an open access, peer-reviewed article, and since then, has been adapted for use by academia and industry, and utilized in small, rural clinics on every continent except Antarctica. The first team award recipient was the COVID-19 Health Action Response for Marines (CHARM) Team, Naval Medical Research Center in Silver Spring, Maryland. The team lead was Navy Cmdr. Andrew G. Letizia. In March 2020, after multiple companies were delayed in graduating from the Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island because of SARS-CoV-2, under-

standing and containing the spread of COVID-19 in the recruit setting became a matter of national security. The CHARM study team executed the largest prospective study of SARSCoV-2 among Active Duty Service Members in the DOD, enrolling 3,472 recruits. The team provided actionable public health data to the Marines and saved thousands of recruit training hours. The results have paved the way for new diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic products. The second team award went to the Operational Infectious Diseases Laboratory Team at the Naval Health Research Center in San Diego. The team lead was Christopher A. Myers. Teaming up with the Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Defense, this team spearheaded the DOD’s laboratory response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This included the design, implementation, and execution of studies leading to Food and Drug Administration authorization of sample pooling strategies. The team managed to rapidly increase sample throughput, decrease turnaround time, and conserve precious reagents. As a direct result of the team’s efforts, 13,000 personnel on 21 ships were screened for COVID-19, allowing operational forces to deploy safely. The third team award went to The Epidemiology, Immunology, and Clinical Characteristics of Emerging Infectious Diseases with Pandemic Potential (EPICC) COVID19 Cohort Team, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland. USU’s Infectious Disease Clinical Research Program was the team lead. The EPICC team enrolled over 3,000 probable and confirmed cases of COVID-19 at 10 military hospitals and clinics, collecting data on the risk factors of severe COVID19, risk factors in congregate settings, and the impact of COVID-19 on performance and lost duty days among Active Duty subjects. They evaluated therapies and vaccines, characterized vaccine breakthrough infections and variants of concern, and examined “long COVID” cases—situations in which certain people who get COVID-19 are plagued with symptoms for months after being infected.

Increased COVID Restrictions on the Pentagon Reservation By DoD News Due to the increase in COVID-19 cases and positive test cases in the National Capital Region, the Pentagon Reservation will move to Health Protection Condition Bravo Plus (Bravo+) effective 5 a.m. EDT, Thursday, Sept. 9, 2021. Protecting our workforce while still performing our national security mission remains the Secretar y of Defense’s number one priority during the COVID19 pandemic. Supervisors will continue to provide maximum telework opportunities and flexible scheduling to optimize the workforce while defending our nation, taking care of our people, and ensuring success through teamwork. HPCON Bravo+ includes the following measures, among others: • Service members, federal employees, onsite contractor employees, and visitors, regardless of vaccination status, will wear a mask in indoor settings on the Pentagon Reservation; • Physical distancing remains at six feet for unvaccinated personnel; • DOD remains at maximum telework; • Organizations are expected to maintain occupancy rates at less than 40% of normal occupancy in workspaces; • Medically vulnerable personnel will continue to be permitted to self-declare their condition and pursue telework, when possible, with supervisors taking precautions to limit their exposure while in the workplace; • Use of the Pentagon Athletic Center remains by reservation only and will

Properly wearing a mask helps prevent the spread of COVID-19 ( Staff Sgt. Anthony Agosti).

continue its current maximum user and staff population of 255 per 2 ½ hour session; 21 maximum occupancy at Mark Center Gym and 15 at Taylor/ Polk Building Gym per 2 ½ hour session; masking will be required regardless of vaccination status; • Random COVID-19 entrance screening of the workforce will continue at 10-20% levels, with 100% screening of visitors; • The Pentagon Reservation will remain closed to the public for tours, and the Pentagon National 9/11 Memorial will also remain closed with the exception of pre-approved 9/11 activities; • Gatherings on the Pentagon Reservation are limited to fewer than 25 persons and by six-foot distancing requirements,

with masks required for indoor ceremonies regardless of vaccination status, including internal gatherings, meetings in conference centers, and gatherings for ceremonies; • Current COVID-19 approved open parking permits will be extended through September 30, 2021; and • Food court and concession options remain available with no options for indoor seating. DOD remains committed to protecting our people, maintaining mission readiness, and supporting the whole-of-government effort response to COVID-19. COVID19 vaccinations remain available through DiLorenzo Tricare Health Clinic including in support of the Secretary of Defense

mandatory vaccinations for military Service members. Testing for those fully vaccinated who are exposed by close personal contact to a positive COVID-19 case, or who are symptomatic and believe they might have COVID, remain available at the DiLorenzo Tricare Health Clinic. You can see the guidance memo from the Director of Administration & Management here. For more information on the Pentagon Reservation response to COVID-19, visit https://www.whs.mil/Coronavirus/ We encourage all DOD personnel to visit https://www.defense.gov/Explore/Spotlight/Coronavirus for information on staying healthy during the pandemic.


6 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 3 | Thursday, September 16, 2021

Estate Sales Estate Sales

Announcements

ESTATE SALE SUFFOLK 815 Dumville Avenue Sat 9/18 9-2 PM Sun 9/19 11-3 PM www.featherednestsales.com

PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT As of August 20, 2021,the Declaration of 1779 Naturalization Act has been recorded and witness by the State Recorder within The American State Assembly in Virginia State, that Kimberly Aileen Geib has come home to the land and soil.

Early home delivery.

757-446-9000 or PilotOnline.com Early home delivery. 757-446-9000 or PilotOnline.com

Dogs, Cats, Other Pets

Dogs, Cats, Other Pets

BLUE PITBULL UKC Pups - rdy to go! Purple ribbon, All males. Shots & dewormed. Papers in Hand $500 Call Billy: 757-749-3515 or Text: 757-695-2060

MULTIGENERATIONAL LABRADOODLES

CAVALIER KING CHARLES SPANIELS $911 Special. 2 males 16 wks, 1 male 1 female 10 wks, all shots, dewormed & vet checked. Norfolk. 509-508-9184 FRENCH BULLDOG PUPPIES

AKC GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPPIES Whelped 08/26/21 $900 Will come w/ 1st shot and weekly deworming Thomas (252) 337-5981

GOLDEN RETRIEVER Pure Bred Puppies $900 8wks Ready To Go 434-324-7506 Early home delivery. 757-446-9000 or PilotOnline.com

VIRGINIA BEACH Furnished Rm, WA/DR, Cable, Wifi, Drug & Alcohol Free, Non-Smoking. Proof Of Income Reqd. $685mo. Ready Oct 1st Call: 757-473-5611

Mult gen labradoodles, Family raised, Vet checked registered! Vaccinated and dewormed. Health guarantee included. M & F chocolate & red $1,600 Call or text. 9103036932 www.doodlemageddon.com

Room For Rent VIRGINIA BEACH Priv entr, BA & kitch. $895 incl all util & cable, lg unit. Pet Ok. 757-717-0129

Subscribe to The Virginian-Pilot today. Call 757-446-9000 or go to PilotOnline.com

PORTSMOUTH Room For Rent $150/wk, $650/month. Call: 757-228-8405

AIR DUCT CLEANING UNIVERSAL DUCT CLEANING FREE INSPECTIONS MEMBER BBB. 757-502-0200

PEST/TERMITE CONTROL Universal Pest & Termite. FREE INSPECTIONS. 757-502-0200. (Mention This Ad and Get $25 Off)

Motorcycles and ATVs 1991 HARLEY DAVIDSON Soft Tail Custom. Motor 81.6 CI, Model FXSTC. 73,211 original miles. We did a very extensive restoration by Leonard at Hampton Roads Harley Davidson in 2007. Lost interest in riding, stored in climate controlled garage, lots of spare parts. Must see show bike! $10,500 Serious Inquires Only. Contact: 757-373-3332

Autos for Sale

BMW 2018 X5

Prestine,fully loaded heated seats/ steering 28kmiles 4wd head up display, panoramaglass roof,full warranty til sep-2022,premium pkg/dealer maint garaged $42K 7572735844

Travel/Camping Trailers

Full AKC. She has the classically perfect with kids and other animal. email: hwhitney34@yahoo.com $1800

Dogs, Cats, Other Pets

Room For Rent

CADILLAC 2018 XTS

CONSIGNMENTS WANTED! Let us clean, sell, & finance your RV. Snyders RV 499-8000.

Early home delivery.

757-446-9000 or PilotOnline.com

XTS. AWD. Ordered Sold By Bank Trust Dept. To Settle Estate of Local Attorney Info: Kenny Keeter 757-718-2464

757.622.1455 | placeanad.pilotonline.com Hauling (A) FAMILY TRASH MAN-HOUSEHOLD, Demo inside & out, construction sites, dumpster drop off, backhoe work. We haul it all! 20 yrs. exp., lic & ins. 485-1414 B & J MOVING Reasonable Rates, Licensed & Insured. bandjmoving.com 757-576-1290

Concrete/Asphalt Estate Sales CONCRETE & MASONRY WORK Landscaping, Grading, Top Soil, Yard Clean Up & Tree Removal. 757-714-4848

Home Improvements ADDITIONS, SUNROOMS, ROOFS, Decks, more. Member BBB. 757-986-3777. www.builderscorporation.com

ALL HOME IMPROVEMENTS Custom Home Repairs & Renovations. Patrick Ellis Ent. Inc. Lic. & Ins. BBB A+ 757-635-6609 BEST PRICE EXTERIORS 757-639-4692 Siding, Windows, Trim, Roofing. FREE ESTIMATES! Lic. & Ins’d. Lowest Prices & Top Quality Work. No Repairs. BBB A+ Rating FRANK’S SIDING & REPAIRS Repairing Siding & Trim. Small jobs. Lic/Ins. Low Prices. BBB A+ RATING 757-227-8964

YOUR PERFECT

JOB

IS WAITING

Lawn and Tree Service AMERICANTREESERVICE.CO ★Catering to all your tree & yard needs.★ ★757-587-9568. 30 years experience★ LEAF RAKING AND CLEANUP Grass cutting, Weed Control, Mulching & Trimming, Planting. 25 yrs exp. 918-4152

Subscribe to The Virginian-Pilot today. Call 757-446-9000 or go to PilotOnline.com

PARKER TREE SERVICES Mulch, trim shrubs, landscaping. Free Estimates. 757-620-9390 YARD CLEAN UP - GRASS CUTTING, WOOD FENCE REPAIR & BUSHES Weed Eating, Blowing, Reasonable prices. Call 757-477-2158

Painting/Paperhanging

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING Wallpapering, Pressure Washing, Carpentry, Plumbing & Renov! Free est! Paint & Wallpaper By Bob: 757-714-4573

Power Washing SOUTH SIDE PRESSURE WASHING Pressure wash exterior surfaces. For free estimate call 757-337-9991.

Roofing CALVIN’S ROOFING REPAIR LLC Specializes in roofing repair, also guttering, Free estimates, roofing of all types, reasonable prices, Shingles, metal, slate, rubber. Over 30 yrs-business, BBB 757-377-2933

Early home delivery. 757-446-9000 or PilotOnline.com

Stop wasting time searching for jobs. Find the right jobs with tribune publishing recruitment services. We work hard to make your job search easy. With our expansive network of distinguished employers from coast to coast and advanced job matching technology, you’ll find opportunities that match your skills, your personality and your life.

Search jobs. Post your resume. Stand out from the crowd.

jobs.pilotonline.com


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 3 | Thursday, September 16, 2021 7 Autos for Sale

Trucks and SUVs

INFINITI 2008 G35

LEXUS 2005 GX 470

155k miles, good condition, runs well, turbo, black. $4,800. 757-515-0579

KIA 2007 RIO5

Automatic, 160K mi., runs great - well maintained! Cold AC. $4000 OBO Call or Text: (757) 635-3963

LINCOLN 2009 TOWN CAR

Signature. 65K orig. mis., gar. kept, new Michelin tires, fully loaded, Limited Pkg., new insp. Showroom new. $12,500. 757-675-0288. Va. Dlr.

SUBARU 2020 OUTBACK

Touring Pkg, 15K original mis., 1 owner, AWD, factory warranty, leather, nav, sunroof, showroom new. $41,500. 757-620-7570. Va. Dlr.

Classic, Antique Cars We will purchase your collectible, classic, late model autos, we will come to you. Call 757-675-0288.

VOLKSWAGEN 1979 SUPER BEETLE

Excellent Condition. $11,095. 757-615-5612

TOYOTA 2017 TACOMA

Crew Cab, 4WD, TRD off-road. Over $5000 in upgrades. 1 Owner. Runs & looks great. All serviced, new insp, $36,900. 757-620-7570. Va. Dlr.

Wanted Automotive ABSOLUTELY ABLY ACQUIRING AUTOS All Makes & Models, Best Price Paid!! FREE TOWING. 757-749-8035 AUTOS ACCEPTED-ANY YEAR Make or Model. Top Dollar, Fast, Free Towing. 757-737-2465, 252-232-9192

Boats & Watercraft GLEN L10 SAILBOAT 1985 Wooden. Sailed for 1yr - stored inside garage since $200obo 757-419-0177

Immaculate VW Convertible, White Exterior&Interior, Fuel Injected, Detailed Engine. $17,500 757-319-2109

Trucks and SUVs

CHEVROLET 1999 PICKUP

8ft Bed Liner, Dependable, Runs Good, $2150. Call: 757-366-9683

FORD 2019 ESCAPE

SEL. Only 9,300 mi! 6 spd auto, pristine, ruby red, $26K. Current inspection. Warranty - 10/22 757-291-7005

LEXUS 2019 RX 350L

26K orig. mis., factory warranty, 3rd row seat, fully loaded, 1 owner, all serviced/inspected, showroom new. $48,500. 757-620-7570. Va dlr

USED TRAILER SALE!!! OVER 100 Avail. For Boats 12’-38’ BUDGET BOATS: (757) 543 -7595

Good news. Early home delivery. 757-446-9000 PilotOnline.com

Subscribe to The Virginian-Pilot today.

Creating your own ad in this publication is easy, affordable and will reach thousands in print and online. Advertising categories include:

• Announcements & celebrations • Merchandise & cars for sale • Job recruitment • Honoring a life • Pets for adoption And more

Place your ad today!

PlaceAnAd.tribpub.com

Call 757-446-9000 or go to PilotOnline.com

Fun & Games

Sudoku

CryptoQuip

Last week’s CryptoQuip answer

Supposing a cattle rustler broke into a ranch, what would he probably be doing? Taking stock.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

Religious Services For your installation’s religious service times visit www.flagshipnews.com⁄ base_information⁄ religious_services


8 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 3 | Thursday, September 16, 2021

Profile for Military News

Flagship 09.16.2021  

Flagship 09.16.2021  

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