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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, July 1, 2021 1

IN THIS ISSUE Legalized marijuana

Know the facts! Despite Virginia legalizing the use of recreational marijuana, marijuana use or possession by uniformed service members is still illegal under federal law. PAGE A3 VOL. 27, NO. 26, Norfolk, VA | flagshipnews.com

July 1-July 7, 2021

Naval Station Norfolk celebrates Pride Month

By RS3 Emily Kelley

Naval Station Norfolk Public Affairs

NORFOLK — On Thursday, June 24, Naval Station (NAVSTA) Norfolk celebrated LGBTQIA (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer (or Questioning), Intersex, and Asexual (or Allies)) Pride Month at the Crew Galley. The celebration began with opening remarks from Culinary Specialist 1st Class Phillip Harrison Jr. who serves as the Diversity Committee president. During the ceremony, attendants were taught the struggles and great strides that the LGBTQIA community has endured within the military. “To me, it is a celebration of being who you want to be, no matter what ethnicity, gender or sexual preference you prefer,” said Harrison. During the ceremony, Harrison Jr. spoke about his own experience as a gay service member in the Navy and how the military has evolved to support the LGBTQIA community. In 1993, President Bill Clinton signed the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy into law. The law represents a compromise between those who wanted to end the ban on the LGBT community serving, and those who felt having openly gay troops would cause problems. Under the policy military personnel were not allowed to harass or discriminate closeted service members they believed to be gay. On Dec. 22, 2010, President Barack Obama signed into law a repeal to the ban on gay men and women serving openly in the military. Since this repeal, many service members have been able to be their true, authentic selves while serving in the United States military without repercussions due to their sexual orientation. “Learning the history and background of the LGBTQIA community and being accepting is the best

Naval Station Norfolk Diversity Committee member Interior Communications Electrician 3rd Class Christine Craft speaks about the history of service members who were wrongfully discharged from the military based on their sexuality. (DC2 ASHLEY N PIERSON)

way to help spread awareness and acceptance to the community,” said Chief Warrant Officer 3, Nicole Campbell, Naval Station Norfolk’s food service officer. During NAVSTA Norfolk’s

LGBTQIA Pride Month 2021 observance, speakers talked about important military members in history who fought for their rights to be gay in the military and blazed the trail for today’s service

National Safety Month: Staying safe 24/7 By Jason Scarborough

Norfolk Naval Shipyard Public Affairs

PORTSMOUTH — The importance of safety does not lessen once you leave work. In fact, it is important Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY) personnel follow safety practices at home and at work to keep themselves and their families safe 24/7. In 1996, the National Safety Council (NSC) established June as National Safety Month (NSM), aiming to increase awareness of current safety and health risks and decrease the number of unintentional injuries and deaths in the United States. According to NSC, three times as many employees are injured off the job than while at work. “Enjoy your summer but remember it only takes a second for an injury to happen, so keep your focus no matter what you are doing. We all get distracted when doing the normal activities of life such as driving the car, chopping up vegetables for dinner, cooking steaks on the grill, or mowing the yard. So just like at work, prepare for the task at hand, identify any hazards, remove/reduce the hazard and keep you and your family safe! You are an important part of NNSY, we want you to be safe not just at work but also at home,“ said NNSY’s Occupational Safety & Health Division Head Jeff

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Martin Trzcinski, Code 970, Preservation Mechanic, dresses out in the required personal protective equipment (PPE) to operate the Critical Coat Blast Booth in Shop 71. (JASON SCARBOROUGH)

Medrano. Each week throughout NSM is an opportunity to make a difference in your home, workplace, and community. During NSM, individuals and organizations can participate by making efforts to reduce the leading causes of unintentional injury and death at work, on the road, in homes and in communities. “Safety and preparedness go hand in hand. It’s a mindset that you must exercise every day.

Be safe, stay safe, live safe! Your Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY) family has a plan, make sure that you and your home family have a plan to stay safe,” said NNSY’s Emergency Management Officer Steve Murley. There are various ways to get involved during NSM, such as, reporting repairs needed around the shipyard, holding drills at home to help children know what Turn to Safety, Page 7

members. “We want to express our beauty to everyone and we just want that same beauty expressed to us in return,” said Harrison Jr. For more information on mili-

tary LGBTQIA history and policies, visit: ht t p s : / / w w w. m i l it a r y on e source.mil/military-life-cycle/ friends-extended-family/lgbtqin-the-military/

USS George Washington changes command By MCSN Jack Lepien

USS George Washington Public Affairs

NEWPORT NEWS — Capt. Brent Gaut relieved Capt. Kenneth Strong as commanding officer of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73) during a change of command ceremony, June 24. Strong became the 14th commanding officer of George Washington September 5, 2019, and served as a faithful steward through two years of refueling complex overhaul (RCOH). “This is a warship, and our job is to build a combat-ready ship and a combat-ready crew,” said Strong. “There is a lot of sacrifice, there is a lot of pain, we all took a lot of risk, and we worked in a difficult environment; we still do. But we got it done together.” Under his command, George Washington departed the dry dock, restored vital systems such as shore steam, potable water, and air conditioning, and saw the arrival of the first Sailors to live aboard in five years. He also served as the executive officer aboard George Washington from 2014 to 2016, and then as commanding officer of the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock USS New Orleans (LPD 18) from 2017 to 2019. Strong, a native of Seattle, graduated from Johns Hopkins University in 1989. He earned a commission through Aviation Officer Candidate School in 1992 and was designated a naval aviator in 1994. He served as a

Surface Line Week

Award

Surface Line Week 2021 came to a close after several days of spirited competition between different sea- and shore-based commands, June 25. PAGE A4

The Department of Defense announced Naval Supply Systems Command Weapon Systems Support as the winner of the 2021 Secretary of Defense Environmental Award in the Sustainability Individual/Team category. PAGE A7

pilot with several squadrons, including Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 51 and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 47, and as commanding officer of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 77, during which time the squadron received the 2010 and 2011 Battle “E” Efficiency Awards, the 2011 Secretary of the Navy Safety Award, the Secretary of Defense Phoenix Award, and the Arnold J. Isbell ASW Excellence Award. Gaut, born in Stockton, California, graduated from the United States Naval Academy with a Bachelor of Science degree in English in 1994. He received his commission upon graduation and was designated a naval aviator in September 1996. “Attitude and sheer force of will may be the difference between success and failure,” said Gaut. “We are United States Navy Sailors, and we will prepare, in everything that we do, to take her to sea, and into harm’s way, if our nation calls for it.” Over his 27-year career, he completed deployments aboard the Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruiser USS Vincennes (CG 49), the Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate USS Vandegraft (FFG 48), the Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruiser USS Cowpens (CG 63), the Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG 53), the Tarawa-class amphibious assault ship USS Belleau Woods (LHA 3), the Turn to USS George Washington, Page 7

Naval Service Training Rear Adm. Jennifer Couture, Commander, Naval Service Training Command) met with midshipmen aboard the Damage Control Wet Trainer during Sea Trials at Officer Training Command Newport (OTCN) PAGE A5

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The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, July 1, 2021

The USS Pasadena (SSN 752) project team’s commitment to“get real, get better”through several improvement initiatives directly contributed to undocking June 26 at Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY). (DANIEL DEANGELIS)

Norfolk Naval Shipyard’s improvements key to undocking USS Pasadena By Michael D Brayshaw

Norfolk Naval Shipyard Public Affairs

PORTSMOUTH — The USS Pasadena (SSN 752) project team’s commitment to “get real, get better” through several improvement initiatives directly contributed to undocking June 26 at Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY). The Los Angeles-class submarine has been at NNSY since September 2020 for a Drydocking Selected Restricted Availability (DSRA) to replace, repair and overhaul components throughout the boat, as the shipyard’s first DSRA in a decade. This overhaul has been garnering attention from Navy leadership as NNSY’s pilot project leveraging Naval Sustainment System—Shipyards (NSS-SY) practices. The NSS-SY initiative is underway at all four public shipyards, leveraging industry and government best practices on shipyard processes to drive quick and visible improvements in conducting maintenance. These improvements helped Pasadena meet its revised undocking milestone. Initia-

tives included the establishment of an Operations Control Center to facilitate project team communications and a “start of shift” focus to gain efficiency in daily work execution. Additionally, shipyard production shops have implemented “crew boards” to track jobs supporting the boat’s overhaul. While Pasadena did not meet its original undocking date, these improvements have assisted the project team. Issues with resourcing and work performance contributed to the delay in undocking, but lessons learned from these occurrences allowed the project team to hold the revised undocking date, and will be implemented in future projects. “Achieving undocking is a great step in returning Pasadena to the Fleet to meet its significant operational commitment for our Navy and Nation,” said Shipyard Commander Captain Dianna Wolfson. “As part of our drive to ‘get real, get better’ we have implemented a number of improvements on Pasadena in recent months that will substantially help us get better as we strive to deliver ships on time, every time. We have welcomed these learn-

ing opportunities with arms wide open as it will only make us stronger and more predictable. And we have learned that it’s okay to be uncomfortable—that’s where our real growth lies. I am so proud of our project team, and everyone in America’s Shipyard who supported them, for their grit and determination to get us to this milestone.” In recent months, Navy leaders such as Acting Secretary of the Navy Thomas Harker have visited NNSY and met with the Pasadena team to pledge their support and discuss the drive to “get real, get better,” encouraging shipyarders to candidly discuss any constraints so they can be resolved. “As you identify problems and barriers to success in your work, there are people across the enterprise asking how they can remove those problems now and for the future,” Harker told the project team. “We’re looking across naval leadership at the things we can put in place to knock down those barriers.” Some of the barriers being knocked down on Pasadena have addressed communication challenges and driving to stay focused on shortterm goals. Wolfson said “help chain” cards have

been distributed to project mechanics, supervisors and zone managers, so team members know where to get assistance as needed, coupled with increased deckplate engagement coaching personnel on processes and expectations to ensure understanding and compliance. “Undocking is a key point in our availability as it signifies that the major work is complete and focus for the ship can shift from repairing to training,” said Pasadena Project Superintendent Frank Williams. “Sailors are meant to be at sea and not in a repair environment and it is our job to get them back there. In order to reduce the impact to our completion date, due to the shift in undocking, our project team has shortened the time after undocking and pulled work into the docking period that typically occurs after.” Each of the public shipyards is piloting NSS-SY initiatives on a submarine undergoing availability, known as the “North Star.” Along with Pasadena at NNSY, they are USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility; USS Virginia (SSN 774) at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Maine; and USS Mississippi (SSN 782) at Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard in Hawaii. “As the ‘North Star’ of the shipyard with respect to improvement initiatives, our project is driving each and every day to do better, pull schedule left, and deliver the ship back to the fleet,” said Deputy Project Superintendent Lt. Cdr. Tim Olson.

Connecticut governor declares June 25 Naval Submarine Medical Research Laboratory Day From Naval Medical Research Center Public Affairs GROTON, Conn. — Governor Ned Lamont has officially proclaimed June 25, 2021 as Naval Submarine Medical Research Laboratory Day in the State of Connecticut. The date marks the 75th anniversary of the laboratory as a command under the Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (BUMED). The proclamation, delivered to NSMRL on June 10, recognizes the Naval Submarine Medical Research Laboratory’s (NSMRL) history as “the Medical Research Section of the Naval Submarine Base New London Dispensary, ultimately becoming a distinct command as the Medical Research Laboratory, under the management of the Navy’s Bureau of Medicine and Surgery in June 1946,” and acknowledges the dedication of NSMRL’s staff of experts and the notable accomplishments gained as well as the overall contribution in ensuring the continuing superiority of the Nation’s undersea warriors and Submarine force. Capt. Katharine Shobe, NSMRL’s commanding officer, thanked Governor Lamont for issuing the proclamation. “We are proud to serve the United States Navy, the submarine force and diving communities, and the state of Connecticut through our health and performance research that promotes the readiness and superiority of our nation’s undersea warriors.” NSMRL is commemorating its 75th anniversary with a ceremony at the Submarine Force Library and Museum on June 30, 2021 at 10:30

am. The ceremony will be attended by distinguished guests including the U.S. Navy Surgeon General and Chief, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, Rear Adm. Bruce Gillingham and other senior military commanders. NSMRL is also unveiling a limited-time display at the museum that highlights the lab’s history and significant contributions to science throughout its three quarters of a century existence. “This ceremony gives us an opportunity to recognize the lab’s accomplishments over the years and celebrate all the hard work our staff does. We’re a relatively small command, not everyone even knows we exist,” said Capt. Marcus Larkin, an industrial hygienist with NSMRL and organizer of the event. “With a celebration like this, we can showcase the very important research we do here. We’re especially thrilled to be hosting the Surgeon General, along with Rear Adm. Tim Weber and Capt. William Deniston, and to welcome back so many of NSMRL’s previous commanding officers and staff,” added Larkin. NSMRL delivers evidence-based solutions that enhance undersea warfighter health and performance. The laboratory ensures the superiority of submariners and divers by conducting research in nine core areas: undersea warfighter health and performance, submariner psychological fitness and resiliency, human systems integration, submarine atmospheric monitoring, bio-effects of underwater sound and blast, hearing conservation, diving and hyperbaric research, disabled submarine survival, escape, and rescue, and undersea health epidemiology.

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The official proclamation from Governor Ned Lamont proclaiming June 25, 2021 as Naval Submarine Medical Research Laboratory (NSMRL) Day in the State of Connecticut. (ERICA CASPER)

Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic (CNRMA): Rear Adm Charles W.“Chip”Rock Regional program manager for Navy Region Mid-Atlantic (NRMA): Public Affairs Director | Beth Baker The Flagship® is published by Flagship, Inc., a private firm in no way connected with the Department of Defense (DOD) or the United States Navy, under exclusive written contract with Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic. This civilian enterprise newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the military services. Contents of the paper, including advertisements, are not necessarily the official views of, nor endorsed by, the U.S. Government, DOD, or the Department of the Navy (DON). The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts and supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the DOD; DON; Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic or Flagship, Inc. of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase,use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user, or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. Editorial content is edited, prepared and provided by the Public Affairs Department of Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic. Stories may be submitted via email to news@flagshipnews.com. The Flagship® is published every Thursday by Flagship, Inc., whose mailing address is located at PO Box 282501, Norfolk, Va. 23510. © 2021Flagship, Inc. All rights reserved


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, July 1, 2021 3

(COURTESY GRAPHIC)

Virginia has legalized marijuana – What does this mean for you?

From Navy Region Mid-Atlantic Public Affairs

NORFOLK — It is important for military members and federal employees to be aware of the fact that despite Virginia legislators passing a law approving the use of recreational marijuana effective July 1, marijuana use or possession by uniformed service members is still illegal under federal law. “In or out of uniform, if the military is your

job, the UCMJ applies 24/7, and as long as marijuana remains on the federal schedule of controlled substances, possession or use will be a prosecutable (or more often separable) offense,” said Lt. Sharon Uti, Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek Fort Story staff judge advocate. It is also illegal for federal employees who hold certain testing designated positions to use marijuana as well. Those positions include firefighters and air traffic controllers, to name a few.

When Virginia’s law passes, in the Hampton Roads region alone there will be more than 415,000 federal jobs located in jurisdictions where recreational pot use is permitted. Past marijuana use is not necessarily a barrier to federal employment, according to a Feb. 25 memo from Kathleen McGettigan, the acting director of the Office of Personnel Management, but current or ongoing use is another matter. “Heads of agencies are expected to continue

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advising their workforce that legislative changes by some states and the District of Columbia do not alter federal law or executive branch policies regarding a drug-free workplace,” McGettigan wrote. “An individual’s disregard of federal law pertaining to marijuana while employed by the federal government remains relevant and may lead to disciplinary action.” On Hampton Roads Installations there have been approximately 90 narcotics violations over the past five years. At every installation, military working dogs and personnel will continue to conduct sweeps to prevent unauthorized drugs and contraband from getting on military installations. “Each individual who works for the DoD, service member or civilian, needs to educate themselves on the policies regarding marijuana,” said Navy Region Mid-Atlantic Command Master Chief Asa Worcester. “If you choose to use marijuana, understand that you may find yourself faced with an administrative action that could ultimately lead to loss of employment and saying, ‘I didn’t know’ probably won’t help you.”


4 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, July 1, 2021

Rear Adm. Brendan McLane, the commander of Naval Surface Force Atlantic (SURFLANT), judges a cake from the Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Oscar Austin (DDG 79) during the final event of SURFLANT Surface Line Week (SLW). (MC2 JACOB MILHAM)

Surface Line Week 2021 concludes By MC2 Jacob Milham

Naval Surface Force Atlantic Public Affairs

NORFOLK — Surface Line Week 2021 came to a close after several days of spirited competition between different sea- and shorebased commands, June 25. An annual competition hosted by Naval Surface Force Atlantic (SURFLANT) for all subordinate SURFLANT commands, Surface Line Week (SLW) sees Hampton Roads-based service members from the Navy and Marine Corps unite to participate in camaraderie-building events and contests. There was no SLW 2020 due to COVID-19. “This year it was especially important to get back to normal and to show that we came through COVID-19, it was a rough year, and

it was good to be able to do something normal and something we’ve done in the past,” said Lt. Cmdr. Gregory DeJute, project manager for this year’s event. He pointed out how SLW often ends up being a reunion for old friends, as participants get to “run into old shipmates [they] haven’t seen in years.” The theme of this year’s SLW was “hard work breeds self-sufficiency,” chosen by Rear Adm. Brendan McLane, commander of SURFLANT, and the competition allowed Sailors and Marines to display their seamanship, and technical and warfighting proficiency. Competitions held throughout the week emphasized the discipline, professionalism, and culture of excellence expected of a combat-ready surface unit. Despite the

absence of team sports as a COVID-19 precaution, several events were added to highlight the theme of a strong, independent and self-sustaining surface force. A newly designed welding competition had ships create unique emblems representing their commands. In another competition, different information technology teams had to troubleshoot a fault on a circuit card and turn it in to Mid-Atlantic Regional Maintenance Center (MARMC) for scoring. In a machining category, ships were given a blueprint of a nut to make and had to demonstrate their best work. Finally, in a Planned Maintenance System (PMS) competition, commands submitted videos demonstrating the right way to perform various kinds of

planned maintenance. The PMS videos can also be used as instructional tools by other commands in the future. “Given the Navy ethos and the competitive profession that we’re in, Surface Line Week provides an outlet for this through a fun and friendly event, showcasing each command’s individual spirit and capability,” concluded DeJute. This year’s Surface Line Week winners include Pre-Commissioning Unit Fort Lauderdale (LPD 28) (small command), USS Whidbey Island (LSD 41) (medium command) and USS Wasp (LHD 1) (large command). SURFLANT mans, trains and equips assigned surface forces and shore activities, ensuring a capable force for conducting prompt and sustained operations in support of United States national interests. The SURFLANT force is composed of 77 ships, 14 pre-commissioning units, and 33 shore commands.

Kearsarge celebrates LGBT Pride Month By MC2 Jacob Richardson

USS Kearsarge (LHD 3) Public Affairs

NORFOLK The diversity committee and its supporting Sailors aboard the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3) joined the nation to celebrate Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Pride Month on June 24, 2021. This year marks the eighth official observance of LGBT Pride Month throughout the DoD, and the 11-year anniversary since the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” Repeal Act became law allowing LGBT service members to serve openly in the military. One of the guest speakers at the event, Master Chief Aviation Maintenance Administrationman Courtney Barber, shared her personal experiences throughout her career and challenged those present to take care of and support each other equally. “There are so many LGBT individuals who feel that they have nowhere to turn,” said Barber. “They are afraid to be who they are because of how some may hate. Every one of you are leaders, so be the leader that you needed when you were just starting out in your career. Be the leader you want your children to have if they needed somebody to talk to.” Pride Month gives Americans the opportunity to come together in support of the LGBT community and acknowledge their contribu-

tions to our nation. “I truly appreciate the time and effort you put into defending our country every day,” said Capt. Neil Koprowski, Kearsarge’s commanding officer, as he addressed the crew during the ship’s Pride observance. “You do it with honor, courage, and commitment. We are one team.” The one team, one fight mantra is more than words aboard Kearsarge, which is committed to the fair and equal treatment of all people. Diversity events help the command of over 1,000 Sailors and Marines learn about each other’s culture, background, and heritage. That understanding fosters acceptance and appreciation for one another and makes Team Kearsarge stronger. Retail Services Specialist 3rd Class Corey Gambirazio, the command diversity committee president, provided closing sentiments that captured the essence of Pride Month. “At the end of the day, we all work together to complete our mission,” said Gambirazio. “I want everyone here to live their life how they want and to let others live their life how they want, with love, compassion, patience, tolerance, humility, and forgiveness.” LGBT History Month was originally established in 1995 by the General Assembly of the National Education Association. June 2021 marks the 51st anniversary of annual LGBT Pride traditions in America set by the first Pride march in New York City on June 28, 1970.

Chief Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) Korinne Reese delivers remarks during the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Pride Month event aboard the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3). (MCSN GWYNETH VANDEVENDER)

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, July 1, 2021 5

Rear Adm. Jennifer S. Couture, commanding officer of Naval Service Training Command, observes NROTC midshipmen bracing for shock at the wet trainer at Officer Training Command Newport (OTCN), Rhode Island. (DARWIN LAM)

Naval Service Training commander meets with NROTC midshipmen during Sea Trials From Officer Training Command Newport Public Affairs NEWPORT, R.I. — Rear Adm. Jennifer Couture, Commander, Naval Service Training Command (NSTC) met with midshipmen aboard the Damage Control Wet Trainer, also known as the “USS Buttercup” wet trainer, during Sea Trials at Officer Training

Command Newport (OTCN), June 24. She encouraged them to “keep learning” and that their takeaway from their experience was that “you’re fit to fight and ready to do great things for your Navy.” Sea Trials is a 10-day milestone event where NROTC rising second class midshipmen (MIDN) must properly demonstrate the skills they have learned and practiced

throughout their training. The skills tested include marksmanship fundamentals, watchstanding, damage control (firefighting and wet trainers), ship handling, drill, navigation, physical training, second-class swim qualification, conning officer training, and room and uniform inspections. MIDN also receive Warrior Toughness training. Sea Trials provides NROTC MIDN with a standardized

training, leadership and qualification opportunity in a high-stress and demanding environment. The program environment provides real-world opportunities for sustained, large group leadership and teamwork. Midshipmen are evaluated based on their ability to perform each critical skill to fleet standards, while upholding Navy core values and Navy core attributes. Sea Trials culminates with Battle Stations, a high-stress crucible event similar to Battle Stations events at the Navy’s Recruit Training Command and Officer Candidate School. “NROTC Sea Trials is an important milestone event in a midshipman’s process of becoming a proven leader, confident and qualified to lead Sailors as future junior officers,” said Couture. Couture added that Sea Trials allows NROTC midshipmen to “prove they have the confidence, competence and character needed to lead.”

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6 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, July 1, 2021

The Surface Maintenance Operations Center (S-MOC) opens in the SURFLANT’s headquarters on board Naval Station Norfolk. (MC2 JACOB MILHAM)

SURFLANT stands up collaborative maintenance operations accelerator By MC2 Jacob Milham

Naval Surface Force Atlantic Public Affairs

NORFOLK — In order to significantly accelerate pre-deployment material readiness, Naval Surface Force Atlantic (SURFLANT) recently stood up the Surface Maintenance Operations Center (S-MOC) in the command’s headquarters onboard Naval Station Norfolk. Rear Adm. Brendan McLane, commander, Naval Surface Force Atlantic (CNSL), and interim S-MOC Director, Cmdr. Jiwan Mack, cut a ribbon to open the organization they expect will become a powerful engine to quickly get results. Its intent will be to hasten communications, prompt key collaborations and eliminate barriers to enable rapid maintenance and material resolution. “With the opening of this new facility, the SURFLANT-led, cross-organizational S-MOC team will be empowered and expected to rapidly collaborate with the SEA 21 (Director for Surface Ship Maintenance and Modernization) war room and NAVSUP (Naval Supply Systems Command) to optimize readiness,” said

McLane. “This will lead to rapid problem solving using a team-based approach along with a database of recurring sustainment and readiness issues to swiftly get the ship — and the ship’s team — fit for the fight.” Buoyed by improved data-sharing processes and shared prioritization, this revised approach to maintenance and readiness begins immediately with a dynamic, six-member team focused on casualty report (CASREP) burn down. Quick to follow in the phased approach will be the addition of additional team members and a keen, collaborative focus on the deployment readiness of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group and the Kearsarge Amphibious Readiness Group. At full operational capability, or FOC, the S-MOC will drive material readiness from the start of the Basic Phase through the Sustainment Phase of the Navy’s Optimized Fleet Response Plan, keeping a keen focus on pre-deployers and Task Group Greyhound assets. S-MOC will also monitor the material readiness of deployed assets, standing ready to support numbered fleet commanders as needed.

“The COMNAVSURFLANT S-MOC is a game changer and NAVSEA, to include our sustainment program offices and PEOs, are committed to partnering with Rear Admiral McLane and his team to improve both current and future ship readiness,” said Rear Adm. Eric Ver Hage, Commander, Navy Regional Maintenance Center (CNRMC) and NAVSEA’s Director for Surface Ship Maintenance and Modernization (SEA 21). “In its first hours, the combined S-MOC team expeditiously coordinated action to restore combat systems capability to a deployed ship. Our Sailors, ships and supported operational commanders will be the direct beneficiaries of this increased Type Commander, NAVSEA, NAVSUP, and DLA collaboration.” NAVSEA is a committed partner in this effort and brings a wealth of expertise to the S-MOC via its Product Support Managers and Class Teams, embedded type commander representatives, In-Service Engineering Agents, and Ship Design Managers. The Common Operational Picture will

encourage decision-making at lower levels and communicate to external customers like the numbered fleet commanders. Additionally, the S-MOC team will build an impressive data bank to identify and track sustainment and readiness issues. The outcomes: increased material readiness leading up to deployment and an enhanced level of visibility and collaboration across the maintenance enterprise. The MOC concept has already proven successful within the Naval Aviation Enterprise (NAE). Created as a result of a 2018 Secretary of Defense memo addressing mission-capable (MC) rates of strike aircraft, the MOC initiative increased MC rates from 50 to 80 percent within just one year. “Aiming to drive CASREP numbers down by a factor of 25 percent below the most recent Carrier Strike Group and Amphibious Readiness Group deployers, initial success will be measured by the material readiness of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group and the Kearsarge Amphibious Readiness Group,” said Mack. “Ultimately, S-MOC will drive material readiness for all CNSL ships outside the Maintenance Phase.” SURFLANT mans, trains and equips assigned surface forces and shore activities, ensuring a capable force for conducting prompt and sustained operations in support of United States national interests. The SURFLANT force is composed of 77 ships, 14 pre-commissioning units, and 33 shore commands.

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, July 1, 2021 7

(COURTESY GRAPHIC)

NAVSUP WSS earned Secretary of Defense Environmental Award for sustainability By Matthew Jones

NAVSUP Weapon Systems Support Public Affairs

MECHANICSBURG, Pa. — The Department of Defense announced Naval Supply Systems Command Weapon Systems Support as the winner of the 2021 Secretary of Defense Environmental Award in the Sustainability Individual/Team category. NAVSUP Weapon Systems Support (NAVSUP WSS) formed a multifunctional team to develop the Navy’s Enterprise Wide Hazardous Materials Standardization and Minimization of General Use Consumables project and conducted pilots to demonstrate that U.S. Navy installations could increase the purchase of more environmentally friendly hazardous materials substitutions using new tools and procedures. The team consisted of representatives from Naval Facilities Engineering Systems Command (NAVFAC) Environmental, NAVFAC Safety, NAVFAC Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, Commander Navy Installation Command Safety, and NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Centers. The team received additional support from NAVSUP Business Systems Center who helped develop a Hazardous Material Management web tool to standardize HAZMAT data-management processes across the enterprise and provide NAVSUP customers with valuable access to Navy Enterprise Resource Planning data leveraging NAVSUP’s Navy Data Platform. Jeff Whitman, NAVSUP WSS Hazardous Materials and Pollution Prevention Department director, said the partnerships were crucial and everyone involved deserves credit for the award. “Without these partnerships, we simply wouldn’t have been able to pull this off,” said Whitman, who has served at NAVSUP WSS since 2008. “This represents years of effort coming together, so we’re proud to know we’re

making an impact across the Navy.” The project demonstrated a process that standardized procurement of consumable general use hazardous materials and tools that guided mission partners, supply personnel, safety, and environmental service providers in the selection of environmentally preferred products at shorebased facilities. The research and development project was funded by the Navy’s Environmental Sustainability Development to Integration program. NAVSUP WSS also created a new ordering process that uses the Weapon Systems Support Hazardous Material Management Tool to automatically approve the purchase of sustainable products from the Navywide Green Authorized Use List. One hundred percent of end-of-pilot survey respondents said that the new ordering system was more efficient than the normal ordering process. “Normally if a Sailor wanted to order a new cleaning item, they would have to go through an approval process, which could take anywhere from three days up to a month in some cases,” said Todd Heintzelman, NAVSUP WSS environmental protection specialist. “Creating this Green Authorized Use List with preapproved sustainable environmentally friendly products incentivizes Sailors to use products that are safer for their health and safer for the environment.” Ultimately, the team increased the number of Safer Choice products available for purchase by over 300 percent. They conducted market research and published a list of local vendors that carried Safer Choice items and created a quick-reference guide for Safer Choice cleaners. Safer Choice is an Environmental Protection Agency program to reduce, eliminate, or prevent pollution at its source by encouraging the use of safer ingredients in products. The EPA also awarded NAVSUP WSS its Safer Choice Partner of the Year honor for advancing the use of safer and more sustainable cleaning chem-

USS George Washington

Safety from Page 1

from Page 1

Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate USS McClusky (FFG 41), and the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). His service to our nation has merited him the Presidential Service Badge, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Legion of Merit, Meritorious Service Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal, the Battle “E” Ribbon, and various unit and campaign service awards. From May 2017 to December 18 he served as the executive officer of the aircraft carrier USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78). He most recently served as the commanding officer of the landing platform dock USS San Antonio (LPD 17). George Washington is undergoing RCOH at Newport News Shipyard. RCOH is a multi-year project performed only once during a carrier’s 50-year service life that includes refueling the ship’s two nuclear reactors, as well as significant repairs, upgrades and modernization.

icals. “Department of Defense policies demonstrate a preference for the use of environmentally safe products, but at the user level it’s not always easy to take those steps,” said Whitman. “Streamlining the process has made a big difference compared to past initiatives.” Additionally, Sailors may be concerned about the performance or effectiveness of the safer products compared to their more hazardous counterparts, but all Safer Choice products are tested against strict performance standards, Whitman said. “So we’ve made it simple: you know it performs, it’s safer for human health, it’s safer for the environment and it meets Department of Defense performance directives.” Thomas Bagnell, NAVSUP WSS Hazardous Materials and Pollution Prevention Afloat Division supervisor, said there may even be a cost savings associated with the use of certain products. “If you’re limiting hazardous materials from your supply chain, then you’re limiting the cost of disposal of many of those products,” he said. “While this particular initiative didn’t measure those costs, there’s definitely a win there as well.” Finally, the team’s Clean with Green community outreach program helped inform people about the benefits of purchasing Safer Choice cleaners over traditional cleaners. Pilot efforts reached upward of 34,000 personnel at Naval Air Station Oceana in Virginia and Naval Base Ventura County in California. Heintzelman said the men and women of the Navy deserve the most credit for voluntarily opting to order and use safer products. “These projects are designed to inform and streamline processes, but the results rest entirely on the choice of the Sailors,” Heintzelman said. “We’ve found that they are increasingly choosing to purchase sustainable products over other options.” To make the choice as simple as possible,

the team had also introduced a green leaf icon to display alongside Safer Choice products during the purchasing process within Navy’s web-based ordering application. They are considering the use of another logo to help flag products containing EPA’s “chemicals of concern.” Each year since 1962, the Secretary of Defense has honored installations, teams and individuals for outstanding achievements in Department of Defense environmental programs. These accomplishments include outstanding conservation activities, innovative environmental practices, and partnerships that improve quality of life and promote efficiencies without compromising the department’s mission success. A diverse panel of 47 experts representing government agencies, academia and the private sector evaluated nominees to select one winner for each of eight categories covering five subject areas: natural resources conservation, environmental quality, sustainability, environmental restoration and cultural resources management. The Sustainability Individual/Team award recognizes individuals or teams for their efforts to prevent or eliminate pollution at the source, including practices that increase efficiency and sustainability in the use of raw materials, energy, water, or other resources. The sustainability award also recognizes energy efficiency and renewable energy practices, greenhouse gas reduction efforts, procurement of sustainable goods and services, waste diversion, electronics stewardship, and efforts to plan for adaptation and resilience. Sustainable practices ensure that the department protects valuable resources that are critical to mission success. NAVSUP WSS is one of 11 commands under Commander, NAVSUP. Headquartered in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, NAVSUP employs a diverse, worldwide workforce of more than 22,500 military and civilian personnel. NAVSUP and the Navy Supply Corps conduct and enable supply chain, acquisition, operational logistics and Sailor & family care activities with our mission partners to generate readiness and sustain naval forces worldwide to prevent and decisively win wars.

(MCSN DAKOTA NACK)

to do in the event of an emergency, or volunteering to participate in community emergency preparedness events. “Identifying risks around the home, in the workplace and in the community improves safety standards and protects everyone. Whether we increase first aid and emergency awareness through drills or provide safety tips for summer recreation, we can take steps to provide a safer environment,” said Murley. Prior to the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) the U.S. saw the highest number of workplace deaths since 2007 — 5,333 fatal workplace injuries in 2019. As the nation and the NNSY workforce receive their COVID-19 vaccination and many employees return to normal, this year’s NSM observance is more important than ever and we can all make efforts to reduce the causes of unintentional injury, death at work, on the road, in our homes and in our communities.


8 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, July 1, 2021

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uarterdeck

www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 2 | Thursday, July 1, 2021 1

USS Laboon The USS Laboon conducted its regularly scheduled southbound international strait transit, concluding operations in the Black Sea. Page B4

The aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), guided-missile destroyer USS Dewey (DDG 105), and attack submarine USS Seawolf (SSN 21) sail in formation while aircraft from Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 323 and Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron (VMGR) 352 fly over the formation in the Hawaiian Islands operating area. (MC3 OLYMPIA MCCOY)

U.S. Navy, Marines, Coast Guard conduct joint operations From U.S. 3rd Fleet Public Affairs PACIFIC OCEAN — U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard units, led by Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), have been conducting integrated operations off the coast of Hawaii for the past two weeks. Units assigned to Carrier Strike Group 1, as well as Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 323, Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron (VMGR) 352, the fast-attack submarine USS Seawolf (SSN 21), and Coast

Guard Cutters Midgett (WMSL 757) and Oliver Berry (WPC 1124), participated in the joint endeavor in support of the Tri-Service Maritime Strategy. “Our integrated Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard team is the world’s finest maritime force,” said Vice Adm. Steve Koehler, the commander of U.S. 3rd Fleet. “Synchronizing our capabilities through combined operations sharpens our edge and reinforces our commitment to a stable and secure global maritime environment.” In addition to tri-service train-

ing, the strike group also completed carrier qualifications with embarked squadrons of Carrier Air Wing 2 and testing of ship’s self-defense systems. “Forward presence matters. Alongside our allies and partners, we are able to quickly respond, where and when needed,” said Rear Adm. Dan Martin, the commander of Carrier Strike Group 1. “By training today how we will respond tomorrow, we ensure we are capable of honoring the U.S.’s security commitments to allies, partners and friends.” Serving under tactical control of Destroyer Squadron 1, seven

guided-missile destroyers—USS O’Kane (DDF 77), USS Howard (DDG 83), USS Chafee (DDG 90), USS Kidd (DDG 100), USS Dewey (DDG 105), USS Wayne E. Meyer (DDG 108) and USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112)—as well as the two Coast Guard cutters executed combat systems training scenarios, damage control and general quarters drills and additional live-fire exercises. “High-level training of joint forces ensures the U.S. military remains the preeminent military power in the region,” said Capt. Jay

Women in submarines: 10 years later

Clark, the commodore of Destroyer Squadron 1. “These operations are vital to our readiness and are part of our routine presence throughout the western Pacific.” Squadrons involved with operations include Strike Fighter Squadrons 2, 113, 147, and 192, Electronic Attack Squadron 136, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron 113, Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 4, and Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 78. As an integral part of U.S. Pacific Fleet, U.S. 3rd Fleet operates naval forces in the Indo-Pacific in addition to providing realistic and relevant training necessary to flawlessly execute our Navy’s timeless roles of sea control and power projection. U.S. 3rd Fleet works in close coordination with other numbered Fleets to provide commanders with capable, ready forces to deploy forward and win in day-to-day competition, in crisis, and in conflict.

Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group enters 5th Fleet From Carrier Strike Group 5 Public Affairs

oped a comprehensive and deliberate plan for the integration of women officers onto submarines based on other lessons learned from other Navy communities. This deliberate integration plan has been successful and has not had any major roadblocks.” More commands were added to the integration plan to better support dual military couples co-location and the increased interest of women to serve as submarine officers. Based on other service communities’ lessons learned, the Submarine Force integrated commands with women officers first. In 2016, the submarine force integrated its first command with enlisted female sailors. “Integrating senior women first was a key lesson learned from the integration of other

ARABIAN SEA — The aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76), flagship of the Ronald Reagan carrier strike group (CSG), along with guided-missile cruiser USS Shiloh (CG 67) and guided-missile destroyer USS Halsey (DDG 97), entered the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations, June 25. The CSG’s arrival marks the first time the Ronald Reagan has entered the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations (AOO) since 2012. “Ronald Reagan’s flexible presence is a key element in helping assure our regional partners that the United States remains committed to ensuring freedom of the seas,” said Capt. Fred Goldhammer, Ronald Reagan’s commanding officer. “The crew aboard Ronald Reagan seeks to preserve ‘peace through strength’ and remains ready to answer the call.” While in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations, the Ronald Reagan CSG will operate and train alongside regional and coalition partners, and provide airpower to protect U.S. and

Turn to Women, Page 7

Turn to Regan, Page 7

The U.S. Naval Academy Class of 2021 female submarine selectees pose for a photo. (MC2 CAMERON STONER)

By MC2 Cameron Stoner

Submarine Force Atlantic Public Affairs

NORFOLK — Female officers in the U.S. Navy have been serving on multiple platforms throughout the Submarine Force for more than 10 years now. In 2010, Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates lifted the ban, which barred females from serving aboard submarines. A year after the ban was lifted, the first female officers began reporting to Ohio-class ballistic missile submarines. “The integration of women on submarines served to increase the talent pool available to the Submarine Force,” said Lt. Sabrina ReyesDods, the Women in Submarines (WIS) coordinator at Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic. “Women make up 57 percent of all

degree-seeking college students and earn half of all science and engineering-based bachelor degrees. Twenty percent of U.S. Naval Academy midshipmen and 28 percent of NROTC midshipmen are women. With the ongoing challenge of recruiting highly trained officers, integrating women allowed the Submarine Force to attract the nation’s best and brightest.” The WIS Task Force took the helm in developing a plan to integrate female officers into submarine crews throughout the force. “The WIS Task Force was formed in 2009 to provide flag officer level oversight for the planning and execution of the Women in Submarines integration based on the proposed timeline approved by the Chief of Naval Operations,” said Reyes-Dods. “The WIS Task Force, a flag-led task force, devel-


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The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 2 | Thursday, July 1, 2021

Heroes at Home

Q: My family and I are planning on moving into privatized or Government housing. Can we have a live-in aide or nanny? A: There is no instruction that directly authorizes a live-in nanny. CNICINST 11103.5 CH-1 Navy Housing Eligibility, Assignment and Termination Criteria states in Enclosure 2, number 2 c.(5):“If the inventory is available and when a live-in aide or nanny is approved by the CO of the Installation, they will be eligible for a separate bedroom.”

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The secret behind “The Meat & Potatoes of Life”: It’s okay to laugh By Lisa Smith Molinari During challenging times, people say, “It’s okay to cry.” Society universally accepts that, in order to overcome sadness, frustration, and even anger, one mustn’t bottle up these uncomfortable emotions. One must be granted permission to cry, without fear of judgement or reproach. But what about laughter? People also say, “laughter is the best medicine” yet at the same time, we are expected to act “appropriately” in the face of suffering and hardship. Apparently, there is a fine line. I hate fine lines because I tend to cross them. If we make the wrong joke at the wrong time, we are relegated to being … DUN DUN DUN … inappropriate. When my husband deployed for a year in 2008, I had an all-out, snotty blubberfest on a weekly basis to “cleanse” my stress. However, I learned that crying wasn’t an effective long term strategy. By the seventh month of the deployment, I was drowning in endless minutia. My head swam with rational and irrational fears. Are the neighbors mad that the kids left scooters in the cul de sac? Did I pay the water bill? Are my teeth turning yellow? Am I an awful parent for serving macaroni and cheese three nights a week? Does my bunco group talk about me behind my back? Am I using the right sugar substitute? If I hate Skyping, does it make me a bad wife?

My weekly waterworks sessions weren’t enough to get me through the deployment — I needed a lifeline to lead me out of the chaos and back to solid ground. For me, that was laughter. At my children’s swimming lessons, I organized my scattered thoughts on a yellow legal pad. By the time they learned the crawl stroke, I had written four humorous essays about parenting, marriage and military life. Writing about my reality helped me sort my thoughts into what was truly important, and what wasn’t worth worrying about. Through this process, I found that crying about hardships in my life wasn’t nearly as therapeutic as laughing at the ridiculous minutia in between. Socrates once said, “The comic and the tragic lie inseparably close, like light and shadow.” Writing and telling funny stories is my way of achieving my own sense of “mindfulness” during times of insecurity, hardship, and even tragedy. Our whole family uses humor for fun and as a coping mechanism to approach delicate topics, get through awkward situations, deal with stress, and put others at ease. So rather than tell others, “it’s okay to cry,” I encourage them to see the humor in car pools, chicken nuggets, juice boxes, minivans, and so-called Supermoms. There is so much to smile about — you just have to know how to see it. “You tell the best stories!” I’ve been told. But my life is not extraordinary. There’s nothing

significant that sets my family apart from other military families. I’ve never been nominated for Military Spouse of the Year. I’m not academically gifted. I haven’t done anything to merit accolades of praise, swarms of sympathy, or chants of disapproval. I haven’t reached Nirvana … yet. For the 28 years my husband was active duty, I was a garden-variety stay-at-home mom and Navy wife with three kids, a dog, and a good meatloaf recipe. If I had any unique quality, it was simply my ability to see fodder for funny stories in everyday life. I honed my knack for storytelling while writing on that yellow legal pad back in 2008, as a way to cope with deployment stress. Two years later, I published my first humor essay in the Washington Post and created this column, “The Meat and Potatoes of Life.” The secret I don’t tell anyone is that it was by pure accident that my home-grown therapy became my career. Writing was something I did to cope, but through the process, I became a columnist and an author. That’s cool, because I’m all about bonus prizes. As life continues to challenge us all, I’ll continue to tell the funny stories that helped keep me afloat during stressful times. Sure, crying is good, but I’ve learned that sometimes it’s better to live, love, and by all means, laugh.

How to Keep Family Stress Away While Everyone Is Home

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From Military Onesource You’ve got experience adapting to unexpected changes in your military life. And that “roll-with-it” attitude will guide you as you help your family learn ways to reduce stress and build resiliency while spending more time together during the 2019 coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19). Localities may have lifted some restrictions, but quarantines could be reinstated to stop the spread of the virus and its variants. Here are some ways to deal with the pressures of sheltering in place and adjusting to changing health guidelines. Stay calm The uncertainty surrounding COVID-19 can increase the stress on your family. Focus on what you can control by employing some of the following strategies: Lead by example. Your children are watching how you handle the quarantine, and they will pick up on your stress. Do your best to model healthy ways to handle stress by using coping skills when you feel tension building up. Limit exposure to news sources. Reduce your anxiety by setting daily limits on the time you spend watching or reading the news. Start with 10 minutes a day and adjust depending on what works for you. Follow these stress relief tips throughout the day and share them with your family. Keep your children informed. Ask your children what they know about the coronavirus and what they are concerned about. Talk with your children about COVID-19 and provide age-appropriate, reliable information. Help clear up any misunderstandings they may have and stay focused on the positive. Engage in relaxation techniques. Find a quiet place at home, get comfortable and try this Chill Drill designed for service members and families. Stick to a schedule. Structure can bring you a sense of calm and certainty during this uncertain time. If you are working from home, here are some Tips for Teleworking During the Outbreak of COVID-19. Stay connected Family, friends and your military community can provide support and strength at times like this. Consider these ideas to stay connected

Mid-Atlantic Fleet and Family Support Centers (FFSC) programs and services are designed to help you make the most of your military experience, and they’re all available to you at no cost.

(COURTESY PHOTO)

while keeping your distance. Remain in touch with family and friends. Schedule time to connect with family and friends through virtual coffee dates, dinner parties or casual catch-up sessions using video chat apps or phone calls. Bring back the art of handwritten letters and include your children, perhaps showing off their artwork. You’ll brighten peoples’ day with mail from your family. Flex your muscles together. Exercise is a huge stress reducer. Engage the family in a game of tag or by taking turns creating balance challenges and scoring it like a game of H-O-RS-E. Create an obstacle course in the house or yard and time each other as you run, walk, crab walk, walk backward or skip through the course. Be creative. Go on a “Simon Says” walk around the house or yard and take turns being the leader. Use your military community resources. If finances are causing you stress, review your options on Military OneSource. There are different relief organizations that may be able to address your specific situation. Read together. Couch cuddles while reading to your children can build great memories. You can also use reading as quiet time — something you all do from separate rooms to give everyone space to relax. Use your MWR Digital Library for video books that read to children or e-books for older youth and adults. Make dinner a group effort. Connect with your children by having them help with plan-

ning and cooking dinner as well as setting and clearing the table and washing and drying the dishes. Doing these activities together teaches them life skills and, more importantly, creates a space for them to talk about whatever is on their minds. They may talk more when doing tasks beside you than talking face-to-face. Military families tend to be resilient. Keep reaching toward your family and military community for support and know that Military OneSource is always here to serve and support you. Stay current Stay up to date on the latest information regarding COVID-19. Select legitimate news sources that provide facts and not escalating drama. For Department of Defense updates for the military community regarding the virus that causes COVID-19, view the following sites: Visit Defense.gov, Coronavirus.gov, CDC. gov and USA.gov. Follow Military OneSource’s Facebook, Twitter and Instagram platforms. Continue to visit the Coronavirus Updates for Our Military Community page for updates. Check Move.mil for PCS-related updates. It is natural for all relationships to feel tested during an emergency or crisis. If your spouse or partner has made you feel unsafe or afraid, help is available through the Family Advocacy Program. Speak to a victim advocate to explore next steps, or call or chat with the National Domestic Violence Hotline 24/7 at 800-7997233 or thehotline.org.


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 2 | Thursday, July 1, 2021 3

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4 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 2 | Thursday, July 1, 2021

Rear Adm. Chris Engdahl, commander Expeditionary Strike Group 7, delivers remarks virtually during the opening ceremony for Cooperation Afloat and Readiness at Sea Training (CARAT) Sri Lanka. (COURTESY PHOTO)

CARAT Series 2021 commences, elevating maritime security partnerships with U.S., Sri Lanka, Japan By Lt. Lauren Chatmas

Destroyer Squadron 7 Public Affairs

TRINCOMALEE, Sri Lanka — The 27th annual Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) exercise series between the U.S. Navy and the armed forces of partner nations commenced with CARAT Sri Lanka, June 24. Taking place throughout South and Southeast Asia, CARAT expands bilateral and multilateral exercises; ensures maritime security, stability, and prosperity; and highlights the United States’ commitment to the region, the sovereignty of nations therein, and to a free and open Indo-Pacific. “The CARAT exercise series creates an opportunity to sharpen our skills, learn from one another and allows us to work towards our shared goal of a free and open Indo-Pacific,” said Rear Adm. Christopher Engdahl, commander, Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) 7. “When we have a better understanding of the environments in which we operate, we can focus on upholding international rules-based order in the maritime environment.” CARAT Sri Lanka marks the commencement of the first cooperation afloat readiness and training event to be held in 2021, where representatives from U.S. Navy and the armed forces of Sri Lanka and Japan will meet virtually and at sea. This is the first year that the Japan Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) will join CARAT Sri Lanka as an official participant, making this a multilateral exercise. The at-sea phase will take place in territorial and international water near Trincomalee, Sri Lanka, where USS Charleston (LCS 18) and a

P-8A Poseidon aircraft assigned to CTF 72 will join with ships and aircraft from Sri Lanka and Japan for partnered training, focused on building interoperability and strengthening relationships. Sri Lankan Navy ships at-sea will include the Advanced Offshore Patrol Vessels SLNS Gajabahu (P626), formerly USCGC Sherman (WHEC-720), a USCG Guard Hamilton-class high endurance cutter that was transferred to Sri Lanka Navy in August 2018, and Indian-built SLNS Sayurala (P623). JMSDF Asagiri-class destroyer JS Yuugiri (DD-153) will also join U.S. and Sri Lanka at sea. The countries will demonstrate their ability to work together through numerous events including divisional tactics designed to enhance communication as ships sail together in complex maneuvers; a tracking exercise aimed at increasing both navies’ ability to track and pursue targets through the coordinated deployment of surface ships and maritime patrol aircrafts; and search and rescue exercises. U.S. Navy, Sri Lankan Navy, and Sri Lankan Air Force will be conducting helicopter crossdeck operations for the very first time, marking a major step forward for military interoperability between the two countries. Assigned to Charleston, an MH-60S helicopter from Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 21 will be operating with Sayurala and Gajabahu, while Sri Lankan Air Force Bell 212 helicopters will be operating with Charleston. The two nation’s helicopters will be conducting deck landing qualifications (DLQs) and vertical replenishments (VERTREP) drills, crucial missions for resupply of any navy warships at sea. The joint practice and lessons learned from cross-decking will assist both countries in improving interna-

tional maritime security in the Indian Ocean region. “CARAT Sri Lanka perfectly reflects the excellent cooperation between our two navies, and emphasizes our partnership and respect for Sri Lankan sovereignty,” said Capt. Tom Ogden, commander, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 7. “This will be exemplified when we meet our Sri Lankan and Japan partners at sea, focusing on key areas to grow our maritime integration training. From the integration of Navy Seabees aboard USS Charleston, to the P-8 and participating commands using IORIS information sharing, the training value of CARAT Sri Lanka 2021 is on track to be invaluable building on previous iterations between our nations.” This is the first year United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the EU Critical Maritime Route Wider Indian Ocean (CRIMARIO) will support CARAT Sri Lanka. Both organizations’ expertise will provide the U.S., Sri Lanka, and Japan militaries a better understanding of the international rules and norms associated with operational challenges of today’s complex maritime security mission. UNODC educates and offers interregional practical assistance on combatting maritime crime, trafficking in persons, and smuggling of migrants. EU CRIMARIO aims to enhance comprehensive understanding of the maritime domain and to promote its security and safety for countries in the region, with the goal to improve maritime security and safety in the wider Indian Ocean. The virtual SMEE events will feature a variety of joint training opportunities, to include vessel interdiction and boarding training, replenishment at sea (RAS) best practices, Women Peace

& Security symposium, and more. Other virtual exchanges will include maritime domain awareness (MDA), maritime aviation training, and anti-terrorism force protection, among other topics. U.S. assets participating in CARAT Sri Lanka include staff from CTF 72, CTF 73, CTF 75, CTF 76, DESRON 7, the U.S. 7th Fleet Band, and a P-8A Poseidon aircraft. Afloat units include Charleston with helicopter detachment from HSC-21, and embarked integrated Navy Seabees assigned to CTF 75. Beginning in 1995, CARAT builds upon other engagements in South Asia, Southeast Asia and the Pacific region. Each CARAT exercise features professional symposia and a robust at-sea phase that incorporates complex evolutions that increase combined operations. Both feature a broad range of naval competencies ranging from explosive ordnance disposal and live-fire gunnery exercises to search and rescue and humanitarian assistance and disaster response. Charleston’s rotational deployment marks the seventh littoral combat ship presence in the Indo-Pacific, which include USS Freedom (LCS 1), USS Fort Worth (LCS 3), USS Coronado (LCS 4), USS Montgomery (LCS 8), USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10), and USS Tulsa (LCS 16). Attached to DESRON 7, Charleston is on a rotational deployment to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations in support of security and stability in the region, and to work alongside allied and partner navies to provide maritime security and stability, key pillars of a free and open Indo-Pacific. As the U.S. Navy’s destroyer squadron forward-deployed in Southeast Asia, DESRON 7 serves as the primary tactical and operational commander of littoral combat ships rotationally deployed to Singapore, ESG 7’s Sea Combat Commander, and builds partnerships through training exercises and military-to-military engagements. Under Commander, U. S. Pacific Fleet, 7th Fleet is the U.S. Navy’s largest forward-deployed numbered fleet, and routinely interacts and operates with 35 maritime nations in preserving a free and open Indo-Pacific region.

USS Laboon concludes Black Sea operations as USS Ross prepares to enter Black Sea for Exercise Sea Breeze 2021 From U.S. Sixth Fleet Public Affairs BLACK SEA — The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Laboon (DDG 58) conducted its regularly scheduled southbound international strait transit, concluding operations in the Black Sea, June 25. USS Ross conducted its northbound international strait transit June 26, to participate in the 21st iteration of Exercise Sea Breeze. The ship is underway from Naval Support Activity Souda Bay, Greece and is currently operating in the Mediterranean Sea. Laboon entered the Black Sea June 11, to conduct presence operations with NATO allies and partners in support of maritime security and stability in the region. While in the Black Sea, the Laboon and its crew participated in a series of separate passing (PASSEX) and communication exercises with the British Royal Navy’s Daring-class air-defense destroyer HMS Defender (D 36), Royal Netherlands Navy’s De Zeven Provincien-class frigate HNLMS Evertsen (FF805), the Romanian Navy frigate ROS Marasesti (F 111), and the Turkish Navy’s Yavuz-class frigate TCG Yildirim (F 243). These maneuvers enhanced the tactical proficiency of all

The Romanian Navy frigate ROS Marasesti (F 111), right, sails in formation with the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Laboon (DDG 58) during a passing and communication exercise in the Black Sea. (MCSN JEREMY R BOAN)

ships through precision ship handling and communication. Laboon also stopped in Constanta, Romania, June 18-20, 2021, for a scheduled threeday port visit. These operations occurred in advance of USS Ross’ participation in Exercise Sea Breeze. Kicking off June 28 and lasting through July 10, Exercise Sea Breeze is in its 21st iteration, the largest since its inception in 1997, with approximately 30 nations from six continents. The exercise will focus on multiple warfare

areas including amphibious warfare, field operations, diving operations, maritime interdiction operations, air defense, special operations integration, anti-submarine warfare, and search and rescue operations. The Black Sea is a critical waterway for maritime commerce and stability throughout Europe. The U.S. Navy routinely operates in the Black Sea to work with our NATO Allies and partners, including Bulgaria, Georgia, Romania, Turkey, and Ukraine. It is in the world’s best interest to maintain a stable,

prosperous Black Sea region and deter aggressive actors who seek destabilization for their own gain. The U.S. Navy routinely operates ships in the Black Sea consistent with the Montreux Convention and International Law. U.S. Sixth Fleet, headquartered in Naples, Italy, conducts the full spectrum of joint and naval operations, often in concert with allied, and interagency partners, in order to advance U.S. national interests and security and stability in Europe and Africa.


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 2 | Thursday, July 1, 2021 5

The Colombian navy training ship ARC Gloria arrives at Naval Station Mayport for a scheduled port visit, June 24. (MC1 STEVEN KHOR)

Colombian navy ship ARC Gloria arrives in Mayport By MC1 Steven Khor

U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command / U.S. 4th Fleet Public Affairs

MAYPORT, Fla. MAYPORT, Fla. — With Sailors singing from the masts, the Colombian Navy training ship ARC Gloria arrived at Naval Station Mayport, June 24, for a scheduled port visit. Commissioned in 1968, Gloria serves as the flagship of the Colombian Navy. The ship has a crew of more than 150 Sailors, the majority of whom are cadets learning astronomical navigation, coastal navigation, and seamanship prior to entering the Colombian Navy. “We are honored to have ARC Gloria visit Mayport after 55 days at sea,” said Rear Adm. Don Gabrielson, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet. “This visit celebrates our strong partnership with the Colombian Navy. A special thanks to all who made this visit happen, despite the ongoing challenges.” While in port, the crew of Gloria will conduct ship tours, engage with military and local leadership, and cadets will have the opportunity to enjoy liberty in the area.

“The crew is looking to strengthen the cooperation between the navies of the United States and Colombia and conduct exchanges of knowledge and culture to strengthen the training of cadets and the crew by being able to visit units of the United States Navy,” said Capt. Jesus Herney Gonzalez Bohorquez, commanding officer of ARC Gloria. The visit to Mayport is part of a series of port calls for Gloria’s 2021 cruise, with the training ship scheduled to visit ports in Mexico, Honduras, and Colombia. Among the crew, there are also five foreign official guests from Argentina, Spain, Mexico, Peru and Uruguay. In its 53 years, the ARC Gloria has navigated a total of 885,429 nautical miles during 9,550 days at sea, which is equivalent to 41 laps around the world. It has served the Colombian Embassy in 199 ports in 69 countries. The ship has visited the United States on 60 occasions and has visited Mayport two times, the last time being in 2012. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ U.S. 4th Fleet supports U.S. Southern Command’s joint and combined military

operations by employing maritime forces in cooperative maritime security operations to maintain access, enhance interoperability, and build enduring partnerships in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American region. With Sailors singing from the masts, the Colombian Navy training ship ARC Gloria arrived at Naval Station Mayport, June 24, for a scheduled port visit. Commissioned in 1968, Gloria serves as the flagship of the Colombian Navy. The ship has a crew of more than 150 Sailors, the majority of whom are cadets learning astronomical navigation, coastal navigation, and seamanship prior to entering the Colombian Navy. “We are honored to have ARC Gloria visit Mayport after 55 days at sea,” said Rear Adm. Don Gabrielson, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet. “This visit celebrates our strong partnership with the Colombian Navy. A special thanks to all who made this visit happen, despite the ongoing challenges.” While in port, the crew of Gloria will conduct ship tours, engage with military

and local leadership, and cadets will have the opportunity to enjoy liberty in the area. “The crew is looking to strengthen the cooperation between the navies of the United States and Colombia and conduct exchanges of knowledge and culture to strengthen the training of cadets and the crew by being able to visit units of the United States Navy,” said Capt. Jesus Herney Gonzalez Bohorquez, commanding officer of ARC Gloria. The visit to Mayport is part of a series of port calls for Gloria’s 2021 cruise, with the training ship scheduled to visit ports in Mexico, Honduras, and Colombia. Among the crew, there are also five foreign official guests from Argentina, Spain, Mexico, Peru and Uruguay. In its 53 years, the ARC Gloria has navigated a total of 885,429 nautical miles during 9,550 days at sea, which is equivalent to 41 laps around the world. It has served the Colombian Embassy in 199 ports in 69 countries. The ship has visited the United States on 60 occasions and has visited Mayport two times, the last time being in 2012. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ U.S. 4th Fleet supports U.S. Southern Command’s joint and combined military operations by employing maritime forces in cooperative maritime security operations to maintain access, enhance interoperability, and build enduring partnerships in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American region.

2021 Navy Medical Readiness, Training Command San Diego academic research competition By MC2 Jacob Woitzel

Naval Medical Center San Diego Public Affairs

SAN DIEGO — Navy Medical Readiness and Training Command (NMRTC) San Diego Clinical Investigation Department (CID) honored the local winners of the Navywide Academic Research Competition (ARC) awards June 24. The Navy-wide ARC was held at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center this year. Winners are as follows: -Lt. Matthew Stein placed first in laboratory category 1B for his study, “Pilot Comparison of Intraosseous Catheter Placement and Flow Characteristics of Five Infusion Devices in a Cadaveric Swine (Sus Scrofa) Proximal Humerus and Sternum Model.” -Jessica Beltran placed second in clinical category 1A for her study, “Overcoming Adversity and Stress Injury Support (OASIS): Evaluation of Residential Treatment Outcomes for U.S. Service Members with post-traumatic

Capt. Kim Davis, Navy Medicine Readiness and Training Command (NMRTC) San Diego’s commanding officer (left), awards Jessica Beltran, a clinical resident assigned to NMRTC San Diego (right), with a 36th annual NMRTC San Diego Academic Research Appreciation Award during a ceremony at the hospital June 24. (MC3 JACOB WOITZEL)

stress disorder.” -Lt. Elise Seinicki placed third in the clinical category 1A for her study, “Does Liposomal Bupivacaine Decrease Postoperative Opioid Use as part of Enhanced Recovery after Bariatric Surgery Pathway? A Prospective, Doubleblind, Randomized Controlled Trial.” “The ARC is a great chance for residents and staff to showcase their amazing research efforts which are instrumental in maintaining a medically-ready force in an ever-changing world,” said Lt. Cmdr. Mary Sullivan, a local

ARC organizer. “It is also a great opportunity for residents to learn about a different aspect of research through the mentorship provided by staff in reviewing abstracts and posters at the local competition. It was an honor to be involved with the competition this year and see all of the amazing work physicians and staff across this command are doing.” “ARC highlights the outstanding science NMRTC San Diego contributes as part of Navy Research and plays a significant role in shaping the future of military medicine,” said Sweden

De Matas, NMRTC San Diego’s CID Department Head. NMRTC San Diego’s mission is to prepare service members to deploy in support of operational forces, deliver high quality healthcare services and shape the future of military medicine through education, training and research. NMRTC San Diego employs more than 6,000 active duty military personnel, civilians and contractors in Southern California to provide patients with world-class care anytime, anywhere.


6 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 2 | Thursday, July 1, 2021

From discharge to advocacy: The story of GLASS By MC1 Phillip Pavlovich

Navy Region Mid-Atlantic Public Affairs

NORFOLK — According to the Chief of Naval Operations Culture of Excellence Campaign, inclusion and diversity is a line of effort that empowers the Navy to achieve warfighting excellence by fostering psychological, physical and emotional toughness. Ensuring inclusion and connectedness helps promote trust and transparency for Sailors and Navy civilians throughout their careers. Across the 245 years the Navy has been in existence, the definition of diversity and how commands promote inclusion has evolved. Today, men and women of all ethnicities and sexual orientations serve openly and free of discrimination. Alongside the changing of policy’s the Navy gave birth to Gay, Lesbians and Supporting Sailors (GLASS). Established in February 2012, a year after the repeal of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell, GLASS promotes diversity and inclusiveness within the Navy through educational outreach, advocacy, visibility of LGBT issues within the Navy while providing Sailors with leadership opportunities. GLASS is a peer-to-peer group that seeks to foster a base free of prejudice, bigotry, harassment, and violence by providing an avenue for all Sailors to explore and learn about the ongoing challenges related to sexual orientation and expression in an open and nonjudgmental environment. The history of LGBT Sailors throughout the history is one of the many topics GLASS committees may teaches Sailors. Arguably one of the most famous names of gay rights activists is Harvey Milk. Milk was born May 22, 1930 served in the U.S. Navy as a Navy Diver during the Korean War and received an “other than honorable” discharge in 1955 after leadership learned he engaged in homosexual acts. In 1972 he moved to San Francisco and gained a following as a leader in the gay community. In 1977, after a couple unsuccessful campaigns, Milk was elected for a seat on the city’s Board of Supervisors and became one of the first openly gay elected officials in U.S. history. The following year Milk and the city’s mayor were shot and killed in City Hall by Dan White, a conservative former city

supervisor. At White’s murder trial, his attorneys successfully argued that his judgment was impaired by clinical depression caused from eating junk food. White was convicted on the lesser charge of voluntary manslaughter causing an uproar referred to as the “White Night Riot.” The Navy has changed in many ways from before and after the days of Harvey Milk. In the early 1940s, homosexuality was classified as a mental illness, disqualifying gay men and lesbians from serving in the military. In 1982, the military enacted a policy explicitly banning gay men and lesbians from serving. Before that, samesex relations were criminalized and a cause for discharge. In 1993, the Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell (DADT) policy went into effect allowing closeted LGBT people to serve in the military. Under the policy, service members would not be asked about their sexual orientation but would be discharged for disclosing it. In 2011, eighteen years later, Congress repealed DADT, allowing gay, lesbian and bisexual people to serve openly in the military. In 2013, spousal and family benefits were extended to same sex married partners in the military. The policy to accept LGBT service members is still relatively new when compared to its 245 year history. According to Military One Source, cultural changes take time and the stigma against LGBT service members may linger. This can be a barrier to living openly as an LGBTQ person in the military. Many members of GLASS believe Sailors can play an important role in the lives of their shipmates by being a sounding board. By working together to grow awareness and education of LGBT issues, Sailors can help Sailors feel understood and supported. GLASS believes you don’t have to be LGBT to make an impact on someone’s life and career. Being a supportive shipmate can have an impact on inclusion within a command. Today, GLASS continues its mission of advocacy, education, and inclusion in the ever-changing Navy. Transgender individuals being allowed to serve was reinstated in 2021, after ending temporarily in 2016, creating opportunity for those who don’t identify with their

(TAYLOR CURRY)

“All men are created equal. Now matter how hard they try, they can never erase those words. That is what America is about.” —Havery Milk

biological gender to enlist and serve in the armed forces. As the Navy changes policy’s its Sailors adapt and change with it. GLASS is one

of the many organizations and jobs the Navy has established to help the process of change and promote diversity and inclusion.

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 2 | Thursday, July 1, 2021 7

Navy COVID-19 research team named Etter Award recipients By Denise Alford

Naval Medical Research Center Public Affairs

BETHESDA, Md. — A team of researchers from Naval Medical Research Center (NMRC) were recognized June 25, at the Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Research, Development and Acquisition Dr. Delores M. Etter Top Scientists and Engineers Awards Ceremony, held at Naval Surface Warfare Center, Cardeock Division. The research team has been studying the effects of COVID-19 on Marine Corps recruits. The study known as the COVID-19 Health Action Response for Marines (CHARM) began in May 2020 at Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island (MCRDPI) and focused on identifying COVID-19 symptoms among a volunteer cohort. The award named after former U.S. Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Science and Technology Dr. Delores M. Etter is presented annually to scientists and engineers who have clearly demonstrated superior accomplishments during the year. The team’s efforts gained recognition in the group award category for technical excellence. “The entire team and I are thrilled to receive this honor,” said Cmdr. Andrew Letiza, principal investigator and deputy director of NMRC’s Infectious Disease Directorate. “This team collected over 56,000 [COVID-19] samples in just six months and displayed an incredible amount

of resilience, creativity, and commitment.” According to the official award announcement, the selection process is highly competitive. Each submission impressively demonstrated high levels of professionalism and scientific or engineering achievement. “To receive this award is an acknowledgment of the ability of Navy medical research to move at the speed of relevance to safely and efficiently help make Marines at MCRDPI,” added Letizia. NMRC’s CHARM team, comprised of medical officers and hospital corpsmen from various research components have traveled, equipment in tow to Marine Corps bases in support of this research. “When it’s time to unpack or pack up at a location you really get to see teamwork in action and it’s awesome,” said NMRC’s Chief Hospital Corpsman Amethyst Marrone. “It takes a lot of work to make this study mobile, lots of behind the scenes efforts led by enlisted team members.” The study is currently in its second phase, traveling across the U.S. conducting follow-up research with study participants in order to gain a better understanding of COVID-19 patterns and the long term clinical effects after COVID-19 infection among a young population, many of whom never had symptoms after infection. NMRC’s eight laboratories are engaged in a broad spectrum of activity from basic science in the laboratory to field studies at sites in austere and remote areas of the

Capt. Carl Goforth, a researcher from Naval Medical Research Center located in Silver Spring, Md.,collects a biological specimen using a nasal swab from a Marine participating in the COVID-19 Health Action Response for Marines (CHARM) study (REGENA KOWITZ)

world to operational environments. In support of the Navy, Marine Corps, and joint U.S. warfighters, researchers study infectious diseases, biological warfare detection and defense, combat casualty

care, environmental health concerns, aerospace and undersea medicine, medical modeling, simulation and operational mission support, and epidemiology and behavioral sciences.

Women

of women are inspired by the rapid expansion and new opportunities. “We hope that future generations of women will take inspiration from our current female submarine Sailors and officers to pursue their own careers as submariners,” said Reyes-Dods. While the Submarine Force has a history of being male-dominated, there is no distinction between the term “submariners”. “From its inception, female submariners have always wanted to be treated as submariners, not ‘female submariners,” said Reyes-Dods. The Submarine Force is currently taking both male and female conversion Sailors and new accession Sailors in all submarine ratings. If a female sailor wants to serve on a submarine, she should visit: https://www. mynav yhr.nav y.mil/Career-Management/Community-Management/Enlisted/ Submarine/Enlisted-Women-Submarines/ Sailors can also reach out to their Enlisted Community Manager for more information. The mission of the Submarine Force is to execute the Department of the Navy’s mission in and from the undersea domain. In addition to lending added capacity to naval forces, the Submarine Force, in particular, is expected to leverage those special advantages that come with undersea concealment to permit operational, deterrent and combat effects that the Navy and the nation could not otherwise achieve. The Submarine Force and supporting organizations constitute the primary undersea arm of the Navy. Submarines and their crews remain the tip of the undersea spear.

from Page 1

The Navy’s only forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) transits the South China Sea. (MC1 RAWAD MADANAT)

Regan from Page 1

coalition forces as they conduct drawdown operations from Afghanistan. “Our commitment to regional stability strengthens those we sail with and discourages anyone who would seek to disrupt international norms, no matter where we deploy in the world,” said Rear Adm. Will Pennington, commander, Task Force 50, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 5. “The Ronald Reagan carrier strike group has professional Sailors with unmatched capability. We will fly, sail and operate wherever international law allows.” As an inherently flexible maneuver force, capable of supporting routine and contin-

(MC1 PHILLIP PAVLOVICH)

gency operations, the carrier’s presence demonstrates the U.S. Navy’s commitment to regional partners and maritime security. Deploying units of the strike group, commanded by Pennington, include Ronald Reagan, Shiloh, Halsey, the embarked aircraft of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, and the embarked CTF 70 and Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 15 staffs. The U.S. 5th Fleet AOO encompasses about 2.5 million square miles of water and includes the Arabian Gulf, Gulf of Oman, Red Sea and parts of the Indian Ocean. The expanse is comprised of 20 countries and includes three critical choke points at the Strait of Hormuz, the Suez Canal, and the Strait of Bab al Mandeb at the southern tip of Yemen.

Navy warfare communities,” said ReyesDods. “Instead of integrating at the lowestlevel first as other communities did, we decided to pursue a top-down integration process in order to provide mentors and role-models for younger women.” After a strategic pause to evaluate retention and accession interest, the Submarine Force expanded the WIS integration plan to include all homeports in 2020. By 2030, the goal is to have 33 different crews integrated with officers across all platforms and all homeports. A similar strategic pause for the enlisted women in submarines program is planned for 2023 to evaluate the continued expansion of enlisted female integration of the current plan of record of 14 crews. Another goal of female integration into the Submarine Force is habitability modifications to maintain privacy requirements. “Habitability modifications are only associated with enlisted integration,” said Reyes-Dods. “The Ohio-class was initially chosen as modifications were relatively modest in scope. Future Virginia-class, USS New Jersey and beyond, and Columbia-class submarines are being built gender neutral and will not require any habitability modifications. In other words, there will be available male and female berthing and head facilities to maintain privacy requirements.” With the women in submarines integration being a part of the Navy for more than 10 years, the hope is that future generations


8 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 2 | Thursday, July 1, 2021

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Whole-Grain Snacks While you get out to explore and gather with family and friends again, remember you’ll need fuel for your adventures.

Respiratory Therapy lab and simulators on the Virginia Beach Campus. (COURTESY PHOTO)

TCC’s Respiratory Therapy program earns national recognition By Laura J. Sanford Tidewater Community College’s Respiratory Therapy program is a recipient of the 2021 Registered Respiratory Therapy Distinguished Credentialing Success Award. TCC’s program is one of eight in the nation to receive this distinction from the Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC) for eight consecutive years. TCC offers one of eight respiratory therapy programs in the state. Five are associate degree and three are bachelor’s degree programs. “The COVID-19 pandemic certainly highlighted the importance of our graduates,” said Denise Bieszczad, program head for respiratory therapy at the college. “We provide critical training for front line health care workers and have continuously had the highest pass rates on national examinations of any school in Virginia, even those programs offering bachelor’s degrees.” She attributes the program’s success to several factors, including the Regional Health Professions Center on

TCC Respiratory Therapy graduate Daniel Velazquez. (COURTESY PHOTO)

the Virginia Beach Campus. The stateof-the-art facility offers a high-fidelity simulation laboratory that allows faculty to provide students with the most authentic educational experience. The college also partners with all major area health care providers to offer clinical rotations for students. “Because of this exposure, our students get to observe respiratory care practitioners developing health care plans and evaluating therapies using critical thinking,” Bieszczad said. “They see firsthand the real-world benefits of working as a team to solve life-threatening clinical problems every day.” Award winners must have three or more years of outcomes data; hold accreditation without a progress report; document registered respiratory therapy credentialing success of 90 percent or above; and meet or exceed established CoARC thresholds for certified respiratory therapist credentialing success, attrition and job placement. For more information about the college’s Respiratory Therapy program, contact Bieszczad at 757-822-7412 or dbieszczad@tcc.edu.

Virginia Beach man will posthumously receive Carnegie Medal for saving colleagues from gunman From The Carnegie Hero Fund Commission VIRGINIA BEACH, Va — Last week, in its second announcement of 2021, the Carnegie Hero Fund recognized and awarded the Carnegie Medal to Ryan Keith Cox who was killed in the Virginia Beach Municipal Center shooting in 2019. Cox was one of 18 people recognized for the award. In 2019, a disgruntled employee opened fire in the Virginia Beach Municipal Center. During the shooting a group of at least seven colleagues attempted to flee, but they were directed to change course when they encountered 50-yearold Ryan Keith Cox, an account clerk who had been working for the city for

12 years. Cox directed the group to quietly enter an office and barricade themselves inside. Cox refused his colleagues’ pleas to enter the office with them and told one co-worker that he needed to see if anyone else needed help. Shortly, the assailant encountered Cox a few feet from the closed office door, fatally shooting him before shooting others in the building; the colleagues secured in the office were not injured. After a shootout with police, the assailant was shot dead. Cox was among 12 people who died and four people who were critically injured. The honor comes with a financial grant that will been given to Cox’s survivors.

Ryan Keith Cox (COURTESY PHOTO)

INSIDE: Check out Flagship Values, your source for automobiles, employment, real estate and more! Pages C6-7


2

The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 3 | Thursday, July 1, 2021

Community Submit YOUR events, news and photos

The Flagship welcomes submissions from our readers online. Please submit events here: www.militarynews.com/users/admin/calendar/event/ Please submit news and photos here: www.militarynews.com/norfolk-navy-flagship/submit_news/

(COURTESY PHOTO)

The Norfolk Fairy Tree Brings Hope During Global

From The City of Norfolk

NORFOLK, VA – Today is International Fairy Day. And in the city of mermaids, we’re celebrating this magical day as fairies have found a home in a Norfolk crape myrtle. Since June 2020, Norfolk residents and families across the country found comfort through the Fairy Tree located in Larchmont. Children and adults alike have written more than 2,000 letters to the Fairy Tree, as they faced the mental, emotional and physical challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic. Recognized as a “witness tree” to the pandemic, the Library of Congress will add the Fairy Tree to the Historic American Landmark Survey (HALS) - the first contemporary location related to the global pandemic. The Fairy Tree is one of 40,000 pink crape myrtles planted by the City of Norfolk since

the 1930s. It’s surrounded with small fairy houses and figurines donated by the Village of Fairies and local residents. Families can drop off letters at the tree, send by mail or post online. The Village of Fairies review, read and save each letter. Every sender receives a written letter of response with words of encouragement. The City recently received a letter from Fairy Queen Lysandra, explaining the feeling of hope, spirit and community felt in Norfolk. This June, Slover Library hosted a storytime at the tree with more programming coming soon. Slover may also become a location for families to drop off letters for the fairies. Local organizations have also supported the Fairy Tree mission, including Old Dominion University which promoted the tree as a coping resource for students.

(COURTESY PHOTO)

HARLEM

From Chartway Arena & S.B. Ballard Stadium

Norfolk, Va — The World-Famous Harlem Globetrotters are bringing their newly reimagined Spread Game tour to Chartway Arena in Norfolk for games on August 19th and 20th. Tickets are on sale now at YnotTix. com The upcoming games in August are the rescheduled dates for the March 2020 games that were postponed due to COVID-19. Fans with tickets to the 2020 dates may use their original tickets for their reschedule date, which are as follows. - Tickets for the 2PM game on March 14, 2020 are now valid for the Friday, August 20th game at 7PM - Tickets for the 7PM game on March 14, 2020 are now valid for the Thursday, August 19th game at 7PM The Spread Game Tour is a basketball event like no other. Ankle-breaking moves, jaw-dropping swag, and rim-rattling dunks are only some of the thrills you can expect from this fully modernized show. Part streetball from the players who defined it, part interactive family entertainment, the new tour will show off the best of the Globetrotters in a dazzling exhibition of talent and game. The Spread Game Tour introduces new

(COURTESY PHOTO)

premium fan experiences with unprecedented access and interaction, including celebrity court passes, meet and greets with players, and in select markets, the #SQUADZONE, where fans have the opportunity to feel like part of the show. For over 95 years, the Harlem Globetrot-

ters organization has been committed to spreading joy through their artful athleticism and unparalleled basketball skill. The Globetrotters have always been global ambassadors of goodwill. The reimagined team is even more committed to bringing their voice to social justice conversations

while inviting communities all over the U.S. to come together and recognize the power of our commonalities and celebrate our differences. The Globetrotters’ mission, to spread game and bring family entertainment to the world, continues to drive them today.


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 3 | Thursday, July 1, 2021 3

(COURTESY PHOTO)

Grant serving Norfolk pets and citizens From Animal Resources of Tidewater Prince William Humane Society Homeless Animals Support Network Invests in Animal Resources of Tidewater with a Grant of $5,000 which will extend efforts to help pets and people in Norfolk live their best lives. June 23, 2021 – Animal Resources of Tidewater today announced that it has been awarded a $5,000 grant from Prince William Humane Society Homeless Animals Support Network to support the Safety NACC program at the Norfolk Animal Care and Adoption Center

Animal Resources of Tidewater is a nonprofit organization which has served the people and pets in Hampton Roads for over two decades. The Prince William Humane Society award will allow Animal Resources of Tidewater to provide critical funding to the Safety NACC initiative which provides temporary foster homes for pets whose owners are facing hardship. The grant will help pay for crates, spay/neuter surgeries, and veterinary care. “For more than 20 years Animal Resources of Tidewater has been providing resources

in Hampton Roads to keep families and pets together,” said ART Founder and Vice President Debra Griggs. “The Safety NACC program is completely aligned with ART’s core mission and we are honored to receive grant funding to support NACC in delivering this vital service to our community.” “We are so grateful that ART has decided to support Safety NACC with this grant,” said Bureau Manager Michelle Dosson. “As COVID-19 eviction moratoriums are lifted around the country, fostering programs like Safety NACC may provide needed support to keep people and their pets together.”

The Prince William Humane Society has served the people and pets of Prince William County VA since 2012 and has recently created the Homeless Animals Support Network (HASN) to expand its mission to strengthen the human/animal bond. HASN provides assistance to keep pets in their homes with their families and to serve the most vulnerable pets who must enter shelter environments. They are accomplishing these goals by 1) increasing the reach of the Poor Animals Welfare and Surgical (PAWS) Fund to support the care of injured and sick animals who enter shelters and rescues throughout Virginia, 2) strengthening the Fur-ever Together program to keep animals out of shelters by working with rescues and outreach groups to assist pet owners so pets can stay in their homes, and, 3) using social media and web presence to shine a light on affiliate partner rescues, adoptable pets, and other pet-related content, all with the aim of increasing adoptions and saving more lives. The organization is funded through donations from individuals and business sponsorships.


4 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 3 | Thursday, July 1, 2021

Food

Blueberry and Pomegranate Power Bars (COURTESY PHOTO)

Make Every Bite Count with Whole-Grain Popcorn Snacks From Family Features Family Features As many people start getting back into normal routines, they’re returning to familiar on-the-go lifestyles by heading back to work, traveling to new destinations and enjoying time with loved ones. While you get out to explore and gather with family and friends again, remember you’ll need fuel for your adventures. According to a National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, most Americans fail to get enough whole grains each day, opting instead for mostly refined grains. Foods like tasty whole-grain popcorn offer an easy health hack so you can make every bite count. Try getting in the habit of popping 9 cups of popcorn in the morning and dividing it into two containers. Season one container with salt and herbs, the other with a pinch of sugar and cinnamon so you can alternate between sweet and salty throughout the day. Bringing delicious options like these while on the go can help satisfy hunger pangs while adding the

fiber your body needs. Because mouthwatering whole-grain popcorn is versatile and 3 cups is equal to one serving of whole grains, it’s a simple yet flavorful option for meeting dietary recommendations. It can be a breeze to add it to snacks like Blueberry and Pomegranate Power Bars or Crunchy Popcorn Trail Mix. Visit popcorn.org to find more nutritious snack ideas. Blueberry and Pomegranate Power Bars Yield: 12 bars Nonstick cooking spray 8 cups popped popcorn 1 ½ cups old-fashioned rolled oats 1 cup dried blueberries ½ cup pomegranate seeds ½ cup whole natural almonds, toasted and coarsely chopped ⅔ cup honey ⅔ cup light brown sugar 2 tablespoons butter or margarine 6 ounces bittersweet chocolate, melted Line 13-by-9-inch pan with foil; spray with nonstick cooking spray.

Crunchy Popcorn Trail Mix (COURTESY PHOTO)

In large bowl, combine popcorn, oats, blueberries, pomegranate seeds and almonds. In small saucepan over low heat, boil honey, brown sugar and butter 2 minutes. Pour over popcorn mixture and mix thoroughly. Using damp hands, press mixture firmly into prepared pan. Refrigerate until firm, about 2 hours. Cut into 12 bars. Dip bottoms of bars into melted chocolate. Place on wax paper-lined pan; refrigerate until ready to serve. Store in tight covered container in refrigerator. Crunchy Popcorn Trail Mix Yield: 9 cups 5 cups popped popcorn 3 cups whole-grain oat cereal ⅓ cup raisins ⅓ cup peanuts or other nuts ⅓ cup sunflower seeds ¼ cup (½ stick) butter or margarine 6 tablespoons brown sugar 2 tablespoons light corn syrup In large, microwavable bowl, stir popcorn, cereal, raisins, nuts and seeds; set aside. In small saucepan, heat butter, brown sugar and corn syrup until boiling; cook 3 minutes, stirring occasionally. Pour over popcorn mixture, stirring to coat evenly. Microwave 3-4 minutes, stirring and scraping bowl after each minute. Spread onto greased cookie sheet; cool. Break into pieces and store in airtight container.

A Summer Meal Solution From Family Features

Sunshine and summer evenings often elicit a certain craving for warm-weather favorites, but many families don’t always have time to light a grill or wait for the charcoal to heat up. On those busy days when summer fare calls your name but time is of the essence, opt for a family-friendly recipe that offers seasonal taste from the cool comforts of the kitchen. Hot dogs provide a versatile option that bring the kids running and can be used in a wide variety of dishes. These Corn Muffin Hot Dog Sliders, ready in just 30 minutes, offer a tasty twist on tradition by combining a summertime favorite with a comfort food classic. In addition to the feel-good flavors, they’re made with all-beef Coleman Natural uncured hot dogs, sourced from American family farms that never use antibiotics or added hormones, meaning you can feel confident about the ingredients you’re feeding your family. For more recipe ideas, visit ColemanNatural.com/Recipes. Corn Muffin Hot Dog Sliders Prep time: 20 minutes Cook time: 10 minutes Servings: 6 (2 sliders per serving) Nonstick cooking spray 1 cup all-purpose flour 1 cup yellow cornmeal ½ teaspoon baking soda ¼ teaspoon salt 1 cup buttermilk ½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, melted ⅓ cup sugar 2 large eggs 6 Coleman Natural Beef Hot Dogs, cut into coins or sliced on bias, ½-inch thick

Corn Muffin Hot Dog Sliders (COURTESY PHOTO)

1 cup baby arugula mustard, for garnish (optional) ketchup, for garnish (optional) relish, for garnish (optional) Preheat oven to 375 F. Lightly coat 12-cup muffin tin with nonstick cooking spray; set aside. In large bowl, combine flour, cornmeal, baking soda and salt. In separate bowl, whisk

buttermilk, butter, sugar and eggs. Pour wet mixture over dry ingredients and stir until moist. Scoop batter into each muffin tin cup until halfway full. Bake 8-10 minutes, or until golden brown. Remove pan from oven and cool on wire rack 10-15 minutes before removing muffins from pan.

In large skillet over medium heat, cook hotdog slices, turning occasionally with fork until slightly browned. Slice each muffin in half horizontally, add arugula and hot dog slices then garnish with mustard, ketchup and relish, if desired. Substitution: Use store-bought corn muffin mix rather than making corn muffins from scratch, if desired.


4 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 3 | Thursday, July 1, 2021

Food

Blueberry and Pomegranate Power Bars (COURTESY PHOTO)

Make Every Bite Count with Whole-Grain Popcorn Snacks From Family Features Family Features As many people start getting back into normal routines, they’re returning to familiar on-the-go lifestyles by heading back to work, traveling to new destinations and enjoying time with loved ones. While you get out to explore and gather with family and friends again, remember you’ll need fuel for your adventures. According to a National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, most Americans fail to get enough whole grains each day, opting instead for mostly refined grains. Foods like tasty whole-grain popcorn offer an easy health hack so you can make every bite count. Try getting in the habit of popping 9 cups of popcorn in the morning and dividing it into two containers. Season one container with salt and herbs, the other with a pinch of sugar and cinnamon so you can alternate between sweet and salty throughout the day. Bringing delicious options like these while on the go can help satisfy hunger pangs while adding the

fiber your body needs. Because mouthwatering whole-grain popcorn is versatile and 3 cups is equal to one serving of whole grains, it’s a simple yet flavorful option for meeting dietary recommendations. It can be a breeze to add it to snacks like Blueberry and Pomegranate Power Bars or Crunchy Popcorn Trail Mix. Visit popcorn.org to find more nutritious snack ideas. Blueberry and Pomegranate Power Bars Yield: 12 bars Nonstick cooking spray 8 cups popped popcorn 1 ½ cups old-fashioned rolled oats 1 cup dried blueberries ½ cup pomegranate seeds ½ cup whole natural almonds, toasted and coarsely chopped ⅔ cup honey ⅔ cup light brown sugar 2 tablespoons butter or margarine 6 ounces bittersweet chocolate, melted Line 13-by-9-inch pan with foil; spray with nonstick cooking spray.

Crunchy Popcorn Trail Mix (COURTESY PHOTO)

In large bowl, combine popcorn, oats, blueberries, pomegranate seeds and almonds. In small saucepan over low heat, boil honey, brown sugar and butter 2 minutes. Pour over popcorn mixture and mix thoroughly. Using damp hands, press mixture firmly into prepared pan. Refrigerate until firm, about 2 hours. Cut into 12 bars. Dip bottoms of bars into melted chocolate. Place on wax paper-lined pan; refrigerate until ready to serve. Store in tight covered container in refrigerator. Crunchy Popcorn Trail Mix Yield: 9 cups 5 cups popped popcorn 3 cups whole-grain oat cereal ⅓ cup raisins ⅓ cup peanuts or other nuts ⅓ cup sunflower seeds ¼ cup (½ stick) butter or margarine 6 tablespoons brown sugar 2 tablespoons light corn syrup In large, microwavable bowl, stir popcorn, cereal, raisins, nuts and seeds; set aside. In small saucepan, heat butter, brown sugar and corn syrup until boiling; cook 3 minutes, stirring occasionally. Pour over popcorn mixture, stirring to coat evenly. Microwave 3-4 minutes, stirring and scraping bowl after each minute. Spread onto greased cookie sheet; cool. Break into pieces and store in airtight container.

A Summer Meal Solution From Family Features

Sunshine and summer evenings often elicit a certain craving for warm-weather favorites, but many families don’t always have time to light a grill or wait for the charcoal to heat up. On those busy days when summer fare calls your name but time is of the essence, opt for a family-friendly recipe that offers seasonal taste from the cool comforts of the kitchen. Hot dogs provide a versatile option that bring the kids running and can be used in a wide variety of dishes. These Corn Muffin Hot Dog Sliders, ready in just 30 minutes, offer a tasty twist on tradition by combining a summertime favorite with a comfort food classic. In addition to the feel-good flavors, they’re made with all-beef Coleman Natural uncured hot dogs, sourced from American family farms that never use antibiotics or added hormones, meaning you can feel confident about the ingredients you’re feeding your family. For more recipe ideas, visit ColemanNatural.com/Recipes. Corn Muffin Hot Dog Sliders Prep time: 20 minutes Cook time: 10 minutes Servings: 6 (2 sliders per serving) Nonstick cooking spray 1 cup all-purpose flour 1 cup yellow cornmeal ½ teaspoon baking soda ¼ teaspoon salt 1 cup buttermilk ½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, melted ⅓ cup sugar 2 large eggs 6 Coleman Natural Beef Hot Dogs, cut into coins or sliced on bias, ½-inch thick

Corn Muffin Hot Dog Sliders (COURTESY PHOTO)

1 cup baby arugula mustard, for garnish (optional) ketchup, for garnish (optional) relish, for garnish (optional) Preheat oven to 375 F. Lightly coat 12-cup muffin tin with nonstick cooking spray; set aside. In large bowl, combine flour, cornmeal, baking soda and salt. In separate bowl, whisk

buttermilk, butter, sugar and eggs. Pour wet mixture over dry ingredients and stir until moist. Scoop batter into each muffin tin cup until halfway full. Bake 8-10 minutes, or until golden brown. Remove pan from oven and cool on wire rack 10-15 minutes before removing muffins from pan.

In large skillet over medium heat, cook hotdog slices, turning occasionally with fork until slightly browned. Slice each muffin in half horizontally, add arugula and hot dog slices then garnish with mustard, ketchup and relish, if desired. Substitution: Use store-bought corn muffin mix rather than making corn muffins from scratch, if desired.


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 3 | Thursday, July 1, 2021 5

Health

Marine Cpl. Wenchelson Baptiste donates blood for the Armed Services Blood Program outside Hopkins Hall Gym on Camp Elmore in Norfolk, Virginia, June 21. Among the most common uses of red blood cells obtained through red blood cell donation, which can be done through the ASBP, are transfusions for people with sickle cell ( Marine Lance Cpl. Jack Chen).

MHS Tackles SCD Through a Variety of Treatment Methods By Jacob Moore

MHS Communications

Although sickle cell disease is incompatible with an active military career, it can affect other military beneficiaries, and have an impact on a service member’s readiness. Still, treatment attempts to keep patients as healthy as possible. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that sickle cell disease affects approximately 100,000 Americans, including roughly one in every 365 African-American births and one out of every 16,300 Hispanic-American births. Sickle cell disease, or SCD, is a group of inherited red blood cell disorders. The condition causes red blood cells to become hard and sticky, and look like a sickle, the c-shaped farm tool used for cutting grass or harvesting crops.

“Sickle cell disease is one of dozens and dozens of hemoglobin mutations that occur in humans and cause disease,” said Army Col. (Dr.) Andrew Cap, director of research at the U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas, and a practicing hematologist at Brooke Army Medical Center. “Sickle cell basically does two things: It causes what we call an ‘ineffective hematopoiesis,’ in the sense that your bone marrow is busy making red cells, but they tend to get cleared more quickly from circulation because they get damaged,” he said. “The structural change of the shape of the cells also causes problems. When they change to that sickle shape, they lose their flexibility. They have the potential to get clogged up in multiple organs.” Cap explained that ‘sickle cell crises’ result from clogging capillaries, starving tissues

of oxygen. This can be caused by increased metabolic demand, including physical activity, other ailments including colds and flus, and temperature changes. “Not every patient with sickle cell looks the same, in the sense that it’s not necessarily predictable - this amount of activity, or that degree of cold, or this illness,” Cap said. “There’s a spectrum of disease severity that’s highly variable.” Problems resulting from sickle cell disease range from anemia and acute chest crisis, where sickled blood cells get trapped in a person’s lungs and prevent the normal gas exchange needed for normal breathing, to blockages in other vital organs and capillaries throughout the body. Within the Military Health System, patients with sickle cell disease are limited to dependents of service members due to the health complications surrounding it.

“Unfortunately, the physiologic effects of sickle cell are quite dramatic and incompatible with having a healthy life, period,” explained Cap. “Most of our sickle population is actually in the pediatric realm because they’re dependents.” Treatments include folic acid and vitamin B12, due to the vitamin deficiencies created by the body’s compensation for the lack of healthy red blood cells; hydration and pain management; as well as avoiding situations that may result in an adverse reaction. “We try to keep these patients as healthy as possible,” said Cap. Another treatment is hydroxyurea, which causes your body to produce “younger” red blood cells, or red blood cells that are similar to what your body produced as a fetus. “This causes your body to make more ‘fetal’ hemoglobin and less sickled hemoglobin,” said Cap. Although it doesn’t affect active-duty service members, another vital treatment for those with sickle cell disease is blood transfusion. Among the most common uses of red blood cells obtained through red blood cell donation, which can be done through the Armed Services Blood Program, are transfusions for people with sickle cell. World Sickle Cell Awareness Day was June 19.

Patients Contribute to Shape Future Hearing Loss Treatment By Larine Barr

Hearing Center Of Excellence

The Defense Health Agency’s Hearing Center of Excellence collaborated in a firstof-its-kind effort to aid in the development of future drug therapies and devices for patients with hearing loss. During the meeting authorized by the Food and Drug Administration, patients with hearing loss shared their testimonies. The Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA) hosted the externally led, patient-focused, drug development meeting for people living with sensorineural (inner ear damage) hearing loss May 25, with key FDA reviewers in attendance. The FDA establishes these types of meetings to help inform its decisions and supervision during drug development and review of marketing applications. “This was an important opportunity for patients to tell the FDA about their symptoms, assessment of current treatments, experiences, and challenges they face living with hearing loss as a way to personally address their needs and conditions,” said the HCE’s division chief, Dr. Carlos Esquivel. “We were honored to collaborate as a patient organization with a dedicated interest in improving care and medications for those with hearing loss.” During the meeting, Dr. Gavin Imperato, with the FDA’s Office of Tissues and Advanced Therapies, expressed enthusiasm at the opportunity to hear from patients as the FDA considers specific therapies for people with hearing loss. The event included two panels of people with hearing loss and a group of patients, caregivers, and their families joining remotely, who shared their most burdensome symptoms, current treatments, and

Barbara Kelley, executive director of the Hearing Loss Association of America (left), kicks off the first-ever externally led patient-focused drug development meeting for hearing loss May 25, which heard from patients living with hearing loss, to aid in the Food and Drug Administration’s development of future hearing loss therapies. The Defense Health Agency’s Hearing Center of Excellence was among key collaborators involved in the event (Courtesy of HLAA).

what they would like to see in future therapies. According to the HLAA, the report Voice of the Patient will be published in the fall based on information from the meeting and comments from patients submitted to the organization through June 25.

The HCE’s collaboration in the virtual meeting is a continuation of the center’s ongoing engagement with the HLAA on several initiatives, dating back to 2014, according to Esquivel. In other related efforts, HCE is leading the Pharmaceutical Interventions for Hear-

ing Loss Working Group, which is examining drug development initiatives for service member and veteran hearing loss. The center also provides subject matter expert support to the Department of Defense’s acquisition of the Pharmaceutical Intervention for Noise-induced Hearing Loss initiative.


6 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 3 | Thursday, July 1, 2021

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PRIVATE SECURITY SERVICES VA. DCJS: 11-17774 Credentialed, Insured, & Licensed; RAVEN ELITE PROTECTION LLC specializes in personal protection, the goal is to mitigate the risk before an unfortunate event occurs. Access the website at https://raveneliteprotection.com to learn more.

Power Washing SOUTH SIDE PRESSURE WASHING Pressure wash exterior surfaces. For free estimate call 757-337-9991

“Fear Nevermore”

Roofing

Professional Services BUYING WATCHMAKER ITEMS Private collector buying old Pocket & Wrist Watches in any condition. Buying Watch Parts, Watch Tools and anything related to the trade. 30 Year Member NAWCC, References Available, Please Call David 314-779-7380 I am Vaccinated Specializing in Large Collections & High Value Accumulations. Paying Cash

A ROOFING SALE 30 Yr. Architect Shingles $1.99 sq ft. Labor & Material included, repair, siding. Class A Lic’d & Ins’d. (757) 880-5215. CALVIN’S ROOFING REPAIR LLC Specializes in roofing repair, also guttering, Free estimates, roofing of all types, reasonable prices, Shingles, metal, slate, rubber. Over 30 yrs -business, BBB 757-377-2933

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 3 | Thursday, July 1, 2021 7 Dogs, Cats, Other Pets

Autos for Sale

MALTESE/YORKIE 9 week old puppies, first shots & wormed. Have mother & father onhand. $850. Call (757) 421-7708

VOLKSWAGEN 2018 JETTA

MALTI-POO $1,500. Male. First shot 8+ wks old. Cell (757) 567-2687 WESTIE PUPPY’S 1 Male, 3 Females Born on June 3, 2021, Ready to go home the week of July 26-July 30th $1500.00 Vet Checked, First Shots 252-473-5619 WANCHESE, NC

GTI, auto, AC, power windows & locks, cruise, tilt, back up camera, 38mpg, warranty, 18k miles, like new. $15,995. 757-351-5611. No fee.

Room For Rent NORFOLK Norview Area, furn/unfurn room, central air, washer/dryer, satellite TV. $170/week + dep. 757-718-0698.

Classic, Antique Cars

Trucks and SUVs

JEEP 1998 GRAND CHEROKEE

5.9 Limited 178,000mi. Two-owner. Stone White / Agate. Inspected. $5,000 OBO. Every option. First of the power SUVs. 4x4 of the Year 1998. Includes large parts list. Tom Harleman (757) 473-8468 harlemantg@verizon. net Virginia Beach

Wanted Automotive We will purchase your collectible, classic, late model autos, we will come to you. Call 757-675-0288.

VOLKSWAGEN 1973 BEETLE

ABSOLUTELY ABLY ACQUIRING AUTOS All Makes & Models, Best Price Paid!! FREE TOWING. 757-749-8035

VOLKSWAGEN 1979 BEETLE

AUTOS ACCEPTED-ANY YEAR Make or Model. TOP DOLLAR, FAST, Free Towing. 757-737-2465, 701-3361

4 Spd, Dual Exhaust, Good condition, $5995. Call 757-495-7960

Boats & Watercraft

Travel/Camping Trailers CONSIGNMENTS WANTED! Let us clean, sell, & finance your RV. Snyders RV 499-8000.

General Help Wanted

MARINE

HARVEY GULF INTERNATIONAL MARINE IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR ALL VESSEL POSITIONS

Captains, Mates, Licensed Engineers, Q-Meds, AB, OS and Deckhands Please apply in person at our Fourchon Facility 495 Adam Ted Gisclair Road Fourchon, LA 70357 Or online at www.harveygulf.com Great Benefits, 401K and more Please submit resume to jobs@harveygulf. com

Subscribe to The Virginian-Pilot today. Call 757-446-9000 or go to PilotOnline.com

Motorcycles and ATVs 2012 HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 SPORTSTER MODEL 48 1600 actual miles, Like New Condition. Must See $7500 757-373-5707

Autos for Sale

HONDA 2001 ACCORD

EX Sunroof, 4 door, runs good, $2,250 757-343-0270

INFINITI 2009 G37

Convertible …no damage or rust history. 95% original. Same owner 20 plus years .. show quality. Runs and drives perfect. No issues $19,500 Beautiful yellow w black top, camel interior 757-472-9934

Trucks and SUVs

FORD 2001 EXPLORER

Limited. Loaded, 1 owner, 167k miles, excellent condition, serviced regularly. $5000 Call: 757-685-3688

GMC 2016 YUKON

Denali white diamond with beige leather, 42,700 miles, has original window sticker, loaded, new tires, original owner exc condition $44,600 757-560-1459

JEEP 1998 GRAND CHEROKEE

Blue Coupe; Journey & Prem Packages. 98K mi. $10,500 757-481-9030

TOYOTA 2002 CELICA

5.9 Limited. 86,000mi. Three-owner. Stone White / Agate. Inspected. $7,500 OBO. Every option. First of the power SUVs. 4x4 of the Year 1998. Enhanced performance and sound systems. Tom Harleman (757) 4738468 harlemantg@verizon.net Virginia Beach

Subscribe to The Virginian-Pilot today.

Newly inspected and registered. Fairly low mileage. Good tires. Good running condition. $3000.00 or best offer (757) 348-6374

Fun & Games

Call 757-446-9000 or go to PilotOnline.com

Early home delivery. 757-446-9000 or PilotOnline.com

BOAT FOR SALE LIKE NEW 12000 2020 tracker pro 170 with trailer 9.9 ELPT motor spare tire minkota edge 45 foot cont low range hook 4x new condition Bargain at 12000 call 7574792089 USED TRAILER SALE!!! OVER 100 Avail. For Boats 12’-38’ BUDGET BOATS: (757) 543 -7595

Good news. Early home delivery. 757-446-9000 PilotOnline.com

Early home delivery.

Don’t pay full price! With The VirginianPilot’s coupons and sales inserts, shop smart and save big every week!

757-446-9000 or PilotOnline.com

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