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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, June 10, 2021 1

IN THIS ISSUE Norfolk Naval Shipyard spotlight

According to Environmental Monitoring Manager Sandra Walton, Clarke brings warmth and positivity to his coworkers, his code, and the shipyard as a whole. PAGE A3 VOL. 27, NO. 23, Norfolk, VA | flagshipnews.com

June 10-June 16, 2021

Hull Maintenance Technician Fireman Recruit Isabella Heyel (left) and Seaman Nicolette Brown, assigned to the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS Arlington (LPD 24), tend to a wounded Marine during a mass casualty training event on the flight deck. (MC2 JOHN BELLINO)

USS Arlington takes on the Final Battle Problem By MC2 John Bellino

USS Arlington (Lpd 24) Public Affairs

ATLANTIC OCEAN — The San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS Arlington (LPD 24) closed out basic phase deployment training with a two-day, shipwide exercise known as the “Final Battle Problem,” while underway in the Atlantic

Ocean, June 5 and 6. Capt. MK Hays, commander, Afloat Training Group (ATG) Norfolk was aboard the Arlington with a team of assessors to observe the 45 real world scenario-based events aimed to test all warfare areas across the ship. This is the first time ATG has had the opportunity to witness a ship conducting the Final Battle Problem since

the onset of COVID-19. “It was great to watch Arlington’s training teams provide a robust training scenario for the crew,” said Hays. “Arlington definitely rose to the occasion to combat fires, flooding, inbound torpedoes and missiles, as well as medical casualties. It was neat to watch everyone’s enthusiasm and know-how to get things done as

NSWC Dahlgren Division Pride Month spotlight: Lanie Pepitone From Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division Public Affairs DAHLGREN — Every time a piece of ammunition or explosive makes its way to the fleet from Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD), it is thanks to the work and support of dozens of employees. From development to testing, it is the work of individual people that gets things done. When it comes to testing explosives and energetic items, NSWCDD test engineer Lanie Pepitone is a master with nearly 14 years of experience. The King George native works in the Weapons System Test Engineering Branch of the Gun and Electric Weapon Systems Department, spending most of her time at the Explosives Experimental Area (EEA) in the Potomac River Test Range complex performing hazard assessment

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Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD) test engineer Lanie Pepitone poses with a Standard Missile rocket motor. (STACIA COURTNEY)

testing, which refers to anything from temperature and humidity testing to shock and vibration, as

well as 40-foot drop and insensiTurn to Lanie Pepitone, Page 7

a team!” During basic phase a ship conducts training evolutions in a very individualistic way that tests each warfare area one at a time. The Final Battle Problem is the first time a ship sees all of its training integrated into one tactical event. This event was the culmination of two months of planning,

Turn to USS Arlington, Page 7

USS New Hampshire carries on submarine battle flag tradition By MC2 Cameron Stoner

Submarine Force Atlantic Public Affairs

NORFOLK — The Virginia-class attack submarine USS New Hampshire (SSN 778), homeported at Naval Station Norfolk, participated in a longstanding submarine tradition during its recent deployment. New Hampshire Sailors honored their recent deployment by creating a submarine battle flag. The flag consists of patches stitched together, each one representing an accomplishment or memory made by the crew. Cmdr. Bennett Christman, New Hampshire’s commanding officer, spoke on the importance of Sailors using submarine battle flags to maintain the connection to submariners of the past. “Each symbol represents one specific achievement, however, the manner of its display is a longstanding tradition that connects modern submariners to the earliest days of our profession,” said Christman. “Successful World War II patrols of boats like Barb, Tang, and Wahoo

Change of command

Righting a wrong

Destroyer Squadron 26 (DESRON 26) held a change of command ceremony onboard Naval Station Norfolk, June 4.

Sara Mbanden ensures that applicants and employees are given equal opportunities in employment and contracting activities, regardless of race, religion, color, national origin, sex, age, disability, or any other protected characteristic. PAGE A5

PAGE A4

coordinating and training by all of the Arlington warfare leaders and coordinators. The ultimate goal was to ensure the Arlington is capable of working as a cohesive force to fight the ship in a real world scenario. Final Battle Problem is not a graded evolution, so each ship’s

were best represented by the battle flags crafted by their Sailors.” Originating in World War II, battle flags were a way for Sailors to keep an unofficial record of the number of ships sank. Although today’s flag holds a different meaning, Sailors continue to create battle flags to show respect to those who came before them and document peacetime events. “While New Hampshire’s flag does not document combat operations like on Barb, Tang or Wahoo, it represents success in the most demanding peacetime operations,” said Christman. “The crew, the force, and the nation can take pride in the events this flag represents.” According to Master Chief Sonar Technician (Submarine) Billy Singletary, New Hampshire’s chief of the boat, battle flags also serve as a reminder of the importance of preserving Navy traditions and customs. “It is important to pass along Turn to USS New Hampshire, Page 7

Hooked on fly-fishing

Tegtmeyer, a Navy veteran and wounded warrior, had been fishing before, but never fly-fishing. A co-worker invited Tegtmeyer to join and then he was hooked. PAGE A6

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The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, June 10, 2021

Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY) employees participate in the annual Chesapeake Bay Clean the Bay Day (CTBD). (SHELBY WEST)

Norfolk Naval Shipyard supports environmental stewardship: Clean the bay our way By Jason Scarborough

Norfolk Naval Shipyard Public Affairs

PORTSMOUTH — Each year, on the first Saturday of June, Hampton Roads residents simultaneously descend on the rivers, streams, beaches and land-based properties of the Chesapeake Bay watershed to remove litter and debris. This year, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, participation will be slightly different. However, Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY) will be safely charging forward to participate in its own rendition of Clean the Bay Day (CTBD). Since the origination of the event in 1989, approximately 152,000 Virginia volunteers have donated their time and energy towards CTBD, which has resulted in more than 6.5 million pounds of debris being removed from

more than 7,390 miles of shoreline. One of the largest volunteer events in Virginia, this annual tradition is organized by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF) and local partners. It is an opportunity for families, military installations, businesses, clubs, civic and church groups to give back to the environment. In 2019, Department of Defense (DoD) installations that participated in CTBD removed 24,506 pounds of trash, had 1,274 volunteers participate, and cleaned 60.45 miles of shoreline. However, last year, for the first time since its start, the event was canceled due to concerns over COVID-19. This year, the pandemic prevents NNSY employees from gathering together on one day as they have done in the past. NNSY and the surrounding communities are adapting this year’s event

to continue the tradition in a safe and effective way. The official 2021 event will last six days, Monday, May 31 to Saturday, June 5. The extended period gives participants flexibility to do a litter clean up anytime during those six days. NNSY’s Natural Resources Manager Hayley Becker is coordinating the shipyard’s participation this year. She believes that events such as CTBD demonstrate NNSY’s good stewardship of the local environment. Becker said, “This event is a big stewardship exercise for the Navy Region Mid-Atlantic. Our installation directly and indirectly affects the creeks, streams and rivers leading to the bay.” NNSY has historically partnered on the CTBD event with Naval Station Norfolk (NSN) and other commands; however, in 2016, NNSY

began organizing its own events, separate from other commands. The NNSY event focuses on cleaning its surrounding waterways that directly affect the Chesapeake Bay. CTBD is a model for teamwork, with the program built on lasting relationships between dozens of cities and counties, non-profits, military installations, small businesses, and large corporations. On CTBD, NNSY comes together for a common cause: clean water, environmental awareness and education. It is a combined community and government demonstration of commitment to the restoration and preservation of the Chesapeake Bay. With more than 60 military installations in the Chesapeake Bay watershed area, a strong presence at events such as CTBD shows the Navy’s commitment to environmental stewardship. For the NNSY family, every day, each of us can do our part to make the Chesapeake Bay even more beautiful by preventing and picking up litter. Adopting a proactive posture, and continuing to make CTBD a command event, ensures the greatest turnout of volunteers and heightens awareness of the need to protect the environment from pollution. For more information on CTBD, visit https://www.cbf.org/events/clean-the-bayday/.

Continuing to serve, shape the Navy By MC1 Phillip Pavlovich

Navy Region Mid-Atlantic Public Affairs

NORFOLK — According to defense.gov, the DoD’s mentorship program is the oldest continuously operating federal mentor-protégé program in existence. Though leaders in the Navy provide mentorship up and down the chain-of-command while serving on active duty, Alphonso Hayes, a retired chief logistics specialist, continues to guide and shape the Navy through retirement. Alphonso Hayes is Navy Region Mid-Atlantic’s (CNRMA) senior equal employment opportunity (EEO) specialist. “My last tour on active duty, I spent as an equal employment opportunity advisor. The command I was at didn’t have an EEO representative and I was asked to take on the responsibility. I accepted because I knew it might be something I would be interested in once I retired. So, I networked, took classes, and maintained relationships that helped me get into this field once I retired,” said Hayes. “I have always been a person that tried to speak up for people who didn’t have a voice. Even as a kid, that was my mindset. It just really bothers me to see people being harassed or discriminated against. I’ve had instances in my own military career in which I was treated unfairly because of my race. I hated that feeling of helplessness, and don’t want anyone else to have to feel or experience that,” said Hayes. As the senior EEO specialist he mentors four other specialists, and overseess the Management Directive-715 (MD-715) Report. MD-715 provides a roadmap for agencies to plan, implement and measure their success in providing equal opportunity for applicants and employees. “I think my work is important because if

a person is being harassed or discriminated against, then they can’t fully perform their jobs because of the distraction. Eliminating those distractions enables workers to focus on their jobs, enabling them to be more productive,” said Hayes. Hayes reviews EEO policies, procedures and practices to ensure that any barriers - institutional, attitudinal or physical - are identified, and a plan of action is developed and implemented. “I get an opportunity to impact policies and programs that directly affect the livelihood of our workforce. My work directly affects how our [employees] are treated, how they are compensated [and] how they advance, and helps determine if they continue to work for us or if they choose to seek employment somewhere else,” said Hayes. As an EEO practitioner, Hayes says he not only enjoys helping others, but also enjoys serving as a model of the behaviors he teaches within his own office. “It’s always a great feeling to be able to help someone in need. The satisfaction of seeing someone get an issue resolved and be able to go back to work in an environment free of harassment or discrimination is an awesome feeling,” said Hayes. Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic (CNRMA) is the regional coordinator for all shore-based naval personnel and shore activities in the mid-Atlantic region, which encompasses 20 states, 14 installations, and 50 naval operational support centers. As the naval shore installation management headquarters for the mid-Atlantic region, CNRMA provides coordination of base operating support functions for operating forces throughout the region in support of the fleet, fighter and family.

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Alphonso Hayes, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic’s (CNRMA) senior equal employment opportunity (EEO) specialist, poses for a selfie. (COURTESY PHOTO)

Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic (CNRMA): Rear Adm Charles W.“Chip”Rock Regional program manager for Navy Region Mid-Atlantic (NRMA): Public Affairs Director | Beth Baker The Flagship® is published by Flagship, Inc., a private firm in no way connected with the Department of Defense (DOD) or the United States Navy, under exclusive written contract with Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic. This civilian enterprise newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the military services. Contents of the paper, including advertisements, are not necessarily the official views of, nor endorsed by, the U.S. Government, DOD, or the Department of the Navy (DON). The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts and supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the DOD; DON; Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic or Flagship, Inc. of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase,use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user, or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. Editorial content is edited, prepared and provided by the Public Affairs Department of Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic. Stories may be submitted via email to news@flagshipnews.com. The Flagship® is published every Thursday by Flagship, Inc., whose mailbox is located at PO Box 282501 © 2021Flagship, Inc. All rights reserved


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, June 10, 2021 3

Norfolk Naval Shipyard spotlight: Kenneth Clarke By Allison Conti

Norfolk Naval Shipyard Public Affars

PORTSMOUTH — Norfolk Naval Shipyard’s (NNSY) Environmental Protection Specialist (Code 106.323) Kenneth Clarke starts each workday the same way — by writing an inspirational quote on his white board. According to his supervisor, Environmental Monitoring Manager Sandra Walton, that is just one of the ways that Clarke brings warmth and positivity to his coworkers, his code, and the shipyard as a whole. Clarke began his career at NNSY in March 2016 in the Pipefitter Shop (Shop 56). When he arrived at NNSY, Clarke already had 11 years of experience under his belt as a pipefitter. He completed a five-year-long apprenticeship program in 2010 and worked as a contractor before walking through the shipyard’s gates for the first time. Clarke’s acumen for occupational health and safety as an Environmental Coordinator caught the attention of NNSY’s Occupational Safety, Health and Environmental Office (Code 106) and he eventually transitioned from Shop 56 to Code 106 in October 2019. Clarke said he was interested in making the career transition because it gave him a chance to learn something new and offered him opportunities for growth. In his current role, Clarke helps the shipyard maintain compliance with the Clean Water Act (CWA) along with the Virginia Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (VPDES) and Hampton Roads Sanitation District (HRSD) permits by performing a wide variety of sampling, inspections and surveillances throughout the shipyard. He also performs sampling to support other regulatory programs such as the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). The transition from being a pipefitter to working with environmental safety had its challenges, but Clarke said that overcoming those difficulties and succeeding in his new role is one of his proudest career achievements. “Just like anyone when they start something new, I was in unfamiliar territory, so I grasped what I could

Norfolk Naval Shipyard’s (NNSY) Environmental Protection Specialist (Code 106.323) Kenneth Clarke transitioned from being a pipefitter to working with environmental safety. (ALDO ANDERSON)

and kept moving — eventually I got it. I was not afraid to ask a question about something if I did not know the answer,” said Clarke. As a survivor of Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, Clarke is not unaccustomed to overcoming difficult situations. “I was told the cancer would cripple me — but I didn’t let that get me down. I kept a positive state of mind and accepted whatever God had coming for me. Four years later, I am here with a big smile on my face. I try to motivate others with my story.” His upbeat attitude has had a positive effect on his colleagues. “If you were to meet Mr. Clarke in the building, the hallway, or within the ship-

yard, be prepared to get a genuine happy smile along with a ‘hello’, ‘good morning’, or a ‘how are you doing?,’ ” said Walton. “He brings a warmth to our building and section with his great work ethic, positive attitude and confidence.” Clarke said that he was drawn to NNSY because of the perks that come with federal employment and the opportunity for growth within his career. But since starting at NNSY, his ability to connect with other shipyarders and impact their day for the better has become his favorite part of the job. “The thing I enjoy the most about my job is interacting with different people daily and helping someone smile that

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might be going through something,” said Clarke. Clarke’s three rules for life are, “If you do not go after what you want, you will never have it. If you do not ask, the answer will always be no. And if you do not step forward, you will always be in the same place.” Walton said that Clarke upholds NNSY’s C.O.R.E. values of Care, Ownership, Respect, and Excellence and is a valuable member of the One Team driving NNSY towards its One Mission. Clarke values being a member of the NNSY team and works hard to help the shipyard meet its mission. “You can’t win a championship without a team!” he said.


4 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, June 10, 2021

USAF Capt. Anthony Ferrelli is currently assigned to Joint Maritime Component Commander, U.S. Strategic Command (JFMCC STRAT). (MC1 ALFRED COFFIELD)

Interservice Exchange Program strengthens Submarine Force By MC1 Alfred Coffield

Submarine Force Atlantic Public Affairs

NORFOLK — U.S. Air Force missileer officers are currently serving multi-year tours with a component command under Commander, Submarine Forces (SUBFOR) in Norfolk. Maj. Cory Elder and Capt. Anthony Ferrelli serve as joint exercise planning officers with the Submarine Force. The Navy has a history of using long acronyms, and to understand the roles both officers, it’s important to understand the mission of JFMCC STRAT. Joint Force Maritime Component Commander, U.S. Strategic Command (JFMCC STRAT) conducts joint maritime operations and executes the maritime aspects of strategic deterrence. The long designation emphasizes the complicated and important mission for the Navy.

“JFMCC STRAT is the U.S. Strategic Command’s (USSTRATCOM) arm of the Navy,” Elder said. “We’re the component that manages operational control of all SSBN and E6-B aircraft, comprising the most survivable one-third of the nation’s nuclear triad.” The “triad” refers to the three strategic nuclear delivery vehicles serving as the backbone of the nation’s national security and providing 24/7 deterrence against adversaries. The intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) force, ballistic missile submarines of the Submarine Force, and the nation’s bomber fleet comprise the weapons systems and platforms of the triad. So how do Air Force officers end up in the Submarine Force? In order to maintain nuclear deterrence, U.S. Air Force Global Strike Command (AFGSC) and U.S. Navy SUBFOR participate in a dual-service, nuclear exchange program to enhance interoperability within the nation’s

nuclear enterprise. The program, named Striker Trident, aims to professionally develop nuclear officers. The exchange program hand selects ICBM officers in various AFGSC units, and assigns them to SUBFOR. Likewise, submarine warfare qualified officers are selected and assigned to AFGSC units. “This program enables Navy and Air Force nuclear-qualified officers to understand other aspects of the nuclear triad, as well as each leg’s respective role in U.S. Strategic Command’s deterrence mission,” Elder said. “My role here is planning joint exercises on behalf of the JFMCC, such as Global Thunder, an annual field training exercise designed to train USSTRATCOM forces and assess joint operational readiness across all USSTRATCOM mission areas; and Exercise Global Lightning, an annual exercise that provides realistic training activities against simulated adversaries, and links

with other combatant commands to ensure and improve nuclear readiness and strategic deterrent capabilities.” In addition to learning the workings of each service’s mission, the program also allows participants a better understanding of branch specific traditions and customs. “As an Air Force ICBM operator (missileer), I have thoroughly enjoyed immersing in the deep, storied culture of not just the Navy but also the Submarine Service,” Ferrelli said. “The pride exuded by the men and women who wear Dolphins is truly energizing, and for me the best part of working with the Submarine Force is going underway and experiencing the tip of the underwater spear and living the ‘Silent Service’ mantra.” The mission of the Submarine Force is to execute the Department of the Navy’s mission in and from the undersea domain. In addition to lending added capacity to naval forces, the Submarine Force, in particular, is expected to leverage those special advantages that come with undersea concealment to permit operational, deterrent and combat effects that the Navy and the nation could not otherwise achieve. The Submarine Force and supporting organizations constitute the primary undersea arm of the Navy. Submarines and their crews remain the tip of the undersea spear.

Destroyer Squadron 26 holds change of command ceremony By Lt.j.g. Benjamin Nickerson

USS George H.W. Bush (Cvn 77) Public Affairs

NORFOLK — Destroyer Squadron 26 (DESRON 26) held a change of command ceremony onboard Naval Station Norfolk, June 4. Capt. Frank E. Brandon relieved Capt. Zoah Scheneman as commodore, DESRON 26. “I’m so proud of the staff and ships of DESRON 26 and all we’ve accomplished,” Scheneman said. “It was a great honor to work with such professional and dedicated warfighters. I am privileged, humbled, and grateful to have worked with the heroes of this team during these unprecedented times.” Scheneman has served as the squadron’s commodore since June 2020. Prior to assuming command, he served as DESRON

26’s deputy commodore. Prior to assuming command of DESRON 26, Brandon’s tours of duty have included the officer in charge for Nuclear Power Mobile Training Team Pacific, reactor officer aboard USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), and operations officer at Naval Surface Force Atlantic. “It is an honor and a privilege to serve with the DESRON 26 team,” Brandon said. “Capt. Scheneman continued the long legacy of great leadership at DESRON 26, and he served as mentor to me and the staff. We will strive to live up to the standards of excellence he established.” DESRON 26 consists of the guided-missile destroyers, USS Stout (DDG 55), USS Oscar Austin (DDG 79), USS James E. Williams (DDG 95), USS Truxtun (DDG 103), USS Nitze (DDG 94), and USS McFaul (DDG 74).

Capt. Frank E. Brandon, commodore, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 26, is piped ashore during a change of command ceremony at Naval Station Norfolk. (MC3 BRYAN VALEK)

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, June 10, 2021 5

Chasing a dream: Righting a wrong By MC1 Phillip Pavlovich

Navy Region Mid-Atlantic Public Affairs

NORFOLK — During the end of 2019, Sara Mbanden had a family member who was in need of surgery to remove cancer. The cancer-ridden family member notified their supervisor about the illness and that they would be in and out of the hospital. The company then fired the family member just a few days before the big surgery and prevented them from claiming employee insurance benefits. “I knew it was wrong, but I didn’t know why it was wrong exactly. Once I started in the equal employment opportunity (EEO) field and learned about employees’ rights and responsibilities, I understood why it was wrong and how my family member’s EEO rights were violated. That has only fueled me up to continue in this career field to teach EEO and to make sure the EEO process is being followed throughout by employers,” said Mbanden, an EEO specialist assigned to Navy Region Mid-Atlantic (NRMA). “I absolutely love that I get to make such a difference and impact.” Mbanden has been working in the EEO field for over a year now. Before that, she worked as a Human Rights Commission liaison where she shared an office with an EEO counselor. She expressed how his job fascinated her and because of him she learned about EEO rights and responsibilities. “I thought, maybe if we had more of people fighting for our rights, we could prevent a lot of issues before it reached the point of human rights violations. I am also from Cameroon where a lot of employees don’t even know that they have rights, let alone what they are. As an immigrant in the U.S., and while talking to a lot of immigrants here, I can tell you that a lot don’t know about their rights as employees either. The combination of all of that is why I wanted to do more, and when I saw an opening with the NRMA EEO office, I took my chance and applied,” she said “The feeling of satisfaction and self-fulfillment I feel when I help a customer is unmatched,” Mbanden added. “When I also hear the customer express their level of satisfaction with my service as a counselor and explanation of the EEO process, it makes me feel great about being in such a field.” While working as a Human Rights Commission liaison for the City of Virginia Beach, Mbanden wanted a job with the Navy to make the moving process easier for her and her husband, who is active-duty Navy. After several interviews at different places, a job at the NRMA EEO Office posted.

“Though I was nervous about applying, I did it anyways and told my husband that this will be the perfect job in my dream field because I aspire to be an attorney for EEO. So, learning as a specialist before I eventually go down that road would be perfect,” said Mbanden. “Thankfully, I was given a chance to come in and interview. Before I knew it, I received an email that I was hired. This is my biggest do it scared moment and it paid big time because I work with one of the best teams ever.” As an equal employment opportunity specialist, she ensures that applicants and employees are given equal opportunities in employment and contracting activities, regardless of race, religion, color, national origin, sex, age, disability, or any other protected characteristic. She provides assistance in handling grievances and works with neutral counselors during alternatives dispute resolution (ADR) to make sure that employees have the best available tools to help them during the EEO process. She also serves as a Special Emphasis Program coordinator, where she brings awareness to all special observances to bring focus to diversity and inclusion. “Often, this combination of trust and expectation create an environment that promotes [an] efficient and safe working environment. However, this combination can also create a toxic work environment where those who are not aware of their rights may have them violated, and with no one to advocate or protect them, they will exist as victims of this toxic culture, toxic work place, with no one to help them. That is where I as the EEO specialist come in to help them through the EEO process,” said Mbanden. Mbanden believes that as humans, we look to our leaders and elders for guidance, and we often take them at their words with no questions. As humans, we are also social creatures who fall into working cultures where norms and expectations are created by these leaders and elders within a working environment. “As an immigrant, Black woman, I appreciate what this office does so much, and the fact that we have so much diversity within our office. Our Director Mr. Walker has created an office where we can openly discuss our feeling, he gives everyone a chance to speak up and he listen. He cultivates and encourages everyone to speak up,” said Mbanden. “Because I feel free and heard in this office, I was able to come up with Real Talk with Admiral Rock, which is now a monthly discussion. It is hosted by Admiral Rock to give Sailors and civilians a voice to speak up openly as we navigate during a racially charged time in our country, and the COVID19 pandemic,” she added.

Sara Mbanden, an equal employment opportunity specialist assigned to Navy Region MidAtlantic (NRMA), poses for a photo. (COURTESY PHOTO)

According to Mbanden, Real Talk with Admiral Rock began in 2020 and was inspired by hearing customers and enlisted Sailors talk about how they felt about the George Floyd case and how some felt they couldn’t discuss their feelings at work. “This job gives me the opportunity to look out for the little guy [and] me advance while supporting my husband and his career in the Navy that he loves. We both get to do what we love and serve our country in different aspects,” said Mbanden.

Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic (CNRMA) is the regional coordinator for all shore-based naval personnel and shore activities in the mid-Atlantic region, which encompasses 20 states, 14 installations, and 50 naval operational support centers. As the naval shore installation management headquarters for the mid-Atlantic region, CNRMA provides coordination of base operating support functions for operating forces throughout the region in support of the fleet, fighter and family.

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6 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, June 10, 2021

Steve Tegtmeyer shows off a fish caught while fly-fishing with Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing (PHWFF). (STACIA COURTNEY)

Hooked on fly-fishing, healing, helping others From Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division Public Affairs DAHLGREN — A tranquil landscape only found in nature. A peaceful mountain river rich with bass and trout. And the easy rhythm of a fly-fishing rod. The cadence ten o’clock, two o’clock, ten o’clock - running through the heads of new fly-fishermen as they try to achieve the perfect cast. “It takes a lot of concentration, and clears your mind of everything else,” said Steven Tegtmeyer, Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division Dam Neck Activity Integrated Training Systems portfolio director and volunteer with Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing (PHWFF). Tegtmeyer, a Navy veteran and wounded

warrior, had been fishing before, but never fly-fishing. A co-worker was bringing a new chapter of PHWFF to the Tidewater area and invited Tegtmeyer to join. It took him a year of consideration before he took the bait and attended. And then he was hooked. Tegtmeyer attended a workshop and learned how to build his own fly rod and tie a fly. From there, he attended outings at local lakes, day and weekend trips to mountain streams in the Shenandoah Valley and a breathtaking trip to Montana, all funded by PHWFF. He discovered a sense of friendship and camaraderie not found anywhere else. “Family members can help you out physically, but they can’t always understand emotionally what you go through in a wartime situation,” he said. Other partic-

ipants of PHWFF have had similar experiences — and that brings a sense of normalcy and unspoken understanding. Tegtmeyer decided to start volunteering so he could share the fun and healing with others. “I enjoyed it so much, and really wanted to be able to share this with other veterans and wounded warriors,” said Tegtmeyer. “So I decided to volunteer and help others and teach them the things I have learned, and build that friendship and companionship that the program is all about.” Tegtmeyer jumped right in and began teaching workshops on fly rod building and fly tying as well as guiding many trips to local waters for group members. PHWFF is a nonprofit group dedicated to supporting disabled veterans and active-

duty military members, guided by the motto “healing those who serve.” There are 14 chapters of PHWFF in Virginia alone, and many more throughout the country. The workshops and outings provide an outlet for the veteran and wounded warrior community that brings a peacefulness that is a gift beyond measure. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the in-person events stopped. The PHWFF groups were still active, however, and held virtual meetings, classes and live-stream events demonstrating how to tie a fly while viewers followed along at home with materials sent to them by PHWFF. As restrictions lift, the groups will get back to the healing waters. “It’s not necessarily about catching the fish as much as it is about just going fishing. It’s finding peace and forgetting about the world around you. You don’t have anything else to worry about,” said Tegtmeyer. “It’s kind of our unspoken motto - it’s great catching fish, but it’s more about getting together and socializing, building friendships and camaraderie.” Tegtmeyer received the Distinguished Community Service Award at the annual NSWCDD Honorary Awards Ceremony, and is among 105 individual employees and 36 teams honored with 22 different awards.

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, June 10, 2021 7

Laura Orr, director of education at the Hampton Roads Naval Museum, presents a historical presentation about the Battle of Midway at Scudder Hall aboard NWS Yorktown. (MAX LONZANIDA)

NWS Yorktown remembers Battle of Midway By Max Lonzanida

Hampton Roads Naval Museum Public Affairs

YORKTOWN — Scudder Hall galley is a familiar site to many Sailors, Marines and civilians onboard Naval Weapons Station Yorktown. Inside, its staff of culinary specialists and civilian employees serve up hearty meals daily to sustain those assigned to tenant commands at both NWS Yorktown and Cheatham Annex. In addition to the lunchtime meal, on June 7, 2021, a handful of service members and civilians enjoyed a hearty portion of naval history in the form of a historical presentation by Laura Orr, Director of Education at the Hampton Roads Naval Museum in Norfolk. Orr’s presentation centered around one of the U.S. Navy’s most historically significant battles in the Pacific during World War II, the Battle of Midway. June 2021 marks the 79th anniversary of the multi-day naval engagement with Japanese forces. The battle centered around tiny Midway Atoll from June 3-7, 1942.

During the presentation, attendees had the opportunity to hear about the American naval experience and specifically about the sacrifices they made during this pivotal moment in history. The presentation started with the narrative of a Narwhal-class submarine, USS Nautilus (SS 168). The 12-year-old submarine’s skipper, LCDR William Brockman, was on his first war patrol at the time. Nautilus escaped strafing from Japanese aircraft on the morning of June 4, 1942 and managed to move into an attack position to fire torpedoes at the Japanese aircraft carrier Kaga. The Mark 14 torpedoes fired by Nautilus did not detonate as anticipated. Lt. Cmdr. Brockman would later report, that “Ships were on all sides [of us] moving across the field at high speed and circling away to avoid the submarine’s position…. A battleship was on our port bow and firing her whole starboard side battery at the periscope.” The presentation shifted to reflect some of the experiences of naval aviators from USS Enterprise (CV 6), USS Yorktown (CV

5), and USS Hornet (CV 8). One of them, LCDR Lance Massey, was in command of Torpedo Squadron 3 from USS Yorktown (CV 5). His squadron attacked the Japanese carrier Hiryu and only three crewmen from this squadron survived. One of them, Radioman 3rd Class Lloyd Charles Childers, recalled LCDR Massey’s final moments noting, “I watched their plane hit the water, exploding in a mass of churning fire. Those were the final seconds in the lives of LCDR Massey and Chief Perry. The only good part was that it was quick.” During the morning portion of the battle, American dive bombers managed to sink three of the four Japanese aircraft carriers, coming back later in the day to sink the fourth carrier. During the intervening hours, USS Yorktown (CV 5) fell victim to attacking Japanese aircraft and suffered significant bomb damage. One of her crewmen, Yeoman Dan Kaseberg, recalled the horrific scene, reminiscing: “Fire hoses were in shreds, shrapnel had scattered all over. How the bombs missed me I’ll never know. One thing I do remember quite

Lanie Pepitone from Page 1

Cmdr. Bennett Christman, left, commanding officer of USS New Hampshire (SSN 778), and Master Chief Sonar Technician (Submarine) Billy Singletary, New Hampshire’s chief of the boat, hold a submarine battle flag created by the boat’s crew during a recent deployment. (MC2 CAMERON STONER)

USS New Hampshire from Page 1

submarine history and traditions for several reasons, the most important being we must understand where we came from,” said Singletary. “We must understand the humble beginnings of man-powered propulsion and reflect on the nuclear juggernauts we have become. By understanding the sacrifices of those who went before us, we can become a better force and nation.” On May 7, 2021, New Hampshire returned home after a deployment where it executed the chief of naval operations’ maritime strategy by supporting national security interests and maritime security operations. Upon New Hampshire’s return, the battle flag consisted of: • the number four to commemorate the boat’s 4th deployment • a gold submarine warfare device, also known as ‘dolphins’, accompanied with the number five to display how many officers earned the insignia on deployment

• silver ‘dolphins’ accompanied with the number 23, representing how many enlisted Sailors earned their warfare device on the deployment • a cross-wrench with the number 33 representing the number of times New Hampshire Sailor’s ingenuity helped while fixing equipment • the number five and a bullseye to signify specific mission accomplishments Fast-attack submarines are multi-mission platforms enabling five of the six Navy maritime strategy core capabilities - sea control, power projection, forward presence, maritime security, and deterrence. They are designed to excel in anti-submarine warfare, anti-ship warfare, strike warfare, special operations, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, irregular warfare and mine warfare. Fast-attack submarines project power ashore with special operations forces and Tomahawk cruise missiles in the prevention or preparation of regional crises. The Virginia-class submarine is 377 feet long and 34 feet wide, and weighs about 7,900 tons when submerged. Underwater, it can reach speeds in excess of 25 knots.

tive munitions testing, according to Pepitone. According to Walt Dzula, Weapons System Test Engineering Branch head, Pepitone “coordinates all phases of testing to include initial meetings with the customer, safety document and test plan development, test execution and final reporting.” Her primary area of expertise is with Navy missiles and Rocket Motor Static Fire (RMSF) testing, where her engineering experience is “unsurpassed in the division,” according to Dzula. RMSF testing at EEA has been conducted on several different rocket motors. In order to test these rocket motors, they must be disassembled from the remainder of the missile system. “A missile is a self-contained weapon system with its own propulsion and guidance system. Since the rocket motors we tested were disassembled from the missile, we had to determine how the rocket motor was initiated when part of the complete weapon system. Then, we designed a firing system that would allow us to static fire each

USS Arlington from Page 1

schedule dictates their ability to conduct the drill. “Since we got basic phase done early, we were able to squeeze in this two-day battle problem and try to stress out the crew and training teams, said Capt. Chris “Chowdah” Hill, commanding officer of the Arlington. A few of the scenarios included items Arlington Sailors hadn’t trained on previously. This allowed leadership to observe them utilizing sound judgement and outside-the-box thinking to overcome the obstacles at hand. Upon completing the Final Battle Problem, leadership deemed it a success based on the smiles seen on Sailors faces throughout the ship.

vividly, was having a very one-sided conversation with the man in the sky.” At 1455 on the afternoon of June 4, 1942, Yorktown’s Commanding Officer, Captain Elliott Buckmaster, ordered the crew to abandon ship. Kaseberg and over 2,000 Sailors did so and were rescued by escorting ships. As Yorktown was being towed back to Pearl Harbor, a Japanese submarine found the ship and loosed its torpedoes, sinking Yorktown and an accompanying destroyer, USS Hammann (DD 412). Yorktown, despite efforts of salvage crews, sank on June 7, 1942. The pivotal battle involved 26 U.S. ships, 360 planes, and 19 submarines. 307 Sailors, Marines and aviators perished or were lost at sea, while Japanese forces suffered a similar fate, and sustained the loss of over 3,000 casualties, along with a cruiser and four fleet aircraft carriers. NWS Yorktown’s Commanding Officer Captain Jason Schneider provided some closing remarks after a short question and answer session. “Today our service members and civilians had an opportunity to reacquaint themselves with one of America’s most important naval victories of World War II, the Battle of Midway,” stated Captain Schneider. “The ability to combine the lessons of our past with today’s U.S. Navy strategies are key to mission success.” There was a brief cake cutting afterwards, and those present at Scudder Hall for the presentation departed after learning and reflecting on this pivotal naval engagement.

rocket motor independently,” said Pepitone. “A lot of that work was conducted in 2007, but since then we have had several other customers reach out to us for this type of testing. Our reputation must be growing.” B efore joining the workforce at NSWCDD, Pepitone had secondhand knowledge of base operations through her father, who worked in the same department in the 1970s and 80s. After graduation from Longwood University with a degree in math, Pepitone took a job with a contractor outside the NSWCDD gates. Around the same time, Pepitone started dating her now-wife, who had just taken a job at NSWCDD Dam Neck Activity (she has since moved back to NSWCDD, and now works in the Strategic and Computing Systems Department). The pair dated for 12 years before getting married in 2014. “One of the things that has really surprised me over the years is how society in general has changed and how accepting people have become of different races, religions and sexual orientations,” shared Pepitone. “I remember in high school, it wasn’t something that was talked about. I was worried about how I would be [perceived] in the workforce, but I have had nothing but positive interactions here at Dahlgren.” “For me, it was a blast because I was a player and not an assessor,” Hill said. I was able to role play being the commanding officer during one of the most challenging threat scenarios we could come up with. I certainly made my own mistakes and learned from them.” As Arlington leaders debrief the event, they plan to utilize the lessons learned for training opportunities throughout the summer as they work through the integrated phase of deployment training. In integrated phase, the Arlington will begin training with the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3) and other ships attached to the amphibious ready group as well as Marine Expeditionary Units. Training evolutions will become larger and more complex as Arlington progresses through each phase leading up to deployment.


8 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, June 10, 2021

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 2 | Thursday, June 10, 2021 1

U.S. Marines in Australia are ready to rapidly provide assistance The Darwin and the Australian Defence Force recently completed a humanitarian assistance and disaster relief exercise called “Crocodile Response.” Page B6

Sailors aboard USS Constitution heave lines to furl the ship’s Spanker Sail. (MC3 ALEC KRAMER)

Blended Retirement System CY 2022 continuation pay announced By MC1 Mark D. Faram

Chief Of Naval Personnel Public Affairs

WASHINGTON — All Sailors enrolled in the Blended Retirement System qualify for incentive pay at the 12-year “mid-career” point. The Navy released the calendar year 2022 Blended Retirement System (BRS) continuation pay (CP) rates for eligible Sailors June 3rd in NAVADMIN 114⁄21. Under BRS, Sailors participate in a modernized retirement program. Throughout their career, Sailors who opt-in or were auto-enrolled in the Thrift Savings Plan receive a matching contribution of up to five

percent of their base pay from the Navy. Those who stay until retirement after 20 years still get retired pay at a two percent multiplier for every year of service (YOS), vice the two and a half percent multiplier they would receive under the legacy retirement system. One additional benefit of BRS is continuation pay. All Sailors enrolled in BRS qualify for the incentive, which currently comes at the 12-year “mid-career” point. To collect the incentive, eligible Sailors must do two things. They must request the pay before they arrive at their 12th pay anniversary and they must agree to obligate for another

four years of service via Navy Standard Integrated Personnel System (NSIPS) before they can collect. If the Sailor has a correct email on file in NSIPS, notification that this milestone is approaching will come at the six, three and one-month dates prior to reaching their 12th YOS. For Active Duty and Full-Time Support (FTS) Sailors, the calendar year 2022 payout is two and a half times their monthly base pay. For drilling reservists, it is half of one month’s salary. This is the same amount as the calendar year 2021 payout. For example, an Active Duty or FTS E-5 or E-6 with 12 YOS is eligi-

ble for a one-time payout of roughly $9,000 and $10,000, respectively. In the Selected Reserve, those payouts would be approximately $1,800 for the E-5 and close to $2,000 for the E-6. The incentive is taxable income, but for Sailors who obligate for the pay while in an eligible Combat Tax Exclusion Zone, the entire amount is tax-free. Sailors get to choose the payment method and can elect either a lump-sum or in equal installments, which can’t exceed four annual payments over four consecutive years. Sailors can also collect this pay in addition to any other career-specific

or retention incentives. Sailors can update their email and elect CP through NSIPS at https:// my.navy.mil/quick-links.html. Those unable to choose CP through NSIPS can manually select the pay through their command career counselor. More CP information, including instructions on electing CP in NAVADMIN 302⁄17 and MILPERSMAN 1810-081. For any other CP issues, Sailors can contact MyNavy Career Center (MNCC) at 833-330MNCC or askmncc@navy.mil. Sailors eligible for the mid-career CP can view the CY 2022 pay rates memorandum at https://www.mnp. navy.mil/group/pay-and-benefits.

Exercise BALTOPS 50 kicks off From Naval Striking and Support Forces NATO Public Affairs

Capt. Marc Ratkus, commanding officer for the Center for Information Warfare Training (CIWT), delivers remarks during a 79th anniversary of the Battle of Midway commemoration ceremony. (GLENN SIRCY)

CIWT, IWTC Corry Station commemorate 79th anniversary of the Battle of Midway By Glenn Sircy

Center For Information Warfare Training Public Affairs

PENSACOLA, Fla. — The Center for Information Warfare Training (CIWT) and Information Warfare Training Command (IWTC) Corry Station commemorated the 79th anniversary of the Battle of Midway

during a morning ceremony on Naval Air Station Pensacola Corry Station, Pensacola, Florida, June 4. The Battle of Midway was a naval battle in the Pacific Theater of World War II from June 4-7, 1942. Widely considered a turning point in World War II’s Pacific theater, the U.S. victory at the Battle of Midway significantly curbed Japan’s offensive

capabilities, shifting the tide of the war in the Allies’ favor. Staff and students attended and participated in the ceremony in which they shared critical points of the Battle of Midway and what events and actions by the information warfare community leading up Turn to Battle of Midway, Page 7

U.S. 6TH FLEET AREA OF OPERATIONS — The 50th Baltic Operations (BALTOPS 50) exercise, the premier maritime-focused exercise in the Baltic Region, kicked off, June 6. Between June 6-18, air and maritime assets from 18 NATO Allies and partner nations will participate in live training events that include air defence, anti-submarine warfare, amphibious operations, maritime interdiction, mine countermeasure operations. “This year, we celebrate the 50th BALTOPS, an exercise that sets the foundation of interoperability across the Alliance,” said U.S. Vice Adm. Gene Black, commander, Naval Striking and Support Forces NATO and commander, U.S. Sixth Fleet. “BALTOPS stands as the keystone of our exercise season, demonstrating half a century of the unwavering commitment of our partners and Allies. Lessons learned in BALTOPS enable international strike group operations, advanced missile defense capabilities and seamless surface action group missions.” BALTOPS 50 consists of two at-sea training phases: the combat enhancement training (CET) and force integration training (FIT) portion and the final tactical phase of the exercise (TACEX). During the first six days (the

CET/FIT phase), ships and aircraft will transit through the Danish Straits, focusing on maritime operations in critical chokepoints, ensuring access and freedom of navigation in the Baltic Sea. The exercise will continue to move East during its two phases, operating in accordance with international law and supported by participating Allies and partners. The exercise will culminate with the TACEX phase, where the exercise paradigm will shift into a “free-play” portion, and commanders are given more freedom to run their own tactical programs. The TACEX phase is designed to better represent operating in real-world situations. For the first time, exercise design incorporates defensive cyber warfare tactics, techniques and procedures as BALTOPS continues to adapt and train to ensure an asymmetric advantage in the era of modern warfare. Naval Striking and Support Forces NATO (STRIKFORNATO) will again command and control BALTOPS from its headquarters in Oeiras, Portugal. II Marine Expeditionar y Brigade and Expeditionar y Strike Group 2 will command and control exercise Marine forces throughout the exercise from aboard USS Mount Whitney (LCC 20), demonstrating international naval integration and Turn to BALTOPS, Page 7


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The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 2 | Thursday, June 10, 2021

Heroes at Home

Q: Where can I find an application and other documents required for housing? A: The documents, including the Housing Application, can be found on the Navy Housing website www.cnic.navy.mil/ housingpolicyandforms. These include the Housing Application, Sexual Offender Form, dependent certification, custody or divorce papers and a copy of your orders.

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Will new remote work opportunities bridge the stubborn milspouse income gap? By Lisa Smith Molinari It’s no surprise that the highest rate of unemployment in U.S. history was during the Great Depression, when rates jumped to 24.9 percent in 1933, four years after the infamous Black Thursday stock market crash caused total economic collapse and widespread poverty. But what would surprise most Americans is that military spouses have faced Depression-era levels of unemployment for decades. Prior to COVID-19, when U.S. unemployment rates dropped to modern lows of 3.5 percent, military wives’ unemployment rate was stuck at 25 percent due to frequent moves, deployments, career interruptions, childcare issues, and occupational licensing requirements. Federal and state governments made good faith efforts to help, with programs for re-licensure reimbursement, DoD scholarships, and business owner residency rules through legislation and programs. But military spouse unemployment rates didn’t budge despite these comprehensive programs aimed to help. “Congress has authorized several initiatives to support military spouse education, employment and career development …, though relatively little is known about their effectiveness. Considering that the unemployment rate among military spouses has remained persistently high for the last two decades, the National Military Spouse Network suspects these initiatives are not having the impact they were designed to have,” stated a 2021 White Paper addressing the seemingly unyielding military spouse unemployment issue.

Tips for Disciplining Your Child From MilitaryOnesource Misbehavior and boundary testing are natural parts of growing up. However, dealing with it as a parent requires lots of deep breathing, patience and strategies for discipline. By using positive discipline, you can keep your children safe, help them develop valuable skills for life and receive the satisfaction that comes with keeping your cool. Positive discipline techniques The following approaches will help your child stay safe and develop self-esteem and self-control: Natural consequences — This is when the behavior or choice causes its own punishment. For instance, if a child refuses to wear a jacket, he or she will be cold. If you allow children to experience the unpleasantness of their choices without the use of “I told you so,” chances are they won’t put up a fight the next time you ask them to wear a coat or put their lunch in their backpack when you ask them to. Logical consequences — These consequences involve more parent involvement to be sure the discipline and the misbehavior have some relation to each other. These consequences often use an “if/then” or “when you” statement. For example, if your child breaks the family rule of riding a bicycle without a helmet, then a logical consequence would be for your child to lose bicycle privileges for a reasonable period of time. You can also use logical consequences for those situations when your child doesn’t care about the natural consequences. For example: “When you have finished folding your laundry, then you may play a computer game.” Logical consequences should be: Related (not random) — If your child makes a mess, the logical consequence is to clean it up, not lose TV privileges. The exception for this technique is when you have framed your initial request within the “when you” context. Respectful (not using shame or humiliation to try to change behavior) — Using “I told you so” usually results in the child focusing on the blame and shame instead of processing the lesson to be learned. Instead, have a conversation about how the behavior and consequence are related and why it’s important for their safety or the wellbeing of other family members that they follow certain rules. Reasonable (age-appropriate) — For example, if cleaning up a mess would be impossible for young children to do alone, assist them in cleaning up rather than do it for them or expect them to complete the task alone. In addition, after unsafe or inappropriate choices are made, discuss what other

Generally, education and qualifications are not an issue for military spouses, 45 percent of whom have bachelor’s or advanced academic degrees, compared to 33 percent of civilian counterparts. However, about 35 percent of military spouses have careers that require professional licensing specific to each state. In a 2012 survey of spouses who had PCSed, only 11 percent got a new occupational license after the move. (As a licensed attorney, I know this all too well. While stationed in Virginia, I jumped through time-consuming and expensive hoops to get an additional license to practice law in the District of Columbia, but ironically, the license was not issued until months after we were already on to the next duty station in California, and we were never stationed near D.C. again.) An even bigger problem is military spouse underemployment which mostly affects the 93% of military spouses who are female. Two-third of working military wives report that their employment does meet their qualifications, education or occupational goals. Active duty military spouses generally earn 38 percent less than their equally-qualified civilian counterparts. To make matters worse, during the pandemic, when America’s unemployment rates peaked at 14.8 percent in April 2020, data suggested that military spouse unemployment hovered a staggering 20 percentage points higher than the general population, putting rates somewhere between 30 to 35 percent for milspouses. During the pandemic, employed military spouses were either losing their jobs or were leaving their jobs to care for children during shut downs. “All of these factors impact military financial options were possible for their behavior. Positive timeouts — When used correctly, timeouts give your child time to calm down and regroup. Timeouts should not be used as punishment but as a chance for children to correct their behavior and learn from their mistakes. Tell your child to take some time to calm down. Provide them with a private space, a special toy or a manipulative, soft pillow or blanket to help them cool down. Stages of positive discipline Age birth to 2 years Try to keep your child happy by creating a safe environment to play inside your home and by establishing routines based on your child’s needs. Use the following positive discipline techniques: Redirect unwanted behavior. Infants and toddlers are too young to understand timeouts and should never be left alone. Instead, draw your child’s attention to a positive activity. Ignore misbehavior when it’s safe to do so. Praise your child to encourage learning, independence and positive self-esteem. Set a good example. Children learn more by watching adults than in any other way. Give your child choices that will avoid power struggles. For example, “Would you like milk or water?” A little decision-making power can give your child a lot of confidence. Try giving yourself a timeout if you think you are about to lose your patience. Step away from the situation and try to readdress it when you are back in full control. Parent with the end game in mind. Look at long-term solutions that will eventually help kids make their own decisions. Show your child respect and understand that criticizing, discouraging, blaming and shaming can cause more hurt than help at any age. 2 to 6 years old Children this age learn by exploring and asking questions. They’re developing language and social skills, including sharing. They may want to try simple tasks on their own and will probably learn by trying new things and taking risks. Help your preschooler by adding the following age-appropriate discipline techniques to those above: Use positive timeouts when your child needs to cool off. Timeouts should be no longer than one minute for each year of your child’s life. Do not give attention, but give your child comfort items to help him or her calm down. Focus on what your child should do instead of what not to do. Praise good behavior rather than punish misbehavior. Rewards are fine but not when they become more important to the child than the good behavior. Establish rules, set clear limits and follow through if rules are broken. Natural and logical consequences are appropriate for breaking your rules. Discourage tattling. Offer to listen while children talk through their problems and use their own problem-solving skills to work things out

readiness by decreasing family earnings over time, diminishing opportunities for career advancement, decreasing their ability to save for emergencies, retirement, and their ability to amass long-term wealth,” concluded one study. With more than a third of military spouses now unemployed and two-thirds of working military spouses underemployed, is there a solution that might bridge this massive income gap for military families? Maybe. The number of people teleworking from home skyrocketed from only seven percent before the pandemic to over 60 percent today, with many companies planning to continue remote work programs. Also, the Army has begun providing coworking spaces for military spouses on some bases. Some postulate that these trend will finally nudge military spouse unemployment numbers off of their high perch by offering portable work opportunities that lessen child care issues and reduce career interruptions. While remote work does not solve the occupational licensure problem, there is also a recent push for states to enter compact agreements to recognize other state occupational licenses. The Department of Labor has a website where military spouses can see which states are in licensure compacts. A bridge spanning the decades-long pay gap for military spouses is purely hypothetical, yet, there is finally hope. Will military spouses, who prioritize service before self, one day be able to find meaningful career opportunities that meet their education and qualifications? Only time will tell.

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instead of having you solve problems for them. Help them develop their own skills in working through dilemmas or disagreements. 6 to 12 years old Children in this age range have more self-control than when they were younger, and they can follow rules, accept responsibility and make decisions. As your child gets older and develops new skills, the discipline you use should also change. Build on the positive discipline techniques already in place with the following: Adjust timeouts if you find they’re becoming less effective. Answer “why” questions in simple terms. Stay calm, even if you have heard “why” approximately 5,000 times that day! Children are curious, and we want to encourage their learning. Involve your child in the problem-solving process. If your children constantly argue in the back seat of the car, hold a family meeting to discuss the problem. Ask your children to offer solutions. Discuss why the arguing is a distraction to the driver and a safety issue. Make requests that are effective and positive. How you say something is just as important as what you say. Nagging, criticizing and threatening can be discouraging to your child. Save yourself from repeating instructions by asking children to repeat back what you’ve just told them. When you do address their behavior, keep it short or they may learn to tune you out. Use more actions and fewer words. Keep explanations brief and be sure to follow through. If you tell your children that you’ll pull over if they keep arguing in the back seat, do it. Disciplining children demands patience and stamina. In between deep breaths, remind yourself that your children’s behavior issues are valuable opportunities to teach them the skills they’ll need to become successful adults.


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 2 | Thursday, June 10, 2021 3

Family members wave as the Virginia-class fast-attack submarine USS Missouri (SSN 780) departs Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam for Exercise Agile Dagger 2021 (AD21). (MC1 MICHAEL B ZINGARO)

U.S. Pacific Submarine

Force participates in Exercise Agile Dagger 21 By MCC Amanda Gray,

Submarine Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Public Affairs

PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii — Multiple submarines departed Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam recently to participate in Exercise Agile Dagger 2021 (AD21). AD21 is a training exercise, with

one-third of the Pacific Submarine Force getting underway, to assess warfighting readiness and build capacity for the joint force. As part of the exercise, submarines from Pearl Harbor, Hawaii; Bremerton, Washington; and San Diego, California; deploy on short notice to demonstrate their readiness, agility, and lethality.

“The Pacific Submarine Force is always ready,” said commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Rear Adm. Jeff Jablon. “Exercise Agile Dagger 2021 allows us to test our capabilities and showcase our warfighters’ ability to rapidly deploy armed submarines into the Pacific.” The Pacific Submarine Force routinely sends our submarines to sea to test and

validate combat response capability. While underway, the submarines are conducting combat readiness training and employing undersea warfare capabilities in support of a wide-range of missions. “Our Submarine Force ensures capabilities overmatch by sharpening warfighting capacity in this short notice exercise,” said Jablon. “Our unparalleled key to success in undersea dominance is the U.S. Navy Sailor. We have, and must continue to develop, the best trained Sailors; so we must test our ability to load out weapons and supplies for extended combat operations, deploying to multiple locations in the Pacific.” AD21 ensures the Submarine Force remains ready for global tasking to deliver a full range of undersea lethal effects. The U.S. Pacific Submarine Force provides anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface ship warfare, precision land strike, intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance and early warning, special warfare capabilities, and strategic deterrence around the world.

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4 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 2 | Thursday, June 10, 2021

Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Josh Espinoza, assigned to U.S. Naval Hospital, Rota, Spain, Seaman Tyrek Kelly, assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80), and members from El Puerto de Santa Maria’s Ayuntamiento, pose for a photo with donations from the Naval Station Rota community. (COURTESY PHOTO)

Making a difference in the community: Helping those in need with the Giveback Project By MC1 Nathan Carpenter

Naval Station Rota, Spain Public Affairs

ROTA, Spain —Rain fell in torrents, driven nearly sideways by the merciless Spanish wind, soaking through the thick material of a navy uniform to the skin and turning an otherwise cool November afternoon into a frigid, aching cold. On the bed of the truck, rivulets of water pooled, then flowed between boxes of donations as freezing fingers worked frantically to unload the boxes before their contents were as wet as the hands that moved them. A few miles away, Sailors sat down to Thanksgiving dinner with their families, in the warm shelter of their homes, but for Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Joshua Espinoza, hard, cold work in the pouring rain was a better way to start the holiday weekend. “I’m doing something that has purpose

right now,” said Espinoza. “That is going to benefit somebody in the immediate future. So that made me feel good.” When Espinosa arrived at Naval Station (NAVSTA) Rota, he was looking for ways to contribute to the local community through volunteer service. What he found was the Giveback Project — an initiative started by Lt. Cmdr Christon Duhon and Hospitalman Manuel Soto with the help of Scouts BSA Troop 73. The program accepts donations of food and non-perishable items, as well as an online donation fund where all proceeds are used to buy food and other essentials at stores in the local community. The donations are then distributed within the local community by churches, soup kitchens and orphanages to residents who are facing difficult times brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. “It gives me a new appreciation for south-

ern Spain,” said Espinoza. “I didn’t realize there were many homeless and needy because when you look in the streets, you might see one homeless person, maybe. Just being able to give back to the local community feels good.” Since he first became involved, Espinoza has taken over the program and worked hard to help it grow. The cardboard boxes at the donation sites have been replaced with large reinforced military grade plastic boxes that hold many more donations and can withstand rain and sun without any problems. Monetary contributions have nearly doubled to more than $2,000, and physical donations have increased from 750 pounds to more than 5,000 pounds of food, clothes and toys. He has also worked hard to make the program more visible, through social media, photo campaigns and advertising. “It helps to show we’re here for a reason,”

said Espinoza. “We’re not just here, because we’re stationed here, we care about the community. We know that people are losing their jobs, we know that the pandemic has had a huge economic impact on the local economy. So however we can help, we’re here to help.” The opportunity to get involved and volunteer is one that Espinoza encourages everyone to take. Many servicemembers from NAVSTA Rota who volunteer at food lines and soup kitchens will find themselves distributing the same donations collected by the Giveback Project. For those who can’t volunteer their time, opportunity to donate money or goods also has a huge impact. Donations, which cannot be legally purchased at the base commissary, provide a double benefit to the community since those purchases help to employ people working in the area. For people who are able to both donate and volunteer, the experience can be the most rewarding of all. “I’ve been volunteering since I was a kid,” said Espinoza. “In high school, I was involved in church, and we did the soup kitchens for the homeless, as well as hanging out with the retirees at a convalescent home. So it’s not something new to me. It’s something I enjoy doing. And so I always like to give back. My wife and kids love it. I tell my kids about giving to people who don’t have so much. And I reiterate that to my son all the time, teaching him, helping the next generation to pay it forward and give back.”

Pacific Fleet names Junior Ship Handler of the Year By Lt. Cmdr. Sherrie A Flippin

Expeditionary Strike Group 7 Public Affairs

SASEBO, Japan — Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CNSP) announced Lt. Benjamin Pedersen, as the CNSP Junior Officer Ship Handler (JOSH) of the Year. Pedersen is currently serving as the navigator on board USS Patriot (MCM 7), forward-deployed to Sasebo, Japan. “I am excited to have been selected for this award and to represent the Patriot. Our ship is like one big family so it means a lot for them to share this achievement with me,” said Pedersen. Pedersen grew up in Johnsburg, Illinois, and always wanted to join the Navy. He graduated with honors from the University of Missouri with a degree in nutrition and exercise physiology, and commissioned in 2016 where he started his journey through the surface warfare officer pipeline. “Pedersen is not only an excellent navigator, he has been a great officer and mentor to both his peers and Sailors,” said Lt. Cmdr. Earvin Taylor, commanding officer of Patriot. “It has been great to see him grow as a surface warfare officer and a leader while on board Patriot.” Throughout the competition, Pedersen displayed a superlative mastery of his craft while retaining his usual calm demeanor. Additionally, he was the only officer in the top five participants to receive a perfect score on his international maritime rules of the road exam. Pedersen shares his accolades with his peers and his training over the past four years.

“Without my fellow officers and leadership over the past few years I wouldn’t have been challenged and given the opportunities to perform under pressure and being on a minesweeper you get a lot of bridge time,” said Pedersen. “Ship handling is bigger than just one officer. It’s the entirety of the crew that makes the ship run smoothly from foc’sle to stern.” Pedersen will go on to Newport, Rhode Island to represent Surface Forces Pacific to compete against the Naval Forces Atlantic JOSH of the year, for the final round at the Surface Warfare Schools Command. “The significant efforts made by U.S. Naval Surface Forces to develop and emphasize maritime skills has had an incredibly positive secondary effect of making these events fiercely competitive.” said Rear Adm. Chris Engdahl, commander, Expeditionary Strike Group 7. “Minesweep junior officers, especially those assigned to forward-deployed naval forces, are historically incredible ship handlers due to the amount of valuable bridge time and watch team leadership they get while being forward-deployed. I am rooting for Lt. Pedersen as he moves on to the final round.” Both competitors will be evaluated on ship handling and leadership skills. A rules of the road exam may come into play to decide the winner in the case of a tie. Patriot is forward-deployed to Sasebo, Japan and assigned to Commander, Mine Countermeasures Squadron (COMCMRON) 7. COMCMRON 7 conducts integrated mine countermeasure operations using air, Surface, and explosive ordnance disposal assets in both exercise and regional conflict scenarios throughout the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility.

Lt. Ben Pederson, navigator on board USS Patriot (MCM 7), poses for a photo while underway in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations. (LCDR SHERRIE A FLIPPIN)


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 2 | Thursday, June 10, 2021 5

Hull Maintenance Technician 1st Class Gavin Takata, assigned to Navy Talent Acquisition Group Portland, poses for a photo. (MCC ELIJAH LEINAAR)

Sailor becomes Navy recruiter to mend the past By Daniel Rachal

Navy Recruiting Command Public Affairs

PORTLAND, Ore. — Hull Technician 1st Class Gavin Takata would not have a successful Navy career without his grandfather — a World War II, Korean War and Vietnam War veteran. After dropping out of college and moving in with his grandparents, Takata did not have much direction or ambition, which did not go unnoticed. His grandfather told him that it was time for a change. “To have my grandfather say that to me was a huge kick,” said Takata. “I had to sit back and evaluate my life.” Takata had a list of potential career options that could help get things on track, and joining the military was at the top of

that list. Luckily for him, the desire to follow in his grandfather’s footsteps outweighed his experience with his recruiter. “I forgot his name, but he was horrible,” he said. “He didn’t have any enthusiasm. He didn’t have any love for the military, didn’t have any customer service and wasn’t very knowledgeable about my questions. He never told me about the Delayed Entry Program. I never knew about general orders, the Sailor’s creed, rank and recognition, so I went to boot camp knowing absolutely nothing.” This experience helped Takata develop into a successful recruiter because he knew firsthand what could happen to a Future Sailor if they had poor assistance during the recruiting process. From the moment he began his journey at Navy Talent Acqui-

sition Group Portland, he wanted to positively impact applicants and Future Sailors. “I strive to have the best customer service,” said Takata. “That’s why I build a rapport with my future Sailors. I put everything into trying to make them successful and giving them the best opportunities to succeed out of boot camp.” That dedication has been rewarded since arriving in 2019 to NTAG Portland. He was promoted to Leading Petty Officer of a 16-Sailor division that encompasses four recruiting stations, has been awarded the Navy Achievement Medal for achieving recruiting based incentives, and was Talent Scout of the Month for July 2020, which led to being named Talent Scout of the Quarter for the 4th quarter in 2020, along with two gold wreaths for recruiting achievements.

Takata takes great pride in the Sailors he puts in the Navy, and loves when they reach back out to update him on their career progress. He chose recruiting duty because it gave him the opportunity to give back to the Navy, help people and change lives. Sometimes the applicant sitting on the other side of the desk is fully qualified to serve the moment they come into the office, but other times, Takata has worked with applicants for up to a year to help them prepare to enlist. For him, it’s about being the kind of recruiter he would have wanted. “If they are dedicated to the process and they really want it, who am I to turn my back to them and not help them out?” he said. “I am going to do everything I can to help you out no matter what. I do it because I would want someone to do it for me. I want to be that leader. I want them to look back and say ‘my recruiter is still my mentor.’ ” Navy Recruiting Command consists of a command headquarters, three Navy Recruiting Regions, and 26 Navy Talent Acquisition Groups that serve more than 1,000 recruiting stations across the world. Their combined goal is to attract the highest quality candidates to assure the ongoing success of America’s Navy.

Patrol Squadron (VP) 45 hosts III Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF) Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Team

By MCSN Thomas Higgins Patrol Squadron 45 Public Affairs

KADENA AIR BASE, Japan —Patrol Squadron (VP) 45 hosted members of the III Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF) Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) team, conducting training to familiarize themselves with the P-8A Poseidon’s weapons systems and aircraft hazards, June 4. The training consisted of aircraft safety and egress familiarization training and ordinance familiarization led by the Pelican’s aviation ordnance team. The purpose of this joint training evolution was to expose marine EOD personnel with the P-8A weapons system and capabilities, to include safe handling of munitions should joint operations between units occur in the future. Secondarily, this exercise was to increase and promote interoperability between forces. The EOD team’s Officer-in-Charge Chief Warrant Officer 3 Nathan Stuhr, said “Our goal is to better understand the weapons systems and hazards of the P-8A in order to better assist during emergency operations or in future fighting Concept of Operations (CONOPS), and to strengthen interoperability between blue and green forces.”

Patrol Squadron (VP) 45 aviation ordnancemen and Marines from III Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF) Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Team pose for a photo during a training exercise on Kadena Air base, June 4. (MCSN THOMAS HIGGINS)

When asked about future endeavors between the two units, Stuhr commented, “We are looking to continue forging relationships, as well as integrating and better understanding one another’s platforms moving forward.” Cmdr. Seth R. Eisenmenger, executive

officer, VP-45, spoke to the III MEF EOD personnel, stressing the importance of, “Interoperability between units, as well as establishing strong relationships between people in order to accomplish the mission.” The VP-45 “Pelicans” are based in Jackson-

ville, Florida, and currently operating out of Kadena Air Force Base in Okinawa, Japan. The squadron is conducting maritime patrol and reconnaissance as well as theatre outreach operations within U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations.


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 2 | Thursday, June 10, 2021 5

Hull Maintenance Technician 1st Class Gavin Takata, assigned to Navy Talent Acquisition Group Portland, poses for a photo. (MCC ELIJAH LEINAAR)

Sailor becomes Navy recruiter to mend the past By Daniel Rachal

Navy Recruiting Command Public Affairs

PORTLAND, Ore. — Hull Technician 1st Class Gavin Takata would not have a successful Navy career without his grandfather — a World War II, Korean War and Vietnam War veteran. After dropping out of college and moving in with his grandparents, Takata did not have much direction or ambition, which did not go unnoticed. His grandfather told him that it was time for a change. “To have my grandfather say that to me was a huge kick,” said Takata. “I had to sit back and evaluate my life.” Takata had a list of potential career options that could help get things on track, and joining the military was at the top of

that list. Luckily for him, the desire to follow in his grandfather’s footsteps outweighed his experience with his recruiter. “I forgot his name, but he was horrible,” he said. “He didn’t have any enthusiasm. He didn’t have any love for the military, didn’t have any customer service and wasn’t very knowledgeable about my questions. He never told me about the Delayed Entry Program. I never knew about general orders, the Sailor’s creed, rank and recognition, so I went to boot camp knowing absolutely nothing.” This experience helped Takata develop into a successful recruiter because he knew firsthand what could happen to a Future Sailor if they had poor assistance during the recruiting process. From the moment he began his journey at Navy Talent Acqui-

sition Group Portland, he wanted to positively impact applicants and Future Sailors. “I strive to have the best customer service,” said Takata. “That’s why I build a rapport with my future Sailors. I put everything into trying to make them successful and giving them the best opportunities to succeed out of boot camp.” That dedication has been rewarded since arriving in 2019 to NTAG Portland. He was promoted to Leading Petty Officer of a 16-Sailor division that encompasses four recruiting stations, has been awarded the Navy Achievement Medal for achieving recruiting based incentives, and was Talent Scout of the Month for July 2020, which led to being named Talent Scout of the Quarter for the 4th quarter in 2020, along with two gold wreaths for recruiting achievements.

Takata takes great pride in the Sailors he puts in the Navy, and loves when they reach back out to update him on their career progress. He chose recruiting duty because it gave him the opportunity to give back to the Navy, help people and change lives. Sometimes the applicant sitting on the other side of the desk is fully qualified to serve the moment they come into the office, but other times, Takata has worked with applicants for up to a year to help them prepare to enlist. For him, it’s about being the kind of recruiter he would have wanted. “If they are dedicated to the process and they really want it, who am I to turn my back to them and not help them out?” he said. “I am going to do everything I can to help you out no matter what. I do it because I would want someone to do it for me. I want to be that leader. I want them to look back and say ‘my recruiter is still my mentor.’ ” Navy Recruiting Command consists of a command headquarters, three Navy Recruiting Regions, and 26 Navy Talent Acquisition Groups that serve more than 1,000 recruiting stations across the world. Their combined goal is to attract the highest quality candidates to assure the ongoing success of America’s Navy.

Patrol Squadron (VP) 45 hosts III Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF) Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Team

By MCSN Thomas Higgins Patrol Squadron 45 Public Affairs

KADENA AIR BASE, Japan —Patrol Squadron (VP) 45 hosted members of the III Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF) Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) team, conducting training to familiarize themselves with the P-8A Poseidon’s weapons systems and aircraft hazards, June 4. The training consisted of aircraft safety and egress familiarization training and ordinance familiarization led by the Pelican’s aviation ordnance team. The purpose of this joint training evolution was to expose marine EOD personnel with the P-8A weapons system and capabilities, to include safe handling of munitions should joint operations between units occur in the future. Secondarily, this exercise was to increase and promote interoperability between forces. The EOD team’s Officer-in-Charge Chief Warrant Officer 3 Nathan Stuhr, said “Our goal is to better understand the weapons systems and hazards of the P-8A in order to better assist during emergency operations or in future fighting Concept of Operations (CONOPS), and to strengthen interoperability between blue and green forces.”

Patrol Squadron (VP) 45 aviation ordnancemen and Marines from III Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF) Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Team pose for a photo during a training exercise on Kadena Air base, June 4. (MCSN THOMAS HIGGINS)

When asked about future endeavors between the two units, Stuhr commented, “We are looking to continue forging relationships, as well as integrating and better understanding one another’s platforms moving forward.” Cmdr. Seth R. Eisenmenger, executive

officer, VP-45, spoke to the III MEF EOD personnel, stressing the importance of, “Interoperability between units, as well as establishing strong relationships between people in order to accomplish the mission.” The VP-45 “Pelicans” are based in Jackson-

ville, Florida, and currently operating out of Kadena Air Force Base in Okinawa, Japan. The squadron is conducting maritime patrol and reconnaissance as well as theatre outreach operations within U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations.


6 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 2 | Thursday, June 10, 2021

U.S. Marines in Australia are ready to rapidly provide assistance to regions affected by a natural disaster By USMC 1st Lt. Gabriel Lechuga

Marine Rotational Force - Darwin Public Affairs

DARWIN, Australia — Marine Rotational Force — Darwin and the Australian Defence Force recently completed a humanitarian assistance and disaster relief exercise called “Crocodile Response.” The focus of Crocodile Response was to increase the readiness of the U.S. Marines and Sailors in Darwin and their ability to conduct foreign humanitarian assistance operations in the event of a natural disaster in the Indo-Pacific region. “Marine Rotational Force — Darwin needs to be ready to support our allies in the region by rapidly responding to a crisis such as a natural disaster, should the need arise,” said MRF-D Commanding Officer Col. David M. Banning. During the field training phase of the exercise, U.S. Marines and the Australian Defence Force honed their ability to conduct support activities such as purifying water, clearing trees and brush from roadways, coordinating the transportation and delivery of troops and large equipment, establishing landing zones and providing basic medical care. “One of the most important things we can do after a country is hit by a natural disaster is provide medical support to the affected community. Our medical capabilities allow us to provide first aid, immediate life saving measures and triage, as well as prevent disease,” said U.S. Navy Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Julian Gordon. Crocodile Response was conducted in three phases: the joint humanitarian operations training phase, the table top exercise phase, and the field exercise phase. The three phases ensured that the U.S. Marines, the Australian Defence Force, the U.S. Bureau for Humanitarian Assistance and the Australian Depart-

Australian Army Engineer Tyson Buckley and U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Deitrick McMahon, a combat engineer with Combat Logistics Battalion 7, Marine Rotational Force – Darwin, build a barbed wire fence during exercise Crocodile Response at Point Fawcett, NT, Australia. (USMC SGT MICHA PIERCE)

ment of Foreign Affairs and Trade built upon learned skills to enhance everyone’s understanding of policies that allow the military to provide humanitarian support in an affected country, as well as to raise awareness of each other’s capabilities and planning processes. “The Joint Humanitarian Operations Course was great because it outlined all the requirements and steps our governments need to take for us to provide assistance with the Australian Defence Force and other government agencies like the U.S. Bureau for Humanitarian Assistance and the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade,” said Engineer Platoon Commander 1st Lt. Marcus Jones. The table top exercise phase helped develop proficiency with the Marine Corps’ rapid response planning process. This process ensures that when Marines receive a mission, they are able to plan and begin execution of the mission on short notice. Planning was done in coordination with all exercise participants to synchronize humanitarian assistance efforts. “Exercise Crocodile Response is an annual

civil military exercise that strengthens humanitarian response capability between Australia, the United States and Indonesia. Effective coordination with our military partners is essential for any civilian-led humanitarian relief effort,” tweeted the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade’s Humanitarian Coordinator James Gilling. The exercise concluded with the final phase, a five-day field training exercise at Point Fawcett on the Tiwi Islands. During this phase, U.S. Marines and the Australian Defence Force used the Marine Corps’ ability to transport troops and equipment with the MV-22B Osprey, used the Australian Army’s ability to transport equipment with their Landing Craft Mechanized, Mark 8 and conducted many of the foreign humanitarian assistance activities Marine Rotational Force — Darwin was tasked with accomplishing. “Deploying side by side, using both Australian Defence Force watercraft and U.S Marine Corps aircraft allows us to get to know each other’s processes, policies and procedures at the personal level and organizationally, proving

the plans and capabilities we have in place to respond to a humanitarian crisis together,” said an Australian Defence Force exercise controller, 1st Lt. Bryce Williams. Other participants included service members from the Philippines and Malaysia who took part in the joint humanitarian operations training phase. Additionally, officials from the Indonesian National Armed Forces, and representatives from Indonesia’s National Disaster Management Agency and Indonesia’s National Search and Rescue Agency observed throughout the exercise and shared their significant operational experiences. All participants quarantined for two weeks in Australia and strictly adhered to all COVID19 mitigation measures in accordance with Australian health protocols. The year 2021 marks the 10th anniversary of MRF-D, which has proven to be a significant force for stability and security in the region. It has created new opportunities for regional engagement and has better postured the U.S. and Australia to respond to crises in the Indo-Pacific.

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 2 | Thursday, June 10, 2021 7

Anthony C. Smith, director of the Department of the Navy (DoN) Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions (HBCU/MI) Program, discusses internship and research opportunities at the DoN HBCU/MI exhibit during the 2019 Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics & Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) conference. (JOHN WILLIAMS)

Harnessing the power of diversity: DoN rolls out new initiatives benefiting HBCUs, MIs By Warren Duffie

Office Of Naval Research Public Affairs

ARLINGTON, Va. — The Department of the Navy’s (DoN) Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions (HBCU/ MI) Program—located at the Office of Naval Research (ONR)—is launching several major initiatives to increase student participation in naval internships and opportunities for faculty to conduct naval-relevant research. “By expanding our outreach to a greater diversity of student populations, the DoN will strengthen existing partnerships, build new ones and better meet the challenges facing the Naval Research and Development Establishment,” said Frederick J. Stefany, acting assistant secretary of the Navy for Research, Development and Acquisition. “The HBCU/MI Program will help grow the acquisition workforce the nation needs to compete globally.” Chief of Naval Research Rear Adm. Lorin C. Selby underscored Mr. Stefany’s comment:

“HBCU/MIs are hubs of intellectual energy and academic rigor. In this age of great power competition—when victory isn’t guaranteed on the battlefield—it’s crucial to have a well-educated, technology-savvy naval workforce to meet the challenge. HBCU/MIs play a vital role in this effort.” The DoN HBCU/MI Program provides various opportunities for HBCU/MI faculty and students to collaborate with scientists and engineers at naval labs and warfare centers, on projects of mutual interest. These include student scholarships, fellowships and internships, as well as faculty summer sabbaticals. “Although HBCU/MIs represent less than 2 percent of U.S. higher education learning institutions, they produce 25 percent of African-American STEM [science, technology, engineering, mathematics] graduates,” said Anthony C. Smith Sr., director of the DoN HBCU/MI Program. “These students offer diverse, unique approaches to solving naval science and technology challenges—and

many of them even consider the naval workforce as a career.” The new programs being launched this year are: —Naval Summer Bridge Boot Camp—A partnership with an HBCU/MI to execute a five-week program for incoming freshmen interested in pursuing and earning an undergraduate degree in a STEM discipline. The boot camp will provide students with an intense exposure to STEM course workload and activities, with the goal of increasing academic success during the freshman year. Courses will include chemistry, physics, calculus, computer programming and “soft skills” such as public speaking, networking and professional development. —Three new virtual internships at the Naval Sea Systems Command, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery and Navy Facilities Engineering Systems Command. These build on the existing DoN HBCU/MI Internships at Naval Air Systems Command, Naval Supply Systems Command, Naval Infor-

Battle of Midway from Page 1

Ships and aircraft from eight nations sail in formation during a photo exercise while participating in exercise Sea Breeze 2020 in the Black Sea. (COURTESY PHOTO)

BALTOPS from Page 1

power projection ashore for an amphibious demonstration in Lithuania. BALTOPS 50 involves participation from 18 nations. The 16 NATO and 2 partner nations will provide approximately 40 maritime units, 60 aircraft, and 4,000 personnel.

The participating nations are: Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, the U.K., and the U.S. BALTOPS, held in the Baltic region since in 1972, is a joint, maritime-focused exercise that brings together NATO Allies and partners in order to increase interoperability and enhance flexibility among the

to the battle helped ensure its success. “I’m so proud that we’ve taken this time commemorate the Battle of Midway and remember the sacrifices of those who served during that time,” said CIWT’s Command Master Chief Francisco Vargas. “The legacy of Sailors who have served and sacrificed in the past helps inspire current and future generations of Sailors to rise to any crisis or combat situation because they are standing on the shoulders, and upholding the honor, of those who have gone before and persevered against the odds.” The Japanese had not lost a naval battle in more than 50 years, and had nearly destroyed the American fleet just six months earlier in a surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. On 3 June, in the preliminary moves of the Battle of Midway, American land-based aircraft from Midway located and attacked Japanese transports about 600 miles west of Midway Island. Navy Sailors’ strength and resilience at Midway were a perfect illustration of the fighting spirit of our Sailors today. “As we remember those who fought to win the day at the Battle of Midway, consider for a moment their heroism, commitment and devotion to duty,” shared Capt. Marc Ratkus, commanding officer of CIWT. “The world has benefited from the actions of those brave military members who sacrificed so much 79 years ago, and our current military personnel have inherited a rich legacy from the generations of warfighters that are our forefathers. The courage, valor and innovation of our military members today continue to be the key to the Navy’s success, and I ask that we continue to

mation Warfare Systems Command and the Naval Research Laboratory. All focus on providing HBCU/MI students with the opportunity to complete internships at various naval sites. —Distinguished Fellows Program—A joint effort involving the DoN HBCU/ MI Program, the Department of Defense HBCU/MI Program and Outreach, and the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering (Research, Technology and Laboratories), this initiative will provide six researchers (selected from six HBCU/MIs) with a full-time salary for three years—enabling them to focus exclusively on naval-relevant research, writing academic papers and abstracts, engagement with naval scientists and engineers, and mentorship. “Many HBCU/MIs are teaching institutions where researchers are expected to teach three to five courses per semester, in addition to conducting research,” said Smith. “That’s significantly more than their counterparts at larger universities where some only perform research. “The Department of the Navy’s increased investment in HBCU/MIs, through the Distinguished Fellow Program as well as the internships and boot camp, will strengthen these schools’ academic research—and prepare the next generation of naval scientists and engineers.” Learn more about the DoN HBCU/ MI Program at https://www.onr.navy.mil/ Education-Outreach/HBCU-MI-Historically-Black-Colleges. perpetuate the memory of the Battle of Midway, may God continue to bless our Navy, our grateful nation, and all those who serve.” American military and intelligence forces worked together to defeat the Japanese. Code-breakers were able to decipher Japanese naval code, allowing American leaders to anticipate Japanese maneuvers. The U.S. Navy was then able to launch a surprise attack on the larger Japanese fleet in the area. “The technology may have changed, but the analytic tradecraft remains largely the same: cryptanalysis, linguistics, traffic analysis, and direction finding,” shared Lt. Cmdr. Ronnie Alagona, the guest speaker and IWTC Corry Station instructor. “As cryptologic warfare and information warfare professionals we build and maintain our credibility by providing the fleet with tactical, actionable intelligence. Now, as then, victory in the Pacific is not guaranteed. But we stack the odds in our favor — we make that horse ready for the day of battle — by falling back on the training we receive here at Corry Station and out there in the fleet.” IWTC Corry Station, as part of the Center for Information Warfare Training (CIWT), provides a continuum of training to Navy and joint service personnel that prepares them to conduct information warfare across the full spectrum of military operations. With four schoolhouse commands, a detachment, and training sites throughout the United States and Japan, CIWT trains approximately 26,000 students every year, delivering trained information warfare professionals to the Navy and joint services. CIWT also offers more than 200 courses for cryptologic technicians, intelligence specialists, information systems technicians, electronics technicians, and officers in the information warfare community.


8 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 2 | Thursday, June 10, 2021

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 3 | Thursday, June 10, 2021 1

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Norfolk Fourth of July Fireworks Celebrations Scheduled for Town Point Park, Ocean View Beach Park From Norfolk Festevents Norfolk, VA — Norfolk Festevents and the City of Norfolk are excited to announce a full weekend of Fourth of July waterfront celebrations for Independence Day, including fireworks shows at Town Point Park on Sunday, July 4, and Ocean View Beach Park on Friday, July 2. “We are excited to announce the return of these two spectacular events!” said Norfolk

Mayor Kenneth Cooper Alexander. “Let’s continue to be mindful of the health and safety of others as we enjoy July 4th weekend.” The Fourth of July Great American Picnic and Fireworks presented by Southern Auto Group at Town Point Park, in partnership with the City of Norfolk and the City of Portsmouth, is scheduled for Sunday, July 4, from 5pm to 11pm along the Downtown Norfolk Waterfront with the one of the larg-

est fireworks shows in the region beginning at 9:30pm over the Elizabeth River. The celebration will also feature a full afternoon of patriotic musical performances, including the U.S. Fleet Forces Ceremonial Band (8:45-9:30pm), the U.S. Fleet Forces 4-Star Edition Band (6:458:15pm), and Brasswind (5:00-6:15pm), along with a DJ afterparty beginning at 10pm. Festival guests can also enjoy all-American food favorites, including hot

dogs, hamburgers, barbecue, seafood, and more, in addition to beer, wine, and themed cocktails. Guests are allowed to bring their own lawn chair or blanket to enjoy the show. The Shore Thing Concert & Independence Day Celebration at Ocean View Beach Park is scheduled for Friday, July 2, from 6pm to 10pm with fireworks starting at 9:30pm above the Chesapeake Bay. The OV celebration will also feature live music from local dance-pop party band Wonderland, as well as food trucks, beer & wine, children’s activities, and much more. Both events are free and open the public. Norfolk Festevents continues to work closely with local and state health departments to ensure guest safety and well-being. Please view local and state COVID-19 guidance before attending events. More information on upcoming events at both Town Point Park and Ocean View Beach Park will be announced soon. Go to Festevents.org for details.

tic pollution problem in a surprisingly fun way that inspires us to take action. Thankfully, Clean the Bay Day and other local programs offer great opportunities to pitch in for healthier waterways,” said Chesapeake Bay Foundation Hampton Roads Director Christy Everett. “We’re grateful for our partnership with Norfolk Botanical Garden, a

longstanding leader in environmental stewardship.” Join us in our mission to take environmental action, TAKE THE PLEDGE and take a bite out of plastic. The Garden is committed to taking action, but need your help. Washed Ashore- Art to Save the Sea is included with Garden Admission.

Washed Ashore: Art to Save the Sea

From The Norfolk Botanical Garden NORFOLK, Va.— Norfolk Botanical Garden (NBG) hosts the national exhibition Washed Ashore: Art to Save the Sea —premiered June 5, 2021. The exhibition features larger-thanlife sculptures of marine life created from trash found on beaches. It will also showcase an exclusive custom-made eagle the community helped to create using debris collected from Coastal Virginia beaches. The eagle will hold a menhaden in its talons and will arrive later this summer. Washed Ashore is part of a global movement bringing much-needed attention to the overwhelming —and growing! — plastic pollution in our oceans. According to the World Economic Forum and the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, it is predicted that by 2050, there could be more plastics by weight in the oceans than fish. Singleuse plastics are particularly detrimental to the health of the environment — both in the water and on land. The world’s oceans and waterways connect all life together—humans, plants and wildlife—and when one part suffers the other parts will feel it, too. There is hope! With more than 7.8 billion people on Earth, each one committed to making at least one change, imagine the impact we can make. The earth and its oceans connects all wildlife and every human - together we can turn the tide for a better world. NBG is working closely with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF) as the environ-

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mental partner for this event. Since 1989, CBF’s Clean the Bay Day has engaged nearly 162,000 volunteers, removing over 7.1 million pounds of debris from more than 8,000 miles of shore lines in Virginia. Join Team Norfolk Botanical Garden virtually for Clean the Bay Day, now through June 5, 2021. “Washed Ashore illustrates the plas-

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The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 3 | Thursday, June 10, 2021

Community Submit YOUR events, news and photos

The Flagship welcomes submissions from our readers online. Please submit events here: www.militarynews.com/users/admin/calendar/event/ Please submit news and photos here: www.militarynews.com/norfolk-navy-flagship/submit_news/

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Comedian John Crist announces date for Fresh Cuts Comedy Tour From The City Of Norfolk NORFOLK, VA — John Crist announced today his 2021 John Crist: Fresh Cuts Comedy Tour that will have him embarking on a 100-show tour all over the country. The tour will kick off on September 23 in Augusta, GA with a performance at Chrysler Hall scheduled for Sunday, November 14. Pre-sale begins Wednesday, June 9 at 10 a.m. and tickets go on sale Friday, June 11 at 10 a.m. at the Scope Arena box office and Ticketmaster.com. For more information visit SevenVenues.com. “The Fresh Cuts Comedy Tour is unlike any tour we’ve ever done. It’s been quite an experience to have been off the road for almost two years and really have time to think, create and build a stand-up show that is all-new, fresh and funny,” says John. “I recently performed at a few small venues in preparation for the tour, and fans were SO grateful to just be outside, in a social setting amongst friends. Especially with comedy, it feels like the more the world is kind of upside-down, the better the comedy. There really is no better therapy than coming together for a night of laughter.” John Crist is one of today’s fast-rising stand-up comedians, with more than one billion video views, four million fans on social media and sold-out shows from coast to coast. Widely known for viral videos like “Honest Football Coach,” “Every Parent at Disney,” “Brands that need to be CANCELLED” plus hundreds more. Crist would still tell you that his live show is better than any of his videos.

In 2019, Crist made Pollstar’s Top 100 Global Tours list, with over 197,000 tickets sold for his “Human Being Tour.” He held the designation for four consecutive weeks, charting as high as #28. Crist’s comedy has been featured on ESPN, The Today Show, HLN, US Weekly, USA Today, SiriusXM, Buzzfeed, The Huffington Post, Cracked, and even The Golf Channel. Crist’s 2016 debut comedy special, I Got Questions is available now on Amazon Prime, DirecTV and Spotify. For more dates and info: www.johncristcomedy.com JOHN CRIST: FRESH CUTS COMEDY TOUR 23-Sep-21 Augusta, GA Bell Auditorium 24-Sep-21 Melbourne, FL King Center 25-Sep-21 Fort Myers, FL Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall 7-Oct-21 Syracuse, NY The Oncenter Crouse Hinds Theater 8-Oct-21 Poughkeepsie, NY MJN Convention Center 9-Oct-21 Pittsburgh, PA Heinz Hall 10-Oct-21 Tysons, VA Capital One Center

14-Oct-21 Fort Wayne, IN Embassy Theatre 15-Oct-21 Evansville, IN Old National Events Plaza 16-Oct-21 Indianapolis, IN Clowes Memorial Hall 17-Oct-21 Champaign, IL Virginia Theatre 21-Oct-21 South Bend, IN Morris Performing Arts Center 22-Oct-21 Rockford, IL Coronado Performing Arts Center 23-Oct-21 Peoria, IL Peoria Civic Center 24-Oct-21 Davenport, IA Adler Theatre 4-Nov-21 Richmond, VA Altria Theater at Dominion Energy Center 5-Nov-21 Charlotte, NC Ovens Auditorium 6-Nov-21 Roanoke, VA Berglund Performing Arts Theatre 7-Nov-21 Asheville, NC Thomas Wolfe Auditorium 11-Nov-21 Savannah, GA Johnny Mercer Theatre 12-Nov-21 Columbia, SC Township Auditorium

13-Nov-21 North Charleston, SC North Charleston PAC 14-Nov-21 Norfolk, VA Chrysler Hall 18-Nov-21 Tupelo, MS BancorpSouth Arena 19-Nov-21 Jackson, MS Thalia Mara Hall 20-Nov-21 Little Rock, AR Robinson Performance Hall 21-Nov-21 Baton Rouge, LA Performing Arts Theatre 2-Dec-21 Fort Smith, AR Fort Smith Convention Center 3-Dec-21 Shreveport, LA Strand Theatre 4-Dec-21 Memphis, TN Orpheum Theatre 5-Dec-21 Paducah, KY Carson Center 9-Dec-21 Kansas City, MO Kansas City Music Hall 10-Dec-21 Wichita, KS Orpheum Theatre 11-Dec-21 St. Louis, MO Stifel Theatre 12-Dec-21 Springfield, MO Juanita K. Hammons Hall

June is Adopt a Shelter Cat Month From Best Friends Animal Society Cats star in some of the most viral videos on the Internet and some even grow to celebrity status on Instagram with millions of followers (looking at you, Nala Cat). Yet some of the coolest cats remain undiscovered at shelters and rescues across the country. Since cats are also the most at-risk pets across America, accounting for 69% of animals killed in shelters, it’s crucial to find them loving homes. Adopt a Shelter Cat Month takes place every June to highlight the immense need for cat adoptions and why a shelter is the best place to find your next feline friend. “By adopting a cat, you’re not only saving that particular cat, but you also make space for the next cat coming into a shelter,” said Samantha Bell, cat expert at Best Friends Animal Society. “Adoption is also very cost-effective, as cats are usually fixed, vaccinated, microchipped and ready to go home with you for one low fee.” According to Bell, cats make great pets for just about anyone. “Whether you are hardly ever home or you are a total couch potato, there’s a ‘purrfect’ cat waiting for you at a shelter or rescue,” she added. Bell offers the following tips on how to pick the right cat or kitten for your lifestyle: • Busy? There are cats for that: Shelters and rescues often have two adult cats who have grown up together and would be happy to go home together. It’s heartwarming to see a pair of cats who are already friends get to stay together. And while you’re away, they’ll have each other for company and security. • Extroverts need love, too: If you are home quite often, then you’ll have more time to play with an active kitty who needs lots of wand toy play time. Some cats can even be trained to walk on a leash or go for stroller rides.

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• Consider a solo artist: There are many cats who are great with people but terrified of other cats. They don’t always make a great first impression on potential adopters, especially if they’re in a shelter surrounded by other cats. But once they’re in a home with you, they’ll flourish. • Involve the whole family: It’s important to take everyone in the home, especially children, to meet all prospective cats so you can observe how they interact with the cat. Every child has their own unique energy, and every pet reacts differently to every child. • Keep an open mind: Don’t get hung up on color, sex or age. Not all cats’ personalities fit into stereotypes. Every cat is an individual, so don’t discount a cat because they aren’t male or

female or orange or fluffy. By doing so, you’ll have the best odds of finding a great match. Still not certain? Give the shelter team an opportunity to play matchmaker. “Talk to the staff and volunteers at the shelter about your lifestyle. Let them know if you live with others, including any pets, as well as who/what you come in contact with on a regular basis, and let them guide you to the cats that they think would mesh well with your life,” Bell said. With kitten season in full swing, many people will be tempted to adopt one (and let’s be honest, it’s hard not to succumb to that level of cuteness). But as Bell noted, kittens require an extra level of care. “Kittens are adorable but be aware that they

are more work than an adult cat. Kittens need to be fed more often and use the litter box much more often,” she said. “Single kittens need lots of positive reinforcement training so that they don’t end up being bitey or scratchy adults.” That is why Best Friends encourages adopters to open their home to a pair of kittens, if possible. Bell explained why. “All cats have to bite and scratch; it’s feline instinct,” she said. “A pair of kittens learns that biting and scratching is something they should do to each other during playtime, and not to their humans.” To find your new best feline friend, visit www.bestfriends.org, where you’ll find more than 3,300 network partners of shelters and rescues across the country.


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 3 | Thursday, June 10, 2021 3

Based on data, MHS experts encourage vaccines for adolescents By Elaine Sanchez

Brooke Army Medical Center Public Af f airs

Air Force Col. Heather Yun enrolled her teenagers in COVID-19 vaccine trials in back in the winter. An infectious disease physician, Yun spoke with her children at length about the vaccine studies, and they were eager to do their part in the battle against the pandemic. More nervous about the blood draw than the shot, her children “overcame their fears and got it done,” she said. “I am so incredibly proud of my brave kids for doing their part for their community and the nation,” said Yun, who also serves as Brooke Army Medical Center’s deputy commander of medical services. With the recent authorization of the Pfizer vaccine for youth ages 12 to 15, Yun is now encouraging other parents to consider the vaccine for their adolescents as well. “The data continues to demonstrate that the vaccine is safe and effective,” Yun said. “Vaccinating this population is an important step in ending the pandemic.” LAYER OF PROTECTION With emergency use authorization and a 100 percent efficacy rate for this age group, “we are strongly recommending the vaccine for adolescents,” noted Army Maj. Megan Donahue, BAMC’s chief, pediatric infectious diseases. However, vaccine hesitancy continues to be an ongoing challenge, particularly among young people who feel less threatened by the virus due to lower infection rates and reports of mild illness, noted Air Force Lt. Col. Alice Barsoumian, associate professor of medicine, San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium Infectious Disease Fellowship Program. While it’s true that fewer children have been infected with COVID than adults, experts are tracking an increase in COVID infection and hospitalizations within younger populations, Barsoumian said, citing reopening schools and the easing of face covering requirements as potential causes. Additionally, some strains appear to be more contagious to children. “Thankfully, hospitalization rates are still low,” she said, “But we need to keep in mind that one in three children hospitalized with COVID is admitted to the ICU (intensive

Lucy Yun, 12, and Eli Yun, 14, pose for a family photo in San Antonio, Texas, May 2, 2021. The siblings, along with their brother Theo, 17, and their mother, Air Force Col. Heather Yun, deputy commander for medical services and an infectious disease physician, participated in vaccine trials. The Food and Drug Administration recently expanded the emergency use authorization to include the Pfizer vaccine for adolescents 12 to 15 years old (Air Force Col. Heather Yun).

care unit).” Children may also be at risk of a severe inflammatory response to COVID infection called Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome, or MIS-C, a condition where different body parts can become inflamed, including the heart, lungs, kidneys, brain, skin, eyes, or gastrointestinal organs, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While a direct link to COVID-19 hasn’t been established, many children with MIS-C had the virus or had been around someone with the infection. Another risk is post-acute COVID syndrome, which causes symptoms to include fatigue, exercise intolerance, depression and poor sleep, explained Army Lt. Col. Elizabeth Markelz, BAMC’s chief of infectious disease service. “This syndrome does not occur with immunization,” she noted. Education and awareness remain key to boosting vaccination rates. “The vaccine is incredibly important for building herd immunity,” Markelz said. “Additionally, children have the same transmissibility to others as adults, providing an important route of spread to their loved ones.” Yun’s 12-year-old daughter, Lucy, agrees. “I think it’s important for kids to get vaccinated because even though in some cases we’re less likely to get hurt from sicknesses, it’s better for protecting people who are

higher risk,” she said. MINIMAL SIDE EFFECTS The Pfizer vaccine is administered in the same dosage and dosing regimen for 12 to 15-year-olds as it is for ages 16 and older - which is two doses 21 days apart. The COVID-19 vaccine and other vaccines may be administered without regard to timing, according to new CDC guidance. Out of an abundance of caution, the CDC previously had recommended a minimum of 14 days between the COVID-19 vaccine and other vaccines; however, data has indicated the safety of simultaneous administration. As with adults, adolescents are reporting varying non-serious side effects post-vaccination, typically lasting for one to three days, Barsoumian said. These side effects can include pain at the injection site, tiredness, headache, chills, muscle pain, fever and joint pain. Yun’s 14-year-old son, Eli, reported a few side effects after his shot. “The vaccine itself didn’t actually hurt when it was injected, but afterward, I had a pretty sore arm following the first dose, and flu-like symptoms following the second dose for a few days,” he said. “Side effects appear similar, but occur slightly more frequently in this population than in older populations,” Barsoumian said. “We’ve noticed this in the adult population as well — the somewhat younger you

are, the somewhat more frequently they occur.” MOVING FORWARD While Pfizer is currently the only FDA-approved vaccine for 12 to 15-yearolds, other manufacturers, such as Moderna, are likely to follow. As for the younger age groups, based on the study cohorts, the manufacturers will most likely roll out approval in stages, Barsoumian said, starting with 6- to 11-year-olds and followed by 2- to 5-year-olds at a later date. Barsoumian is eager for that day to arrive. Her children, who are 10 and younger, are unable to get the shot at this time, but she has signed them up for all available studies across the state. Markelz has also signed her young children up for local studies and is awaiting enrollment to open. “My kids dread getting vaccines, but they both have stated they will get it when they can because they want to protect ‘nanna, papa and their teachers,’ ” she said. With authorization at hand, many parents and adolescents are lining up to get the shot. The CDC has announced that half a million kids ages 12 to 15 have received a COVID19 vaccine in less than one week and, in total, more than 4.1 million adolescents ages 12 to 17 have been vaccinated so far. “This is incredible progress,” Barsoumian said. “Go get ‘em kids!”


4 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 3 | Thursday, June 10, 2021

Food

Thousand Island Burger Pizza (COURTESY PHOTO)

Take Salad Season to the Next Level

Find more ideas to elevate salad season at freshexpress.com. Thousand Island Burger Pizza Prep time: 15 minutes Total time: 25 minutes Servings: 6 1 can (11 ounces) refrigerated thin pizza

crust 12 ounces lean ground beef 1 cup pizza sauce 2 cups shredded cheddar cheese 1 package (9.4 ounces) Fresh Express Bacon Thousand Island Chopped Kit ⅓ cup dill pickle slices Heat oven to 400 F. Unroll dough and spread on 13-by-9inch nonstick baking sheet. Bake 8 minutes; remove from oven. In small skillet over medium-high heat, cook ground beef, stirring frequently, 8-10 minutes, or until no longer pink; drain. Spread sauce evenly on baked dough to within ½ inch of edge. Top with beef and cheese. Bake 8-10 minutes, or until crust is golden brown. Top with lettuce, bacon and salad toppings from kit and pickle slices. Drizzle with Thousand Island dressing from kit. Cut into 12 (3-by-3-inch) pieces. Kickin’ Chicken Tostadas Prep time: 30 minutes Total time: 35 minutes Servings: 6 1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breasts 1 jar (16 ounces) salsa verde, any heat level 2 packages (10.2 ounces each) Fresh Express Kickin’ Bacon Ranch Chopped Kit 12 tostada shells 1 avocado, peeled, pitted and cut into ½-inch pieces In large, covered skillet over medium heat, cook chicken in salsa verde 20 minutes, turning once, until internal temperature reaches 165 F. Remove chicken, reserving ½ cup salsa verde; shred with two forks. Toss with reserved salsa verde. Place salad from kit in large bowl; toss with half the salad dressing from kit. Add toppings from kit; toss to combine. Divide salad evenly among tostada shells. Top each salad with chicken and avocado; drizzle with remaining dressing.

watermelon wedges watermelon sticks flower-shaped watermelon cutouts peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, halved ham and cheese pinwheels sliced veggies, such as cucumbers, carrots, sweet peppers and celery sliced fruit

pretzels crackers small bowl of candy (optional) Prepare watermelon, sandwiches, pinwheels, veggies, fruit, pretzels, crackers and candy, if desired. On large board or platter, arrange all ingredients.

From Family Features

Warmer months typically call for lighter bites, and one of the first things that comes to mind for many is a fresh and flavorful salad. While a salad is a quick and easy way to up your veggie intake and get food on the table in next to no time, the same formula over and over again can make mealtimes feel mundane. To take your salads to the next level, think of those greens as a blank slate for creativity and look beyond the bowl for elements that can help create new, satisfying meals. For example, Fresh Express Chopped Salad Kits are tasty and versatile salad mixtures with premium ingredients that can also be eaten as sides with your favorite protein or used as toppers for favorites like pizza and tostadas to help kick mealtime up a notch. The salads are thoroughly washed, rinsed and gently dried then sealed in keep-crisp bags for long-lasting freshness. These easy Kickin’ Chicken Tostadas are made using the Kickin’ Bacon Ranch Chopped Kit, which includes garden fresh cabbage, green leaf lettuces, carrots, green onions, tortilla strips, uncured bacon bits and some heat from jalapeno ranch dressing. Just add the mixture to tostada shells topped with salsa verde chicken and avocado for a flavorful combination. Or for a tasty twist on traditional favorites like pizza and burgers, try this Thousand Island Burger Pizza using the Bacon Thou-

Kickin’ Chicken Tostadas (COURTESY PHOTO)

sand Island Chopped Kit - a combination of iceberg and green leaf lettuces, uncured bacon bits, Parmesan cheese crisps, honey butter cornbread crisps and creamy Thousand Island dressing - to bring sweet and savory flavors together with beef and cheese on top of a homemade pizza crust.

Kid-Friendly Summer Snacking From Family Features Summer sun means it’s time for warmweather fun for kids of all ages, and all that activity and playing calls for snacks and hydration to recharge. Whether your children like to play poolside or take a bicycle adventure through the neighborhood, the right nutrient-dense foods can keep the fun going all day long. For an option that quenches hunger (and thirst) without sacrificing nutrition, try an assortment of ways to enjoy watermelon. As a refreshing ingredient or standalone treat, watermelon includes just 80 calories and no fat while providing an excellent source of vitamin C (25%) and higher levels of lycopene (12.7 mg per 2-cup serving) — an antioxidant being studied for its role in sun protection — than any other fresh fruit or vegetable. Plus, it’s made of 92% water, meaning it’s a flavorful way to encourage kids to rehydrate during some fun in the sun. Make watermelon part of a balanced snack plate with this Kids Charcuterie Snack Board including assorted watermelon, peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, sliced veggies, sliced fruits, crackers, pretzels and more. In addition to the nutritional benefits, the simplicity of this snack means children can help assemble it while showing

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off their creativity. Visit watermelon.org to find more kid-friendly recipe ideas. Kids Charcuterie Snack Board Recipe courtesy of the National Watermelon Promotion Board Cubed watermelon watermelon balls, skewered


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 3 | Thursday, June 10, 2021 5

Health

LSSN Nydera Walker in her cubical in the Directorate for Resource Management at Naval Hospital Twentynine Palms. (DAVID MARKS)

MTF Logistics Specialist Plays Key Role in Assuring High

By Dave Marks

Nhtp Pao Public Affairs

Frequently it’s the front-line providers who are profiled to represent Navy Medicine. Working beneath the surface, however, are the administrators, supply officers, maintenance techs and an army of dedicated staff who assure that when a provider reaches for a tongue depressor, syringe or bandage, it’s available. If a critical, yet seemingly innocuous item in the medical inventory is depleted, the consequences can cascade, and eventually could affect patient care. Serving as a warranted contract official in

the Directorate of Resource Management at Naval Hospital Twentynine Palms (NHTP), Navy Logistics Specialist Seaman (LSSN) Nydera Walker is responsible for ordering supplies for the military medical treatment facility and assuring that medical inventories are maintained. Walker arrived at NHTP two years ago as a logistics seaman recruit, having just completed the five-week Logistics A-School in Meridian, Mississippi. Prior to joining the Navy she worked in a call center for medical alerts. Walker joined the Navy because she wanted to see the world. Her recruiter was a logistics specialist. And Walker, not wanting to be listed as “undecided,” chose the

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logistics route as well. “He pretty much sold it,” she said. She has no regrets. After working in the logistics field for two years and becoming a critical in the inventory chain, she plans to become a supply officer. She’s currently finishing her final class for an undergraduate degree in pre-optometry, and explained how priorities change as you grow and gain experience. She now plans to work on a Master’s degree in business management and then apply for an officer-commissioning program. Walker explained how she likes the logistics field because it’s similar to the customer service she was doing at the call center. “It’s getting customers what they need and making sure they are satisfied,” she said —

and that makes her feel appreciated. “She executes orders from the medical supply vendors, makes sure the orders are in, makes sure the inventory catalogs throughout the hospital are well organized and that her customers are getting the correct supplies,” said Anthony Lambert, assistant department head for the material management department. “Her replacement has very big shoes to fill.” When asked who she admires most, Walker immediately name her father who served 10 years as an electrician’s mate in the Navy. “He always found a way to keep family important,” she said. “He’s been through some tough times and has always managed to make his way back on top. That’s inspiring to me because it’s easy to give up when times get hard. My inspiration is my dad. He keeps pushing so I keep pushing too.” In early May, Walker departed NHTP for a new assignment on the USS Donald Cook (DDG-75), an Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer.


6 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 3 | Thursday, June 10, 2021

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Mini Cavapoochons puppies, (4) males and (1)female, shots, wormed, vet checked, family raised, health guarantee $1650 Both Parents Ready 7/2 Call (757) 922-8118

NORFOLK NSU Area Room For Rent All Utils $160 wk + deposit. Call: 757-284-6249

AKC GOLDEN RETRIEVER 1st shots, deworming, available for pick up. $925. Please Text: 252-548-8327

Misc. Merchandise For Sale FREE PICK UP Of your broken or unwanted lawn equipment. Call 757-412-5664.

CAVALIER KING CHARLES SPANIELS Males Only, AKC Reg’d. $1500-$2500 Avail June 11th Call For details 509919-6950 Norfolk

YORKSHIRE TERRIOR

Shop smart. Save big! Sunday (and every day).

Home Raised Vet Checked, UTD 1 F, 1 M, $750. 10 wks 978-846-9449

NISSAN 2015 VERSA

Classic, Antique Cars

Travel/Camping Trailers

Motorcycles and ATVs

Ready for the their forever home. 1 male and 1 female puppy. 9 weeks old. Mom is 5 lbs Platnium blonde, and Dad is 3 1/2 lbs Chocolate . AKC registrable. They will have age appropriate shots. Call or txt Brenda @757912-4387

4D Sedan; 91K; Bge color; Single owner; well maintained; sold as is.

GTI, auto, AC, power windows & locks, cruise, tilt, back up camera, 38mpg, warranty, 18k miles, like new. $16,900. 757-351-5611

CONSIGNMENTS WANTED! Let us clean, sell, & finance your RV. Snyders RV 499-8000.

DOODLES

HONDA 2003 ACCORD

VOLKSWAGEN 2018 JETTA

YORKIE PUPS Ready 7/21, M & F, traditional & parti. $850 each. Call: 252-655-1575 YORKIE/MALTESE MIX Black & tan male, runt, 6 wks. $1,600. Cell: 757-567-2687

EX Sunroof, 4 door, runs good, $2,250 757-343-0270

54K original mis, all serviced, new state insp, auto, air, gar. kept, looks new. $9800. 757-675-0288. Va. Dlr.

WANTED: BOSTON TERRIER Looking to buy Boston Terrier puppy or older dog. Please call Peggy at 757-489-0070

Dogs, Cats, Other Pets

HONDA 2001 ACCORD

1997 HARLEY DAVIDSON Heritage Softail Classic FLSTC, 2 owner bike, garage kept, great shape, 27k miles, $6500.00. 757-572-9265 MISC. TRANSPORTATION 2011 HD Road Glide Ultra Gar. Kept-Many Extras-15k mi $11,000 Call 757-650-9273

We will purchase your collectible, classic, late model autos, we will come to you. Call 757-675-0288. VOLKSWAGEN 1979 BEETLE

Convertible …no damage or rust history. 95% original. Same owner 20 plus years .. show quality. Runs and drives perfect. No issues $19,500 Beautiful yellow w black top, camel interior 757-472-9934

Trucks and SUVs

Trucks and SUVs

HONDA 2015 ACCORD

LX, 4 door, 4 cylinder, auto, AC, cruise, tilt, power windows and locks, back up camera,44k miles, exc condition, $16,000, Call: 443-351-5611

HONDA 2015 CROSSTOUR

52K orig. mis., leather, sunroof, 4WD, new insp, loaded, cargo rack & tow pkg., showroom new, $19,900. 757-620-7570. Va. Dlr.

TOYOTA 2000 LAND CRUISER

$14500 1Owner, Toyota Land Cruiser Wht w/beige int. 188,000 mi Ex cond, recent oil change, wiper blades, tune up, pwr str pmp, valve cvr gsk Newer tires, battery, Timing belt and water pump in last 50k. txt 843.290.0079

Wanted Automotive ABSOLUTELY ABLY ACQUIRING AUTOS All Makes & Models, Best Price Paid!! FREE TOWING. 757-749-8035 AUTOS ACCEPTED-ANY YEAR Make or Model. TOP DOLLAR, FAST, Free Towing. 757-737-2465, 701-3361

Boats & Watercraft BOAT FOR SALE LIKE NEW 12000 2020 tracker pro 170 with trailer 9.9 ELPT motor spare tire minkota edge 45 foot cont low range hook 4x new condition Bargain at 12000 call 7574792089

Early home delivery.

FORD 2018 F-350

Crew Cab. Lariat pkg., diesel, leather, full sunroof, 5th wheel set-up, 4WD, new tires, just serviced, fully loaded, looks great, $58,900. Call 757-620-7570. Va. Dlr.

757-446-9000 or PilotOnline.com

757.622.1455 | placeanad.pilotonline.com Concrete/Asphalt Estate Sales CONCRETE, BRICK & TREE REMOVAL Landscaping, Top Soil, Press Wash’g, Yard Clean Up & Home Repairs. 757-714-4848 S & H ENTERPRISE 20 YRS. Concrete Exp. All types of concrete work driveways, stamped & exposed. We accept credit cards. 757-652-4050. www.shabazznva.com

Care For The Elderly PRIVATE HARDWORKING CNA - HONEST, reliable & exc. references 757-524-9170

Early home delivery.

757-446-9000 or PilotOnline.com

Handyman Services ★BROWNS HOME REPAIRS★ Baths, Kitchens, Ceiling Fans, Doors, Locks, Flooring, Paint, Plumbing. 25 yrs. exp. Lic. & ins. Call Rob 757-679-4558 ★GENERAL REPAIRS★ AFFORDABLE. All Handyman, Int & Ext: Flooring, Bathrooms, Small Jobs, Remodel, Rot Repair. 30 Yrs. Exp. BBB A+ Rating. 757-430-2612.

Hauling (A) FAMILY TRASH MAN-HOUSEHOLD, Demo inside & out, construction sites, dumpster drop off, backhoe work. We haul it all! 20 yrs. exp., lic & ins. 485-1414 B & J MOVING Reasonable Rates, Licensed & Insured. bandjmoving.com 757-576-1290

Home Improvements ADDITIONS, SUNROOMS, ROOFS, Decks, more. Member BBB. 757-986-3777. www.builderscorporation.com ALL HOME IMPROVEMENTS Custom Home Repairs & Renovations. Patrick Ellis Ent. Inc. Lic. & Ins. BBB A+ 757-635-6609 BEST PRICE EXTERIORS 757-639-4692 Siding, Windows, Trim, Roofing. FREE ESTIMATES! Lic. & Ins’d. Lowest Prices & Top Quality Work. No Repairs. BBB A+ Rating

YOUR PERFECT

HIRE

IS WAITING

BRICK & STONE REPAIRS Steps, Walls, Foundations, etc. Virginia Beach Native. Masonry Contract. 40+ yrs Known As Stone Smith USA. Semi-Retired - A Legend In His Own Mind! Earl Smith 757-2700578. Please Leave Message. You Won’t Find A Better Man!

Lawn and Tree Service ★ 100% DRAINAGE & YARD CLEANUP ★ Shrub & Tree Removal, Pruning, Tractor Work & Grading, French Drains, Mulching, Fences. ★★757-282-3823★★

FRANK’S SIDING & REPAIRS Repairing Siding & Trim. Lic/Ins. Senior & Military Discount! 757-227-8964

AMERICANTREESERVICE.CO ★Catering to all your tree & yard needs.★ ★757-587-9568. 30 years experience★

HOME REPAIRS-RICHARD’S Crawl Space, Room Additions Bathrooms, Kitchens Now Servicing OBX. 757-869-0380 RGSPROS.COM “The RICHARD’S Difference When It Absolutely Has To Be Done Right”

GODWIN TREE SERVICE 25yrs. Trimming, Topping, total removal. Free est. Winter Pandemic Discount; Lic’d & Ins’d 757-2371285 or 757-816-3759 BBB Member

PEST/TERMITE CONTROL Universal Pest & Termite. FREE INSPECTIONS. 757-502-0200. (Mention This Ad and Get $25 Off)

YARD CLEAN UP - GRASS CUTTING, WOOD FENCE REPAIR & BUSHES Weed Eating, Blowing, Reasonable prices. Call 757-477-2158

Power Washing SOUTH SIDE PRESSURE WASHING Pressure wash exterior surfaces. For free estimate call 757-337-9991

Roofing

LEAF RAKING AND CLEANUP Yard Work, Weed Control, Mulching, Trimming, Planting, Transplanting of Shrubbery and Trees. 25 yrs exp. Call 757-918-4152 PARKER TREE SERVICE Mulch, trim shrubs, landscaping. Free Estimates. 757-620-9390

A ROOFING SALE 30 Yr. Architect Shingles $1.99 sq ft. Labor & Material included, repair, siding. Class A Lic’d & Ins’d. (757) 880-5215. CALVIN’S ROOFING REPAIR LLC Specializes in roofing repair, also guttering, Free estimates, roofing of all types, reasonable prices, Shingles, metal, slate, rubber. Over 30 yrs -business, BBB 757-377-2933

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