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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, May 27, 2021 1

IN THIS ISSUE

Submarine Search, Rescue Exercise

SUBLANT recently conducted a search and rescue training exercise (SMASHEX) at Naval Support Activity Hampton Roads in Norfolk. PAGE A2 VOL. 27, NO. 21, Norfolk, VA | flagshipnews.com

May 27-June 2, 2021

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Virtual Fleet Week New York schedule to feature dozens of action-packed videos: FOLLOW, LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE From Navy Region MidAtlantic Public Affairs NORFOLK — New York’s traditional kickoff to summer returned, May 26, when the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard launched Virtual Fleet Week New York 2021. Fleet Week New York has been part of the fabric of the nation’s largest city since the event was first held in 1984. The annual celebration of the maritime services typically involves public ship tours, band performances and demonstrations. Due to the coronavirus pandemic, a decision was made in February to hold the event for the second year entirely on social media May 26 - 31. The decision allows the public to see a greater variety of ships, aircraft and demonstrations than they typically could in person. “New Yorkers are in for a treat with Virtual Fleet Week New York,” said Rear Adm. Charles Rock, commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic. “We’ll introduce you to a New Yorker serving aboard USS New York who enlisted after the 9/11 attacks, show you what it’s like to fly in the backseat of an F/A-18 Super Hornet, and take you out to sea where you can see why the Navy-Marine Corps team is the fiercest fighting force on the planet.”

Virtual Fleet Week New York 2021 will also include a mini-documentary about the Navy’s explosive ordnance disposal community and dozens of other videos demonstrating the capabilities of the women and men who serve in the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. “This event will be a memorable part of the ‘Summer of New York City’ as we emerge from the pandemic,” Rock said. “We’re excited to show New York exactly how the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard provide the United States an advantage at sea around the world.” The virtual environment also allows Fleet Week New York to go international for the first time by highlighting New Yorkers serving in Japan, which hosts the largest U.S. naval installation outside the United States. New York and Tokyo have been sister cities since 1960 and this year the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force is hosting its inaugural Fleet Week Japan in conjunction with Virtual Fleet Week New York to showcase the special relationship the allies have. Other Virtual Fleet Week New York videos include a tour of the ballistic-missile submarine USS Maine (SSBN 741), a live martial arts demonstration by Marines, and an interview with the first African American woman to serve as the commanding

officer of Coast Guard Sector New York, Capt. Zeita Merchant. There will also be musical performances by Navy Band Northeast and country music artists Phil Vassar, Stephanie Quayle, and Jo Smith, who is a Navy Reservist. Virtual Fleet Week New York content will appear on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube and Twitch. This year’s event is also expanding to include an Instagram Stories takeover by Sailors from New York and the introduction of shortform videos on Instagram Reels and YouTube Shorts. Navy veteran and YouTube influencer Gabriel Brown, known as Black Gryph0n, is also releasing a series of Navy-related videos for Virtual Fleet Week New York. For up-to-date information on all FWNY events, “Like” FleetWeekNewYork on Facebook, and “Follow” @ FleetWeekNYC on Twitter and Instagram. Join the conversation on social media by using #FleetWeekNYC. Fleet Week New York YouTube videos posted throughout the week can be found on Navy Region Mid-Atlantic’s channel at www.youtube.com/ cnrmapao A Virtual Fleet Week New York promotional video can be viewed and embedded on websites via YouTube at https://www.youtube.

com/watch?v=PwlE5rkBv_0 The full schedule is as follows and is subject to change without notice. Additional videos may appear unannounced Wednesday May 26 . 9 a.m.: What’s the Scuttlebutt? . 11 a.m (Live): United States Marine Corps martial arts demonstration . 12 p.m.: Tour of USS New York . 2 p.m. (Live): EOD demonstration and Q&A . 4 p.m.: EA-18G Growler in action . 7 p.m.: USCG video - We’re always ready Thursday May 27 . 8 a.m.: USMC Blue Green Team . 10 a.m.: NAS Oceana Military Working Dogs . 12 p.m.: Country music singer Jo Smith . 2 p.m.: What makes the world’s best Coast Guard? . 4 p.m.: The Silent Service - 121 years of Submarines . 7 p.m.: USS America Highlights Friday May 28 . 8 a.m.: USMC F-35 Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 314 . 10 a.m.: Navy helicopter tour . 12 p.m.: Gabe Brown - F/A-18 flight . 2 p.m. (Live): Enlistment ceremony from Time Square . 4 p.m.: USS Maine Submarine

Tour . 7 p.m.: Navy Band Northeast — How to make a New York Style Pizza Saturday May 29 . 8 a.m.: USO Troupe — Jump Jive and Wail . 10 a.m.: Navy Divers STEM video . 12 p.m.: Maritime Expeditionary Security Force . 2 p.m.: Capt. Zeita Merchant - CO of USCG Sector NY “Representation Matters” . 4 p.m.: EOD helicopter operations . 7 p.m.: Unmanned Submarine Sunday May 30 . 8 a.m.: What happens to plastic waste aboard ships . 10 a.m.: Country music artist Phil Vassar . 12 p.m.: USMC ANGLICO . 2 p.m.: Navy Band Northeast — Learn to Fly . 4 p.m.: USMC Recruiting — Native New Yorker SSGT Lee . 7 p.m.: Navy Expeditionary Combat Command Monday May 31 . 8 a.m.: TAPS . 10 a.m.: New York native reflects on serving aboard USS New York . 11 a.m. (Live): Memorial Day Ceremony from the Intrepid . 12 p.m.: United States Naval Academy Midshipmen Q&A . 2 p.m.: Assault Craft Unit 2 Tour . 7 p.m.: EOD mini-documentary

Naval Station Norfolk gives Naval Station to Fisher House Foundation Norfolk celebrates National EMS Week

By ACAN Amy Hudek

Naval Station Norfolk Public Affairs

NORFOLK — The First Class Petty Officer Association (FCPOA) at Naval Station Norfolk hosted a donation collection during the month of May for the Fisher House Foundation. The Fisher House Foundation builds comfort homes for active duty military and veteran families where they can stay free of charge while a loved one is in the hospital. It was founded in 1990 and is an international foundation, usually located near large hospitals. Due to COVID-19, the FCPOA had to adhere to HPCON Charlie restrictions. “We wanted to give back while still adhering to Charlie restrictions,” explained Master-at-Arms 1st Class Alexandra Johnson. “We wanted to get as many donations as possible on behalf of Naval Station Norfolk.” Johnson was in charge of orga-

By DC3 Ashley Pierson

Naval Station Norfolk Public Affairs

Religious Program Specialist 1st Class Christopher Atwood, and Aviation Structural Mechanic (Safety Equipment) 1st Class Renee Drew collect donations at a supply drive for the Fisher House Foundation. (COURTESY PHOTO)

nizing the event. She became a first class petty officer in 2020 and began

Turn to Fisher House, Page 7

NORFOLK — Naval Station (NAVSTA) Norfolk took part in the 46th annual celebration of National Emergency Medical Service (EMS) Week, May 16-22. This year’s theme was “This is EMS: Caring for Our Communities.” In 1974, President Gerald Ford authorized the establishment of National EMS Week to celebrate the importance of our country’s EMS practitioners and the work they do to help our communities. “The true mark of any professional is a commitment to one’s job and ability to execute their

duties at a high level in spite of the circumstances or challenges they face,” stated Fire Department Medical Director Lt. Cmdr. Paul Roszko. Throughout the week long celebration in honor of National EMS Week, each day highlighted and promoted something different to help educate our local community on the importance of EMS and lifesaving measures. The week’s events included a visit to a Norfolk Child Development Center where the children were invited to explore an ambulance and an educational display at the Norfolk Navy Exchange Turn to EMS, Page 7

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These heroes at home are being recognized for their unending strength, personal sacrifices, support for their military families and their selfless commitment to our communities. The Heroes at Home Military Spouses of the Year & Military Child of the year are chosen from nominees provided by actively serving personnel from all branches of the military, spouse support groups, charitable organizations, friends and family. Read about the honorees starting on PAGE C1.

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The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, May 27, 2021

Information Systems Technician (Submarines) 1st Class Derrick Bassett, from Colorado Springs, Colorado, currently serves as the site leading petty officer and an Information Systems Technician Submarines Block“0”instructor at Information Warfare Training Command Virginia Beach Learning Site Groton. (COURTESY PHOTO)

IWTC Virginia Beach Learning Site Groton instructor trains “Silent Service” Sailors to fight, win From Center For Information Warfare Training VIRGINIA BEACH — Information Systems Technician (Submarines) 1st Class Derrick Bassett, from Colorado Springs, Colorado, currently serves as the site leading petty officer (LPO) and an Information Systems Technician Submarines (ITS) Block “0” instructor at Information Warfare Training Command (IWTC) Virginia Beach Learning Site (LS) Groton. Bassett completed boot camp at Recruit Training Command Great Lakes in November 2013. He then transferred to Naval Submarine School in Groton, Connecticut to attend ITS “A” and “C” Schools, obtaining the Information Systems Administrator Navy Enlisted Classification Code 2791 and

Submarine Local Area Network (SUBLAN) Technician Navy Enlisted Classification Code 2783. Upon completion of training, Bassett reported to his first operational command aboard USS Minnesota (SSBN 783) in Groton, Connecticut. During his first tour, he was promoted to third class petty officer, second class petty officer, and first class petty officer and also made multiple deployments as a member of ITS division and served as a local area network administrator and a SUBLAN subject matter expert. Following his tour aboard USS Minnesota, Bassett reported to IWTC Virginia Beach LS Groton where he serves as the site’s LPO and ITS Block “0” instructor, providing apprentice to journeyman-level instruction to students to prepare them for assignments

Submarine Search, Rescue Exercise (SMASHEX): Quick response saves lives when seconds matter By Lt. Emily McCamy,

Submarine Force Atlantic Public Affairs

NORFOLK — Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic (SUBLANT) recently conducted a search and rescue training exercise (SMASHEX) at Naval Support Activity Hampton Roads in Norfolk. The exercise, conducted annually, focused on two different scenarios, each testing the team’s response to the simulated sinking of a submarine. “The staff engagement across SUBLANT was great,” said Capt. Charles Fink, commanding officer of Navy Reserve Undersea Rescue Command Headquarters. “Knowing who to call and what information to provide is critical to good communication. Time matters when a submarine is in distress.” Fink was a senior observer who shared best practices used across other c command task forces. “If a submarine has an emergency, which leads to the submarine sinking, the window of time to rescue submariners could be

short and require quick, decisive actions to achieve a rescue,” said Lt. Cmdr. Ben Moran, the U.K. Royal Navy’s exchange officer assigned to SUBLANT. “Throughout the scenario, we are testing our ability to provide accurate and timely information to supporting agencies and nations who may be involved with saving lives at sea.” Moran helped deliver the two-day training scenario to test SUBLANT’s response to a distressed submarine (DISSUB) situation. The scenario utilized real events from history to drive the response team and ensure liaison with the many agencies involved in submarine search and rescue, such as Military Sealift Command (MSC), Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) and Undersea Rescue Command (URC), who together provide ships, personnel and equipment to support the rescue or recovery of personnel from a DISSUB worldwide. “Rescuing personnel at depth, whilst dealing with possible time and supply constraints is extremely difficult and requires a lot of coordination,” said Moran. “Exercising with URC helps us to develop

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to the cyber security workforce (CSWF) and system administrators in the submarine force. When asked about his selection as this month’s Sailor in the Spotlight, Bassett stated, “My time at Information Warfare Training Command Virginia Beach Learning Site Groton has been rewarding in a multitude of ways. Being able to educate, mold and mentor future Sailors allows me to shape the future of the Navy. From my first day onboard, I was surrounded by great leaders and mentors who have been crucial in my success. I have gained knowledge here that I will carry with me through the entirety of my naval career. I am fortunate to have spent the time that I did at Information Warfare Training Command Virginia Beach Learning Site Groton.” an insurance policy that hopefully we never have to use.” As rescue specialists, URC utilizes a mix of active duty and Reserve component sailors and government contractors to provide worldwide submarine rescue coverage for the U.S. Navy and foreign submarines. Submarine rescue is an international effort. In 2003, NATO established The International Submarine Escape and Rescue Liaison Office (ISMERLO), a military organization, which supports all nations and pursues the involvement of global submarine-operating nations. NATO membership is not required. “The idea of ISMERLO is that we are independent, even though we’re under the NATO umbrella,” said Royal Norwegian Navy Cmdr. Espen Engebretsen, who is assigned to NATO Submarine Command and ISMERLO as their plans and exercises officer. “This way, non-NATO countries can reach out for help. Our focus is saving lives at sea, regardless of the country.” Engebretsen advised SUBLANT on how to use the ISMERLO website effectively. “In January, we updated the website and want to ensure the community knows how to use it and can provide feedback for continued improvement,” said Engebretsen, emphasizing ISMERLOs dedication to the global humanitarian effort. “As submariners, we operate in an inherently high-risk environment, making it vital to act quickly and efficiently both as part of a submarine crew or ashore as the support element,” said Vice Adm. Daryl Caudle, Commander, Submarine Forces. “We train so that we are decisive, proficient,

Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic (CNRMA): Rear Adm Charles W.“Chip”Rock Regional program manager for Navy Region Mid-Atlantic (NRMA): Public Affairs Director | Beth Baker The Flagship® is published by Flagship, Inc., a private firm in no way connected with the Department of Defense (DOD) or the United States Navy, under exclusive written contract with Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic. This civilian enterprise newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the military services. Contents of the paper, including advertisements, are not necessarily the official views of, nor endorsed by, the U.S. Government, DOD, or the Department of the Navy (DON). The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts and supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the DOD; DON; Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic or Flagship, Inc. of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase,use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user, or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. Editorial content is edited, prepared and provided by the Public Affairs Department of Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic. Stories may be submitted via email to news@flagshipnews.com. The Flagship® is published every Thursday by Flagship, Inc., whose offices are located at 150W. Brambleton Ave., Norfolk, Va. 23510. © 2021Flagship, Inc. All rights reserved

IWTC Virginia Beach currently offers 59 courses of instruction in information technology, cryptology, and intelligence with an instructor and support staff of 278 military, civilian, and contract members who train over 6,600 students every year at five training sites in the Hampton Roads area. It is one of four school houses for Center for Information Warfare Training (CIWT) and also oversees learning sites at Jacksonville and Mayport, Florida; Kings Bay, Georgia; and Groton, Connecticut to continue aligning information warfare community training. With four schoolhouse commands, a detachment, and training sites throughout the United States and Japan, CIWT trains approximately 26,000 students every year, delivering trained information warfare professionals to the Navy and joint services. CIWT also offers more than 200 courses for cryptologic technicians, intelligence specialists, information systems technicians, electronics technicians, and officers in the information warfare community. For more news from the Center for Information Warfare Training domain, visit https://www.netc.navy.mil/CIWT, www. facebook.com/NavyCIWT, or www.twitter. com/NavyCIWT.

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and ready in any scenario, because bringing our undersea warriors home after every underway is a no fail mission.” The mission of the Submarine Force is to execute the Department of the Navy’s mission in and from the undersea domain. In addition to lending added capacity to naval forces, the Submarine Force, in particular, is expected to leverage those special advantages that come with undersea concealment to permit operational, deterrent and combat effects that the Navy and the nation could not otherwise achieve. The Submarine Force and supporting organizations constitute the primary undersea arm of the Navy. Submarines and their crews remain the tip of the undersea spear.


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, May 27, 2021 3

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4 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, May 27, 2021

Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 2nd Class Mark Rubio, from Quezon City, Philippines, assigned to USS Gerald R. Ford’s (CVN 78) air department, poses for a photo. (MC3 BRETT WALKER)

Ford recognizes Asian-American, Pacific Islander Heritage Month By MC3 Brett Walker

USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) Public Affairs

NORFOLK — USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) recognizes May as Asian-American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month and why it’s important to celebrate and appreciate their culture and diversity. Asian-American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month is a celebration of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States. It encompasses all of the Asian continent and the Pacific islands. “I think this month is important because of the history behind Asians and Islanders in the military,” said Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Matthew Ye, from Ridgecrest, California, assigned to Ford’s medical department. “There was once a time in the military where we as Asians or Islanders could only get the more grueling jobs. Now there are so many

important leaders out there in the military that are Asian-American or an Islander. I think this month is a celebration to show how far we’ve worked our way up and are getting to share our cultures and ideas with everyone.” May was selected as Asian-American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month to commemorate the first Japanese immigrant to the United States, May 7, 1943. It’s also to remember when the transcontinental railroad was completed, May 10, 1943. Chinese immigrants made up the majority of workers who set the tracks. “We’re always a part of history,” said Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 2nd Class Mark Rubio, from Quezon City, Philippines, assigned to Ford’s air department. “It could be a substantial amount at some points or not as much to others, but we’re always there. Our culture is important to remember because of how different it is.”

Ye is proud to be the president of the Gay, Lesbian and Supporting Sailors (GLASS) association aboard Ford as an Asian-American. Ye is showcasing how Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders have come a long way from getting the more grueling jobs to being the leader of an association aboard a warship. “I am very proud to be the president of GLASS,” said Ye. “Being the first Asian-American in GLASS, I want to make history. I want people later down the line to remember the forefathers of [Ford’s] GLASS and see me, an Asian-American, who was once the president and be proud of the heritage.” As of 2020, approximately only 7 out of 100 Sailors are Asian-American or a Pacific Islander. Rubio was positively shocked and saw the numbers more as an opportunity to grow. “I honestly think that number is good,” said

Rubio. “It may seem like a small number now, but I know it’ll grow. I am in a social media group where Filipinos who are trying to join the military will ask questions on what they need to do to improve themselves to join the military. There are always people who want to join. People may think that number is small, but I see it as a lot.” “That statistic is hard to believe,” said Ye. “All of us seem to come together as brothers and sisters. When we are together we don’t see race or color, we are just a family. That statistic is honestly shocking to me. My brothers are both in the Navy, as well. One of my brothers is a [gunner’s mate second class] and the other is a lieutenant.” Rubio is the assistant leading petty officer in Ford’s crash and salvage division. He is not only a leader on the ship, but a leader to everyone around him in his personal life and back home. “No matter where someone is from or what race they are, they are going to be an example to someone else,” said Rubio. “It’s important that no matter who we are or where we come from that we are always setting the best example at all times.” For more news from USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78), visit www.dvidshub.net/unit/ CVN78.

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, May 27, 2021 5

Command University’s (CU) (Code 900CU) Management and Program Analyst Turner Anthony instructs Lifting and Handling (Code 740) Rigger Leader (Shop 72) Britton Williams Hawkins during CU’s new High Velocity Work Leader Course. (ALDO ANDERSON)

Norfolk Naval Shipyard introduces new High Velocity Work Leader Course By Hannah Bondoc and Allison Conti Norfolk Naval Shipyard Public Affairs

PORTSMOUTH — Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY) recently introduced its new High Velocity Work Leader (HVWL) course, a threemonth hybrid course that consists of eLearning and in-person sessions. This initiative is in direct support of NNSY’s People Development Strategic Framework pillar. According to Command University’s (Code 900CU) (CU) Management and Program Analyst Turner Anthony, the HVWL course was created to provide first line leaders with essential supervisory skills, enabling work leaders to

assume many of the responsibilities of the first level supervisor in the supervisor’s absence. “It incorporates emerging leader content, critical core competencies (communication, emotional intelligence, accountability, problem solving, team building and conflict mastery) and resources such as online leadership courses,” he explained. “It also integrates the knowledge, skills and abilities (KSAs) needed to stand in for the supervisor in their absence and/or assist in their daily responsibilities.” Before participating in the course, production and refueling work leaders must complete a number of required prerequisites. Participants must have completed the Foundations of

Leadership (FOL) (L023) or Skills for Emerging Leader (C900CU-SEL) courses, LinkedIn Learning modules on Microsoft Office and Adobe Acrobat Reader, the Strength Finders assessment, Completion of Work Review (G002A) and the Quality Control for Nuclear Supervisors (NS-N3002). Additionally, refueling work leaders are required to complete Lead Shift Supervisor (R-24) training. All of these prerequisites can be obtained through CU. Prior to enrolling in the course, participants must have access to Automated Training Management System (ATMS), Supervisor Desk (SUPDESK), and Advanced Industrial Management (AIM) software.

The HVWL course is currently scheduled for one to two in-person sessions per quarter. To enroll in the course, interested participants should sign up online after confirming with their training manager that they have completed all of the required prerequisites. For more information or to sign up, visit ATMS and search for C900CU-WLHV or visit the Command University SharePoint page. According to Anthony, production work leaders should take this course because it will allow them to share daily responsibilities and give their first line supervisors (1LS) time to evaluate, plan, and increase opportunities to mentor deckplate mechanics. “The return on investment with emerging supervisory skills within our work leaders will provide personal development, increased organizational work structure, and satisfaction with meeting the NNSY mission of dependable delivery of ships,” he said.

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6 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, May 27, 2021

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 1 | Thursday, May 27, 2021 7

As a self-described“pipeventrician,” Norfolk Naval Shipyard’s (NNSY) Non-Nuclear Temporary Services (Code 990) Electrician David Stevens is responsible for providing electrical, air, water, and ventilation services for many NNSY Shops, Ship’s Force, and contractors. (ALDO ANDERSON)

Norfolk Naval Shipyard Spotlight: David Stevens By Allison Conti

Norfolk Naval Shipyard Public Affairs

PORTSMOUTH — Norfolk Naval Shipyard’s (NNSY) Non-Nuclear Temporary Services (Code 990) Electrician David Stevens is a self-described “pipeventrician.” That label captures all Stevens and his team in Code 990 are responsible for providing electrical, air, water, and ventilation services for many NNSY Shops, Ship’s Force, and contractors. In alignment with the One Team mindset at NNSY, Stevens’s job is all about teamwork. “We essentially make sure that everyone has what is necessary to complete the jobs they are working on-time and under budget,” he said. “That can be achieved by teamwork and by working as one.” The Oshkosh, Wisconsin native, came to the shipyard in 2015 after spending more than 30 years in his hometown. With a degree in electro-mechanical tech, Stevens was working as a traveling electri-

Fisher House from Page 1

participating in the FCPOA in January 2021. She has been stationed at Naval Station Norfolk for a little over three years. “Since selecting a new board in October, this was the first thing outside of base clean-ups we have been able to do due to COVID restrictions,” said Religious Program Specialist 1st Class Christopher Atwood. First class petty officers collected items each Thursday during the month of May from 13001500 in the chapel parking lot on base. “I had not heard of the Fisher House,” Johnson said. “MA1 Jessica Peña had worked with them in the past. I did research on the Fisher House and decided it would be a good program to give back to The Fisher House Foundation is asking for

cian performing commercial installs across the country. “I did it for about three years but living on the road for six months at a time got old fast.” Stevens wanted to make a change and his uncle recommended he consider a career at NNSY. When he received his offer and start date, he quickly packed up and moved halfway across the country to Virginia. Stevens quickly adjusted to life as a shipyard employee thanks to a team of important mentors who became his teammates providing valuable mentoring. Now, having completed three to four projects with his mentors-turned-teammates, he considers them close friends. Work Leader Christopher Blake was even a groomsman in Stevens’ wedding along with several other Code 990 NNSY Apprenticeship Program graduates. Six years after starting his career at NNSY, Stevens now has valuable experience under his belt. He is currently assigned to the USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) Drydocking

donations of various items. These items include laundry and cleaning supplies, gift cards to places such as Food Lion and Lowes, kitchen and food items, and personal hygiene items. There are a total of 91 houses in operation and since 1990, 413,000 families have been served and have saved them a total of $525 million. In 2020 alone, the Fisher House served 13,000 families around the world. The daily capacity is about 1,200 families. Fisher Houses are given to the military families and veterans as a gift, and the commander or director of each medical center where the houses are located are responsible for deciding the eligibility, priorities, and selection criteria. There is no charge to stay at the Fisher House; all room fees are paid for by the Fisher House Foundation. “It feels good to be able to do something to give back to the community.” stated Johnson. For more information, visit fisherhouse.org.

Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA) project which undocked on-time last August. Stevens played an important role in ensuring other shops had the tools they needed to get the job done. “I could write a list that would go on for pages covering everything we (Code 990) have our hands in and assist with,” said Stevens. The effort Stevens puts into his work can be measured in miles — literally. As the lead mechanic on the Bush when she was still in dry dock, he averaged around 20,000 steps and 30 flights of stairs per day. But despite the physical demands, Stevens stayed motivated by focusing on NNSY’s mission and teamwork. Stevens’s dedication to his teammates has been noticed by everyone he works with, including his supervisor, Temporary Services Supervisor Matt Stephenson. “Mr. Stevens is a motivated self-starter and a hard worker, he is always willing to help his fellow teammates to complete an assigned task and help support production,” said Stephenson.

“I have been his direct supervisor for several years and I have watched him develop and excel in his shipyard career. I am sure he will continue to strive here at NNSY and I am looking forward to being a part of it.” With regards to the future, Stevens hopes to impart his knowledge onto the next generation of shipyarders, just like his teammates did for him when he started. When asked of his proudest career accomplishment, Stevens said it was watching the apprentices and helpers-to-workers he has helped train grow and become excellent mechanics, not just within the shipyard itself but at NNSY’s satellite locations as well. Stevens took a leap of faith when he moved across the country to start his career at NNSY; however, he can safely say it paid off. Six years later, he finds himself excelling in a career he loves as an invaluable member of a diverse team. “I’ve learned so much from the diverse background of knowledge others have, not just knowledge about the job but stuff outside the yard too. I’ve made some lifelong friends that I would not have made if it wasn’t for the shipyard and I’m grateful for that,” he said. One thing has stayed the same since his first day on the job, and that is his awe of the U.S. Navy’s warships. “I continue to be constantly amazed by the ships and places we get to work. I like to say that eight-yearold me would geek out if he could see me now.”

EMS

from Page 1

Fire Rescue Team members from Navy Region Mid-Atlantic Fire and Emergency Services visit a Child Development Center in Norfolk as part of Emergency Medical Service (EMS)

also offered blood pressure tests. “I am very proud of every one of our firefighter’s and emergency medical technicians (EMT’s),” said Anthony Sickell, NAVSTA Norfolk district fire chief. “Their selfless actions and duty to the fleet are second to none and assure a constant state of mission readiness.” Navy Region Mid-Atlantic Fire and Emergency Services provides high quality emergency medical care to naval installations in the Navy’s Mid-Atlantic Region with more than 600 personnel operating from 29 fire stations across 10 states. Of those numbers a total of 76 EMS responders work on NAVSTA Norfolk. “I thank you all for your service and for rising to the Occasion,” said Rear Adm. Chip Rock, commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic.


8 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 1 | Thursday, May 27, 2021

THANKS TO ALL THE BRAVE MEN AND WOMEN FOR YOUR SERVICE TO OUR COUNTRY.

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$750 INCENTIVE OFFERED BY TOYOTA MOTOR NORTH AMERICA, INC. AND MAY BE APPLIED TOWARD FINANCE OR LEASE CONTRACTS ON NEW TOYOTA VEHICLES, DATED FROM MAY 3, 2021 THROUGH JUNE 1, 2021. TO QUALIFY FOR THE INCENTIVE, AT THE TIME OF PURCHASE OR LEASE YOU MUST (1) BE IN CURRENT ACTIVE DUTY STATUS IN THE U.S. MILITARY (NAVY, ARMY, AIR FORCE, MARINES, NATIONAL GUARD, COAST GUARD AND ACTIVE RESERVE) OR A U.S. MILITARY INACTIVE RESERVE (I.E., READY RESERVE) THAT IS PART OF THE INDIVIDUAL READY RESERVE, SELECTED RESERVE AND INACTIVE NATIONAL GUARD; OR A MILITARY VETERAN OR RETIREE (RETIREES HONORABLY DISCHARGED) OF THE U.S. MILITARY WITHIN TWO YEARS OF THEIR DISCHARGE/RETIREMENT DATE; OR A HOUSEHOLD MEMBER OF AN ELIGIBLE U.S. MILITARY PERSONNEL, INCLUDING GOLD STAR FAMILY MEMBERS; AND (2) PROVIDE VERIFIABLE PROOF OF MILITARY STATUS OR ACTIVE SERVICE; (3) RECEIVE A SALARY SUFFICIENT TO COVER ORDINARY LIVING EXPENSES AND PAYMENT FOR YOUR NEW VEHICLE; AND (4) RECEIVE CREDIT APPROVAL FROM AND EXECUTE A FINANCE OR LEASE CONTRACT THROUGH A PARTICIPATING TOYOTA DEALER AND TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. NOT ALL APPLICANTS WILL QUALIFY. ON LEASE CONTRACTS, INCENTIVE MUST BE APPLIED TOWARD THE AMOUNT DUE AT LEASE SIGNING OR TOWARD THE CAPITALIZED COST REDUCTION. ON FINANCE CONTRACTS, INCENTIVE MUST BE APPLIED TOWARD THE DOWN PAYMENT. LIMIT ONE INCENTIVE PER FINANCE OR LEASE TRANSACTION PER ELIGIBLE U.S. MILITARY PERSONNEL OR ELIGIBLE HOUSEHOLD MEMBER. OFFER NOT COMBINABLE WITH THE COLLEGE GRADUATE INCENTIVE PROGRAM, THE IFI PROGRAM, AND THE LEASE-END REFI PROGRAM. VEHICLE MUST BE TAKEN OUT OF DEALER STOCK. TERMS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS APPLY. PROGRAM IS NOT AVAILABLE IN AL, FL, GA, HI, NC, AND SC. ASK YOUR PARTICIPATING DEALER ABOUT THE MILITARY INCENTIVE TERMS IN YOUR AREA. MUST PAY SALES TAX. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED BY LAW. NOT REDEEMABLE FOR CASH. TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES IS A SERVICE MARK OF TOYOTA MOTOR CREDIT CORPORATION (TMCC). TMCC IS THE AUTHORIZED ATTORNEY-IN-FACT AND SERVICER FOR TOYOTA LEASE TRUST. ©2020 TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.2CUSTOMERS CAN RECEIVE $750 CASH BACK FROM TOYOTA ON RAV4 (EXCLUDES HYBRIDS) AND $1500 CASH BACK FROM TOYOTA ON COROLLA OR CAN APPLY CASH BACK TO DOWN PAYMENT. 3LOW MILEAGE LEASE. TERMS AVAILABLE ON APPROVED CREDIT THROUGH PARTICIPATING DEALERS AND TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES (TFS). NOT ALL CUSTOMERS/LESSEES QUALIFY. CAMRY LEASE EXAMPLE BASED ON 2021 CAMRY 2.5L 4-CYL GAS MODEL 2532 WITH MSRP OF $25,965, NET CAPITALIZED COST OF $22,352, AND A LEASE END PURCHASE AMOUNT OF $13,761. $2,999 DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $2,110 CUSTOMER DOWN PAYMENT, FIRST MONTH’S PAYMENT OF $239, AND $650 ACQUISITION FEE. HIGHLANDER LEASE EXAMPLE BASED ON 2021 HIGHLANDER LE 3.5L V6 8AT (AWD) MODEL 6948 WITH MSRP OF $40,103, NET CAPITALIZED COST OF $35,545, AND A LEASE END PURCHASE AMOUNT OF $26,869. $3,999 DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $3,020 CUSTOMER DOWN PAYMENT, FIRST MONTH’S PAYMENT OF $329, AND $650 ACQUISITION FEE. TACOMA LEASE EXAMPLE BASED ON 2021 TACOMA SR 4X4 ACCESS CAB 4-CYL. ENGINE 6-SPEED AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION 6-FT. BED MODEL 7514 WITH MSRP OF $29,033, NET CAPITALIZED COST OF $26,051, AND A LEASE END PURCHASE AMOUNT OF $22,355. $2,999 DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $2,150 CUSTOMER DOWN PAYMENT, FIRST MONTH’S PAYMENT OF $199, AND $650 ACQUISITION FEE. ALL LEASES: DEALER CONTRIBUTION MAY VARY AND COULD AFFECT LEASE PAYMENT. INDIVIDUAL DEALER PRICES, OTHER TERMS AND OFFERS MAY VARY. MUST LEASE FROM PARTICIPATING DEALER’S STOCK AND TERMS ARE SUBJECT TO VEHICLE AVAILABILITY. LESSEE RESPONSIBLE FOR MAINTENANCE, EXCESS WEAR AND USE, AND WILL PAY $0.15 PER MILE FOR ALL MILEAGE OVER 10,000 MILES PER YEAR. $350 DISPOSITION FEE IS DUE AT LEASE END. CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH TFS APR CASH, TFS LEASE CASH, CUSTOMER CASH, APR, APR SUBVENTION CASH. OFFER AVAILABLE IN DE, MD, PA, VA, WV REGARDLESS OF BUYER’S RESIDENCY; VOID WHERE PROHIBITED. TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES IS A SERVICE MARK USED BY TOYOTA MOTOR CREDIT CORPORATION (TMCC). TMCC IS THE AUTHORIZED ATTORNEY-IN-FACT AND SERVICER FOR TOYOTA LEASE TRUST. 4CASH ALLOWANCE INCLUDES $750 CASH BACK FROM TOYOTA, WHICH CUSTOMERS MAY RECEIVE FROM TOYOTA OR APPLY TO DOWN PAYMENT, AND $750 BONUS CASH FROM TOYOTA, WHICH WILL BE APPLIED TO DOWN PAYMENT. ALL OFFERS: OFFERS MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH OTHER OFFERS UNLESS SPECIFIED OTHERWISE. DEALER FEES ARE EXTRA. VEHICLE SHOWN MAY BE PROTOTYPE AND/OR SHOWN WITH OPTIONS. ACTUAL MODEL MAY VARY. DELIVERY MUST BE TAKEN FROM DEALER STOCK BY 6/1/21 AND IS SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY. SEE PARTICIPATING CENTRAL ATLANTIC TOYOTA DEALER FOR DETAILS. OFFERS END 6/1/21. 5TOYOTACARE COVERS NORMAL FACTORY SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE FOR 2 YEARS OR 25,000 MILES, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. 24-HOUR ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE IS ALSO INCLUDED FOR 2 YEARS AND UNLIMITED MILES. THE NEW VEHICLE CANNOT BE PART OF A RENTAL OR COMMERCIAL FLEET, OR A LIVERY/TAXI VEHICLE. SEE PARTICIPATING CENTRAL ATLANTIC TOYOTA DEALER FOR DETAILS AND EXCLUSIONS. VALID ONLY IN THE CONTINENTAL U.S. AND ALASKA. ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE DOES NOT INCLUDE PARTS AND FLUIDS, EXCEPT EMERGENCY FUEL DELIVERY. 1


uarterdeck

www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 2 | Thursday, May 27, 2021 1

USS Bunker Hill The USS Bunker Hill returned to San Diego marking the successful completion of its deployment to U.S. 3rd Fleet and 7th Fleet areas of operation. . Page B6

The amphibious assault ship USS Makin Island (LHD 8) transits through the Gulf of Alaska. (MC3 AARON SPERLE)

Makin Island ARG, 15th MEU return from 7-month deployment From Makin Island ARG Public Affairs SAN DIEGO — More than 5,000 Sailors and Marines of the Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) returned to their San Diego homeport, May 21, concluding a sevenmonth deployment to the U.S. 3rd, 5th, 6th, and 7th Fleet areas of operation. Marines with the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), embarked aboard the ships of the ready group, arrived off the coast of Southern California to disembark at Camp Pendleton,

California. USS Makin Island (LHD 8), USS San Diego (LPD 22) and USS Somerset (LPD 25) returned to port at Naval Base San Diego following the offload. A contingent of 15th MEU personnel remained aboard ARG shipping for the pier side arrival. “I am so proud of the resilience and strength of character our Sailors and Marines displayed while serving our nation across four different fleets,” said Capt. Henry Kim, Makin Island ARG commander. “Despite the additional challenges of protecting a COVID-free bubble

within the ARG, our Blue-Green Team determinedly exemplified the mottos of all three ships, ‘Gung Ho!’ ‘Stay Classy!’ and ‘Let’s Roll!’ ” The Makin Island ARG is comprised of the amphibious assault ship USS Makin Island, and amphibious transport dock ships USS San Diego and USS Somerset, and led by Commander, Amphibious Squadron THREE. The 15th MEU consists of the Command Element; the Aviation Combat Element, Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 164 (Reinforced); the Ground Combat Element, Battalion Landing

Navy commissions littoral combat ship USS Mobile From Littoral Combat Ship Squadron One Public Affairs MOBILE, Ala. — The Navy commissioned its newest Independence-variant littoral combat ship USS Mobile (LCS 26) during a ceremony in Mobile, Alabama, May 22. Due to COVID-19 limitations, 400 guests attended the socially distanced ceremony for the littoral combat ship named in honor of the city in which it was built. The Honorable Tommy Tuberville, U.S. Senator of Alabama, delivered the ceremony’s principal address. “The United States has been the greatest source of good in the history of the world and we will continue to be a force for good because of the brave men and women that we have here today,” said Tuberville. Guest speakers for the event also included the Honorable Kay Ivey, Governor of Alabama, the Honorable Sandy Stimpson, Mayor of Mobile and the Honorable James Geurts performing the duties of the Undersecretary of the Navy. “The ships that this city has built are literally sailing on every ocean right now,” said Geurts, referencing ship manufacturer Austal USA, based in Mobile, Alabama. Mrs. Rebecca Byrne, president and chief executive officer of The Community Foundation of South Alabama and wife of former U.S. Representative of Alabama Bradley Byrne, provided remarks as the ship’s sponsor. “We have the distinction of the USS Mobile being built and commissioned in its namesake city here in the historic port of Mobile,” said Byrne. “We welcome the ship to the United States fleet that bears our great name and comes on great Navy tradition.” During t he ceremony, Mobile’s commanding officer, Cmdr. Christopher W. Wolff, reported the ship ready and

Team ¼; and the Logistics Combat Element, Combat Logistics Battalion 15. The ARG-MEU team departed November 10, after completing a pre-deployment sequester and back-to-back at-sea exercises in October. “The 15th MEU and Makin Island ARG deployed during an unprecedented pandemic and demonstrated the ability of the Navy and Marine Corps team to successfully and safely execute operations in a COVID-19 environTurn to Makin Island, Page 7

Navy Reserve to test new evaluation, fitness report system By Lt. Cmdr Adam Demeter

Navy Reserve Forces Command Public Affairs

The crew of USS Mobile (LCS 26) mans the ship during the commissioning ceremony of Mobile. (MC2 JOSEPH MILLAR)

Byrne gave the traditional order to “Man our ship and bring her to life!” “The commissioning of the fleet’s newest warship is an awesome occasion and with it comes the equally awesome responsibility to prepare ourselves to go forward and conduct our nation’s business,” said Wolff. The ceremony completed a weeklong series of events celebrating the ship and its namesake city. USS Mobile is the fifth ship named in honor of the port city on Alabama’s Gulf Coast. Mobile will homeport in San Diego with sister ships USS Independence (LCS 2), USS Coronado (LCS 4), USS Jackson (LCS 6), USS Montgomery (LCS 8), USS Gabri-

elle Giffords (LCS 10), USS Omaha (LCS 12), USS Manchester (LCS 14), USS Tulsa (LCS 16), USS Charleston (LCS 18), USS Cincinnati (LCS 20), USS Kansas City (LCS 22), and USS Oakland (LCS 24). The LCS is a fast, agile, mission-focused platform designed to operate in near-shore environments while capable of open-ocean tasking. The LCS can support forward presence, maritime security, sea control, and deterrence. For more news from Naval Surface Forces, visit DVIDS - Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet, and Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet.

NORFOLK, Va. — Several Navy Reserve commands, units, and support centers across the Reserve force have been selected to participate in a test pilot program for eNavFit, a modern solution for all Navy Evaluation (EVAL) and Fitness Report (FITREP) processing. eNavFit is scheduled to replace NAVFIT98A by December 2021. The system will minimize the need for the hard copy routing process, reduce unit-level administrative hurdles, and automate submissions to the Performance Evaluations Division (PERS-32) for entry into Sailor Official Military Personnel File (OMPF) records. “This upgrade is what many Reserve Sailors and administration professionals have been waiting for,” said Rear Adm. John Schommer, commander, Navy Reserve Forces Command (CNRFC). “eNavFit aligns with the Navy’s wholesale approach to identify, design, and implement modern information technologies to minimize the burden of everyday administrative processes. We’re are excited to test this new system on behalf of Navy Personnel Command and make life easier for all Sailors, active and Reserve.” eNAvFit Feature Highlights -While eNavFit will operate through an online, web-based environment for shore commands, it will also account for the limited connectivity on surface ships, submarines, and other sea and operational commands. -Both offline and online capabilities will allow local administrators to create, edit, delete, route, and validate performance appraisals, as well as allow reporting seniors to group and process summary group reports. Turn to Fitness, Page 7


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The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 2 | Thursday, May 27, 2021

Heroes at Home

Q: My spouse is about to enter A school. Is my spouse required to live in unaccompanied housing? If I live in the community, will we receive BAH? A: In general, students are typically required to be housed in unaccompanied housing for the duration of A school and are not eligible for BAH. Contact your spouse’s command for specific information.

NAVY HOUSING Norfolk (757) 445-2832 JEBLCFS (757) 462-2792 Oceana/Dam Neck (757) 433-3268 Yorktown (757) 847-7806

(ISTOCK)

Withering Heights: The humbling of a seasoned milspouse By Lisa Smith Molinari As my car wound along Lexington Street through the neat rows of tidy duplexes in Coddington Cove military housing community near Naval Station Newport, Rhode Island, I breathed a long sigh of relief. I’d taken this shortcut to Home Depot many times before, but today it felt like therapy — a comforting and familiar routine. I had just returned from a two-day apartment-hunting trip to New York City with our daughter, Anna, who was moving there to start her career. In 48 hours, we walked 16 miles, climbed 40 flights of stairs, and toured over 20 apartments. I was sore, tired, and somewhat troubled by the whirlwind trip. As a “seasoned” military spouse who moved eleven times in 23 years, lived six years overseas, and traveled extensively, I considered myself a model of resilience, adaptability, and grit. But New York City had jackhammered its way through my hard-earned callouses (literally … I have a blister the size of Fort Bliss on my big toe) and rendered me a pathetic jellyfish, quivering in fear among the shadowy depths of its towering and complex personality. I was excited to experience Anna’s eccentric

new locale, with only mild apprehension about my lack of city-savvy. I figured, how different could it be from Rome, London, Paris, and all the other cities we’d visited as a military family? As we’d done before, we’d figure out the subway, find our bearings, hit major landmarks, and sample indigenous cuisine. Easy peasy! Walking from our Midtown hotel the first morning, I was too distracted by interesting architecture, charming parks, gargantuan billboards, ethnic restaurants, and fascinating characters to notice the city’s seedy underbelly. But soon, the wormy side of the Big Apple exposed itself. Several tiny apartments we toured in the East Village were filthy, with entrances wedged between noodle shops and tattoo parlors. Some had dank basement laundry rooms where rapists might lurk, and others forced tenants to patronize nearby laundromats where heroine addicts nap. In Midtown, I was shocked at what constituted an apartment bedroom: a “flex” space with just enough room for a twin bed, no closet, and if you were lucky to get a window, a lightless view of a brick wall. The next day, we crossed the Williamsburg Bridge, believing we’d find charming apartments among matcha bars and organic grocers. Our tour began at a bakery with massive wedges of sticky,

nutty baklava, but then we saw six apartments, each one with its own appalling deal-breaker. The last straw happened five feet from a train trestle so crumbling with rust, I thought it might collapse. “Don’t worry,” our painfully thin and jittery agent told us as we trudged up another grimy stairwell, “the apartment has noise-cancelling windows.” Minutes later, I looked out a bedroom window as a train rumbled by, mere feet from the sill. Not only was the noise deafening, I had to grab my chin to keep my teeth from chattering. Back in Rhode Island, as I pressed my sore foot to break for military children on their way to Coddington Cove community playground, I shuddered at the memory of two dead rats (one flattened and displaying hideous fangs) among scattered garbage I side-stepped in Brooklyn. Should I trust our daughter to live in a place that reduced me to a withering pantywaist? Had military life really “toughened me up”? Did I take safety, camaraderie and order for granted after 23 years of living in military communities? Does our daughter have the resilience to succeed in New York City? Short answers: Yes, yes, yes, and yes. While military life forces military spouses out of comfort zones, it also coddles us with secure housing, safe neighborhoods, and close-knit communities. Our children, on the other hand, learn from a young age to adapt to new and sometimes frightening situations. They know they might need to climb a few stairs, avoid the dark alleys, and side-step a scary rodent or two before they’ll learn the ropes. It may be hard for a seasoned military spouse like me to admit, but my military child’s unique courage sometimes makes her better suited for “the real world” than I am.

FUNCTIONS AND/OR SERVICES FFSC PROVIDES:  ClinicalCounseling(Individual, Couples,a nd Child Counseling)  Personal Financial Management  Information & Referral  Family Employment Assistance  Transition Assistance  Family Advocacy Program  Deployment and Mobilization Support  Ombudsman Support

Money Management Strategies for Military Children

 Relocation Assistance  Parenting Programs  Stress and Anger Management  Command Support  Crisis Support  SuicidePrevention  SAPR Support

From Military Onescource It’s never too early to start teaching your children about money. Studies show that children are absorbing money habits by the age of 7. Setting a good example for money management at home as well as providing age-appropriate lessons in earning, saving, spending and giving will help you raise financially fit children and build sound financial practices for your child. Don’t wait to begin laying the groundwork. Let Military OneSource help you get started with your child’s financial foundation today. Money basics for young children The ABCs of money basics can be introduced to children ages 3-7. • Teach core math basics with money. Show your child how different forms of currency add up to the same amount of money. For example, a one dollar bill is the same as 10 dimes and one quarter is the same as five nickels. Introduce the concept of earning money by starting an allowance. Even at a young age, a child can complete simple responsibilities around the house and earn a small allowance for tasks such as making one’s bed, clearing dishes after a meal or feeding and watering the pets. Whether you pay for a specific task or provide a small allowance for general tasks you expect your children to complete daily or weekly, give them an opportunity to earn a small amount of physical money in order to teach them how to save and spend. • Give your child a visual way to save. Encourage your children to save their allowance in a glass jar when they begin to earn money for small tasks around the house. Even the youngest of children can set small goals to buy something special. Help your child keep track of savings progress. You can find fun, printable savings trackers online, from gumball machines and money trees to piggy banks, where children can color in their savings one circle or square at a time. Celebrate when your child’s goal is achieved. • Have your child make purchases with cash. Children make the best direct connection between spending and available funds by paying with cash. Guide your child in making small purchases with the money they earn or receive as gifts. Money management for the middle years As your children grow, so will their understanding of math and money. • Teach the connection that money pays for goods and services. Help them understand that people work in order to purchase goods and services, there are large and small purchases and not all purchases are made with cash.

Mid-Atlantic Fleet and Family Support Centers (FFSC) programs and services are designed to help you make the most of your military experience, and they’re all available to you at no cost.

(COURTESY PHOTO)

• Help your child explore different ways to earn money. Teach your child how to increase savings with opportunities such as babysitting, additional household tasks, and yard and garden cleanup, both for you and for others. • Give your child spending choices. Should we rent a movie or order out pizza? Children learn from making these types of spending decisions. • Introduce the concept of compound interest. There are several resources available to help parents explain how debt, and savings, can multiply when interest is at work. Check out tools like the compound interest calculator and these youth-friendly resources at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Financial lessons for teens Money management lessons are especially important as your children become teenagers teetering on the edge of adulthood. There are specific skills that will give your children the lifelong gift of financial freedom. Teach them smart money habits before they go out on their own. Here are seven money management tips to get you and your teen started: • Be open about your family’s monthly income and expenses. Your teen probably has no concept of basic living expenses. Share actual facts and figures with your children to show how you prioritize your spending between “needs” and “wants.” This is also a great time to start the discussion about how to pay for postsecondary education. Discuss how tuition and other school fees stack up against scholarships, financial aid, loans, your teen’s employment income and family savings. • Help them set up a bank account. Once your teen has a job and is receiving regular paychecks, it’s time to open a checking account. Talk to them about picking a bank, discuss the responsibility of having a debit card and show them how to use online banking tools to check their account balance regularly. Discuss the portability of the checking account between installations, if your family expects to move. • Review monthly statements together. Your teen may not realize they’re spending $50 a month on junk food, but those $1.50 purchases can really add up. A review of monthly state-

ments can be a great way to point out spending patterns and discuss money management. • Show the impact of savings. If there’s something your teen wants to buy, whether it’s small, like concert tickets, or big, like a car, sit down and make a savings plan together. Figure out what amount they’ll need to save over how many months to reach their goal. Encourage them to set a monthly savings goal. • Discuss how to make smart purchases. Even if your teen knows exactly what he or she wants, show him or her how to do a cost comparison, read product research and check consumer reports. He or she might figure out another choice is a better value. • Start out with small monthly expenses. Giving your teen a little financial responsibility each month can help create purposeful spending habits that will serve her or him well later in life. Whether it’s gas, their cell phone or even just a monthly music or movie streaming service fee, this can be a great teaching tool. • Teach your teen about the rewards and dangers of credit cards. To an unprepared teen, the first credit card can feel like a license to spend. Help her or him to understand the advantages of building good credit while also explaining the risks of acquiring credit card debt. Revisit the concept of compound interest and how interest fees can multiply rapidly. • Teach your teen about identity theft. Your teen should guard credit and bank information and only provide account details to a trusted source. Information should only be shared electronically if it is encrypted or password-protected. This information includes your child’s bank account numbers, credit card numbers and social security number. If at any time you or your child suspects fraudulent activity, report it immediately. You can also place a credit freeze on your child’s social security number to stop identify theft after suspicious activity. • Teach your teen how to file taxes. Part of the rite of passage for that first job is learning how to handle income taxes. Teach your teenager how to understand deductions and keep track of pay statements and how to enter the information from their annual tax statements onto tax forms or into tax software, such as MilTax.


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 2 | Thursday, May 27, 2021 3


4 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 2 | Thursday, May 27, 2021

This Memorial Day weekend, NEX customers can #RunForThisMoment with the virtual 5K run May 27 – 31, 2021. (COURTESY GRAPHIC)

NEX patrons #RunForThisMoment on Memorial Day Weekend

By Kristine Sturkie

Navy Exchange Service Command Public Affairs

VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. — This Memorial Day weekend, NEX customers can #RunForThisMoment with the virtual 5K run May 27 — 31, 2021. Participants can run at their own pace to the virtual finish line, accompanied by live musical performances and entertainment. The first 1,500 to register for the virtual 5K will receive a free commemorative medal, while supplies last. Registration opened May 17 on myNavyExchange.com/NEXtLevel5K. “This run gives our patrons the opportunity to remember and a chance to sustain

the memory of those we’ve lost while serving in the U.S. military,” said Navy Exchange Service Command’s (NEXCOM) Command Master Chief Dayna Winn. “By dedicating your participation to a fallen hero, you can share who they were and how they impacted your life. By honoring their sacrifice, you can add to their legacy. We are proud to offer this virtual 5K race to our military members and their families.” In addition to the 5K virtual run, NEXCOM will be hosting the 2nd annual NEX Grill Master Contest beginning May 19. Authorized patrons are invited to send a video of them grilling their favorite recipes. Contes-

tants will be judged on originality of the recipe, the appearance of the final dish and the excitement the grill master provides on the video. The highlight of the weekend will be musical performances developed in collaboration with MWR Navy Entertainment. The weekend kickoffs off with a concert by Switchfoot live from the USS Midway in San Diego. The long weekend will continue with performances by 18 additional artists May 28 - 31 including Noah Schnacky, Kameron Marlowe, Weathers, Tessa Violet, and Charlie Starr from Blackberry Smoke. Concerts can be viewed on the @NavyExchange Facebook. The sched-

uled concerts are as follows: Thursday, May 27 (all times are EDT) 8 PM - Switchfoot Friday, May 28 6 PM — The Orphan The Poet 7 PM — Derek Jones 8 PM — Kesley Bou 9 PM — Walker County 10 PM — Kameron Marlowe Saturday, May 29 2 PM - Everette 4 PM — Charlie Starr 6 PM — Georgia Webster 7 PM — Carbon Leaf 8 PM — Carolyn Miller 9 PM — Tessa Violet 10 PM - Weathers Sunday, May 30 2 PM — Tyler Booth 4 PM — Thad Cockrell 6 PM — Josh Gallagher 7 PM - Anson 8 PM — Jameson Rodgers 9 PM — Ben Kweller 10 PM — Noah Schnacky The #RunForThisMoment is the first in a series of five virtual 5K races the NEX will be hosting throughout the year. A limited edition challenge coin will be given to anyone who participates in all five races, while supplies last.

Navy exercises option for second guided missile frigate From PEO USC Public Affairs WASHINGTON — The Navy awarded a contract option to Fincantieri Marinette Marine to build its second Constellation Class Guided Missile Frigate, officials announced. “The Navy Program Office is pleased to award the option for the USS Congress (FFG 63) to our industry partner Fincantieri Marinette Marine,” said Capt. Kevin Smith, major program manager for Constellation Class Frigate (PMS 515). “As the second ship of the Constellation Class Frigate Program, the USS Congress will provide a highly capable, next-generation surface combatant that our Navy and Nation needs.” The future USS Congress (FFG 63) will be built at FMM’s shipyard in Marinette, Wisc. where preparations are being made to begin construction on lead ship USS Constellation (FFG 62). Like its sister ship, FFG 63 will have multi-mission capability to conduct air warfare, anti-submarine warfare, surface warfare, electronic warfare, and information operations. Shipboard systems will include an Enterprise Air Surveillance Radar (EASR) radar, Baseline Ten (BL10) AEGIS Combat System, a Mk 41 Vertical Launch System (VLS), communications systems, MK 110 57mm Gun Weapon System (GWS) and added capability in the

A cross-warfare center team, including Naval Surface Warfare Center, Port Hueneme Division, is developing a total ship Frigate Readiness Assessment Model (FRAM) for the new Constellation-class frigate, FFG 62, which is nearing completion of the design phase. (COURTESY GRAPHIC)

Electronic Warfare/Information Operations area with design flexibility for future growth. The Constellation Class Frigate will be an important part of the Navy’s future Fleet. It represents the evolution of the Navy’s small surface combatant force with increased

lethality, survivability, and improved capability to support the National Defense Strategy across the full range of military operations. It will help conduct distributed maritime operations more effectively and improve the Navy’s ability to fight both in

contested blue-water and littoral environments. The acquisition process for the Navy’s Constellation Class Frigate began in 2017. Since then the Navy has worked closely with industry to balance cost and capability.


www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 2 | Thursday, May 27, 2021 5

Joint Force Command Norfolk kicks off Part 1 of NATO’s Steadfast Defender 2021 From JFC Norfolk Public Affairs ATLANTIC OCEAN — A dynamic NATO maritime live exercise (LIVEX) has begun off the coast of Portugal with participation from 11 Allied Nations from North America and Europe as a part of Steadfast Defender 2021, May 20. The maritime LIVEX, led by Joint Force Command Norfolk (JFCNF), focuses on the rapid reinforcement of NATO’s European Allies by North American forces. Over 5,000 service members and 20 ships will be participating, including the Royal Navy’s Carrier Strike Group HMS Queen Elizabeth; and 40 aircraft, including F-35B Joint Strike Fighters embarked. “This challenging mission serves to demonstrate the unity of NATO Allies and our readiness to deter conflict and aggression,” said Vice Adm. Andrew Lewis, Commander, JFCNF and U.S. 2nd Fleet. “It showcases our abilities, as an Alliance, to maintain freedom of navigation, rule of law, and to effectively deter adversaries around the globe.” The size and scope of Steadfast Defender 2021 will test NATO’s capability to secure the strategic and sea lines of communication and move large numbers of troops, equipment and supplies across the Atlantic and Europe in response to the exercise scenario. The prompt deployment of forces from North America, their movement across the European Continent, and the integration of multinational troops will strengthen the readiness and deterrence posture of Allied Command Operations. “The 21st Century transatlantic link is complex and technologically advanced,” said Royal Navy Rear Adm. Andrew Betton, deputy commander, JFCNF. “We will deter and defeat challenges to protect our economic prosperity and strategic lines of communication by keeping the arteries of commerce open on the world’s intercon-

nected oceans. This exercise will demonstrate alliance unity and the importance of the transatlantic bond to Allied security.” There will be a serialized program over the course of two weeks that allows Allied submarines, surface ships, and aircraft, to work together in a dynamic environment to prepare for challenging, high-end operations against near-peer competitors. U.S. 2nd Fleet is acting as the Maritime Component Commander (MCC) for part one of Steadfast Defender 2021. Staff in support of the Maritime LIVEX embarked aboard the U.S. 6th Fleet command and control ship USS Mount Whitney (LCC 20). “The USS Mount Whitney plays a pivotal role with its communications capability,” said Rear Adm. Steve Waddell, Royal Canadian Navy and vice commander of U.S. 2nd Fleet, embarked aboard Mount Whitney as the leader of the MCC. “Second Fleet’s role as the MCC for the exercise demonstrates the United States’ ironclad commitment to NATO, and the U.S.’s dedication to further revitalize its relationship with the Alliance.” For added high-end complexity, the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group will integrate into the exercise as a testament to the seamlessness of our integration. USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) and its ready group are providing reach to the MCC for the sea lines of communication protection mission. This exercise is also part of the maiden deployment of the United Kingdom’s newest aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth. U.K. and U.S. F-35B Strike Fighters embarked, making it the world’s largest air group of fifth generation jets. It will also be the largest deployment of Fleet Air Arm helicopters in a decade. Steadfast Defender 2021, NATO’s flagship exercise for 2021, is the first in a new series of long-planned NATO exercises to ensure that forces are trained, able to operate together and ready to respond to threats from any direction. This exercise

(Courtesy Graphic)

will display the value of North America and Europe’s interoperability and national security during challenging environments working together to keep nations safe in a more challenging security environment. Steadfast Defender is comprised of three parts, made up of a series of linked exercises, taking place across the Atlantic and Europe. Part 1 is the maritime LIVEX focused on Transatlantic Reinforcement. Part 2 focuses on the enablement of Supreme Allied Commander Europe Area of Responsibility, Military Mobility and the Deployment of the NATO Response Force; and Part 3 is where Allies and partner nations will participate in various national exercises including redeployment operations back to their home stations. JFCNF is the only operational-level

NATO command in North America and its establishment and location in Norfolk, Virginia, embodies the enduring trans-Atlantic commitment to collective security and defense of our allies and partners. Participating units in the Maritime Live Exercise include; USS Mount Whitney (LCC 20) as the command and control platform, with the embarked U.S. 2nd Fleet Staff; the Royal Navy’s HMS Queen Elizabeth carrier strike group with embarked U.S. Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 211, and cooperative deployers, the Dutch HNLMS Evertsen (F805), USS The Sullivans (DDG 68); the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group; Standing NATO Marine Groups 1 and 2; as well as, surface ships and aircraft from Portugal, Spain, France, Canada, Turkey, Germany and Italy.

An AWIPS display of real-time weather data, with four different depictions of weather conditions in the Mid-Atlantic region. (LTJG ELIJAH RAY)

Naval Oceanography, National Weather Service advance Navy fleet, aviation By Lt.j.g. Elijah Ray

Fleet Weather Center-Norfolk Public Affairs

STENNIS SPACE CENTER, Miss. — The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) and Fleet Weather Centers, San Diego and Norfolk (FWC), are implementing advanced software—Automated Weather Interactive Processing System II (AWIPS)— acquired from the National Weather Service (NWS) to create operational advantages for U.S. Navy aviation and surface warfare. AWIPS processes large data with superior monitoring and distribution tools in one program, while displaying high-resolution data from satellites, radar and numerical prediction models for more precise weather forecasts. The software significantly decreases time to issue precise meteorological conditions

at airports and airfields, or Terminal Aerodrome Forecast (TAF), within a 24-hour timeframe. “Before AWIPS, it took forecasters over five-hours to produce and disseminate 14 TAF’s across U.S. Navy Regions Southeast and Mid-Atlantic, now the Navy has the capability to accomplish the same task in less than one-hour,” said Andy Kraft, Maritime Operations Officer at FWC-Norfolk. “AWIPS streamlines aviation and maritime forecasting by compiling all relevant parameters in its system and providing realtime data layered within its model.” The ability to monitor weather conditions with minute-precision allows AWIPS to significantly enhance accuracy of watches, warnings and advisories (WWA). “The ‘Time of Arrival’ tool in AWIPS allows users to click-and-drag from a

particular cell of thunderstorms to a defined point, with AWIPS providing an exact distance and arrival time of hazardous weather at that specified point,” said Mr. Richard Engle, Aviation Operations Officer at FWC-Norfolk. “This allows us to issue WWA with greater accuracy, minimizing the amount of time airfields and other infrastructure are impacted by thunderstorm warnings and other watches & warnings.” AWIPS can also deliver the same cuttingedge forecasting it provides to airfields and airports to U.S. Navy ships and aircraft at-sea. “It’s instrumental in allowing maritime forecasters to issue more accurate information in a variety of formats, and at greater lead times, for critical decision-makers,” said Mr. Darin Figurskey, Operations

Branch Chief at the Ocean Prediction Center, a branch of the National Weather Service. AWIPS brings automation to this generation of forecast WWAs, allowing forecasters capacity to focus on the weather’s actual impact on Navy operations, or daily life. “Integrating weather data from a multitude of databases contributes to decrease in time issuance of WWAs, and increases accuracy of products and services across aviation, resource protection, maritime, and tropical cyclone realms,” said Patrick Dixon, Senior Meteorological Officer at FWC-Norfolk. “The value of this system to Naval Oceanography and the Navy will be immediate and will continue to grow as we fully implement and expand the software across our watchfloor.” Naval Oceanography has approximately 2,500 globally distributed military and civilian personnel, who collect, process and exploit environmental information to assist Fleet and Joint Commanders in all warfare areas to guarantee the U.S. Navy’s freedom of action in the physical battlespace from the depths of the ocean to the stars.


6 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 2 | Thursday, May 27, 2021

Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Bunker Hill (CG 52) returns to its homeport of Naval Base San Diego. (MC2 JESSICA PAULAUSKAS)

USS Bunker Hill returns home from deployment From U.S. 3rd Fleet Public Affairs SAN DIEGO — The Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Bunker Hill (CG 52) returned to San Diego, May 22, marking the successful completion of its deployment to U.S. 3rd Fleet and 7th Fleet areas of operation. Bunker Hill, part of the Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group (TRCSG), departed on deployment to the Indo-Pacific, Dec. 23, 2020. “The Bunker Hill crew should feel very proud of what they’ve accomplished over the last six months,” said Rear Adm. Doug Verissimo, commander, Carrier Strike Group Nine. “The ship, her CO, and the

Sailors provided forward-operating presence throughout 7th Fleet as a key component of our strike group. As the air defense commander, they answered the call every step of the way even during a challenging double-pump deployment under COVID conditions. I could not be more pleased with their performance and resilience.” Bunker Hill’s primary mission was conducting maritime security operations while in U.S. 7th Fleet, ensuring a free and open Indo-Pacific. In support of allies and partners, Bunker Hill conducted bilateral exercises with the Indian Navy, Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, Royal Australian Navy and Royal Malaysian Air Force, focusing on building capabilities and increasing

combat readiness to win the high-end fight. Most recently, Bunker Hill participated in Exercise Northern Edge 2021 in the Gulf of Alaska. “Following our second 7th Fleet deployment in less than a year, Bunker Hill remains one of the most capable and storied warships in the fleet today,” said Capt. Shea Thompson, commanding officer of Bunker Hill. “This crew’s commitment to excellence was critical to demonstrating U.S. resolve in maintaining regional stability through freedom of navigation operations, and bilateral and joint exercises all while remaining postured to project power throughout 7th Fleet.” Bunker Hill joined forces with the Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group in the

South China Sea for expeditionary strike force operations. They also participated in dual carrier operations with TRCSG and the Nimitz Carrier Strike Group that showcased the tactical power of two carrier strike groups, increasing interoperability as well as command and control capabilities. “Bunker Hill excelled this deployment, and this team’s performance honors the sacrifice of past Bunker Hill crews that have gone before us,” said Thompson. “The 2021 Bunker Hill crew can hold their heads high and take pride in knowing they did it right. They are disciplined, fearless and lethal. Bunker Hill remains the ‘sword of the fleet!’ ” An integral part of U.S. Pacific Fleet, U.S. 3rd Fleet leads naval forces in the Indo-Pacific and provides the realistic, relevant training necessary to flawlessly execute our Navy’s role across the full spectrum of military operations—from combat operations to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. U.S. 3rd Fleet works together with our allies and partners to advance freedom of navigation, the rule of law, and other principles that underpin security for the Indo-Pacific region.

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www.flagshipnews.com | The Flagship | Section 2 | Thursday, May 27, 2021 7

From paralysis to competitive bodybuilding – One Sailor’s story of grit, From Center for Information Warfare Training Public Affairs GOODFELLOW AIR FORCE BASE, Texas — As restrictions slowly lift for COVID-19, our nation’s Navy is getting back into the practice of group physical training, and while the Navy has its standards, there are some Sailors who go way above and beyond the requirements. One of those Sailors is Cryptologic Technician (Collection) 1st Class Gino Bua who is attached to Information Warfare Training Command (IWTC) Monterey Detachment Goodfellow. Born and raised in South Side Chicago, Bua always had a competitive edge to his personality. In addition to general fitness, he was also a star volleyball player at Northern Illinois University. In 2009, after attending university, he said he made his smartest life decision to date and joined the United States Navy. After boot camp and “A” school, his first duty station was Navy Information Operations Command (NIOC) Georgia. Never one to sit still, Bua opened his own gym where he trained dozens of people in powerlifting and competitive CrossFit. Among both amateur and professional circles, he and his team won 25 CrossFit competitions in the Georgia region. But, like all Sailors in the Navy, his time came to change duty stations. He transferred to CTF-70 Forward Deployed Naval Forces. Still maintaining his physical fitness standards, this is where deployed life became busy for Bua. In addition to his information warfare specialist designation that he earned in Georgia, CTF-70 is where he earned both his air and surface warfare specialist designations. From CTF-70, he transferred to Hawaii where he remained for seven years at NIOC and Pacific Fleet Hawaii commands. Hawaii is where Bua really started to amplify his fitness culture. Following his previous model in Georgia, he opened another gym. He and his team began to compete professionally in CrossFit. In 2017, after training for a full year, they competed at the CrossFit games in California, which was nationally broadcast by ESPN. During the three-day competition, he suffered incredible back pain due to an intense exercise. He and his team were required to lift a 600-pound, 12-foot long sandbag a total of 60 times as fast as possible. Being the tallest of his teammates, he ended up carrying too much weight at an awkward angle, causing significant muscle tears and pressure on his spine. After taking a week off to recover, Bua traveled to Mount Hood, Oregon, to relax and snowboard down the mountain. He went off the trail and boarded down the back end of the mountain where he hit a patch of ice and became airborne. His momentum and direction forced his body to spin around where his back was facing the direction of his flight. He crashed into large tree. The

collision immediately rendered him unconscious, which may have saved him from the shock and pain of four fractured vertebrae, three herniated discs, a caved lumbar spinal wall, a concussion, and a traumatic brain injury. Although he was lucky enough not to sever his spinal cord, the combination of his injuries left Bua in a state of lowerbody paralysis for weeks. When the hospital deemed him well enough to be transferred to Hawaii, he left Oregon and stayed in Tippler Army Medical Center for approximately two months. He underwent four surgeries and is still due for a fifth. During his time at Tippler, Bua spent roughly 14 hours a day researching people who had recovered from similar injuries. He read hundreds of medical journals about his condition as he worked on his mobility and auxiliary exercises. This is also where he made the decision to eat a completely plantbased diet. After leave ng Tippler, he was given 18 months of limited duty (LIMDU), and if he was able to recover, then he could stay in the Navy. Bua took this as a challenge and increased his mobility using the same methods he learned in the hospital — little by little, and one day at a time. Eventually, he was walking again. Although he was not able to run, he was able to get to the gym to do basic exercises. During his physical therapy sessions, a lot of that training was learning how to exercise other muscles that the body doesn’t typically use — for physical therapy, it was a way to increase mobility and self-sufficiency. Essentially, these movements and exercises were the same practices involved in bodybuilding. This was Bua’s gateway into the competitive world of bodybuilding. After his 18 months of LIMDU, his medical board decided to retain him. Since Bua was 17 years old, he was consistently involved in some form of competition. After his setback, he made a conscious choice to continue that path and compete once more. His options had become limited, but bodybuilding was both attainable and good for his recovery. In 2019, Bua was given the “OK” to start lifting. He trained for two months and hit yet another roadblock — he tore his Achilles tendon and was not able to walk for six months. After more therapy, more building, and a strict diet, he was able to compete. In early 2020, Bua entered his first bodybuilding competition where he won his height and weight division and placed second overall. This qualified him for the state championship of Texas. In early 2021, Bua competed in the State Championship of Texas Organization of Competitive Bodybuilders in San Antonio, Texas. He won third place overall and qualified for nationals, which will be held in September 2021 in Austin, Texas. If he wins that competition he will move from amateur to professional, acquire a profes-

Cryptologic Technician (Collection) 1st Class Gino Bua, attached to Information Warfare Training Command (IWTC) Monterey Detachment Goodfellow, poses with his competitive bodybuilding trophy. (ALLEN VANDER)

sional contract, and possibly pick up corporate sponsors. Since July 2020, Bua has been a Navy Instructor at IWTC Monterey Detachment Goodfellow. To date, Bua has facilitated three classes of the Navy Analysis and Reporting Course. He continues to be an example of fitness, professionalism, and a living example of the Navy’s core values. His students praise him and the staff rally with him in support of both his competitive bodybuilding and Navy career endeavors. IWTC Monterey Detachment Goodfellow is aligned under IWTC Monterey. As part of the CIWT domain, they provide a contin-

uum of foreign language training to Navy personnel, which prepares them to conduct information warfare across the full spectrum of military operations. With four schoolhouse commands, a detachment, and training sites throughout the United States and Japan, CIWT trains approximately 26,000 students every year, delivering trained information warfare professionals to the Navy and joint services. CIWT also offers more than 200 courses for cryptologic technicians, intelligence specialists, information systems technicians, electronics technicians, and officers in the information warfare community.

Fitness from Page 1

-The ability to export performance appraisals and correspondence to a transportable medium that can be emailed or passed by disk, with the capability to import information back into the system. Users of the offline interface may then either access an online system to upload documents, or print and mail documents to the NPC Performance Evaluations Division (PERS-32) for processing. “The idea of simplifying the evaluation and fitness report routing process from creation to completion is a welcome step in the right direction,” said Yeoman 1st Class Sara Baumlein, Leading Petty Officer for Command Services at CNRFC. “Knowing firsthand how cumbersome the performance appraisal process can be, especially for Reservists, I’m excited to

(COURTESY GRAPHIC)

Makin Island from Page 1

ment,” said Col. Fridrik Fridriksson, 15th MEU commanding officer. “I am so incredibly proud of the professionalism, toughness and mental resiliency demonstrated by our Marines and Sailors. They have accomplished great things during this deployment.” During the deployment, Sailors and Marines supported Operation Octave Quartz (OOQ) in Somalia, Operation Inherent Resolve (OIR) in Iraq and Syria, Theater Amphibious Combat Rehearsals in Kuwait and Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, and Exercise Northern Edge 2021 in Alaska. Less than two months into deployment, the ARG-MEU team, operated under U.S. Naval Forces Africa, and supported repositioning efforts in the U.S. Africa Command area of responsibility (AOR). From Dec. 20, 2020 to Jan. 31, 2021, the Makin Island ARG and 15th MEU conducted operations in Somalia and off the coast, as part of the Joint Force Maritime Component Command to Joint Task ForceQuartz, to provide support to OOQ in relocating Department of Defense forces in Somalia to other East Africa operating locations while maintaining pressure on violent extremists and supporting partner forces. “From aboard the Makin Island ARG, the 15th MEU provided contingency response forces on a 24-hour alert status and security

forces to facilitate the safe and expedient repositioning of troops from within Somalia,” said Lt. Col. George Flynn, commanding officer of BLT ¼, 15th MEU. “Operation Octave Quartz demonstrated the 15th MEU’s ability to flex the entire Marine Air-Ground Task Force to meet combatant commander requirements.” In U.S. 5th Fleet, from February to March 2021, the ARG-MEU team operated in the Gulf of Aden, Arabian Gulf and the Red Sea, and conducted Theater Amphibious Combat Rehearsals in Kuwait, Ras Al-Khair and Tabuk in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to enhance proficiency and readiness while maintaining a tiered crisis response posture in the U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) AOR. Ships of the ARG also participated in Group Arabian Sea Warfare Exercise (GASWEX) 21 with the French Marine Nationale’s Charles de Gaulle carrier strike group. GASWEX 21 was a multilateral maritime exercise in the Arabian Sea and Gulf of Oman with France, Belgium, and Japan, which allowed participating naval forces to effectively develop the necessary skills in maritime security, anti-air, anti-surface, and anti-submarine warfare to address threats to regional security, freedom of navigation and the free flow of commerce. Additionally, Marine Corps F-35B Lightning II joint strike fighters with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 164 (Reinforced), 15th MEU, conducted nine OIR missions as part of broader counterterrorism operations. While operating in U.S. 7th Fleet support-

ing U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, VMM 164 conducted bilateral operations with the Republic of Singapore Air Force in international waters near Singapore. Somerset participated in La Perouse, a multinational exercise conducted with ships from the Royal Australian Navy (RAN), French Navy, and Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF). The exercise was designed to strengthen interoperability and enhance cooperation in maritime surveillance, maritime interdiction operations, and air operations amongst all participating nations. The ARG conducted Expeditionary Strike Force (ESF) operations with the Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group and the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Port Royal (CG 73) in the South China Sea. ESF operations demonstrate U.S. capability to quickly aggregate an integrated naval force to operate all-domain warfare anywhere international law allows. After returning to U.S. 3rd Fleet, the ARG-MEU team supported Northern Edge 2021 (NE21) from May 3 to 14. Approximately 15,000 U.S. service members participated in a joint training exercise hosted by U.S. Pacific Air Forces on and above the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, the Gulf of Alaska, and temporary maritime activities area. NE21 was one in a series of military exercises designed to sharpen the joint forces’ skills; to practice tactics, techniques, and procedures; to improve command, control and communication relationships; and to develop cooperative plans and programs. Makin Island, flagship of the ARG, supported

see another system upgrade that will have a direct and positive effect on the Navy’s greatest asset — it’s Sailors.” eNavFit Rollout The pilot program will begin in July 2021 and extend through the regularly scheduled EVAL and FITREP cycles for several pay grades. “Having the Reserve Component be the first to use the new interface was a strategic decision,” said Lieutenant James Kelly, action officer for the Performance Evaluation Transformation at NPC. “We’re utilizing a phased rollout approach with eNavFit, and the Reserve Force allows us to perform as much testing as possible in a controlled manner environment at various Reserve units.” After completion of the pilot program, NPC will gather feedback and adjust the system as necessary for a fleet-wide user experience testing, with the active component Navy and subsequent rollout.

every unit’s operations and hosted five embarked units in addition to the MEU, while supporting a broad cross-section of mission areas. “This deployment has been operationally diverse - from operating in the heat during Operation Octave Quartz to the cold weather for Northern Edge,” said Capt. Tom Ulmer, Makin Island commanding officer. “We have sailed independently as well as formed expeditionary strike forces with partners, allies, and other U.S. forces including the French carrier, Charles De Galle and USS Theodore Roosevelt strike groups. We have conducted operations in all warfare areas, while building a strong Makin Island / 15th MEU team—Team Raider—that excelled in all of our challenges—including overcoming COVID. I am very proud of all our Sailors and Marines for their hard work and dedication. We are excited to be home to reunite with family and friends.” The ARG-MEU conducted more than 10,000 hours of flight operations, 6,800 launch and recoveries, and traveled more than 135,000 nautical miles of open ocean and restricted water transits. The Makin Island ARG and 15th MEU provided numbered fleet and combatant commanders with a responsive, flexible and forward-deployed asset capable of maritime power projection, contingency operations and crisis response. Their capabilities enabled the shaping the operational environment to protect the United States and allied interests in any threat environment.


8 The Flagship | www.flagshipnews.com | Section 2 | Thursday, May 27, 2021

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Misc. Merchandise For Sale FURNITURE Brown Couch & Love Seat Set. Approx 5 yrs old. Good Condition. Cash Only. $150 OBO Call: 757-353-7897

Shots and training started, grab a ball & give us a call, $1550. 757-274-2381. SCOTTISH TERRIER PUPPY Male, Vaccinated, Brindle, 12wks, $700. Call: 804-445-5586 SHEPADOODLE PUPPIES

Males and females vet checked 7578460093 also have Merle giant schnoodles $850

LX, 4 door, 4 cylinder, auto, AC, cruise, tilt, power windows and locks, back up camera,44k miles, exc condition, $16,000, Call: 443-351-5611

Motorcycles and ATVs

HONDA 2018 HR-V

1997 HARLEY DAVIDSON Heritage Softail Classic FLSTC, 2 owner bike, garage kept, great shape, 27k miles, $6500.00. 757-572-9265

I restored for mother who no longer drives .Spent over $4000 on new parts .cold ac,30mpg,180k,looks&drives great,$3500 call 757-237-5757

2010 YAMAHA TW200

Classic, Antique Cars We will purchase your collectible, classic, late model autos, we will come to you. Call 757-675-0288.

CHEVROLET 1972 NOVA

Dogs, Cats, Other Pets BORDER COLLIE 1 Male For Sale 13wks , Tri Color, $750 Text 10am-10pm. Call After 7pm. 757-319-2860

Subscribe to The Virginian-Pilot today. Call 757-446-9000 or go to PilotOnline.com

Room For Rent VIRGINIA BEACH Room in Sandbridge. $750/mo. Refs & No Smok’g. 757-227-8046 Early home delivery. 757-446-9000 or PilotOnline.com

Road & Trail bike (70MPH), a cult classic! Extras including a car carrier - excellent condition like new! Never dropped - 600 original miles. $2,800 Call: 516-316-7043

MISC. TRANSPORTATION 2011 HD Road Glide Ultra Gar. Kept-Many Extras-15k mi $11,000 Call 757-650-9273

Super Sport. 350 V-8, air, frame off, photo history, award winner, looks great. Call for details, 757-6750288. Va. Dlr.

VOLKSWAGEN 1956 BEETLE

Conv. National Show Car, removable hardtop, award winner, runs & looks beautiful, magazine feature car. Call for details, 757-675-0288. Va. Dlr.

LX package, AWD, 34K mis., new insp, 1 owner, runs & looks great. $22,700. 757-675-0288. Va. Dlr.

Cuddy cabin, twin 200 Yamaha, radar, ff/gps, vhf, stereo, great fast & stable fishing boat, 1998, $18,000 Call: Jeff 757-715-3442 USED TRAILER SALE!!! OVER 100 Avail. For Boats 12’-38’ BUDGET BOATS: (757) 543 -7595

TOYOTA 2000 LAND CRUISER

$14500 1Owner, Toyota Land Cruiser Wht w/beige int. 188,000 mi Ex cond, recent oil change, wiper blades, tune up, pwr str pmp, valve cvr gsk Newer tires, battery, Timing belt and water pump in last 50k. txt 843.290.0079

Good news.

Wanted Automotive ABSOLUTELY ABLY ACQUIRING AUTOS All Makes & Models, Best Price Paid!! FREE TOWING. 757-749-8035

Early home delivery. 757-446-9000 PilotOnline.com

AUTOS ACCEPTED-ANY YEAR Make or Model. TOP DOLLAR, FAST, Free Towing. 757-737-2465, 701-3361

Subscribe to The Virginian-Pilot today. Call 757-446-9000 or go to PilotOnline.com

757.622.1455 | placeanad.pilotonline.com Handyman Services

Home Improvements

★GENERAL REPAIRS★ AFFORDABLE. All Handyman, Int & Ext: Flooring, Bathrooms, Small Jobs, Remodel, Rot Repair. 30 Yrs. Exp. BBB A+ Rating. 757-430-2612.

ADDITIONS, SUNROOMS, ROOFS, Decks, more. Member BBB. 757-986-3777. www.builderscorporation.com

Hauling Concrete/Asphalt Estate Sales CONCRETE SPECIALIST Aych & Aych Inc. BBB. FREE estimates. Call Sylvester: 757-371-1911 S & H ENTERPRISE 20 YRS. Concrete Exp. All types of concrete work driveways, stamped & exposed. We accept credit cards. 757-652-4050. www.shabazznva.com

(A) FAMILY TRASH MAN-HOUSEHOLD, Demo inside & out, construction sites, dumpster drop off, backhoe work. We haul it all! 20 yrs. exp., lic & ins. 485-1414

B & J MOVING Reasonable Rates, Licensed & Insured. bandjmoving.com 757-576-1290

ALL HOME IMPROVEMENTS Custom Home Repairs & Renovations. Patrick Ellis Ent. Inc. Lic. & Ins. BBB A+ 757-635-6609 BEST PRICE EXTERIORS 757-639-4692 Siding, Windows, Trim, Roofing. FREE ESTIMATES! Lic. & Ins’d. Lowest Prices & Top Quality Work. No Repairs. BBB A+ Rating

BRICK & STONE REPAIRS Steps, Walls, Foundations, etc. Virginia Beach Native. Masonry Contract. 40+ yrs Known As Stone Smith USA. Semi-Retired - A Legend In His Own Mind! Earl Smith 757-2700578. Please Leave Message. You Won’t Find A Better Man!

YOUR PERFECT

JOB

IS WAITING

FRANK’S SIDING & REPAIRS Repairing Siding & Trim. Lic/Ins. Senior & Military Discount! 757-227-8964 HOME REPAIRS-RICHARD’S Crawl Space, Room Additions Bathrooms, Kitchens Now Servicing OBX. 757-869-0380 RGSPROS.COM “The RICHARD’S Difference When It Absolutely Has To Be Done Right” PEST/TERMITE CONTROL Universal Pest & Termite. FREE INSPECTIONS. 757-502-0200. (Mention This Ad and Get $25 Off)

Early home delivery. 757-446-9000 or PilotOnline.com

Subscribe to The Virginian-Pilot today. Call 757-446-9000 or go to PilotOnline.com

Lawn and Tree Service ★ 100% DRAINAGE & YARD CLEANUP ★ Shrub & Tree Removal, Pruning, Tractor Work & Grading, French Drains, Mulching, Fences. ★★757-282-3823★★ ★★★AFFORDABLE TREE SERVICE★★★ Josh 757-998-5327 Theo 757-515-6933 AMERICANTREESERVICE.CO ★Catering to all your tree & yard needs.★ ★757-587-9568. 30 years experience★

GODWIN TREE SERVICE 25yrs. Trimming, Topping, total removal. Free est. Winter Pandemic Discount; Lic’d & Ins’d 757-2371285 or 757-816-3759 BBB Member LEAF RAKING AND CLEANUP Yard Work, Weed Control, Mulching, Trimming, Planting, Transplanting of Shrubbery and Trees. 25 yrs exp. Call 757-918-4152

YARD CLEAN UP - GRASS CUTTING, WOOD FENCE REPAIR & BUSHES Weed Eating, Blowing, Reasonable prices. Call 757-477-2158

Roofing A ROOFING SALE 30 Yr. Architect Shingles $1.99 sq ft. Labor & Material included, repair, siding. Class A Lic’d & Ins’d. (757) 880-5215.

CALVIN’S ROOFING REPAIR LLC Specializes in roofing repair, also guttering, Free estimates, roofing of all types, reasonable prices, Shingles, metal, slate, rubber. Over 30 yrs -business, BBB 757-377-2933

ROOF REPAIR Shingles, tar, rubber, slate, metal, asbestos removal. 757-718-1072

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