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ONE-HUNDRED-TWENTY-THREE YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM Tuesday, September 3, 2013

Ann Arbor, Michigan

CAMPUS SAFETY

P I C K YO U R P R O D U C E

‘U’ changes sex misconduct procedures New policy demands investigations into all allegations By AUSTEN HUFFORD Online Editor

The University has adopted a new policy for how it responds to student sexual-misconduct allegations, transitioning from a complainant-driven model to one driven by University investigators. Per the policy, the University has assumed the burden of internally investigating all allegations of student sexual misconduct, which includes allegations of sexual harassment and sexual assault. The policy doesn’t deal with the criminal repercussions that result from law enforcement investigations, which are outlined in federal, state and local laws. A 2011 Department of Education mandate clarified that Title IX, the federal anti-sex discrimination statute, obligates universities to actively investigate sexual misconduct allegations. In response, the University reviewed its sexual misconduct allegation policies and implemented an interim policy in August 2011. The newly effective final policy follows fine-tuning process over the last two years, which brought together the directors of the Office of Student Conflict Resolution, the Office of Institutional Equity, the Sexual Assault

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Awareness and Prevention Center and a staff member in the Office of the General Counsel. In addition to discussions at several community forums, survivors of sexual assault and other people who were impacted by the previous policy were also consulted. The policy also instructs the Title IX coordinator, the person who ensures the University follows the mandate’s regulations, to notify law enforcement of potential criminal sexual misconduct allegations. This may prevent situations where investigators know about criminal misconduct allegations but do not inform police. This seemingly occurred recently when reports of sexual misconduct at the Zaragon Place apartments were not conveyed to University police until a third student came forward making accusations against the suspect in two previous assaults. The new policy clarifies that only three University divisions — SAPAC, Counseling and Psychological Services and the Office of Ombuds — offer full confidentiality to students who report misconduct. It states that students should assume that reports made to any other University official will be shared with the Title IX coordinator and investigated following the new procedure. Non-confidential sources include professors and residential advisers. This has raised some concern over whether survivors could unknowingSee MISCONDUCT, Page 3A

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LSA senior Madeline Dunn observes the student farm at the Matthei Botanical Gardens on Monday.

CRIME

Assault reported late AAPD fails to notify UMPD of sexual assault near campus By TAYLOR WIZNER Daily News Editor

A student was sexually assaulted Saturday while walking in the parking lot of an off-campus apartment, according to a University

crime alert sent out Monday evening. While University Police often release crime alerts regarding off-campus sexual assaults with information from the Ann Arbor Police Department, University Police said they weren’t made aware of a sexual assault reported to the AAPD on Saturday until an inquiry by The Michigan Daily on Sunday afternoon. According to UMPD, the student was walking in an apartment parking lot at

STUDENT GOVERNMENT

By AMRUTHA SIVAKUMAR Daily Staff Reporter

Every year, as a fresh lot of students set foot on campus, a new Central Student Government takes its seats at the helm of the student body. On Tuesday, for the first time this academic year, CSG President Michael Proppe and Vice President Bobby Dishell, leaders of CSG political party youMICH, will lead a new slate of student body representatives. As the 2012-2013 academic year came to a close, the CSG executive branch completed a total of 58 projects over eight areas of campus improvement. Former CSG President Manish Parikh and Vice President Omar Hashwi fulfilled all of their election promSee CSG, Page 3A

In an interview with the Daily before the crime alert was sent, the student said a UMPD officer called her to explain there would be no public alert sent out because University Police didn’t have enough information about the incident. However, when asked Sunday whether an alert would be sent out, University Police said the Daily’s inquiry was the first they had heard of the incident. Shortly after, a crime See CRIME, Page 3A

GREEK LIFE

CSG gears up for new fall term Pres., VP to announce commision chair nominations

about 10 p.m. Saturday on East University Ave. near Hill St. when an unknown male approached her and grabbed her buttocks before riding away on a bicycle. The suspect is described as a 5-foot-9-inch, middleaged black male who was wearing a blue hat, shorts and a gray T-shirt at the time of the incident. UMPD is classifying the assault as fourth-degree criminal sexual conduct, which is a misdemeanor.

FratPAC lobbies U.S. Senate, House for tax-exempt pledges Legislation would make more types of donations tax-deductible By STEPHANIE SHENOUDA

ADAM GLANZMAN/Daily

Freshmen move into the newly renovated East Quad Residence Hall building Monday, Aug. 26.

Residence Life Initiative updates residence halls South, West Quad are final projects of Coleman’s initiative By WILL GREENBERG Daily Staff Reporter

This is the first article in a series on housing at the University. A 2004 University Presidential Initiative described the

future of student residence hall life at the University as creating a “good city.” Nine years later, the city is two major reconstructions away from creating a fully modernized and interconnected dorm life. The Residential Life Initiative includes an array of both major and minor renovations to most of the 18 residence halls on campus. The RLI continues with ongoing

renovations to South Quad Residence Hall, and will conclude with construction in West Quad Residence Hall starting May 2014. University Housing spokesman Peter Logan described University President Mary Sue Coleman’s vision for the residence halls as an enhancement to the residents’ education inside and outside of the classroom. “Our focus has been on See HOUSING, Page 3A

Daily Staff Reporter

About 40 percent of U.S. senators and a quarter of U.S. representatives participated in Greek life during college, according to Bloomberg. Now, they’re pledging again. This time, however, their providing loyalty to their former institutions by supporting a multi-million dollar tax break for Greek life as it makes its way through Congress. The Fraternity Political Action Committee, an eightyear-old political action committee that lobbies on issues related to fraternities and sororities, is working to pass legislation that would effectively allow Greek alumni to donate money as a tax write-off to directly fund the construction or renovation of

SportsTuesday

their chapters’ houses. Under current rules, only money donated to fraternities and sororities for the purposes of education, such as for the creation of a library, qualifies as taxdeductible. The bill, first reported by Bloomberg, was introduced in 1996 after a fire at a University of North Carolina fraternity killed five students and garnered national attention. Ann Arbor’s fraternity and sorority houses have suffered from several fires in the past decades as well. Most recently, damage caused by a blaze in 2008 forced the University’s chapter of Delta Upsilon to undergo a fouryear remodel on their house. Mary Beth Seiler, director of Greek life at the University, says the new legislation would have a positive effect on University Greek life, making it easier to fund the renovations that many of the sorority and fraternity houses require. “I actually had kind of forgotten that this legislation was pending because it has been going on for such a long time,” Seiler said. See FRATS, Page 3A

A Grande Debut Ariana Grande channels Mariah Carey on ‘Yours Truly.’

Five things we learned against Central Michigan.

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INDEX

Vol. CXXIII, No. 123 ©2013 The Michigan Daily michigandaily.com

NEWS......................... 2A OPINION.....................4A ARTS......................6A

DISCOUNTS..............8A S P O R T S T U E S DAY. . . . . . . . . .1 B N E W S T U D E N E D. . . . . . . . . .1 C


News

2A — Tuesday, September 3, 2013

MONDAY: This Week in History

TUESDAY: WEDNESDAY: Professor Profiles Professor Profiles Before You Were Here In Other Ivory Towers

AFFIRMATIVE ACTION

to ensure that student bodies at universities are more diverse. The numbers of black and American Indian students have decreased since 1996 when California passed Proposition 209, which banned affirmative action in public universities in that state. OSU spends $360K to monitor athletes’ social media Ohio State University signed a three-year contract with JumpForward, a sports rela-

WHERE: University Hospital WHEN: Friday at about 10:40 a.m. WHAT: A single cigarette was reported stolen from a custodial closet, according to University Police. The theft is thought to have occured between 8 and 10 a.m. A suspect has been identified.

Steal-a-phone WHERE: Literature, Science and Arts Building WHEN: Friday at about 8:15 a.m. WHAT: A staff member reported that a cell phone was stolen from an office between 4:30 and 5:30 p.m. Thursday, according to University Police. There are currently no suspects.

WHERE: Michigan Stadium WHEN: Saturday WHAT: Law enforcement personnel located in and around Michigan Stadium reported the following: -One arrest for minor in possession of alcohol -Three citations: Two for alcohol in the stadium and one for possessing false identification -Eleven ejections from the stadium: four for alcohol in the stadium, three for minor in possession of alcohol, three for disorderly conduct, and one for possessing false identification.

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Crime stats from Saturday’s football game

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Members of Encore perform a dance routine at Gayz Craze at Palmer Field Monday.

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tionship management firm, for $360,500 to keep tabs on student athletes’ and coaches’ social media activity, The Lantern reported Friday. The Chicago-based firm, which began working for the OSU in July 2012, works to help monitor social-media activity in response to the “Tattoo Gate” scandal, which lead to the resignation of former OSU football coach Jim Tressel and NCAA sanctions.

CRIME NOTES

Butt out

FRIDAY: Photos the Week Week Photos of the

DA N C E IT O UT

UC system files brief

The University of California system submitted a statement to the U.S. Supreme Court Friday in support of affirmativeaction policies at universities, the Daily Bruin reported Friday. The amicus curiae brief to the court is in regard to Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action, which will determine the future of Michigan’s affirmativeaction ban. The University of California says affirmative action is necessary

THURSDAY: CampusProfiles Clubs Alumni

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PanHel mass meeting WHAT: Women interested in joining Panhellenic sororoties are invited to learn more about the recruitment process. WHO: Office of Greek Life WHEN: Last Names A-L register today at 6 p.m.; M-Z register at today as 8 p.m. WHERE: Michigan Union

Social skills lesson WHAT: Parents and children are encouraged to attend an educational session on childhood social skills. Lessons will focus on establishing friendships and maintaining positive social interactions. WHO: University Center for the Child and the Family WHEN: Today at 6 p.m. WHERE: Institute for Human Adjustment

Jazz concert WHAT: Music Assistant Prof. Jonathan Ovalle, a percussionist, is joined by several Detroit musicians for a performance of funk and electric jazz music. The ensemble is excited to welcome students back to campus. WHO: School of Music, Theatre & Dance WHEN: 8 p.m.

Costumes show WHAT: Theatre Prof. Jessica Hahn has curated a collection of costumes from recent productions. WHO: School of Music, Theatre & Dance WHEN: Today at 12 p.m. WHERE: Duderstadt Center CORRECTIONS l Please report any error in the Daily to corrections@michigandaily.com.

THREE THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW TODAY

1

Authorities in Egypt are detaining a bird that a citizen has accused of being a spy, the Associated Press reported. A man alleged that a tracking device on the bird was being used for espionage. The bird will be released once the investigation is closed.

2

The No. 17 Wolverines toppled Central Michigan Saturday, 59-9, led by three Devin Gardner touchdowns. It was the most points Michigan scored in an opener since 1905. >> FOR MORE, SEE SPORTS, PAGE 1B

3

A 33-year-old man from Singapore has collected over 6,000 Barbie dolls since he was 13 years old, Reuters reported. The dolls occupy three sides of his living room and overflow into cabinets in his dressing room and shelves in his study.

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BUSINESS STAFF Amal Muzaffar Digital Accounts Manager Doug Soloman University Accounts Manager Leah Louis-Prescott Classified Manager Lexi Derasmo Local Accounts Manager Hillary Wang National Accounts Manager Ellen Wolbert and Sophie Greenbaum Production Managers The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter terms by students at the University of Michigan. One copy is available free of charge to all readers. Additional copies may be picked up at the Daily’s office for $2. Subscriptions for fall term, starting in September, via U.S. mail are $110. Winter term (January through April) is $115, yearlong (September through April) is $195. University affiliates are subject to a reduced subscription rate. On-campus subscriptions for fall term are $35. Subscriptions must be prepaid. The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and The Associated Collegiate Press.

Assad: Regional war may result if West strikes Syria Embattled leader asks for proof of chemical warfare PARIS (AP) — France released an intelligence report on Monday alleging chemical weapons use by Syria’s regime that dovetailed with similar U.S. claims, as President Bashar Assad warned that any military strike against his country would spark an uncontrollable regional war and spread “chaos and extremism.” The verbal crossfire, including a rejection of the Western

allegations by longtime Syrian ally Russia, was part of frenzied efforts on both sides to court international public opinion after President Barack Obama said he would seek authorization from Congress before launching any military action against Assad’s regime. In an interview with French newspaper Le Figaro, Assad was quoted as saying that Syria has challenged the U.S. and France to provide proof to support their allegations, but that their leaders “have been incapable of doing that, including before their own peoples.”

“If the Americans, the French or the British had a shred of proof, they would have shown it beginning on the first day,” he said, deriding Obama as “weak” and having buckled to U.S. domestic political pressure. “We believe that a strong man is one who prevents war, not one who inflames it,” Assad said. French President Francois Hollande and Obama have been the two world leaders most vocally calling for action against Assad’s regime, accusing it of carrying out a deadly chemical attack against rebel-held suburbs of Damascus on Aug. 21.


News

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NEWS BRIEFS

CRIME From Page 1A

MISCONDUCT From Page 1A

alert was sent out. The student’s name is being withheld at her request and in accordance with Daily policies regarding survivors of sexual assault. The student questioned whether a crime alert should be sent out because she was concerned about the safety of the other members of her apartment building. “I’m wondering what has to be deemed dangerous enough to get an alert,” she said. According to the Clery Act, the University is required to send out crime alerts only when a crime, considered to be a public safety threat, occurs on campus. In the past, UMPD has gone beyond its jurisdiction and released alerts about crimes that occurred nearby and are considered threats to public safety. In order to receive information about crimes that occur off campus, University Police said they must establish relationships with AAPD. Past incidents, including the delayed discovery of repeated sexual assaults at a Zaragon Place apartment, shed light on communication issues between the University and the city. AAPD is not required to volunteer the information and, unlike the University, does not employ a full-time public information officer to coordinate with media and make the public aware of dangers to public safety.

ly begin an investigation during the course of a private conversation. SAPAC Director Holly RiderMilkovich said first-year students are informed multiple times about confidential and non-confidential locations. “Many times students have trust relationships with people who are in non-confidential locations and chose to share their information with them,” Milkovch said. “And we want for that to happen because we want students to share their information in a place where they feel safe but we hope always that that is an informed choice.” Once allegations are made, the first step is to provide the survivor with support services, like a SAPAC advocate, per the new

NEW YORK

Steering-shaft corrosion causes Ford to recall 370,000 cars Ford is recalling 370,000 cars due to potential corrosion to their steering shaft that may result in loss of steering. No incidents or injuries have been reported. The cars include 2005 to 2011 Ford Crown Victoria, Mercury Grand Marquis and Lincoln Town Cars. About 355,000 are in the U.S. and 15,000 in Canada. Dealers will inspect the cars and may replace the lower intermediate steering shaft and if necessary resecure a lower steering column bearing and replace the upper intermediate steering shaft.

NEW YORK

Time Warner, CBS end dispute, resume programming TV network CBS and cable provider Time Warner Cable have ended their payment dispute and expect programming to resume in millions of homes Monday night. The agreement ends a monthlong blackout of CBS and CBSowned channels including Showtime Networks, CBS Sports Network and the Smithsonian channel that affected more than three million homes in Dallas, Los Angeles and New York and began Aug. 2. The companies were in dispute about how much Time Warner Cable Inc. would pay for CBS Corp. programming. Specific terms of the deal were not disclosed.

RIO DE JANEIRO

Brazil condemns U.S. spy program as ‘unacceptable invasion’ The Brazilian government condemned a U.S. spy program that reportedly targeted the nation’s leader, labeled it an “unacceptable invasion” of sovereignty and called Monday for international regulations to protect citizens and governments alike from cyber espionage. In a sign that fallout over the spy program is spreading, the newspaper Folha de S.Paulo reported that President Dilma Rousseff is considering canceling her October trip to the U.S., where she has been scheduled to be honored with a state dinner. Folha cited unidentified Rousseff aides. The president’s office declined to comment. The Foreign Ministry called in U.S. Ambassador Thomas Shannon and told him Brazil expects the White House to provide a prompt written explanation over the espionage allegations.

JOHANNESBURG

Mandela released from hospital, will receive home care South Africans on Monday welcomed Nelson Mandela’s discharge from a hospital after nearly three months of treatment amid concerns that his health remains so poor that he still must receive intensive care at home. An ambulance returned the 95-year-old leader of the antiapartheid movement to his home in the leafy Johannesburg neighborhood of Houghton on Sunday. The office of South African President Jacob Zuma said Mandela remains in critical and sometimes unstable condition and will receive the same level of care that he did in the hospital, administered by the same doctors.

—Compiled from Daily wire reports

HOUSING From Page 1A improving the quality of the residential experience and strengthening that connection between living and learning,” Logan said. Most renovations added enhanced study spaces as well as community areas, two items requested by students in early surveys on housing. On a larger scale, efforts were made to connect students from different dorms within particular neighborhoods, Logan said. The dining halls have played a role in bringing different students together by creating communal dining locations — such as the Hill Dining Center and The Blue Apple at Bursley Residence Hall. “Before the Residential Life Initiative, so many of our halls had individual dining places, and while students with their meal plans could still dine at other locations, the tendency was to dine where you live,” Logan said. Logan went on to say that having fewer but larger dining halls rather than one in each dorm is cost-effective and helps create the neighborhood atmosphere the RLI project intends. New entrances between South Quad Residence Hall and West Quad Residence Hall will also serve to connect students between different halls. Though a main focus of RLI is on student learning and interaction, Logan emphasized that the renovations were “not simply cosmetic.” Construction focused primarily on older heritage buildings, while leaving major changes to comparatively newer dorms, such as the Mary Markley and Bursley Residence Hall, for later. The total project costs $750 million, funded by 2-percent increases in room and board every year since renovations commenced, Logan said. There are no current plans to renovations non-RLI dorms, like Bursley and Markley. Gregory Wright, assistant director of planning and design for University Housing, said the buildings included in the project needed facility repairs and those not included will likely need them soon. All residence halls received upgrades to fire-alarm and sprinkler systems, and most dorms also required upgrades in wireless Internet capability. Many of the listed repairs in the RLI briefing included mechanical, electrical and plumbing overhauls in the outdated buildings. “There was a lot of ‘band-aiding’ going on over the years, and that’s why they reached a point where they were putting BandAids on Band-Aids,” Wright said of the plumbing system. Wright explained that many of the major issues came from trying to include modern systems

CSG From Page 1A ises — but these achievements were not without struggles. Graduate students sought secession from CSG, claiming the assembly did not focus due efforts toward their needs despite utilizing funds received from graduate tuition. The student government was forced to spend what Parikh recalls as several hundred hours seeking a resolution. Like in Winter 2013, when independent candidates Parikh

in older buildings. Issues like improper floor height to accommodate Internet and other wiring, and inability to distribute electricity and plumbing in taller buildings, required improvised solutions. The building renovations have also included updates in sustainability. Most notably, all buildings are now equipped with occupancy sensors for the lights, and many have low- or dual-flush toilets. “I’m really excited about what we’ve done and what we’re still doing,” he said. “The transformation of these buildings is just incredible.” Wright said the South and West Quad renovations will take a similar approach to the model used for East Quad Residence Hall. The South Quad project will not alter dorm rooms, but instead focus primarily on lounges and the dining hall. It is scheduled to be completed by August 2014, a tall order according to Wright. “There’s a lot packed into the short amount of time that we have,” Wright said. “It’s always touch-and-go, but we’ve always made it.” The University isn’t the only Big 10 institution improving its residence facilities in recent years: The dining hall renovations and improvements are similar to those undergone at Michigan State University’s Brody Neighborhood in 2009. The Brody dining hall, used by the six residence halls in the neighborhood, now includes a two-story student lounge and community spaces. The cafeteria, named Brody Square, features nine different eating venues. Five of the residence halls themselves have been renovated, and the sixth is currently under construction. An $83-million renovation to Pennsylvania State University’s South Hall dormitories was also completed this year. The dorm rooms, lounges and community spaces were all upgraded and air conditioning was installed. Unlike renovations here in Ann Arbor, building exteriors were also redesigned. A second phase

Tuesday, September 3, 2013 — 3A

policy. Next, the University provides an assessment to determine if any temporary intervention is needed, such as if the accuser and the accused share classes or live in the same residence hall. Two employees in the Office of Institutional Equity, which is responsible for investigating civil-rights abuses at the University, have been assigned to investigate all sexual misconduct allegations. The policy also indicates that no party has an obligation to meet with the investigators, and can choose not to cooperate with an investigation. In cases when the survivor does not want to meet with investigators, a special review panel will meet to determine if the investigation will continue. The panel is charged finding a balance between survivor choice and campus safety, and the Title IX coordinator having the final say on the future of the investi-

gation. In many cases, because of the nature of the sexual misconduct, an investigation cannot continue without the cooperation of the survivor. Title IX Coordinator Anthony Walesby, associate vice provost and senior director of OIE, explained that in a typical investigation, OIE staff meet separately with the complainant and accused. “There’s never this back and forth; no one’s cross examining,” Walesby said. “We ask questions. We ask follow up questions based on the information we have, but you never have to worry about being in the same room as the person you are accusing and vice versa.” Law enforcement investigations and interviews are independent of OIE activities, but Walesby said UMPD and investigators frequently share information.

When determining guilt, OIE investigators will use a lower standard of proof. Known as preponderance of the evidence, the standard declares that guilt is determined if there’s enough evidence to suggest a complaint is more likely true than not. The final report is then given to the Office of Student Conflict Resolution, where consequences can include probation, suspension and other sanctions. OSCR also coordinates efforts to communities affected by misconduct. The differences between the old policy and the interim policy have already resulted in a significant increase in the number of sexual misconduct cases reported to the University. During the 2010-2011 academic year, three cases of sexual misconduct were reported to the University, but in 2011-2012, there were 62 cases of sexual misconduct investigated under the interim policy.

and Hashwi were faced with the task of leading an opposition-dominated Representative Assembly, Proppe and Dishell will lead an assembly dominated by members of opposition party forUM in the wake of election disputes<\a> that led to the disqualification of that party’s presidential candidate, who won the popular vote. In May interviews, Proppe and LSA sophomore Pavitra Abraham, forUM’s party chair, both said they didn’t believe party politics would interfere with the efficiency of student government.

“All the representatives will be working on their individualized platforms and will be working with other members of the Assembly to draft their resolutions,” Abraham said. “But they will definitely be able to work (with the executive) to accomplish all goals for the year.” During Tuesday’s assembly meeting the representatives will discuss and vote on a series of resolutions pertaining to CSG rules and look back on a resolution from the winter pertaining to the increased price of student football season tick-

ets. Additionally, Proppe and Dishell will finalize and present selected nominations to serve as the chairs of the newly created executive commissions and the executive board to the Assembly. “We’re still in the process of interviewing (candidates),” Proppe said. “We were thrilled with the number of applicants we had; it’s a great problem to have, but it gets bogged down a little bit in terms of processing all of them.” The assembly meets every Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. on the third floor of the Michigan Union.

of renovations will be completed at Penn State in 2015. Indiana University has upgraded and built several residence halls in recent years and hopes to improve all of its residence halls by 2020. LSA sophomore Samantha Lyons never felt that her former dorm, South Quad, was desperate for repair, but after moving to Stockwell Residence Hall this year, she’s is glad to see the dorm updated. “It’s nice to try and keep up with the other Big 10 schools and other schools around the country,” Lyons said. When you ask a resident of the renovated dorms about their living situation, the word “hotel” tends to come to mind. LSA junior Iqra Nasir lived in luxury last year in Couzens Residence Hall and said the dorm felt extremely comfortable. “The areas set up in Couzens are wonderful,” Nasir said. “There are lounges on every floor, and it was really helpful to have study areas so close to your room.” Since the implementation of RLI, the total dorm capacity of the past several years has been notably lower. After closing Baits I Residence Hall and beginning renovations to East Quad in 2011, housing priority was reversed — freshmen were given priority in dorm placement. Logan said giving those rooms to younger students helped ease the transition into college life and relieve the burden of trying to find off-campus housing. “That was not a popular decision,” Logan said, noting the frustration of the upperclassmen who expected precedence in the housing lottery. “What we’re anticipating is with our full complement of rooms back in order of Central Campus, we’ll actually have more choices for returning students.” The dorm re-openings could also mean fewer undergraduates in Northwood Apartments I and II, though the specifics on the housing selection process have not been finalized.

FRATS From Page 1A “I’m not sure what’s stopping it or how soon anymore progress can be expected to be made.” Seiler said houses here on campus are in desperate need of renovations. “Greek life has been in existence at Michigan since 1845, and less than half of the houses have sprinkler systems installed, which is a major factor in safety

and fire prevention,” she said. “Because these houses have been around so long, especially the ones in the historic district, the electrical wiring, plumbing and other safety measures necessary are very expensive to make.” Seiler said she believes more people would be willing to support facility upgrades if their donation could be classified as a tax write-off. The bill is currently pending in the U.S. House Ways and Means Committee.


Opinion

4A — Tuesday, September 3, 2013

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Unsigned editorials reflect the official position of the Daily’s editorial board. All other signed articles and illustrations represent solely the views of their authors.

FROM THE EDITOR: AN INTRODUCTION TO THE DAILY The first Football Saturday has passed and undergraduate classes are underway — and that means The Michigan Daily is back for our 124th year of production. I’d like to take a few paragraphs to introduce you, or reintroduce you, to the largest student newspaper at the University of Michigan. The Daily produces five weekly editions, maintains a continuously updated website and is produced entirely by a staff of about 200 University students. The paper has been and will always be editorially independent of the University. There are a few professional staff members who assist our business staff — the students who handle the Daily’s finances and advertising — but students, like myself, are ultimately responsible for all content that goes into print. With that said, we aim for complete transparency with the community we serve and take responsibility when we break that trust by straying from our mission of fairness and accuracy. Never hesitate to contact me at anweiner@michigandaily.com or @andrewweiner. When we make a mistake, we want to know about it: Send any corrections to corrections@michigandaily.com and we’ll make the change online and run a correction in the next newspaper. Reading a printed newspaper too old fash-

ioned for you? We’re all over the Internet. Beyond our easy-to-navigate website, we maintain a robust presence on social media at www.twitter.com/MichiganDaily and www. facebook.com/MichiganDaily. This summer, we began uploading each day’s paper to www.issuu.com/MichiganDaily, so you can read the print edition if you can’t grab a copy around Ann Arbor. This semester is full of changes when it comes to the Daily: We’ve brought back liveblogging a variety of events and games, and now we’re running book reviews with the help of a local bookstore Literati. And now we’ve spun sports coverage back from our sister site to the main website. Lastly, we’re always looking for students to join our staff. Check out www.michigandaily. com/join-us to contact any of our editors. The best way to find out if the Daily is for you is to attend a mass meeting in the newsroom at 420 Maynard St. All meetings will begin at 7:30 p.m — we hope to see you there! • • • •

Thursday, Sept. 12 Sunday, Sept. 15 Tuesday, Sept. 17 Thursday, Sept. 19

The summer, condensed

Wrapping up the last four months of University, city and state news

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his summer was an especially busy one for the University, Ann Arbor and the state of Michigan. Returning to school can become quite stressful when you’re unaware of the recent changes to University policy and Michigan law. This editorial will help fill you in on all of the changes you’ve missed over the past four months, and what we’d like to see happen in the near future.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

said the University and the city need to work together more efficiently in terms of security. Better communication between the University Police and the city’s law enforcement can help prevent crime on campus. Even certain improvements in the city, such as increased street lighting, may promote both student and resident safety. The council has a history of seeing the University as a separate concern from city matters; this year, we hope to see a shift in this mindset. Last Tuesday, the battle for Medicaid expansion finally came to a close (for now) in Michigan, with the state Senate reluctantly approving the expansion, which is a critical mandate of the Affordable Care Act. Supported by Gov. Rick Snyder, the proposal will add roughly more than 400,000 Michigan residents to the low-income health insurance plan. The expansion has been supported by numerous organizations, including the Michigan Health and Hospital Association and the Small Business Association of Michigan. These groups, like Snyder, have advocated the positive fiscal impact of expanding health care. Unfortunately, the conservative-dominated state legislature’s drawn-out debate over Medicaid was divided more on party lines rather than the bill’s flaws or merits. The ideological divide nearly prevented Michigan’s uninsured from gaining coverage — an embarrassment that even the Republican governor recognized. The legislature should follow the governor’s example more often.

Send letters to: tothedaily@michigandaily.com

Response to “Open letter to Provost Pollack” TO THE DAILY: Dr. Shane Brady provided an excellent description of what many black students and black faculty at the University of Michigan have known for years — activism is always welcome at Michigan, but there are strong restrictions on who may articulate the activism. Blacks may “almost” freely pontificate on the subject of race, but only during Martin Luther King Day or Week, and only after receiving approval from the Office of Multicultural Studies. Mind you, nothing too controversial. Being a woman of color with staying power at Michigan requires some sacrifice. The nature of this sacrifice is the “insider knowl-

edge” alluded to by Brady. As I was recently advised by a semi-retired black faculty in the School of Social Work, “you have to be sure not to burn your bridges.” Simply keep your mouth shut, behave gratefully and don’t upset white liberals, especially ones with money. The disinvitation is no surprise. The more compelling failure is that of University President Mary Sue Coleman to offer a public response, i.e., apology. But for those with “insider knowledge” of University politics, it’s par for the course. Well, there’s always the next election for the University’s Board of Regents to seek needed change. Thank you, Dr. Brady. Believe me, if your lecture appointment is not renewed, some of us understand. Audrey Jackson University alum

CHECK US OUT ONLINE Keep up with columnists, read Daily editorials, view cartoons and join in the debate. Check out @michdailyoped and Facebook.com/MichiganDaily to get updates on Daily opinion content throughout the day.

were talking about. At first, I was impressed and even jealous of how self-assured they were. However, I soon realized how this very certainty was actually blinding them, making them unwilling to hear the opinions of others — or even just the facts. In my head, I blamed their parents. They must have praised their kids for tying their shoes for the 100th time or remembering to say “thank you” at age 12 — all in the name of their children’s self-esteem. I blamed the colleges they attended, too. I knew that these schools — like ours — constantly remind them that they are the smartest, they are the elite, they are destined for greatness. But then I realized that I myself was a little too certain. After seeing “Fruitvale Station,” I caught myself saying, “It will win the Oscar for Best Film. The Academy will want to make a statement.” I also began to announce the results of the upcoming New York City mayoral race — four months too early— based off nothing except my own emotions. This epiphany didn’t hit me until a couple of weeks later. A family friend had gone to the emergency room a few days before, but was dismissed. The emergency room doctor said it was just a virus and that it would pass. Well, it turns out that the doctor was wrong and our family friend had both pneumonia and a virus the hospital couldn’t identify. For two days, a resident tested

out different antibiotics on him, hoping that one would work. His parents were told that he might not make it. A week later, he was discharged from the hospital, but significantly weaker. I don’t know if it could have gone any differently. Still, I found myself wondering if the resident could have called on an older, more experienced doctor instead of waiting and guessing. Perhaps it would have saved my friend and his family from this terrifying experience.

I have to acknowledge the limits of what I do and don’t know.

At the same time, it’s certain that I don’t know what could have or might have, but in the end, it clicked: I have to acknowledge the limits of what I do and don’t know. So, the next time someone mentions some intellectual-sounding book I don’t know, I won’t nod and smile like usual, and when someone asks my opinion about what’s going on in Egypt, I’ll admit I haven’t been following the news too much. It may sound ignorant, but hey, at least it’s honest. — Zoe Stahl can be reached at zoestahl@umich.edu.

A perfect politician?

Andrew Weiner is the editor in chief.

FROM THE DAILY

This past July, the University’s Board of Regents voted to expand in-state tuition eligibility to many of Michigan’s undocumented students, marking the end to a student-led campaign for tuition equality. Beginning in January 2014, undocumented residents in the state may qualify for the lower resident tuition prices, provided they can meet new residency requirements. While this historic decision may now make enrollment to the University possible for the state’s undocumented population, legal hurdles hinder the new policy’s impact. Undocumented students are currently ineligible for state and federal financial aid. Considering the average undocumented family earns $27,000 annually — roughly the cost of attendance for one year at the University — the broadening of in-state tuition is not enough. If the University intends to promote a more economically diverse campus, administration must push state and federal officials to widen financial-aid options — regardless of where someone was born. In August’s primary election for Ann Arbor City Council, both Ward 3 and 4 were up for reelection. Incumbent Democrat Stephen Kunselman was reelected in Ward 3, and Jack Eaton beat out Marcia Higgins in Ward 4. Both Kunselman and Eaton suggested that Ann Arbor and the University should have a better relationship with each other — a talking point that’s often brought up but rarely acted upon. A break in this pattern is necessary come November’s election. For instance, Kunselman

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his past summer, I lived and interned in Washington, D.C. While I was there, I learned to love D.C. for its quirks. I loved that after work meant going to happy hour and that, as a born-again omnivore, there ZOE was a neverSTAHL ending supply of burgers to try. I loved picnics in Meridian Park for lunch and runs by the monument at night. But as much as I enjoyed being in D.C., there were some things I just couldn’t get used to: The muggy days didn’t do it for me, nor did the long waits for the always overcrowded Metro. What I really couldn’t stomach was how certain all of my fellow college-aged interns were about everything. On the Red Line to Union Station, I heard a Senate intern announce with absolute confidence that “Hillary has these next two terms in the bag. We’ll have Gov. O’Malley after that, but for only one term. After that, you know, we will gotta swing back, so a Republican for two terms. Not sure exactly who yet.” I also heard other twenty-somethings announce their “politically viable” plans to solve the ArabIsraeli conflict, income inequality and our public education system. They all knew exactly what they

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ne of the most difficult concepts to grasp as we grow up and mature is that no one — absolutely no one — is perfect. We learn that some of our greatest heroes in life often have equally great flaws, challengJAMES ing our relentBRENNAN less admiration of them. In recent months, I began to see the darker side of one of my most treasured idols. Reading about Newark, N.J. Mayor Cory Booker, I quickly found every reason to adore him. Booker has made a name for himself as an intelligent and charismatic politician with the commitment and work ethic of a community organizer. As mayor, Booker has personally shoveled snow for constituents, allowed hurricane victims to stay in his home and even ran into a burning building to save someone’s life. His energy and personal involvement have led to an explosion in his national profile, and last month he won the Democratic nomination for New Jersey’s vacant Senate seat. In many ways, Booker is the epitome of what a public servant should be. He cares deeply for his city, he works tirelessly and he connects intimately with his constituents. However, Booker also appears to be the epitome of everything wrong with high-profile Democratic politicians. The progressive activist group Blue America refused to endorse Booker, citing his cozy relationship with Wall Street and Silicon Valley elites, his support for privatized education reform and a willingness to cut Social Security. President Barack Obama, former

President Bill Clinton and countless other Democrats have taken similar paths, trying to be “pro-business” as a way to garner bipartisan support while filling their campaign coffers. They championed deregulation, cut into the social safety net and abandoned the middle class on their way to the top. As a bona fide rising star, it appears Booker may be no different. The accusations raised by his opponents on the left are not unfounded, as Booker has accepted millions in donations from Wall Street, has made close friends with the leaders of tech giants and has supported dubious charter-school initiatives. It seems that the mayor many have dubbed “Superman” is not quite the hero he was made out to be. As disheartening as it may be to mature and realize that people like Booker are not the gods they seemed like at first, part of growing up is also finding the good in situations rather than the perfect. The critiques of Booker’s political stances and potential to be a national leader overshadow what truly matters about him, which is a concept that no poll or study will ever be able to quantify. People like Booker inspire all of us to do what it takes to really make change happen. When I look at the list of the would-be senator’s accomplishments, I say to myself, “I could do that.” I don’t know if I could get Mark Zuckerberg to give my school district a $100-million grant, but it doesn’t take a Rhodes scholar to volunteer with Big Brothers Big Sisters. It also doesn’t take a mayor to shovel snow or give people displaced by natural disasters a place to stay. As much as progressives can and should call into question what Booker really supports, they have

to look past political positions and realize what’s really important. Booker deserves his “Superman” moniker purely for inspiring thousands of people to do the little things that make big accomplishments possible. Going out to shovel snow motivated dozens of Newark residents to do the same and suddenly an entire community was helping people get to work, go to the store and take their kids to school. It’s not the most glorious, headline-grabbing achievement,

Being a true public servant — and for that matter, a true hero — is about helping others. but it makes a difference. Being a public servant is not about writing laws, just like being a hero is not about dressing up and fighting crime. Being a true public servant — and for that matter, a true hero — is about helping others. You don’t have to be elected mayor or get a law degree from Yale University to be a public servant. Would I have voted for Booker had I lived in New Jersey? I honestly can’t say. What I can say for certain, though, is that I will always admire Booker for the way he inspired me to help others, even in little ways. He has inspired countless others, and the ripple effects of his symbolic acts have made a difference that cannot be quantified. Booker will always be a superhero to me, not because of what he does, but because of what he symbolizes and how he inspires me. — James Brennan can be reached at jmbthree@umich.edu.

EDITORIAL BOARD MEMBERS Kaan Avdan, Sharik Bashir, Barry Belmont, Eli Cahan, Eric Ferguson, Jesse Klein, Melanie Kruvelis, Maura Levine, Patrick Maillet, Aarica Marsh, Megan McDonald, Jasmine McNenny, Harsha Nahata, Adrienne Roberts, Paul Sherman,Sarah Skaluba, Michael Spaeth, Daniel Wang, Derek Wolfe

ARE YOU BORED? DO YOU CARE ABOUT THE ISSUES WHATEVER THOSE MAY BE? COME TO EDITBOARD. MONDAYS AND WEDNESDAYS AT 6PM. 420 MAYNARD ST. EMAIL OPINIONEDITORS@MICHIGANDAILY.COM FOR DETAILS.


Arts

6A — Tuesday, September 3, 2013

FILM REVIEW

The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

ALBUM REVIEW

UNIVERSAL REPUBLIC

It’s not Ariana Venti.

PERDIDO

“One of us should probably take off our glasses. Nose goes.”

Blanchett steals show in ‘Jasmine’ Woody Allen layers dramatic tension in latest opus By CARLY KEYES Daily Arts Writer

When movies end with the bad guy getting caught and the good guy getting the girl, it’s as repulsive and trite as it A is warm and fuzzy. Sure, Blue the audience Jasmine wants a happy wrap-up, but At the life seldom Michigan supplies those. Life is hard. It’s Perdido worth living, but it’s hard and certainly no picnic for the tragic heroine in writer-director Woody Allen’s latest effort, “Blue Jasmine.” Jasmine (Cate Blanchett, “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey”), the way-upper-class Manhattan socialite formerly known as Jeanette, loses her luxurious and glamorous lifestyle with her sexy sugar daddy (Alec Baldwin, “AmeriQua”) when she discovers his authentic self

that ain’t so sweet. Embarrassed and broken — with nowhere else to go — she flees to San Francisco and bunks with her sister, Ginger (Sally Hawkins, “All is Bright”), much to the dismay of Ginger’s soon-to-be fiancé, Chili (Bobby Cannavale, “Lovelace”). To claim Blanchett carries the film is an immense understatement. She’s part of an incredibly talented and impactful ensemble cast that makes an indelible impression, but Blanchett is a reigning giant among … smaller giants. It’s impossible not to pity and hate her character simultaneously: She’s lost everything, but she refuses to accept that she’s lost everything, which makes life harder than need be. She tightly grips her Louis Vuitton luggage and firmly clings to her Chanel belts as she reminisces about her previous position of wealth and power and expresses zero gratitude for Ginger’s generosity and zero interest in gaining her own financial independence. This obstinacy and intense rejection of reality prompts several sessions of manic-depressive behavior. She talks to herself in public, pops prescription pills

and downs drink after drink to quell the chaos inside her head. It’s hard to root for her as she lives in denial and copes destructively, but she’s so pathetic that it’s easy to root for her, too, even if only to stop the moping madness. Jasmine’s wistful internal flashbacks manifest visually as Allen cuts back and forth between past and present, a technique that heightens the dramatic tension and moves the story along at an exciting pace without revealing too much too soon. Allen layers. He layers the story; he layers the characters and, in doing so, layers viewers’ emotions. He peels them away like an onion — not simply because an onion physically has layers — but it becomes more and more difficult to refrain from tearing up as the beats go on. The staggering complexity hits home for anyone who’s ever experienced an entirely unexpected loss then slipped into their denial hoping that — just maybe — they’ll bounce back to an even higher spot than before. But to begin anew, we must let go of the old. And it’s hard. Life is hard. But sometimes it doesn’t have to be as hard we make it.

Ariana Grande strives for diva stardom By GREGORY HICKS Daily Arts Writer

Initially glancing at the cover for Ariana Grande’s newest record release, Yours Truly, the gray-scaled star (doused B in spotlight) can come off Yours Truly as a bit too Ariana Grande diva-esque for a debut album Universal Republic — but she sure does have the pop-chops to back it up. Don’t be fooled by Grande’s juvenile biography, the 20-year-old Nickelodeon actress has vocals directly comparable to the high-ranged powerhouse that is Mariah Carey herself. Grande entered into the Top 10 with her multi-platinum lead single “The Way,” simultaneously swooping up a broader demographic of listeners. Previously, the former “Victorious” actress released immature disasters like “Put Your Hearts Up,” along with a variety of poorly chosen covers such as Demi Lovato’s “You’re My Only Shorty.” The new R&B aim for Grande’s career spawns a serious tonality in her work, thus canning the teenybopper image that was so heavily embedded into her music. “The Way” became representative of the overall direction

of Yours Truly — an R&B-style record almost entirely written and produced by Harmony Samuels and Babyface. Babyface, the ten-time Grammy Winner singer-songwriter, is notable for being a hit-maker for Mariah Carey. Therefore, it’s only rational that Grande and Republic Records would recruit a songwriting legend for such a comparable voice. Points awarded for rationality, points lost for unoriginality. Unoriginality is further spotted in “Daydreamin,’ ” one of the first tracks recorded for the album. The song is melodically indistinguishable from Grease’s “Beauty School Dropout,” specifically when tapping the piano keys in the track’s introduction. This song title was initially the title of the record, but the Yours Truly title appeared after controversy in name-similarity to Mariah Carey’s album Daydream.

Young pop star wants to be the next Mariah Carey. Most tracks are of quality com-

position, lyrically and melodically, but beat usage becomes excessive at times. The record’s second promotional single, “Baby I,” exploits nearly every beat in existence, resulting in messiness. Putting soul snaps on the majority of tracks also becomes increasingly monotonous. Despite this production flaw, the album practices a worthy bassline and vocal mix, using many pleasant harmonies. The collaborations provide considerable assistance in Grande’s strive to be taken seriously on this debut. Mac Miller and Big Sean may lean toward the obnoxious side of rapping, but following a trend certainly helps when trying to sit at the same table as industry dominators. “Popular Song,” however, will do MIKA more favors in the long run as he attempts to break into the American music demographic. Truthfully, it’s difficult not to label Grande as a MariahCarey ripoff, but consider this: Where is Mariah Carey now? The fact that an artist with that much legendary prowess can’t even scrape a Top-10 hit or sell a decent number of records is frankly embarrassing. It’s no wonder her new record is called The Art of Letting Go. Carey needs to let go of her career and let someone else take the reigns. And Grande may very well be just the singer for that.


Arts

The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

FILM COLUMN

Danny Torrance taught me how to love By AKSHAY SETH Daily Film Columnist

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anny Torrance showed me how to love. Or, love movies at least. Yes, we’re talking about that weird psychic kid from “The Shining” who only wears overalls — you know, the little brunette whose best buds are his imaginary finger friends. Through passing eyes, it’s a quaint memory, touching fondly on the love little Danny had for his little tricycle, but as I sit here thinking of my younger self, my infinitely wiser present self sees a column idea. Because the real reason I fell in love with Danny and his tricycle has to do with a particular tracking shot, the way it drew me in even as a youth and showed me the simplicity in following. The first time I saw it, I was no older than Danny, fresh off the boat — or air-boat — from India, friendless, on the very far end of the heavy side and the go-to target of my elder cousins’ idiotic sense of humor. Leading up to my first Halloween, this idiotic sense of humor dictated that I be dragged to an evening screening of “The Shining.” My mother was told I’d be watching “a movie kind of like ‘Home Alone’ that takes place in a hotel.” They wanted to see me pee my elastic jeans, but the joke was on them. I didn’t understand diddly shit of what anyone was saying. The American accent, with its rolling r’s and tapered t’s, was an enigma, a weird mutation of the English language that only white people seemed to truly comprehend (I’m convinced this is the reason I look utterly dumbfounded in every family picture taken over the course of my first year in the U.S.). So it goes without saying I was totally confuzzled by what was happening on screen. That is until that iconic blue tricycle appeared. Danny looked like a certifiable badass gliding forth through the deserted halls of the Overlook Hotel. The overalls were there. The wind was in his hair. The little red shoes were pedaling away like they just didn’t care (a poem). He was about to see the mutilated, axed remains of those creepy identical twins with their equally creepy identical dresses, but in retrospect, even that was a veiled yet important life lesson: looking fly has its consequences. And let’s not forget the cinematography

Tracking shots tear down language barriers. involved with this priceless piece of movie magic history. The try-and-top-this-swagcycle just pushes forward, the eerie drawl of its wheels sliding over hardwood, then carpet, then again hardwood: a thudding noise oddly reminiscent of our hearts’ quickening pace. Kubrick teases ever closer to Danny, only to wheel further away at the next moment, holding us still and hostage with his camera at calculated points around the corner to let our suspicions build, then topple into frenzied anticipation. Yeah. It’s great — one of those perfectly composed scenes boasting an inimitable marriage between editing, photography and direction.

The only thing my nine-yearold, thoroughly homesick self had to do was follow the tracking shot. There was peace in that simplicity, no American accent to throw me off — a calmness that gave me my first experience of being totally disarmed by film. For those too lazy to schleck their way to Wikipedia, the tracking shot is, in basic terms, a shot taken by mounted or handheld camera that tracks movement over an extended period of time. The idea is simple, but as is true of most worthwhile things in showbiz (and by extension, real life), the simplest mechanisms can yield the most natural solutions. In this case, the problem is the jump-cut — the annoying little thing that cuts from one frame to the next with little to no transition, creating a jumping effect that can become tiresome with overuse. It’s not fun. Like this. Really short and dull. Random and weird. Half sentences. So for the film to breathe, we need a touch of stability to diversify our viewing experience, to convince our eyes to look closely and with more commitment. But it loses that crucial focusing/refocusing effect if unceremoniously tacked on between any random transition in the script. There has to be weight behind it, a purpose to serve other than just varying up shot length. Take for example, the scene of utter beauty from “Children of Men,” an esteemed member of the hallowed and fabled pantheon deemed “Akshay’s Five Fave Flicks” (AFFF™), where the protagonists are first attacked. Like the scene from “The Shining,” we’ve completed a journey by the time our three protagonists begin their hellish tailspin into the blood-splattered madness that is future United Kingdom. Make no mistake — leading up to this point, they’re no strangers to violence, watching it unfold around them with the resigned, almost apathetic acceptance that this is what their surroundings have become. This shot splinters the distanced concept of “surroundings.” As he watches his wife’s life ebb through his fingers, Clive Owen is no longer a civilian, and thanks to our established commitment to this gripping scene, neither are we. That’s not to say the consequences have to be bloody to be impactful. Queue entrance of “Good Fellas,” featuring one of the most famous long takes in all of cinema. It’s a deceivingly simple shot, framed to bubbly perfection by The Crystals classic “Then He Kissed Me.” With this scene, Scorsese drags us into the confined yet expansive mob world without ever so much as glancing at a garrote. Lorraine Bracco, playing an outsider much like ourselves, is our guide, remaining close to the center of the screen for nearly every second of the two-minute run, but what we really see are the benefits of easy money, the oohs and ahs of our guide as she falls for the romanticized notions of gangster life. It’s hard not to follow. In this unifying context, merging audience with film, the tracking shot excels precisely because it offers impactful consequences in a shorter time frame. It’s our vignette within a story. It’s nine-year-old me getting hooked on movies. It’s the simplicity in following. Seth is following the tracking shots of life. To find out what that means, e-mail akse@umich.edu.

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@michdailyarts

Tuesday, September 3, 2013 — 7A

ALBUM REVIEW

COLUMBIA

“Precipitation won’t block my shine.”

Juicy J stays true to self on latest ‘Trippy’ album Unapologetic rapper shines on major label debut By JACKSON HOWARD Daily Arts Writer

Juicy J makes it perfectly clear what he is all about from the start of Stay Trippy. “Stop It,” the opening track, is a warning of B sorts for potential listeners: If Stay Trippy you don’t like Juicy J money, drugs, strippers or Columbia murder, you should turn this album off. Quickly. Though now in his late 30s with two solo albums to his name, Stay Trippy serves as Juicy J’s proper reintroduction to a new generation. Founder, producer and longtime member of the legendary southern group Three 6 Mafia, Juicy has managed to reinvent himself in recent years as the mentally unstable, drug using, stripclub endorsing, simultaneously hilarious and frightening hype man to Wiz Khalifa. On Stay Trippy, Juicy attempts to strike the perfect balance between his traditional southern roots with his recently developed Khalifasponsored identity. This is not to say, however, that Juicy J or any of the music he makes is by any means complex. Instead, Juicy has nearly perfected his unique blend of “ratchet” music, and though the lyrical content can drop towards the abysmal, there’s no one you’d rather bring to a house party. The unexpected smash-hit lead single, “Bandz A Make Her Dance,” featuring Lil Wayne and 2 Chainz, is likely the reason the label green lit the album. The song, a menacing ode to strippers complete with a chanting chorus and hand claps, is the new Juicy J at his best, and finds him uttering the most bluntly vulgar and hysterical lines in years: “You say no to ratchet pussy / Juicy J can’t.” There is a clear distinction, then, between the somewhat tailored-for-radio songs and the classic Juicy J tracks. On Stay Trippy, the former is found on the “Bandz”-imitating “Show Out” and “Bounce It,” as well as the two collaborations with Wiz Khalifa, which sound like passed-on leftovers from Khalifa’s last album. The latter can be found throughout Juicy’s extensive mixtape catalogue, which featured titles like Blue Dream & Lean. Tracks such as “So Much Money,” “Money A Do It,” “All I Blow Is Loud” and “If I Ain’t” could’ve easily been plucked off any of his past mixtapes, as they share threatening, drum-heavy beats filled with violence, drugs and money. At least one or two of these songs should have been cut — the album is 16 tracks long, and at points the monotonous lyrics and rhyme patterns make it feel endless. Nonetheless, there is a noticeable difference between

Juicy’s mixtapes and Stay Trippy. The beats here are more cinematic — think John Carpenter’s legendary score to “Halloween” — and the guests better placed. The latter is integral to making the album work. Since signing with Khalifa, Juicy has become somewhat of a perennial guest feature. On Stay Trippy, however, the spotlight is on Juicy, and he expertly establishes himself as the lead artist on “Smokin’ Rollin,’ ” “No Heart No Love” and “Gun Plus a Mask,” which feature the late Pimp C, Project Pat and Yelawolf, respectively. All three tracks wait until the last minute to unleash the guest artist, which not only allows Juicy to get most of the attention, but also gives all three guests the chance to spit 40 seconds of pure aggression. Juicy probably could have left off the somewhat forced The Weeknd sample on “Smokin’ Rol-

lin’ ” and instead kept the excellent and venomous “One Of Those Nights,” an actual collaboration with The Weeknd that is inexplicably relegated to a Best Buy bonus track. The most interesting collaboration comes on “The Woods,” produced by Timbaland and featuring Juicy’s fellow Memphis resident, Justin Timberlake. Though it’s not his strongest production, Timbaland’s late-90s hyperactive beatboxing and eerie piano licks carry Juicy’s flows nicely. Timberlake drops a sexlaced chorus, singing, “Release the animal / Hear my mating call,” and while there’s no way this track would ever appear on either Timberlake or Timbaland’s solo projects, it’s good enough for Juicy’s simple rhymes about spoiling his “trippy chick.” Placed awkwardly between two intense partying and money-counting

songs, “The Woods” is nonetheless a refreshing break from the rest of the album. The main flaw of Stay Trippy is, for Juicy diehards, its greatest attribute. Juicy J’s songs, for the most part, have no conceptual direction, no sense for lyrical diversification or even an attempt at breaking form. And that’s OK. Juicy is a guilty pleasure of sorts, a certified entertainer who seems to be somewhat aware of his own absurdity but nonetheless embraces it with everything he has. Stay Trippy is a step forward for Juicy — it proves he’s capable of floating by himself on a majorlabel album. Though lyrical purists might shudder to lines such as “Bad bitch want me / Give me head like lice,” Juicy is doing what only Juicy knows how to do. And that’s to stay as trippy as possible.


SportsTuesday B

The Michigan Daily | michigandaily.com | September 3, 2013

PHOTO BY MARISSA MCCLAIN

READY FOR THE LIGHTS MICHIGAN VS . CENTR AL

59

9

Five things we learned: CMU By EVERETT COOK Daily Sports Editor

It was Central Michigan. This wasn’t Notre Dame, or a Big Ten opponent. What we learned about this Michigan football team on Saturday in its first game of the year might not hold true once conference play starts, or even when the Fighting Irish come into town this weekend. Still, there are some takeaways from Michigan’s 59-9 drubbing of the Chippewas. Just don’t be surprised if Devin Gardner looks more like Chad Henne than Denard Robinson next week. It’s the Five Things We Learned, Week 1 edition: 1. Gardner’s offense isn’t dramatically different from Robinson’s. After spending an entire summer hearing about a new, traditional pro-style offense, Michigan’s first two drives had Gardner take

snaps entirely from the shotgun formation. By the end of the day, Gardner ran seven times for 52 yards and two touchdowns. Only one of them was a designed run. This offense wasn’t an under-center, runthe-ball-down-your-throat classic. It had a reverse, plenty of different formations, and a quarterback that could break free for a long run even when every avenue was seemingly shut down. This offense was the norm when Robinson was still in Ann Arbor. It was supposed to be different this year, but in the end, it wasn’t all that different. Yet, Gardner’s scrambles still look different than Robinson’s — more controlled and fluid and less like a mad dash. Gardner’s decision making is going to be tested every weekend, where tucking the ball and pirouetting through the defense isn’t going to be as easy. Gardner’s two interceptions on Saturday weren’t pretty — one was well overthrown and one was a poor read in the opponent’s red zone. Notre Dame is going to

punish those mistakes a lot more than Central Michigan did. One thing is for sure — this offense isn’t going to be traditional. There will still be a quarterback running the ball this season, even if he’s bigger and doesn’t have dreadlocks. 2. Extra pounds or not, Derrick Green will be a factor. The No. 1 running back recruit in the nation showed up to training camp more than a few pounds overweight, to the point where Michigan coach Brady Hoke had him listed in a positional battle for the fifth running back spot on the first depth chart of the year alongside fellow freshman De’Veon Smith. Green entered the game in the third quarter, when the game was already well out of reach, but still looked impressive. He finished with 58 yards on 11 carries and scored See FIVE THINGS, Page 5B

In rivalry week, players avoid distractions By LIZ VUKELICH Daily Sports Editor

PAUL SHERMAN/Daily

TOP Junior linebacker Desmond Morgan (48) during the game versus Central Michigan. Michigan won 59 to 9. BOTTOM Devin Gardner threw two early interceptions but breezed past the Chippewas with his legs.

KELLY DOESN’T KNOW n Brady Hoke says Notre Dame chickened out of the rivalry. Brian Kelly says there is no rivalry. What makes a rivalry, anyway? Page 2B

There’s always a little more hype surrounding rivalry weeks, because, well, that’s the point. And with the Michigan-Notre Dame rivalry taking a hiatus after next season, it’s only fitting that the game this year will be even bigger than usual. The stage is traditionally big — over 114,00 fans flocked to Michigan Stadium to see the first night game two years ago. It was made even bigger on Saturday, when ESPN announced that College Football GameDay would air out of Ann Arbor. This will be the 11th time in history that GameDay is set on Michigan’s campus, the most recent of which was for the last Under

The Lights game against the Fighting Irish. But while fans will likely do their best to rise early on Saturday and carry the wittiest sign in hopes of nabbing an on-air cameo, there’s at least one person on campus that isn’t impressed by any of the hoopla. “I think in the past, people try to make all of this a huge deal, (but) it’s not for us, it’s for the students,” said fifth-year senior left tackle Taylor Lewan. “For us, we’re playing a game on Saturday, representing 134 years of Michigan football. I’m representing them when I step on the field. I don’t need to focus on College Gameday being here.” For some, like Lewan, it’s easier to push all the distractions aside. Redshirt junior quarterback Devin Gardner — who only has classes on Monday — laughed about how the Labor Day holiday meant he had no classes

GA: TAKE ONE

at all this week. Now he has five whole days to do nothing but study for and think about the game. But for others who maybe don’t have as much rivalry-game experience, Notre Dame week is a completely different beast. Eleven true freshmen saw playing time last weekend against Central Michigan. Though Michigan coach Brady Hoke said he was pleased that so many new players got the experience of playing in front of 112,000 screaming fans, the fear that the youngsters could get carried away by distractions still lingers. “We try to educate (the younger players), what it’s going to be like,” Hoke said. “Started that (on Sunday). Tuesday, we’ll talk more about the atmosphere and have some See NOTRE DAME, Page 5B

n The first game with the new student ticketing policy started with yawns and pizza and ended with what it set out to accomplish: a full student section. Page 4B


SportsTuesday

2B — September 3, 2013

The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

SportsTuesday: What Brian Kelly doesn’t know H ere’s what Brian Kelly knows but won’t say: he can’t decide what is a rivalry and what isn’t. Jack Swarbrick can’t decide what is a rivalry and what isn’t. He’s not insane. What Brian Kelly knows but won’t say is that by questioning a ZACH rivalry, he’ll HELFAND rile up his fan base and save face for his boss. Kelly knew all this on Sunday when he said of the MichiganNotre Dame series: “I really haven’t seen it as one of those historic, traditional Notre Dame rivalries. I’ve seen it as just one of those great football games that Notre Dame has played.” Michigan spent much of Monday insisting that, for them, this game is a rivalry. Michigan coach Brady Hoke dropped the phrase “great rivalry game” twice in a row before even being asked a question at his afternoon press conference. Then reporters asked him and his players about it for the rest of the press conference. But arguing that the series is a rivalry is a waste of time because the answer is so glaringly obvious. And Brian Kelly knows this. Brian Kelly coached in the state of Michigan from 1987 to 2006, so he surely knows about the 1994 game. He knows it was televised in more than 100 countries, “including Zimbabwe,” The Michigan Daily reported at the time. After Michigan won, Rachel Bachman reported, students flooded South University and swelled onto South Forest and into East University. “There were shouts of ‘Let’s Go Blue!’ and spontaneous rounds of ‘The

FILE PHOTO/Daily

Former Michigan quarterback Denard Robinson became a legend in 2010 and was a big reason the student section stayed in the stands 45 minutes after the last Under the Lights game in 2011.

Victors,’ ” Bachman wrote. “The air smelled of sweet leaves and cloudless sky, and no one seemed to know it was dinnertime.” Maybe he also knows that Michigan’s former Athletic Director, Don Canham, promoted the 1978 version of the game — played after a long hiatus — for nearly a decade. The Daily reported that one scalper sold a fifty-yard line ticket for $500. That’s worth $1,971 today, adjusted for inflation. He knows football, so he

knows that Raghib Ismail means kick returns and Desmond Howard means diving catches and Denard Robinson means breathtaking runs. Who cares what makes a rivalry? We made them up to occupy our time. In 1887, a bunch of Michigan students traveled to South Bend to teach the sport to a bunch of Notre Dame students so someday their great-great grandchildren could bicker about it at press conferences. We decide the games are

important, because when we’re exhausted from classes or when our country is set to bomb another country or when we’re having a bad week, we need a place where everyone can get together and drink and yell and hug and cry. We want moments when the leaves smell sweeter, and the skies seem brighter and no one cares they’re missing dinnertime. These moments have come when Michigan plays Notre

Dame. Moments like two years ago. The students stayed in the stadium for 45 minutes after the game ended. Denard Robinson, his voice cracking, marveled at the student section. “The game is over!” he said, but still they stayed until, finally, they spilled out into the streets. No one cared it was 4 a.m. as they partied on the lawns and in the streets, and no one cared if this game was a rivalry or not. If Michigan wins another game

like that on Saturday, they’ll do it again, and they won’t bother asking themselves if Michigan plays Notre Dame enough to warrant it. They’ll just know. Does that mean this is a rivalry? It doesn’t matter. Brian Kelly knows that, and he probably knows, too, that whatever he calls it, it’s worth playing every single year. Helfand can be reached at zhelfand@umich.edu or on Twitter @zhelfand


SportsTuesday

The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TOP-10 POLL Each week, Daily sports staffers fill out ballots, with first place votes receiving 10 points, second-place votes receiving nine, and so on. 1. ALABAMA(13): Week one meant Alabama had to humor the country by wasting their precious time and energy on a game.

6. SOUTH CAROLINA (1): It got so wet the refs gave the Cocks a breather, and it looked like the lightning delay would make them finish early.

2. OREGON (1): Combined with Oregon State to go 1-1 against FCS opponents this weekend.

7. TEXAS A&M: We would pay top dollar for Johnny Manziel’s autograph.

September 3, 2013 — 3B

MARGIN OF FIRST VICTORY AND WINNING PERCENTAGE Michigan’s 50-point victory was its largest opening-day victory since 1905. Does that mean more wins? Here’s a look at the last 25 years:

0.8

0.6 3. OHIO STATE: Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo lost to Ohio State. 4. CLEMSON: The Tigers beat the Bulldogs in the creative nickname bowl. 5. STANFORD: I don’t pop molly, I rock Stan Ford.

8. LOUISVILLE: Teddy Football, anyone?

0.4 9. LSU: The last time there was as much purple around LSU as Saturday’s Cowboy Classic against TCU was when JaMarcus Russell brought his codeine onto campus.

0.2 0

-20

0

20

40

10. GEORGIA: If I were a Richt man...I’d have my national championship hopes all but erased after one game.

STAFF PICKS The Daily football writers do their best to predict, against the spread, what happens in the 2012 football season.

Zach Helfand

Matt Slovin

Everett Cook

Liz Vukelich

No. 1 Alabama (-21.5) vs. Virginia Tech

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

No. 2 Ohio State (-35) vs. Buffalo

Ohio State

Ohio State

Ohio State

Ohio State

No. 3 Oregon (NL) vs. Nicholls State

Oregon

Oregon

Oregon

Oregon

No. 5 Georgia (-1.5) at No. 8 Clemson

Georgia

Clemson

Clemson

Georgia

No. 6 South Carolina (-12) vs. North Carolina

South Carolina

South Carolina

South Carolina

South Carolina

No. 7 Texas A&M (-27) vs. Rice

Texas A&M

Texas A&M

Rice

Rice

No. 9 Louisville (-21) vs. Ohio

Ohio

Ohio

Ohio

Ohio

No. 10 Florida (-24) vs. Toledo

Florida

Toledo

Toledo

Toledo

No. 11 Florida State (-10.5) at Pittsburgh

Florida State

Pittsburgh

Florida State

Florida State

No. 12 LSU (-4.5) at No. 20 TCU

LSU

TCU

LSU

LSU

No. 13 Oklahoma State (-13) vs. Mississippi State

Oklahoma State

Oklahoma State

Oklahoma State

Oklahoma State

No. 14 Notre Dame (-29.5) vs. Temple

Temple

Temple

Temple

Temple

No. 15 Texas (-43) vs. New Mexico State

New Mexico State

New Mexico State

New Mexico State

New Mexico State

No. 16 Oklahoma (-21) vs. Louisiana Monroe

Oklahoma

Oklahoma

Oklahoma

Oklahoma

No. 17 Michigan (-31.5) vs. Central Michigan

Michigan

Michigan

Central Michigan

Central Michigan

No. 18 Nebraska (-31) vs. Wyoming

Wyoming

Nebraska

Nebraska

Nebraska

No. 19 Boise State (+3.5) at Washington

Washington

Washington

Boise State

Washington

No. 21 UCLA (-21) vs. Nevada

Nevada

UCLA

UCLA

UCLA

No. 22 Northwestern (-6) at California

Northwestern

Northwestern

California

California

No. 23 Wisconsin (-44.5) vs. Massachusetts

Wisconsin

Massachusetts

Wisconsin

Massachusetts

No. 24 USC (-24) at Hawaii

Hawaii

Hawaii

USC

USC

No. 25 Oregon State (NL) vs. Eastern Washington

Oregon State

Oregon State

Oregon State

Oregon State

Michigan State (-28) vs. Western Michigan

Western Michigan

Western Michigan

Western Michigan

Western Michigan

Purdue (+10.5) at Cincinnati

Cincinnati

Cincinnati

Cincinnati

Purdue

Illinois (NL) vs. Southern Illinois

Illinois

Illinois

Illinois

Illinois

Iowa (-3) vs. Northern Illinois

Iowa

Iowa

Iowa

Iowa

Penn State (-9) at Syracuse

Syracuse

Syracuse

Penn State

Penn State

Indiana (-25) vs. Indiana State

Indiana State

Indiana

Indiana State

Indiana State

Minnesota (-13) vs. UNLV

Minnesota

UNLV

Minnesota

UNLV

Indiana State

19-10

18-11

17-12

14-15


SportsTuesday

4B — September 3, 2013

The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

Scrambling brings crossed fingers By ZACH HELFAND Daily Sports Editor

Every time Devin Gardner improvises, Brady Hoke says, the Michigan coach crosses his fingers. On Saturday, Gardner improvised often. Of all the attributes possessed by the redshirt junior quarterback — size, speed, arm strength —his best might be his creativity. Gardner thrives amid confusion. His confidence and athleticism extend plays and converts third and fourth downs. This is a skill that infuriates defenses and wins games. Think Johnny Manziel’s broken play artistry (or for more familiar, more painful examples for Michigan fans, think Vince Young in the 2005 Rose Bowl or Troy Smith for three years). When left un-spied in Saturday’s 59-9 victory, Gardner gashed Central Michigan with his legs. He rushed seven times for 52 yards. Only one was designed. Three converted a third or fourth down. Two scored touchdowns. But Hoke crosses his fingers for a reason. “It’s a blessing and a curse,” Hoke said. For Michigan coaches, Gardner can make any play call look smart. In coming games, defenses will use a defender as a spy, or Gardner will run wild. But the coaching staff also worries that he’ll expose himself to hits or force the issue. For players, blocking or running routes becomes an adventure. Every time Gardner improvises, fifth year senior offensive tackle Michael Schofield says, he doesn’t even try to guess where Gardner’s headed. First Schofield feels the defender move one direction, so he adjusts. Then the defender runs the other direction. Then switches again. Gardner, he said, is “shifty, shifty.” “So you have no really clue where he is, you just try to stay in

PAUL SHERMAN/Daily

Redshirt junior quarterback Devin Gardner ran seven times for 52 yards and two touchdowns on Saturday. Only one was a designed running play.

front of your guy as much as you can,” Schofield said. On Michigan’s first offensive touchdown, Gardner took the shotgun snap and waited. He waited and pumped. He pumped and waited. He waited and dropped back and stepped up and

then, finally, tucked and breezed, with long-legged grace, into the end zone. In all, he danced in the pocket for six seconds and covered the 22 yards to the end zone in another four. Later, facing a fourth and one in the second quarter, offensive

coordinator Al Borges called a designed quarterback run. Gardner converted easily, directing his blockers before ducking out of bounds past a defender like a matador. When Denard Robinson ran, Schofield said, he put his head

General Admission: Take one By AUSTEN HUFFORD

down and beat defenses with pure speed. Robinson rarely scrambled effectively. Gardner, Schofield said, keeps his head up. He changes direction often. When Gardner runs, his long strides make running look easy, calm. That’s by design. When he

Army veteran is first student in line By MATT SLOVIN

Online Editor

Managing Editor

It started with a trickle. At 7:20 a.m., there were 16. At 9:20 a.m. there were 41. Around 100 by 11 a.m. All standing or sitting, talking or napping, playing cards or watching ESPN on an 18-foot TV in a line of mostly empty gated spaces. All waiting to enter the Big House and be in the front rows for the Michigan football season opener against Central Michigan. For the first game of generaladmission student tickets in Michigan football history, no one knew what to expect. Was it the end of Football Saturday pregames? Would students not buy tickets? Would hundreds camp out overnight like they did when President Barack Obama came to speak? The Athletic Department overestimated the number of students who would show up very early. The gates were too long, the private security guards were too many — 20 as of 7 a.m. — and too much free Pizza House pizza was given out to the small group of waiting students. A private security guard said he thought there would be more people. “It’s 10 o’clock, man,” he said. “Where is everyone?” Very few students arrived before noon. But soon, they started coming in droves. The four chutes labeled H, O, K and E were opened at 11:45 a.m., and the stadium student gates were opened at 12:35 p.m. Students were given a wristband (complete with a bank advertisement) to be granted access to the first 22 rows. Once those rows were filled, the newly arriving students were given a general-admission ticket. The growing crowd was easygoing and no one seemed drunk — very different than the lower bowl at games in prior years. Radiofriendly songs were played, some students danced on their seats and simple contests were held: a tricycle race across the field, a guess the Michigan legend on the billboard and a field-goal contest for an iPad. Simple things kept the crowd from going crazy during the wait.

TERRA MOLENGRAFF/Daily

Some of the students who waited in the general admission line for good seats get some company after Saturday’s win.

As of 1:20 p.m., only the first 14 rows of student seating were filled, so superb seats were still up for grabs. The first rows were filled with a younger crowd — lots of freshmen and sophomores — in a space previously held by upperclassmen. An hour before kickoff, the student bowl was more than half full. The general-admission policy seemed to be a success. They had convinced students to show up to a game not only before kickoff, but an entire hour before. The few students at 7 a.m. had turned into a horde of fans by 2:30 p.m. Athletic Department Chief Marketing Officer Hunter Lochmann said Saturday morning that

one reason for general admission was to “create an atmosphere” for coach Brady Hoke by kickoff. That had certainly been accomplished. After the game, Hoke mentioned how cool it was to have the section full during warmups and how much he appreciated that from the students. However, everything wasn’t perfect. The normally packed or beyond capacity lower bowl was filled but not crazily so. From a faraway camera, it looked complete, but on the ground there were empty seats and everyone had plenty of room — certainly not the norm in previous games. The traditional hierarchy of

seniors in the front, freshman at the back has been destroyed. Classes were mixed together and some traditions were certainly lacking in the front rows: students were not thrown up in the air after a Michigan score. This only occurred in the back. Traditions will still get passed down from class to class, but it will be more complicated. About an hour before kickoff a group of younger students tried to start a wave. Other students started to join the effort, even though the non-student sections of the stadium were not filled. An older student yelled, “The wave is for the third quarter.” The others stopped.

improvises, Gardner says, he keeps a straight face. His teammates see that, he said, and they’re calm too. “I’m not really chaotic, my heads not spinning or anything,” he said. “It’s probably refreshing for them. And then when they get open, I get an opportunity to hit them. And if they don’t I’ll just run.” Gardner is so confident that coaches must remind him that it is okay to throw the ball away. Gardner switched fields and pirouetted without looking Saturday. That didn’t hurt him against Central Michigan. Against a better defense, forcing the issue is more dangerous. Gardner’s mistakes Saturday came in the pocket. Both were balls he shouldn’t have forced but did. His second pass attempt on Michigan’s second offensive play was an interception deep in Michigan’s own territory. He stared down senior receiver Drew Dileo on an out route. The cornerback read it from the start. “A decent pass,” Gardner said, “But it was a bad read.” He forced the issue again in the second quarter when both receivers ran streaks. Both were covered. He tried to find fifth-year senior Jeremy Gallon anyway. He was hit when he threw, and Central Michigan had another easy interception. Gardner finished 10-of-15 with the two interceptions. He scored a touchdown through the air and two on the ground. “He had a good game,” Hoke said. “I wouldn’t say elite or excellent or anything. But I thought he had a good game.” Against Notre Dame and beyond, when more than good is needed, Gardner’s balance between creative and conservative will be crucial. Gardner will scramble. That will make plays and turnovers. Fingers will be crossed.

The first Michigan student arriving to sit in the first row of Michigan Stadium on Saturday wasn’t a wide-eyed freshman. Nor was it a senior who showed up at dawn to ensure a close seat to the opener against Central Michigan despite the switch to general-admission seating. Instead, it was a father. A husband. A 10-year military veteran with tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. Doug Krusell, technically an Engineering junior by credit hours, turned 31 on Sunday and his first football game as a University student was a perfect gift. The celebration, about an 11-hour ordeal altogether, began at 7 a.m. when he became the first to walk through the roped lines outside the Big House, securing his place in the front row. His party had a disc jockey (hired by the Athletic Department to provide entertainment while students waited for entry), plenty of guests (112,618 of them, to be exact) and a pizza lunch (hand delivered to the waiting area by Chief Marketing Officer Hunter Lochmann). Along with other early risers, Doug got a first look at the Athletic Department’s new general admission policy. He waited patiently in the shadow of the Big House until 12:30 p.m., when the hundreds of students were finally able to enter the stadium. First come, first served, and Doug was the first to arrive. But he didn’t come alone. Beside him sat three more students who would’ve been wideeyed had it not been for their exhaustion. This was their first time at the Big House. This was their first time attending a football game — they had transferred from China’s Shanghai Jiao Tong University, which doesn’t have a team. And this was their first couple weeks in the United States. “They think I’m crazy, but you’ve got to be crazy to do this,” Doug said. “It’s been a long seven

months without football.” Doug dragged them here, out of bed early on a Saturday morning, when even some of the most overzealous pregamers had yet to stir. He didn’t introduce them to football without a little deceit, though it wasn’t intentional. The three women had believed the game would start at 8 a.m. They had no way of knowing the marathon day that lay ahead of them, nor the history they’d soon be making as the first guinea pigs of the Athletic Department’s new blueprint. Lochmann said Saturday that the main intention of the general admission policy was to fill the seats, after plenty of them had been left open well after kickoff in recent seasons. The move proved to be a smash hit — barely any room remained by the time kickoff rolled around. The shocking turnaround from years past — a near-full student section for a non-marquis opponent — surprised even Doug, who began his studies at Grand Valley State University knowing all along he wanted to end up in Ann Arbor. “I don’t want to make enemies with the Athletic Department,” he said. “But the people they’re trying to encourage to show up early … this won’t do anything.” Later, sitting in his longsought-after prize, the concreted Row 1 of Section 26 at Michigan Stadium, Doug changed his mind. “I may be eating my words,” he said. “If general admission is responsible (for the increased early attendance), then maybe it is a good thing.” Some students might be satisfied with a one-week spot at the front of the sea of maize, near where the Wolverines sang ‘The Victors’ after the 59-9 victory. Once isn’t enough for Doug, though. This week was merely practice. The Notre Dame game, under the lights at the Big House next weekend, is where his focus has been since he found out about the new ticketing system. “That’s the big one,” Doug said.


SportsTuesday

The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

GAME STATISTICS Team Stats First Downs Rush/Yards Passing Yards Offensive Plays Total Offense Kick returns/yds Punt returns/yds Comp/Att/Int Punts/Avg Fumbles/Lost Penalties/Yards Time of Possession

Michigan 22 47/242 221 68 463 5/108 4/40 14/21/3 1/51 1-0 7-55 34:16

CMU 12 29/66 144 57 210 5/108 0/0 13/28/1 7/39.6 2-1 8-74 25:44

M I C H I G A N PASSING Player

C-A

Yds

TD

Int

Gardner

10-15

162

1

2

Morris

4-6

59

0

1

Totals

14-21

221

1

3

RUSHING Player

Att

Yds

Avg

Lg

Green

11

58

5.3

30

TD 1

Toussaint

14

57

4.1

20

2

Gardner

7

52

7.4

22

Norfleet

1

38

38

38

0

Smith

7

12

1.7

4

0

Rawls

3

12

4

9

1

Johnson

2

9

4.5

7

0

Hayes

1

7

7

7

0

Morris

1

-3

-3

-3

0

Totals

47

242

5.1

38

6

Player

No.

Yds

Avg

Lg

TD

Gallon

4

47

11.8

16

1

Funchess

2

47

23.5

36

0

Dileo

2

43

21.5

36

0

Norfleet

2

15

7.5

12

0

Reynolds

1

45

45

45

0

Jackson

1

17

17

17

0

Butt

1

8

8

8

0

Toussaint

1

-1

-1

-1

0

14

221

15.8

45

1

RECEIVING

Totals PUNTING Player

No. Yds Avg

Lg

Allen

1

51

51

51

Totals

1

51

51

51

KICKOFF RETURNS Player

No.

Yds

Avg

Lg

TD

Norfleet

4

106

25.5

39

0

Totals

4

106

25.5

39

0

PUNT RETURNS Player

No.

Yds

Avg

Gallon Norfleet

Lg

TD

2

-1

-0.5

2

0

1

2

2

2

0

Thomas

1

9

9

9

0

Reynolds

0

30

30

30

1

Total

4

40

10

30

1

TACKLES Player

Solo Asst

Tot

Morgan, D.

3

4

7

Stribling

4 1

5

Furman

3 2

5

Gordon

3 1

4

Taylor

2 2

4

Gedeon

2 2

4

Wilson

2 2

4

Countess

1 3

4

Beyer

2 1

3

Bolden

1 2

3

Ross

0 3

3

Lewis

2 0

2

Wormley

2 0

2

Thomas

1 1

2

Strobel

1 1

2

Pipkins

0 2

2

Butt

1 0

1

Johnson

1 0

1

Heitzman

1 0

1

Godin

1 0

1

Ojemudia

1 0

1

Chesson

0 1

1

Wile

0 1

1

Jenkins

0 1

Totals

By EVERETT COOK Daily Sports Editor

Earlier this week, defensive coordinator Greg Mattison said that his defensive line could rotate three deep, even if that means constantly swapping players. Some would play more than others, but Mattison had enough faith in the second and third string players to consider them a part of the regular rotation. On Saturday, we saw what Mattison has been seeing all offseason — a deep, talented group strong enough to comfortably rotate more than ten players on the line even though it’s a group without much experience. In Michigan’s 59-9 drubbing of Central Michigan, the defense registered four sacks, two of them by the defensive line. The Wolverines posted four sacks in a game just once all of last season, when the defensive line contributed just 12 sacks all year. “(The defensive line) had a lot of energy,” said junior linebacker Desmond Morgan. “They were flying around. Stunts came a little bit cleaner and guys communicated a little bit better. It’s something we kind of pride ourselves on, having depth and rotating guys in as much as possible.” The Wolverines were at it from the get-go, rotating different defensive lineman in on just the second play of the game. The game officially became a blowout in the second half, but even while the game was still close, the rotation never stopped. Veterans like fifth-year senior Quinton Washington played. Rookies like redshirt freshman Willie Henry played. There were budding stars like junior Frank Clark and lesser knowns like junior Brennan Beyer, who got the first sack of his career against Central Michigan. (Beyer switched to linebacker from defensive end, but played on the line at times Saturday.) Mattison had them all in

FIVE THINGS From Page 1B

64

W e s t e r n

With a stable of rushers, defensive line rotation dominates Chippewas

1

34 30

M i c h i g a n

PASSING Player

C-A

Yds

TD

Niznak

11-22

131

0

Int 1

Kater

2-6

13

0

0

Totals

13-28

144

0

1

RUSHING Player

Att

Yds

Avg

Lg

Lavallii

10

52

5.2

15

TD 0

Garland

4

16

4.0

6

0

Tipton

4

10

2.5

7

0

Totals

29

66

2.3

15

0

the first touchdown of his career. He still looked big, but if Hoke and Co. have anything to do with it, he won’t be that big all year. Fifth-year senior Fitzgerald Toussaint has the starting job locked up. Green won’t be challenging for that spot any time soon. But after backup Drake Johnson was lost for the year with an ACL injury, Green has a good chance to see the field when the game is still close. 3. The kids are alright.

RECEIVING Player

No.

Yds

Avg

Lg

TD

Flory

4

79

19.8

43

0

Davis

2

28

14

21

0

Williams

1

17

17

17

0

Butler

2

Walker

1

Chapman

1

McCord

1

Totals

13

8

4

7

0

8

8

8

0

7

7

7

0

1

1

1

0

144

11.1

43

0

PUNTING Player

No. Yds Avg

Lg

Hogan

6 277 46.2

67

Totals

6 277 46.2

67

This team is going to be a strong national contender within the next two years, regardless of how this season goes. That’s how good these freshmen could be, especially when the highlyranked recruiting classes of 2014 and 2015 join. Including Green, 13 freshmen

PAUL SHERMAN/Daily

Sophomore defensive end Mario Ojemudia and junior linebacker Brennan Beyer highlight Michigan’s uncommon defensive depth.

there, in-and-out, almost like he had a limitless stream of depth to pull from. “It was good to get a lot of the young guys in,” Hoke said. “Willie Henry on defense and those guys. It will be good to watch some tape with them and really coach them off that tape.” The last time Mattison could remember this much depth on the defensive line was when he was a defensive coordinator at Florida. He had six first-string guys. Five of them were NFL Draft picks. Last week, Michigan coach Brady Hoke said he’s “never had that much on depth,” on the defensive line .

That doesn’t mean the unit played perfectly. Hoke mentioned a specific drive in the second quarter where the Chippewas rushed for 48 yards. Rush, first down, rush, first down, and so on. There were missed tackles and gaps in the line. It’s a young group that could afford to make some mistakes against a vastly inferior Central Michigan offensive line. Down the line, maybe next week against Notre Dame, that youth will rear its inexperienced head. “There’s discipline and things like that you need to play with,” Hoke said. “That’s something they’ll learn. They’ll learn a lot

or redshirt freshmen played on Saturday. They made an impact from the get-go, when Dymonte Thomas blocked Central Michigan’s first punt attempt and fifth-year senior Joe Reynolds returned it for the first touchdown of the game. Channing Stribling had the second-most tackles on the team, while Smith and Green split 10 carries on a 55-yard touchdown drive in the third quarter. Hoke also got backup quarterback Shane Morris some much-needed game reps. Morris had a tipped interception in the third quarter that was inches away from being a fantastic pass to fellow freshman tight end Jake Butt. That pass, like the rest of these young players, will come with time.

points. Again, it was Central Michigan, but it’s still a good sign. Next week, fifth-year strong safety Thomas Gordon is back from a suspension, but senior free safety Courtney Avery will miss another week or two, and captain Jake Ryan is out until mid-October. And yet, some of their replacements were key players on Saturday. Fifth-year senior Cam Gordon had two sacks in place of Ryan, while redshirt junior Josh Furman and sophomore Jarrod Wilson did a solid job from the safety spots. The defensive line rotated more than 10 players throughout the game, confirming defensive coordinator Greg Mattison’s idea that he could go three-deep on the defensive line. Many of the defensive linemen are inexperienced, but it’s still a talented group that will consistently rotate enough guys to stay fresh. This team’s depth is inexpe-

4. The depth is there. Michigan’s defense was missing three of its starters and the unit still only allowed nine

No. Yds Avg Lg

Davis

4

88

22

27

Lavalli

1

20

20

20

Totals

5 108 21.6 27

Solo Asst

Tot

Wilson

6 2

8

Cunningham

5 2

8

Frazier

5 2

7

Cherocci

2 5

7

Chapman

3 3

6

Benton

2 4

6

King

3 0

3

Greer

3 0

3

Walton

2 1

3

Hamilton

0 3

3

Wimberly

2

Lopez

2 0

2

Palmer

2 0

2

Smith

1 1

2

Davis

1 0

1

Gainer

1 0

1

Henry

1 0

1

Armstead

1 0

1

Butler

1 0

1

McClendon

1 0

1

Annese

1 0

1

Ricketts

1 0

1

Serpa

1 0

1

Zelinsky

1

0

1

Johnson

0 1

1

Losiniecki

0 1

1

Latta

0 1

1

0

rienced but talented, and could be a big factor late in the season. 5. Bold Prediction: Dennis Norfleet is going to win a game for Michigan this year. Man, he’s fast, and man, can he read the field. In the first quarter, the sophomore wide receiver/kick returner took a reverse handoff on a 38-yard gallop, and late in the game, he had a long punt return that was called back because of a blockin-the-back penalty. It still doesn’t seem that Michigan is entirely certain how to use Norfleet yet. He caught two passes along with his reverse and came close to breaking a kick return on more than one occasion. He might not be a factor in every game, but he’s too quick to not turn a game at one point this season. It might not be against Notre Dame, but before the season ends, a game will belong to Dennis Norfleet.

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TACKLES Player

off this game. We took 68 guys to the hotel last night and 36 of them were first and second year players. That’s a lot of babysitting and teaching going on. And it is babysitting.” But still, the defensive line depth speaks to the depth of the defense as a whole. Playing without three of its starters, the defense held Central Michigan to 210 yards and forced two turnovers. The biggest example: star linebacker Jake Ryan is out until mid-October. His replacement, fifth-year senior Cam Gordon, was a wrecking ball and finished with two sacks.

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September 3, 2013 — 5B

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Thursday Sept. 12 Sunday Sept. 15 Tuesday Sept. 17 Thursday Sept. 19

All meetings at 7:30 p.m. PAUL SHERMAN/Daily

Sophomore wide receiver Dennis Norfleet has the speed and athleticism to win a game for Michigan.

Make no mistake — Central Michigan is not a Big Ten team. Notre Dame will make this defense look a lot younger next Saturday, even with starting safety Thomas Gordon back from a one-game suspension. But for one Saturday, the first Saturday, it was important to see what the defensive line was capable of, even if it’s not the finished product. “You can say you gave up nine points, so I guess they responded,” Hoke said. “But did they respond well enough? This is all about winning a championship. If we get satisfied, for one effort, then we aren’t going to win it.”

NOTRE DAME From Page 1B of the older kids talk about what that atmosphere will be like.” But many of these true freshmen will take on a minor role. Redshirt sophomore cornerback Blake Countess recalled how during the Under the Lights game his freshman year, his principal job was to act as a support system for the older players. In the meantime, Hoke is using every resource at his fingertips to try and keep a sense of normalcy this week while still promoting the importance of the rivalry. “With technology today, you can show (the freshmen the atmosphere),” Hoke said. “Then you talk about not being distracted. Taking care of your job, being accountable to the teammates that you have on this team.” NOTE: Redshirt freshman running back Drake Johnson is out for the remainder of the season with a torn anterior cruciate ligament sustained during the Central Michigan game. This makes him the third player since the spring to suffer from an ACL injury. Saturday was Johnson’s first career game for the Wolverines. He had two carries for nine yards and one tackle on special teams. “You just hate it for Drake, but he’s as tough as anyone on this football team, and he will make it back from this,” Hoke said in a statement. “He worked so hard through his redshirt season and had a really good camp in backing up Fitz (Toussaint), not to mention he was a really valuable special teams player for us.” According to Hoke, Johnson was injured trying to make a tackle but was pushed from behind. He also said that the strength staff and the trainers would take a look at preventative measures to protect the team from more ACL injuries.


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Tuesday, September 3, 2013 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 7B


SportsTuesday

8B — September 3, 2013

Michigan grinds out draw at Bowling Green

The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

WOMEN’S SOCCER

Wolverines down 21st-ranked Aztecs By ALEX TAYLOR Daily Sports Writer

By JEREMY SUMMITT Daily Sports Editor

The Chaka Daley era of Michigan soccer continues to produce positive results. The Michigan men’s soccer team traveled to Bowling Green on Monday in hopes of avenging last year’s 2-0 loss in Ann Arbor, but the Wolverines were forced to settle for a 1-1 draw after the Falcons found a late equalizer in the 82nd minute. Senior midfielder Fabio Pereira netted his first goal of the season off a 25-yard strike in the 41st minute, giving Michigan the halftime advantage. A rebound from sophomore forward James Murphy trickled back to Pereira, who struck the ball into the top corner. “We got a little bit of a rhythm there at the end of the second half, and it resulted in a great goal by Fabio,” Daley said. “It was a grind the rest of the game.” But just as Michigan (1-0-1) crept ahead, a red card issued to redshirt junior forward Tyler Arnone neutralized its positive first half. A foul-laden prelude to Arnone’s infraction may very well have been at fault for a questionable ejection. Multiple Wolverines expressed the feeling that the head official lost control of the game early on. Down a man for 70 minutes, the Wolverines were still able to stymie Bowling Green (1-0-1) for a majority of the match, a credit to Michigan’s back line. Daley commented on senior defender Ezekiel Harris’s invaluable leadership and the growth of freshman defender Andre Morris as clear positives to take from this result. “This is the battle these guys need to go through to create

FILE PHOTO/Daily

Michigan soccer coach Chaka Daley wants his squad to be a blue-collar, grind-it-out team, and it was Monday.

some character and some quality,” Daley said. “I think they did a very solid job in the back.” The Falcons were unable to create many quality chances, and the late equalizer was the result of a scramble in the box that was eventually hammered home by midfielder Brandon Silva. Behind the back line, sophomore captain

Adam Grinwis recorded four saves. “It was a little unlucky by us,” Daley said. “We deserved to take the game. Bowling Green didn’t create a ton of chances and scored a bit fortunately at the end.” Last year, a lackluster result against Bowling Green reversed the fortunes of the team that resulted in

“It was a grind the rest of the game.”

the program’s first NCAA Tournament appearance since 2010. This time around, the young Wolverines squad, led by a core group of seniors, aims to embrace the gritty effort Daley instilled in his team at the beginning of last season. “I was talking to coach after the game, and it’s not a bad result,” Pereira said. “Especially in the beginning of the season, that’s something that builds character. In those circumstances, you’ve just got to fight. We showed that we’re a blue-collar team.”

With the ball in their own net, and not even two minutes off the clock, a stunned No. 14 Michigan women’s soccer team huddled in the center of the field, trying to regroup after giving up lightningquick goal Playing host to No. 21 San Diego State, the Wolverines (4-0) answered the Aztecs’ quick goal with a score of their own just two minutes later and never looked back on their way to a 3-1 victory. “It’s kind of tough when they go up so early in the game,” said senior forward Nkem Ezurike. “But I think we did a really good job of just getting organized and getting back to playing our game and getting a quick goal after that.” In the fourth minute, with San Diego State (1-2-1 overall) deep in the Wolverines’ territory, senior midfielder Meghan Toohey raced back and won a one-on-one battle for the ball. After winning the tackle, Michigan’s defense controlled the ball and then sent a long pass to Ezurike, who raced past a defender and slipped the ball to streaking senior midfielder Kayla Mannino. Mannino then crossed the ball into the box, where it was tipped by Aztec goalie Melanie Vaughn. But sophomore midfielder Christina Ordonez was there to pick up the rebound and knock the ball into the back of the net, tying the game at one. “I think it shows the confidence and character of this team,” said Michigan coach Greg Ryan. “If we go down, we’re going to get our goals.” After the tying goal, the game featured up-and-down play with most of the action happening in the final thirds of the field. Michigan had several over-the-top balls

that led to great scoring opportunities, with several shots hitting the goal posts, but the team couldn’t convert. “(San Diego State leaves) a lot of space that you can get into,” Ryan said. “We knew we would get those chances, and they eventually came for us.” Michigan was able to pull ahead in the 30th minute when freshman forward Madisson Lewis scored her third goal of the season. Junior midfielder Chloe Sosenko crossed a ball from the left side of the field that was deflected by Ezurike to the front of the net. Lewis beat her defender to the loose ball and slipped the ball past a charging keeper. “To get the second one, that really turned the game,” Ryan said. “At that point, we were starting to really dominate the game, and I felt like through most of the second half we continued to carry the game to them.” After halftime, the Wolverines began to dominate most of the play. Michigan was able to pepper Vaughn, eventually outshooting San Diego State 18-9. “The whole team played well,” Ezurike said. “It was a total team effort. We stuck to the game plan and kind of ran them into the ground, and everything just worked for us.” Ezurike, the center of action throughout the game, scored the Wolverines’ third and final goal of the game. In the 64th minute, the senior received a long throwin from Toohey that bounced perfectly over a defender, setting up Ezurike for a close-range goal, her third of the season. “It feels good,” Ezurike said of the win. “They are a very good team. They made it to the Sweet Sixteen last year and just to come out and get a win against them is good for us.”

Bartelstein pens e-book on Final Four run By DANIEL WASSERMAN Daily Sports Editor

Following his graduation from Michigan, former basketball captain Josh Bartelstein compiled the 80 blogs he wrote over the past three years into his own personal book — a makeshift diary journaling his experiences and the progression of the program. For months, that’s where the story of the ‘Bartelstein Blog’ was supposed to end — on Bartelstein’s coffee table. But thanks to a chance encounter between former Wolverine Zack Novak and entrepreneur Zack Price, the founder of Blog Into Book and a Michigan alum, Bartelstein’s blogs, along with a

host of interactive content, will be available to Michigan fans nationwide. ‘We On: Behind the Scenes of Michigan’s Final Four Run’ is set for an electronic release on Tuesday. For $7.99, fans can purchase the e-book on iTunes, Amazon, Kindle or from www.BlogIntoBook.com. Bartelstein, who is currently working for a real estate firm in Chicago while doing speaking engagements about creating winning atmospheres, can’t help but laugh at how far along the blog has come since he was first asked to write it prior to his sophomore season. “It’s really surreal to me,” Bartelstein said last week. “Never in a

million years did I think it would get to this point where it’s going to be a book.” The book begins with an introduction from Bartelstein, followed by a forward from Novak, who recounts his pivotal role in constructing the program from the ground up. It includes details of the various meetings he had with Michigan coach John Beilein and how and why certain programrelated decisions were made. Passages written by three of his former teammates — Trey Burke, Tim Hardaway Jr. and Stu Douglass — come next, before the book jumps into its central focus: the 2013-14 Final Four season. Each blog from the year is included chronologically, interspersed with new insights from Bartelstein. But the section Bartelstein calls the “best part” covers the Final Four. This section is centered around a 14-page insert, breaking the week down “minute by minute of what happened every day.” The coverage is comprehensive, from every perspective. Fans will not only see behind-the-scenes videos and pictures from the players’ and coaches’ vantage points, but from the eyes of fans in both Atlanta and Ann Arbor. “The biggest thing we miss as players, or even coaches, is we don’t get to experience what the fans are like during the games,” Bartelstein said. “We don’t get to see inside the Brown Jug or in the Diag when we beat these teams, so to have the videos of (students) dancing or at the bars — it gives you any perspective. So while I give you the perspective of what we were doing or the coaches were doing, you also get videos of what the fans were doing during the games. So if you weren’t in Atlanta or weren’t in Dallas, you’ll see it from every angle. “When you see those things, you can kind of put yourself back in the moment. It really gives you the chills.” Following the Final Four, the book transitions back into the beginnings of Bartelstein’s blogwriting career, which began with the 2010-11 campaign, when a young, upstart Wolverine squad, picked by some to finish last in the

TODD NEEDLE/Daily

Former Michigan captain Josh Bartelstein is releasing an e-book chronicling the team’s run through the Final Four last year.

Big Ten, made a shocking run into the NCAA Tournament. Bartelstein, who said he wouldn’t typically describe himself as nostalgic, repeatedly found himself in awe at the transformation the program underwent during his tenure. “The coolest thing for me is going back and reading it and seeing how far that we’ve come,” he said. “My favorite part will always be seeing how much progress this

program has made. “It was an amazing stretch of how quickly it happened and even crazier to see page by page.” A few months ago, Bartelstein felt lucky just to have so many memories bound together in one place. Now, he’s gotten the chance to dive so much deeper into the tournament run of his life, while in the process, experiencing an entirely different angle. And for a player that built his reputation

around sharing his inside perspective of the basketball program with the Wolverine fanbase, he’s happy to share one final time. “It’s just everything you could ever want to not just remember this year, but remember this program and what’s happened so recently,” Bartelstein said. “There are not many books that can really capture a program, written by players — key players — and this book is going to be that.”


The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

SportsTuesday

September 3, 2013 — 9B

Michigan sweep gives Rosen 500th win By ALEXA DETTELBACH Daily Sports Writer

The No. 7 Michigan volleyball team picked up where it left off last year in its first weekend back on the court, winning its first three games. The weekend culminated with Michigan coach mark Rosen earning his 500th career win. “One of the coolest things is that it’s about those people that won those matches, because I didn’t win any of those matches from the standpoint of playing,” Rosen said. “We’ve had a great group of people throughout my career, but certainly throughout our time here at Michigan.” The seventh-ranked Wolverines opened their season at the three-game tournament at the Xavier Invitational in Cincinnati. They faced off against Clemson and Xavier on Friday and Northern Kentucky on Saturday — and Michigan swept the competition without dropping a set. A dominant win over the Norse on Saturday gave Rosen his 500th career win as well as an invitational title for the Wolverines. Rosen is the fourth active Big Ten coach with 500 career wins. In his 15th season with Michigan, Rosen boasts a record of 291-177 and last season he led the program to its first Final Four appearance. Rosen’s players continued last season’s success on Saturday, where the Wolverines opened the first set against Northern Kentucky (0-3) hitting .342. A 7-1 run ultimately led them to winning 25-19 win in the first set. Ultimately, senior outside hitter Lexi Erwin paced Michigan (3-0) with 16 kills, while fellow-senior outside hitter Molly Toon added 11 kills and six digs. The Wolverines finished the match hitting .343 and committed just 11 errors. Junior setter Lexi Dannemiller earned the MVP award and senior middle blocker Jennifer Cross joined Dannemiller as a selection for the All-Tour-

PATRICK BARRON/Daily

Junior setter Lexi Dannemiller earned the MVP award of the Xavier Invitational over the weekend and said that the team looked “fearless.”

nament Team. “Jen was great,” Rosen said. “She played very consistent, dominating as an attacker and as a blocker. And Dannemiller was running the offense as well as anyone’s ever run it here. She’s just doing a great job. It’s really fun to watch her become such a mature player now that she has two years of college under her belt.” And just like they ended it, the Wolverines started the weekend on fire beating Clemson (1-2) in straight sets and hitting .476 in

the match’s first set. Sophomore middle blocker Krystalyn Goode had a career-high eight blocks and added four kills. “I thought all of our returners did a really nice job this weekend,” Rosen said. “We really made some changes in our lineup today to give our younger players some experience and I really wanted our older players to carry a big load to help that process and they did really well.” Overall, Michigan opened the tournament in dominant fashion,

hitting .315, while holding the Tigers to a meager -.033. Michigan has now won its season opener for the eighth straight season. Dannemiller led the Wolverines with 35 kills, five digs and two blocks in the first game against Clemson. Meanwhile, freshman middle blocker Abby Cole registered nine kills in her first college appearance. Cole, the top recruit for the Wolverines this season, is expected to contribute immediately and help fill the void of Claire McEl-

heny. The freshman also played in the second game against Xavier but did not see action in the third game because of a lingering knee problem that the team wants to monitor. “Abby looked great,” Dannemiller said. “She didn’t seem scared at all, she just wanted to go out and kill the team and she handled it really well, a lot better than I expected.” Added Rosen: “Abby Cole on the first series of the first match of her career she had two or three

blocks and a couple kills and really impacted the game very quickly and significantly and she continued that the first two matches.” Only one of the other freshmen — middle blocker Gabbie Bulic — saw playing time on Saturday. She contributed in the third game, registering nine kills and a .529 hitting percentage. “Gabbie played today and she did a really nice job and worked evenly into the college game,” Rosen said. “There are still some things she’s a little behind on, but offensively (she) did a great job and really did a nice job of getting better as the match went on.” The Wolverines continued to look like a top-10 squad against Xavier (2-1), winning the first set 25-18 while hitting .571. The Mountaineers opened the second set on a 6-1 run before Michigan climbed back to take the set 25-22. The Wolverines went on to win the match in straight sets for the second game in a row, completing the perfect first day of play. Against Xavier, Dannemiller led Michigan with 37 assists and eight digs, while sophomore defensive specialist Tiffany Morales added a team-high 12 digs. Leading the offense were senior captains Erwin and Cross, who had 11 and 10 kills, respectively. “I think we’re fearless,” Dannemiller said. “There wasn’t a moment in time in the last two matches that we ever doubted ourselves or got down on ourselves. We just looked really fearless.” Next up for the Wolverines is the Big Ten/Pac-12 Challenge, where they will face Oregon State on September 6 and Oregon on September 7 in Cliff Keen Arena for their home opener. “I’m excited,” Dannemiller said. “I think we have a great season ahead of us and we proved it after these last few matches. Just being able to play someone else for a change and see the success, it’s just really exciting.”


10B — Tuesday, September 3, 2013

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