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Q3 / 2020

WORLD FOOD DAY Full campaign on www.globalcause.co.uk

El alto de La Paz, Bolivia

Simon Laura and his daughter take care of the family garden, on the outskirts of El Alto de La Paz. In times of COVID-19 Bolivian urban farmers have rethought their ways of working. Simon Laura, a farmer on the outskirts of El Alto, has been producing vegetables for 10 years with the support of his wife and daughter.

© I M AG E P R OV I D E D BY FAO

Please help us feed hungry children affected by the pandemic

The impact of Covid-19 on South Africa’s struggling economy has left many poor households unable to provide their children with even a single nourishing daily meal. Breadline Africa’s Emergency Feeding Programme has now provided over 1 million meals to hungry children and vulnerable people. If you have enough today, please help us by donating any amount you can spare.

For more info or to donate visit www.breadlineafrica.org Barclays Acc: 90777501 Branch: 204451


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Tackling hunger more important than ever

IN THIS ISSUE

02

“It’s up to us to use the opportunity posed by COVID-19 to work as a global community for the good of everyone”

As COVID-19 forces the world to rethink systems of trade and commerce, we need to ensure that the most vulnerable are not forgotten.

Dr Maximo Torero Cullen Chief Economist, Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations

04 “COVID-19 has disrupted the food system in many ways, hitting producers, distributors, manufacturers, retailers and consumers” Francesco Branca MD, PhD, Director, Department of Nutrition for Health and Development (NHD), World Health Organization

06 “COVID-19 is a stark reminder of how ignoring biophysical risks can have catastrophic health and economic impacts at the global scale” Akanksha Khatri Head of Nature Action Agenda, World Economic Forum Senior Project Manager: Lucy Harris (lucy.harris@ mediaplanet.com) Business Development Manager: Kirsty Elliott Content and Production Manager: Kate Jarvis Managing Director: Alex Williams Head of Business Development: Ellie McGregor Digital Manager: Jenny Hyndman Designer: Thomas Kent Content and Social Editor: Harvey O’Donnell Paid Media Strategist: Ella Wiseman Mediaplanet contact information: Phone: +44 (0) 203 642 0737 E-mail: uk.info@mediaplanet.com All images supplied by Gettyimages, unless otherwise specified

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@MediaplanetUK

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Please recycle

T INTERVIEW WITH:

Dr Maximo Torero Cullen Chief Economist, Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations WRITTEN BY:

Kate Sharma

he fact is we are not on track to achieve the Sustainable Development Goal of zero hunger by 2030. Far from it. The number of hungry people in the world has been rising steadily for years and COVID- 19 has further compounded the problem. Today, 690 million people are going hungry - that’s nearly 1 in 10 people. If we add to that all other forms of malnutrition, we’re talking about 2 billion people, and if we include the people that can not afford healthy diets we are talking of 3 billion people. Plagues of locusts in East Africa and South America and, of course, COVID-19 have added to issues of climate change, conflict and economic slowdown. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations estimates that an additional 87 to 132 million people may experience food insecurity as a direct result of the pandemic. Access to food is now our main concern As we assess the problem, our main concern is now food access. Food systems have been shown to be resilient, but as we move into global recession, the most vulnerable in the poorest countries are at greatest risk. COVID-19 has also triggered changes in our food systems, notably e-commerce and increased automation. While developed countries have invested in adapting their systems, many developing nations don’t have the capacity. As change is pushed forward without sufficient planning, we’re already seeing the negative impact on many

labour markets and particularly on females, who account for the majority of workers in processing and packaging.

Plagues of locusts in East Africa and South America and, of course, COVID-19 have added to issues of climate change, conflict and economic slowdown.

Critical opportunity to protect those most vulnerable Stakeholders at all stages of the supply chain need to work together to reverse these negative trends. First and foremost, we need to accelerate efforts to ensure the most vulnerable have access to food, by identifying hot spots. We also need to improve efficiencies and reduce loss and waste – especially from harvest to wholesale. Programmes to improve infrastructure are already underway, but it’s key that they benefit everyone. Global and intra-regional trade also needs to be encouraged. One of every five calories that we eat has crossed at least one international border. Countries that depend on imported food are especially vulnerable, and there is more that can be done to encourage inter-regional trade. Of course, change needs to be underpinned by policies and tariff systems that support everyone. It’s up to us to use the opportunity posed by COVID-19 to work as a global community for the good of everyone. The views expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of FAO.

©Image provided by FAO


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Farmers are the frontline stewards of the environment Plenty of companies these days recognise the importance of sustainability, but few can care as much as people who actually live off the land and depend on the environment like the farmers who own Arla Foods.

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WRITTEN BY

Ash Amirahmadi Managing Director, Arla Foods UK

he farmers who own our cooperative are the first to feel passionate about animal welfare, soil health, water usage, wasted resources and changes to our climate since these have farreaching impacts on their lives and work. We know that we represent people for whom “the environment” is their livelihood. Our cooperative structure brings significant stability and allows us to build enduring relationships, not just with our farmers, but also with our customers and across the supply chain. We have the benefit of scale: we are owned by nearly 10,000 European farmers, of whom 2,300 are in the UK, making up more than a quarter of British dairy producers. Our decisions have a disproportionate impact on the environment, on animal welfare and in a host of other areas.

©Image provided by Arlo

Climate checks identify how we can reduce our carbon footprint We pledged, more than a year ago, to achieve net zero emissions across our business by 2050. As part of this, our owners have delivered on a commitment to complete ‘climate checks’ on every Arla farm, identifying where emissions can be reduced. We are looking closely, too, at carbon emissions from our processing sites and our transportation activities. Cutting emissions is only part of the challenge. We must also reduce plastic waste, make efficient use of water, cut lorry movements, improve local air quality, protect the health of the soil, achieve the highest possible standards of animal welfare and take into account the social and economic benefits of a thriving industry. Additionally, we strive to provide nutritious food for everyone.

Reducing levels of plastic used on farms We are making good progress, including via our ‘Arla 360’ programme. This involves working with major retailers to cut the amount of plastics used on farms, to promote pollinators and to ensure that every calf has a value. Through our ‘R500’ initiative we are helping farmers to learn from best practice in how they run their businesses. And, more widely, we are driving up standards in the use of inputs (such as fertilisers), in animal welfare and in many other areas. All of this means that Arla is making a leading contribution to improving the sustainability of our industry and it all starts from the fact we are owned by farmers, the frontline stewards of the environment.

Paid for by Arla

Changing the tide: sustainable food from the ocean ©GSI Member:Cermaq Canada.

G WRITTEN BY

Sophie Ryan CEO, Global Salmon Initiative

Paid for by Global Salmon Initiative

lobal food systems must change to deliver healthy and sustainable diets while respecting people and planet. Could the ocean be a solution to this challenge? The ocean covers 70% of the earth, yet only 5% is currently used for food production. While the ocean offers huge potential, 93% of wild fisheries are already fully or over fished. Farming fish offers an opportunity to better utilise the ocean for food while alleviating pressure on fisheries. Many of us acknowledge that salmon is good for us; it’s nutrient-dense, high in heart-healthy omega-3s, minerals and vitamins. Lesser known, is that farmed salmon is one of the most resource-efficient animal proteins; requiring less land, fresh water, food and energy to produce. This powerful combination of strong nutritional and environmental profiles makes farmed salmon an important part of healthy and sustainable food systems and diets. Responsible growth for positive change is imperative However, as a young and rapidly expanding sector, salmon farming has faced challenges and must now focus on responsible growth. Seeing their responsibility and ability to drive positive change, the Global Salmon Initiative (GSI) was established in 2013 by leading industry CEOs, to accelerate improvements at speed and scale to ensure salmon farming continues to offer a nutritious and planet-friendly food. And it is showing progress:

• 60% of GSI member production is now Aquaculture Stewardship Council certified • Launching the first industry-wide, independently audited Sustainability Report1 in the food sector • Driving improvements in sustainable sourcing and efficiency in feed ingredients2 • Facilitating a global problem-solving platform to deliver bestpractices3 for optimal fish health and welfare Building on this strong foundation, the GSI is setting new ambitious targets and introducing projects to address global challenges in climate and food security. This includes establishing a first-of-its-kind reporting framework of industry and supply chain climate impact in collaboration with the World Wildlife Fund. Projects promoting responsible plastic use, and the integration of circular economy approaches, will also be integrated. Through collaborative efforts to improve sustainability performance, transparency and innovation, GSI members help ensure farm-raised salmon is one of the most eco-efficient animal proteins available, while maintaining its high nutrient content and reducing pressure on the ocean’s resources. References 1. https://globalsalmoninitiative.org/en/sustainability-report/ 2. https://globalsalmoninitiative.org/files/documents/GSI_Case-Study_Commitment_Long_2020.pdf 3.https://globalsalmoninitiative.org/files/documents/GSI_Case-Study_Biosecurity_Long_2020.pdf

What is the GSI? The Global Salmon Initiative (GSI) is a leadership initiative established in 2013 by global farmed salmon producers focused on making significant progress on industry sustainability. Today, the GSI comprises 21 companies that are fully committed to realising a shared goal of providing a highly sustainable source of healthy food to feed a growing global population, whilst minimising our environmental footprint, and continuing to improve our social contribution.

Read more at globalsalmoninitiative.org


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When schools close, children go hungry

Food security is deteriorating

F

Despite us living in a world where food is in abundance, access to good quality food that meets nutritional and energy needs is not equal. And with the onset of COVID-19, food security is only getting worse.

or over 27 years, Breadline Africa has worked to support vulnerable children in South Africa, providing early childhood development infrastructure to disadvantaged communities.

Many South African children do not have adequate spaces to learn, so, by converting shipping containers into classrooms, libraries, kitchen and toilet units, we provide thousands of children with the opportunity to escape poverty through education. South Africa instituted one of the world’s strictest national lockdowns, closing all schools, businesses and non-essential services abruptly. We immediately realised the implications of these measures on an economy already severely strained with high unemployment. Thousands of households living hand-tomouth would have no means of putting food on the table. School closures meant that many children would be deprived of their school meals. Most South African children rely on their school for their main source of nutrition for the day. We were now facing a humanitarian crisis of hunger. Weekly food distributions to those in need We immediately launched an emergency feeding programme to ensure that these children received a warm daily meal. Dry ingredients and fresh vegetables were – and continue to be – distributed weekly to food stations.

The programme started with a handful of our beneficiary sites around the Western Cape. But, every week, we received more appeals for ingredients from partners and community members and the queues at the stations grew longer. Children as young as three years old lined up day after day with empty plastic containers. Within months we were providing over 82,000 weekly meals to 40 food stations across four provinces and passed the one million meal mark in July. As lockdown eased in August, schools gradually re-opened, but the pre-schools continue to face greater challenges. They are unable to meet social distancing. Centres require additional classrooms and hygienic kitchens and toilets to align with our mission of providing safe learning spaces. The lingering economic impact of this pandemic requires our food distribution programme to continue well into 2021 and will run in parallel to our infrastructure programme.

F INTERVIEW WITH

Francesco Branca MD, PhD Director, Department of Nutrition for Health and Development (NHD), World Health Organization WRITTEN BY:

Francesca Baker

ood security refers to having access to a healthy diet that provides nutrients required for growth and development, adequate living, and prevents chronic diseases. Francesco Branca, MD, PhD Director, Department of Nutrition for Health and Development (NHD), World Health Organization says: “The purchasing power of families has been reduced due to unemployment and loss of income, and many are simply unable to afford adequate diets. In fact, we estimate up to an additional 132 million people have gone into food insecurity as a result of COVID-19”. 690 million people affected by food security The latest reports from FAO, IFAD, UNICEF, WFP and WHO, released in May, indicate that nearly 690 million people are affected by falling food security. Although numbers vary in different regions, more than three billion people are unable to afford a healthy diet. COVID-19 has disrupted the food system in many ways, hitting producers, distributors, manufacturers, retailers and consumers. For many people fresh products were not available for long periods, as food workers were unable to work in production or distribution, impacting the entire supply chain. While this has been worse in countries already affected by malnutrition, “what we have seen, is a big impact in western countries as well, including the UK”. The goal to eliminate global malnutrition by 2030 has been disrupted by COVID-19 One of the 2030 United Nations

The pandemic demonstrated that our food systems are weak and inefficient. Sustainable Development Goals is to eliminate all forms of malnutrition by 2030. But, due to COVID-19, up to 15% more children under the age of five may be affected by malnutrition, or seven additional million, unless action is taken. Health services have also been affected by the pandemic, and health workers have had to shift focus, with many basic services disrupted. People are not taking the risk of going to health centres, meaning that, for the first time in 28 years, immunisation levels are down. At the same time as losing access to healthy and fresh food, and eating more sweetened or processed food, people are moving less so obesity levels are rising. “It particularly impacts children. School meals have been interrupted, which often provides the bulk of a healthy diet and physical activity could not take place,” says Branca. “Work is starting now on changing food systems. The pandemic demonstrated that our food systems are weak and inefficient. We need to meet the physical and biological needs of a growing population, whether it is public policy, making a healthy environment or investment from the public and private sector – food production can be more in line with people and the planet”.

We are eternally grateful to our donors who answered our call for support. If you would like to learn more about our work and to support our emergency feeding programme (£0.12 funds one meal), please visit www.breadlineafrica.org or contact our UK office at +44 (0) 1473 259048

WRITTEN BY

Marion Wagner Director, Breadline Africa ©paseven ©Image provided by Breadline Africa


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Food entrepreneurship in the age of coronavirus

ne thing is certain in this uncertain world: if consumers were taking food for granted six months ago, they’re not doing so now. COVID-19 has seen to that. It’s focussed our minds and made us think differently about food, from farm to fork. The pandemic has also put the global food system under huge pressure, exposing its greatest weaknesses. For example, how can food producers operate at full capacity with social distancing measures in place and a reduced workforce? If 2020 has shown us anything, it’s that we need food entrepreneurs – innovators who disrupt the food system with dynamic new products and services – more than ever. “The industry needs innovation,” agrees Andy Zynga, CEO of EIT Food, a European food innovation initiative, which aims to create a sustainable and future-proof food sector. “It’s the key to many of the challenges we face.”

rapeseed oil pressing. Its potential as a source of protein hasn’t been explored by the food industry yet but could provide a sustainable alternative to meat. Rapeseed oil is considered to be one of the healthiest oils available, and eating a healthier diet is particularly important during this crisis. Unfortunately, when COVID-19 struck, the company’s work was threatened by the pandemic. “We’d initiated various research and development projects but began to experience a slow down in decisionmaking from our partners,” says Magdalena Kozłowska, CEO of NapiFeryn BioTech. “That meant we were running into all sorts of challenges.” Kozłowska says the Bridge Fund investment is helping the company continue its R&D plans, and will ultimately lead to the commercialisation of novel, plantbased, functional food ingredients. Because these are derived from existing rapeseed production methods, it’s a solution that’s both healthy and sustainable. “Looking to the future, food entrepreneurs will have to balance the nutritional demands of a growing population without exploiting any more of the earth’s resources,” she notes. “We’ll need to use our current resources more efficiently.”

©STEVANOVICIGOR

The food industry has been put under huge pressure by the COVID-19 crisis. It’s why food entrepreneurship will play an important part in the sector’s future development.

O

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Looking to the future, food entrepreneurs will have to balance the nutritional demands of a growing population without exploiting any more of the earth’s resources.”

It’s why EIT Food – a consortium of key industry players, start-ups, research centres and universities from across Europe – is on a mission to encourage food entrepreneurship and innovation with a social purpose. Its community of stakeholders are collaborating with consumers and each other to develop new knowledge and technology-based products and services that will deliver a healthier and more sustainable lifestyle for all European citizens. Helping companies continue their R&D projects One way it’s doing this is by investing €5.4 million in 13 high-impact agrifood startups, via its COVID-19 Bridge Fund, and a further €6.17 million in 13 innovation projects, via its COVID-19 Rapid Response Call for Innovation projects. As part of EIT’s Crisis Response Initiative, this activity directly contributes to the European Union’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. One of the Bridge Fund’s beneficiaries is NapiFeryn BioTech, a Polish startup which extracts protein from the side streams and waste generated in

COVID-19 and the future of the food industry Meanwhile, SwissDeCode – a Lausannebased company which develops rapid on-site tests for bacteria and viruses – is using the funding it has received from EIT Food to build a COVID-19 diagnostic platform. Called COVID-19 BEAMitup, it will provide farmers, food manufacturers and other parts of the food value chain with coronavirus test results in just 30 minutes. “Food entrepreneurs are passionate about making a difference,” says Brij Sahi, Co-founder and CEO of SwissDeCode. “I have a saying which is: ‘Never stop learning, growing and building.’” Indeed that’s the only attitude to have, insists Sahi, because COVID-19 won’t be the last virus the world will have to deal with. “As an industry, we’ll need to react very quickly when another virus occurs in the future,” he says, noting that big players, as well as small, can’t afford another downturn. “The dynamics of the food industry have changed forever because of COVID-19. Virus awareness and awareness of food safety has increased among all the major stakeholders and decision-makers in the food sector. As a result, it’s now easier to get a corporate organisation interested in innovation projects than it was in the past.” Despite the problems caused by the pandemic, Andy Zynga is optimistic about the future of the food sector. “Food entrepreneurship used to be under-developed,” he says. “But now we’re seeing an explosion of innovation and entrepreneurship, so this is an encouraging time for the industry. I’m so glad we’re bringing all of these great minds together to tackle the crisis.”

INTERVIEW WITH

Andy Zynga CEO, EIT Food

INTERVIEW WITH

Magdalena Kozłowska CEO, NapiFeryn BioTech

INTERVIEW WITH

Brij Sahi Co-founder and CEO, SwissDeCode

WRITTEN BY

Tony Greenway

Read more at eitfood.eu Paid for by EIT Food


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Putting nature first is good for business

Food fortification is critical to pandemic response

T

he COVID-19 pandemic has stunned and paralysed nations around the world. In even the wealthiest countries, health systems have been overwhelmed and lockdown measures have left many people with little to no income, struggling to pay bills and buy food. Low- and middleincome countries are facing similar but greater challenges, compounded by already difficult conditions of poverty and inequality. This is resulting in a second crisis – a malnutrition crisis – that could hinder recovery efforts and undo years of hard-won development gains.

COVID-19 is a stark reminder of how ignoring biophysical risks can have catastrophic health and economic impacts at the global scale.

H

ow we use the land and ocean currently endangers 72% of threatened or nearthreatened species, but, there are wins for business and nature if we start to change our ways. By implementing nature-positive solutions across this system, we could create 191 million jobs and $3.6 trillion in business opportunities by 2030. There are four ways we can secure this transition.

The availability of food is not enough to prevent malnutrition The malnutrition crisis underlies the growing food crisis. With reduced purchasing power, many households buy the cheapest calories they can find, usually staples like rice, wheat flour or maize, that will satiate hunger but will not meet their nutritional needs. While they may feel full, they may be malnourished, jeopardising their current and future health and development. During the pandemic, food fortification is an important tool for reaching large numbers of people with better nutrition. Fortifying staple foods with critical vitamins and micronutrients, like iron, zinc, vitamin B12 and folic acid, can help to improve the nutrition status of entire populations. This is especially true for women and girls, who face the most barriers in accessing good nutrition and are twice as likely as men and boys to be malnourished. The United Kingdom has been a driver of development and large-scale food fortification, and this leadership must continue today to guarantee a healthy future tomorrow.

Sustainable farming and fishing could generate billions Firstly, the ever-expanding footprint of farming, fishing and ranching is unsustainable. Some 75% of the world’s food comes from 12 plant and five animal species. Animal products provide 18% of calories but take up 80% of farmland. A more diversified diet of vegetables and fruits can create $310 billion in business opportunities. To secure this transition, the first and immediate step is to stabilise and reduce the footprint of agriculture and fishing on ecosystems while restoring degraded ecosystems to return them to nature. Agriculture needs to become sustainable and regenerative Second, the food and land use system could significantly benefit from a fundamental shift towards productive and regenerative agriculture. Transforming agricultural landscapes and farming practices for both food

Poor nutrition increases the risk of contracting illnesses The frontline of any country’s health system is the immune systems of its people. Poor nutrition prevents the brain from developing fully, the body from growing properly, and the immune system from functioning effectively, which exposes people to lifelong disease and disability. Food fortification can deliver micronutrients that help strengthen the immune system, resulting in enhanced resistance to infection and faster recovery from infection. While the world is occupied by the emergency response to COVID-19, we must not lose sight of the long-term goal to build economies and health systems resilient and robust enough to withstand future crises. Food fortification and other nutrition interventions build better health and stronger immune systems now and ensure proper development later so people can not only survive – they can thrive.

Dr Noor Khan Technical Director, Food Fortification Program, Pakistan

©RIDOFRANZ

WRITTEN BY

WRITTEN BY

Akanksha Khatri Head of Nature Action Agenda, World Economic Forum

upholding biologically viable quotas and limiting fishing to specific zones.

It takes five times the effort to catch the same amount of fish now as it did in 1950. and non-food agriculture through a combination of traditional farming techniques, advanced precision technologies, and bio-based inputs can increase biodiversity, enrichen soils, improve water management and enhance ecosystem services while improving yields. Over 4.3 million jobs and $195 billion in business opportunities can come from precision-agriculture technologies by 2030. With 40% improvements in yields expected, investments could yield returns of over 10%. Current fishing practices are depleting wild fish stocks Thirdly, it takes five times the effort to catch the same amount of fish now as it did in 1950. If the ‘business as usual’ approach continues, wild fish stocks will decline by 15%. This will cost the industry $83 billion. Sustainable ecosystem management is one way to tap into a $40 billion opportunity for the maritime industry worldwide. To fulfil this potential will require managing wild fisheries sustainably by respecting and

Sustainable forest management is “critical” Fourth, given the outsized impact of logging on biodiversity, a transition to sustainable management of forests is critical. Techniques such as reducedimpact logging, improved harvest planning and precision forestry can allow forests to flourish while meeting the world’s resource needs. However, a successful transition will rely on finding just and equitable solutions that address the land rights of indigenous peoples and local communities. Changes are vital to support a growing global population These first four transitions need to happen in the context of a rapidly expanding global population. Based on current consumption trends, global food production would need to increase by between 50% and 98% by 2050 from 2005 levels. This increase would jeopardize the ambition for the food, land and ocean use system to both share with and spare nature. By integrating transparency, traceability and increased collaboration into supply chains, stakeholders can improve sustainable sourcing; eliminate illegality; reduce food and material loss; improve safety and quality; and ensure that consumers, regulators and investors are able to make informed decisions that, in turn, reinforce responsible production.


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WORLD FOOD DAY

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A promotional supplement distributed on behalf of Mediaplanet, which takes sole responsibility for its contents | MEDIAPLANET

Today, 690 million people are going hungry - that’s nearly one in 10 people. If we add to that all other forms of malnutrition, we’re talking about two billion people, and if we include the people that can not afford healthy diets we are talking of three billion people. Dr Maximo Torero Cullen Chief Economist, Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations

©dmbaker

Profile for Mediaplanet UK&IE

World Food Day - Q3 2020  

This Mediaplanet campaign launched on 17-Sep 2020 on www.globalcause.co.uk, and distributed with the Guardian newspaper.

World Food Day - Q3 2020  

This Mediaplanet campaign launched on 17-Sep 2020 on www.globalcause.co.uk, and distributed with the Guardian newspaper.

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