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ARTSEVENTSTASTE d e c e m b e r / 2 0 1 2

w w w . i c o n w a y . n e t

FASHIONMISTA AT THE GYM SHORT SHORTS? SHIRTLESS WORKOUT? SHOWER CHITCHAT?

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ICON FOUND THE COOLEST GIFTS IN CONWAY

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GONE IN 60 REFURRL TAKES COMPETITION

GIVING BACK

MAKE A DIFFERENCE THIS HOLIDAY SEASON


ARTSEVENTSTASTE E F D F N C F S       t  X X X  J D P O X B Z  O F U

GYM ETIQUETTE FASHIONMISTA’S DOS AND DON’TS

ON THE COVER Shopping local: Gordo Gallery has this acrylic painting on canvas by local artist Kris Baxter.

out SHOPPING BUY IT LOCAL GONE IN 60 REFURRL TAKES COMPETITION

rouabdout

ROUND

contents

ABOUT

GIVING BACK

MAKE A DIFFERENCE THIS HOLIDAY SEASON

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tech: iPad mini review.

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charity: Operation Christmas Child and

Be a Santa to a Senior.

13

fashionmista: Dos and Don’ts in the

gym.

16

refurrl: The newest idea.

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gifts: Buying local forlife the holidays. art food

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music: Learning to play.

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Conway happenings: iCon has you covered with our events calendar. Check out photos from past area events. PAGES 4-9.

NDABOUT

icontech

Apple downsizes with iPad mini.

conway

Gone in 60 seconds competition winner

STAFF CREATIVE DIRECTOR / STEWART COLE PUBLICATION SALES MANAGER / RHONDA OVERBEY GRAPHIC ARTISTS / JAY PRINCE & KELLIE MCANULTY SPECIAL EVENTS / LEAH BROWN FEEDBACK@ICONWAY.NET ADVERTISING SALES JESICA TALBERT • BETSEY WILLBANKS SARAH ALLEN • TARA SANDERS Follow us on Twitter: @iconwaymagazine www.iconway.net Check out our Facebook page for weekly calendar of events.

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DECEMBER 2012 / VOL. 2, ISSUE 11

fashionmista

Gym etiquette

COMMENTS? We want your feedback! Write to us at feedback@iconway.net. iCon, Conway City Magazine, is a publication of the Log Cabin Democrat. All rights reserved. iCon is published monthly. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to iCon, Conway City Magazine P.O. Box 969 Conway, AR 72033 For subscriber service, please call (501) 327-6621 Unauthorized use of materials contained herein is strictly prohibited. 3


UCA Men’s Basketball 11.13 {Tuesday} UCA vs Hendrix, 7 p.m. At UCA.

Writing as Remedy 11.13 {Tuesday} 7:30 p.m. Reves Recital Hall Hendrix College Campus. Mark Richard is an award-winning novelist, short story writer, poet, and screenwriter. Having spent much of his childhood in charity hospitals, he turned to reading for solace and to writing for therapy, becoming a champion to the broken and disabled. His work has appeared in numerous publications, and he is the recipient of many awards, including the PEN/Hemingway Award, a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, and Whiting Foundation Writer’s Award. He currently teaches at the University of Southern California. Admission: Free Contact: Henryetta Vanaman Phone: 501-450-4597 Email: vanaman@ hendrix.edu. CBC Men’s Wrestling 11.15 {Thursday} CBC Men’s Wrestling vs Oklahoma City University, 7 p.m. At CBC.

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ICONEVENTS

n SUBMIT AN EVENT TO iCON: FEEDBACK@ICONWAY.NET

Dazzle Daze 11.15-11.17 {Thursday-Saturday} 6-9 p.m. Conway Expo Center. The 11th annual Dazzle Daze will open Thursday, Nov. 15, at the Conway Expo Center with Girls Nite Out, from 6 to 9 pm. The night event features live jazz music by Rodney Block and The Real Music Lovers , a Chicks Who Click photo sessions and a variety of appetizers by Conway Chef Jill McCollum. And oh yes, don’t forget about early-bird, holiday shopping with more than 100 vendors. Clothing, jewelry, holiday food delicacies, and children’s items are just part of a large assortment of treats for the holiday gift seeker who doesn’t want to wait for Black Friday. CBC Women’s Basketball 11.17 {Saturday} CBC Women’s basketball vs University of the Ozark, 7 p.m. At CBC.

Chamber Players Concert 11.18 {Sunday} 7:30 Reves Recital Hall, Hendrix College. The Chamber Players will perform The Sun Quartets, Opus 20, of Joseph Haydn as part of the Exploring Haydn Series. Also fea-

in partnership with

4

tured will be music for winds by Mozart and the Hendrix jazz combo. Sponsor: Department of Music (501) 450-1422.

Hendrix Chamber Orchestra 11.19 {Monday} 7:30 p.m. At Reves Recital Hall on Hendrix College Campus. Hendrix Men’s Basketball 11.20 {Tuesday} Hendrix Men’s Basketball vs Ozarks, 8 p.m. At Hendrix College.

Hendrix Women’s Basketball 11.20 {Tuesday} Hendrix Women’s Basketball vs Ozarks, 6 p.m. At Hendrix College. UCA Men’s Basketball 11.21 {Wednesday} UCA Men’s basketball vs Arkansas State University, 7 p.m. At UCA. UCA Men’s Basketball 11.24 {Saturday} UCA Men’s basketball vs Sacramento State, 7 p.m. At UCA.


{

2013 barcamp is coming

}

signup.barcampconway.com

HOME SCHOOL BAND 11.26 {Monday} Community information meeting for a new home school band program. 6:30 p.m. at Preston Palmer Studios, 2105 Harkrider. White Christmas 11.28-12.30 {Wednesday-Sunday} 7 p.m. Arkansas Repertory Theatre, 601 Main Street, Little Rock, AR. Based Upon The Paramount Pictures Film Written For The Screen By Norman Krasna Norman Panama and Melvin Frank Music and Lyrics By Irving Berlin Book By David Ives And Paul Blake “Just like the ones you used to know...” Celebrate the holidays with a musical as fresh as the season’s first snow. You’ll want to snuggle up with the entire family for this funny and heartwarming musical adaptation of the perennially popular Paramount Pictures classic, White Christmas. Candlelight Carol Services 11.29-12.02 { Thursday-Sunday} 7:30 pm. Greene Chapel, Hendrix College. The Christmas story presented through scripture and music. Reservations are required and can be made by calling 501-450-1495 beginning November 19. COMMUNITY CHOIR REHEARSAL 11.29 {Thursday} Community choir rehearsal at Preston Palmer Studios, 6-8 p.m. Everyone in the community is invited to participate. Performances will be for local nursing homes in early to mid December. MUSIC WORKSHOP 12.01 {Saturday} Bluegrass/roots musicworkshop with Jonathan Trawick. 10 a.m. with a lunch at Preston Palmer Studios, 2105 Harkrider. Cost $25. CSO Tinsel and Tutus Holiday Concert 12.01 {Saturday} 7 p.m. Reynolds Performance Hall, UCA Campus. The Con-

way Symphony Orchestra welcomes the Arkansas Festival Ballet for another holiday extravaganza, with selections from The Nutcracker and all your seasonal favorites. Tickets 501-450-3265, www.conwaysymphony.org. Mozart’s La Clemenza di Tito 12.02 {Sunday} 2 p.m. Reynolds Performance Hall, UCA Campus. The virtuosic Elîna Garanèa sings Sesto in Mozart’s drama set in ancient Rome. Giuseppe Filianoti is the noble Tito and Barbara Frittoli is Vitellia, in this handsome revival of one of the composer’s final masterpieces. Harry Bicket conducts. Business After Hours 12.03 {Monday} 5-6:30 p.m. First Service Bank 2475 Washington Ave. Conway. Bring your business card to network and to register for door prizes. Complimentary hors d’ oeuvres will be served. UCA Women’s Basketball 12.04 {Tuesday} UCA Women’s basketball vs Central Baptist College, 7 p.m. At UCA. FESTIVAL OF ONE ACT PLAYS 12.04-12.06 {Tuesday-Thursday} 7:30 p.m. Bridges/Larson Theatre Snow Fine Arts Center, UCA Campus. One of our most popular events, this series includes 3-4 different plays each evening, produced and directed by our 2012 Directing Class and involving over 50 cast and crew members. Play titles will be available online by November 15. Some content may be for adults only. Admission is free. Tickets are not required and seats are not reserved. UCA Men’s Basketball 12.05 {Wednesday} UCA Men’s basketball vs Tennessee-Martin, 7 p.m. At UCA.

5


COMMUNITY CHOIR REHEARSAL 12.06 {Thursday} Community choir rehearsal at Preston Palmer Studios, 6-8 p.m. Everyone in the community is invited to participate. Performances will be for local nursing homes in early to mid December. Junior Auxiliary of Conway Frozen Feet 5K at Conway High School 12.08 {Saturday} 8:30 a.m.-noon. The Junior Auxiliary of Conway hosts its first annual Frozen Feet 5K Race, to be held at the Conway High School track. Costumes, jingle bells, hot chocolate, and jolly old St. Nick are just a few reasons this event will be full of holiday spirit and fun for children and adults of all ages. Downtown Conway Christmas Celebration 12.08 {Saturday} Celebrate the Season in Downtown Conway. There will be special events planned for the entire day with stores hosting hot chocolate stations and other yummy surprises. Plus the UCA Euphonium group will present their annual “Tuba Christmas” concert on the sidewalk in Downtown Conway. Then the Conway Christmas Parade, sponsored by “Relay For Life” will kickoff at 5 p.m. down Front Street! A Celtic Christmas 12.09 {Sunday} 3 p.m. Reynolds Performance Hall, UCA Campus. Celtic Crossroads is an explosion of youthful energy and dazzling musicianship. Celtic Crossroads abounds with fusions of traditional Irish music, bluegrass, gypsy and jazz, pulsating with the rhythms of exciting Irish dance percussion. Spontaneous mid show ovations are the norm, and enraptured Celtic Crossroads audiences are always compelled to shout, and SHOUT for more. Their Christmas show brings a delightful blend of Celtic and traditional Christmas spirit to the stage. COMMUNITY CHOIR REHEARSAL 12.13 {Thursday} Community choir rehearsal at Preston Palmer Studios, 6-8 p.m. Everyone in the community is invited to participate. Performances will be for local nursing homes in early to mid December. Hendrix Women’s Basketball 12.15 {Saturday} Hendrix Women’s basketball vs Austin College, 2 p.m. At Hendrix. Hendrix Men’s Basketball 12.15 {Saturday} Hendrix Men’s basketball vs Austin College, 4 p.m. At Hendrix. Hendrix Women’s Basketball 12.16 {Sunday} Hendrix Women’s basketball vs Lagrange, 3 p.m. At Hendrix. Literature of Prescription; Charlotte Perkins Gilman and ‘The Yellow Wall-Paper’ 12.17 {Monday} 8 a.m. Bailey Library, Hendrix College Campus. This traveling exhibit from the

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UCA HOMECOMING BONFIRE

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National Library of Medicine explores the role that gender has played in the treatment of mental illness and the development of medicine by using Gilman’s work, as well as primary source material, to examine the famous short story which served as an indictment of the medical profession and the social conventions restricting women professionally and creatively. UCA Women’s Basketball 12.18 {Tuesday} UCA Women’s Basketball vs Southern Arkansas University, 7 p.m. At UCA. Faulkner County Day School’s Racin’ New Year’s Eve 5k 12.29 {Saturday} 10 a.m. Faulkner County Day School 1700 South Blvd. Conway, Ar. Cost: $20 until 12/3/2012 and $25 after 12/3/2012; T-shirt only $15 until 12/3/2012 and $20 after 12/3/2012 For more information, please contact Teresa Little at 329-8102 between 8:00 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. UCA Men’s Basketball 12.31 {Monday} UCA Men’s basketball vs Central Baptist, 3 p.m at UCA. Christmas Holiday Concert 12.04 {Tuesday} The Conway Men’s Chorus will present its 15th annual Christmas Holiday Concert at 7 p.m. at Reynolds Performance Hall on the campus of the University of Central Arkansas in Conway. Music will be a wide variety of seasonal selections from sacred to popular. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., with free admission and parking. For more information, go to www.conwaymenschorus.org.

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ICONTECH IPAD MINI

BY PETER SVENSSON

HELLO AGAIN I bet the iPad Mini is going to be on a lot of wish lists this holiday season. I also bet that for a lot of people, it’s not going to be the best choice. It’s beautiful and light, but Apple made a big compromise in the design, one that means that buyers should look closely at the competition before deciding. Starting at $329, the iPad Mini is the cheapest iPad. The screen is a third smaller than the regular iPads, and it sits in an exquisitely machined aluminum body. It weighs just 11 ounces — half as much as a full-size iPad — making it easier to hold in one hand. It’s just under 8 inches long and less than a third of an inch thick, so it fits easily into a handbag. The issue is the screen quality. Apple has been on the forefront of a move toward sharper, more colorful screens. It calls them “Retina” displays because the pixels — the little light-emitting squares that make up the screen — are so small that they blend together almost seamlessly in our eyes, removing the impression that we’re watching a grid of discrete elements. The iPad Mini doesn’t have a Retina screen. By the standards of last year, it’s a good screen, with the same number of pixels as the first iPad and the iPad 2. The latest full-size iPad has four times as many pixels, and it really shows. By comparison, the iPad Mini’s screen looks coarse. It looks dull, too, because it doesn’t have the same color-boosting technology that the fullsize model has. This is not an entirely fair comparison, as the full-size iPad starts at $499 and weighs twice as much. The real issue is that this year, there are other tablets that are cheaper than the iPad Mini, weigh only slightly more and still have better screens. Amazon.com Inc.’s Kindle Fire HD costs $199 and has about the same overall size as the Mini. While the Kindle’s screen is somewhat smaller (leaving a bigger frame around the edges), it is also sharper, with 30 percent more pixels than the Mini. Colors are slightly brighter, too. Barnes & Noble Inc.’s Nook HD costs $229 for a comparable model with 16 gigabytes of storage and has a screen that’s even sharper than the Kindle HD’s. It’s got 65 percent more pixels than the iPad Mini. (There’s a $199 model with half the memory, and the storage space can be expanded with inexpensive memory cards.) Why do tablets from two companies chiefly known as book stores beat Apple’s latest for screen quality? Sharper screens are darker, requiring a more powerful backlight to appear bright. That, in turn, would have forced an increase in the battery size. That’s the reason the first iPad with a Retina

display was thicker and heavier than the iPad 2. So to keep the iPad Mini thin while matching the 10-hour battery life of the bigger iPads, Apple had to compromise on the display. This can’t last, though. By next year, it will likely be even more obvious that Apple is seriously behind in screen quality on its small tablet, and it will have to upgrade to a Retina display somehow. That means this first-generation iPad Mini will look old pretty fast. The display causes a few other problems, too. One is that when you run iPhone apps on the Mini, it uses the coarsest version of the graphics for that app — the version designed for iPhones up to the 2009 model, the 3GS. You can blow the app up to fill more of the screen, but it looks pretty ugly. The full-size iPad uses the higher-quality Retina graphics when running iPhone apps, and it looks much better. Some apps adapted for the iPad screen don’t display that well on

the Mini screen, either, because of the smaller size. Buttons can be too small to hit accurately, bringing to mind Steve Jobs’ 2010 comments about smaller tablets. The late Apple founder was of the vociferous opinion that the regular iPad was the smallest size that was also friendly to use. In some apps, text on the Mini is too small to be comfortably read — the section fronts in The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal apps are examples of this. Of course, in some other respects, the iPad Mini outdoes the Fire and the Nook, so it isn’t just the tablet for the buyer who needs the prettiest and the thinnest. In particular, the Mini is a $329 entry ticket to the wonderful world of iPad and iPhone apps. For quality and quantity, it beats all the other app stores. In short, the iPad Mini is more versatile than the competition, and I’m sure it will please a lot of people. But take a look at the competition first, and figure that by next year, we’ll see something from Apple that looks a lot better.

ABOUT THE IPAD MINI

The base model of the iPad Mini costs $329 and comes with 16 gigabytes of storage. A 32 GB model goes for $429 and 64 GB for $529. Soon, you’ll be able to get versions that can connect through cellular networks, not just Wi-Fi. Add $130 to the price. 9


ICONCHARITY the

GIFT of

giving

HOLIDAYS OFFER OPPORTUNITY TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE

WRAP A SHOE BOX & GET PACKING Operation Christmas Child is a worldwide children’s project of Samaritan’s Purse that uses simple gift-filled shoe boxes to let hurting children know that they are loved and not forgotten. As of 2012, OCC has reached more than 93,000,000 children since 1993 and is hoping to pass the 100 million mark this collection season. WHAT CAN YOU DO? Right now kids, families, churches, scout troops, schools, civic clubs and businesses are filling their shoe boxes. We recommend packing a mix of things from school supplies, clothing, toys and hygiene items. The items that should not be shipped are food, liquids and war-type items. WHERE/WHEN IS DROP OFF? During National Collection Week, Nov. 12-18, the area drop off location for completed (filled) shoe boxes is 1051 Hogan Lane (next to Plant Outlet). Drop off hours are from 10-2 Monday-Saturday, 7-9 p.m. Wednesday and 1-7 on Sunday. WHO IS INVOLVED? Millions Worldwide! Generous kids, families, businesses and organizations in all 50 states and Puerto Rico and 10 additional countries will fill more than 8 million shoe boxes with school supplies, toys, necessity items, family photos and notes of encouragement for needy children. Some 140,000 volunteers in the United States, bringing the total to more than 500,000 volunteers worldwide, will then help prepare the boxes for transport to distant lands.

10

WHERE DO BOXES GO? Operation Christmas Child shoe box gifts are collected in the United States, Canada, Australia, Austria, Finland, Germany, Ireland, New Zealand, Spain, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. Samaritan’s Purse and its national partners will hand-deliver each of the 8.5 million shoe box gifts to children in more than 100 countries on six continents. Operation Christmas Child uses tracking technology that allows donors to “follow” their box to the destination country where it will be hand-delivered to a child in need. To register shoe box gifts and find out to which country they are delivered, use the EZ Give donation form found at www. samaritanspurse.org. HOW ARE THEY DELIVERED? By land, air, sea and elephant. After they are collected at more than 2,900 drop-off locations, shoe box gifts are prepared for overseas shipment in seven major centers across the United States. The shoe box gifts are then loaded onto trucks, sea containers and sometimes even the world’s largest cargo planes bound for the far reaches of the earth. Once the gifts are transported to countries around the world, Samaritan’s Purse teams and partners distribute them by bus, train, helicopter, boat, elephant, mule and even dog sled. MORE INFO For more information visit www.samaritanspurse.org/occ or contact the local coordinator, Dawn Wilson, at 501-2690434.


{

}

HOW ARE YOU GIVING BACK? Let us know at feedback@iconway.net.

HOLIDAY PROGRAM HELPS FAULKNER COUNTY SENIORS Be a Santa to a Senior, the popular campaign that in 2011 delivered more than 200 gifts to local needy seniors, is being planned again this holiday season as older adults continue to face poverty and loneliness. The area office of the Home Instead Senior Care network, the world’s largest provider of non-medical in-home care and companionship services for older adults, is joining Conway Regional Medical Center and local senior-care agencies and non-profit organizations to provide gifts and companionship to seniors who otherwise might not receive either. “Seniors faced with medical bills and the high cost of living can find they have little left at the end of the year,” said Dan Fry, owner of the Home Instead Senior Care office serving Pope, Conway, Faulkner, Perry, Van Buren and Cleburne Counties. “That’s not the only issue, though. Needs may become magnified for so many living alone with no one to share their problems.” According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 9 percent of U.S. seniors 65 and older are living in poverty, and 27 percent are widowed. Here’s how to help these struggling seniors: Pick up ornaments with the first names of seniors and their gift requests from Christmas trees, which will be up at Conway Regional Medical Center Nov. 12-Dec. 10. Buy items on the list and return them unwrapped to the hospital, along with the ornaments attached. A community gift-wrapping event, when hundreds of the presents will be wrapped, will be held at 3 p.m., Dec. 17 at the Conway Senior Wellness & Activity Center. For more information about the program, visit www.BeASantaToASenior.com or call 888.764.1814. 11


12


FASHIONMISTA GYM ETIQUETTE

BY DERRICK BARNHART stobyman@yahoo.com

DON’T BE THIS GUY

Fashionmista says...

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Fashionmista says...

DO ... AND DO NOT

Keep Your Shirt on

3

If you’re exercising indoors, you should be wearing a shirt. Some fitness clubs have polices against working out bare-chested. If you can go shirtless, keep a towel on you to wipe up sweat quickly.

7

DON’T WEAR SHORT SHORTS

Never wear high-cut running shorts — the only exception is if you’re sticking to the treadmill. Some guys have shorts that will ride up and expose parts that should not be seen. You want them to hit the knee or slightly below.

DON’T RE-WEAR

7

Change your shirt after every workout and your shorts after every two days. Body heat during a workout can bring back baked-in odor from your previous gym visit. Do a sniff test of your gear. I suggest choosing high-tech, lightweight antibacterial fitness wear, which draws moisture away from your skin to reduce B.O.

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DO TIME YOURSELF

3

DON’T TUNE OUT

7

do put the cell away

3

Thirty Seconds — the time you should allow yourself to recover between sets on a weight machine. Taking any longer can make you a machine hog. If you need more of breather, get up and allow others a turn.

Listening to headphones in a class is insulting and distracting to the instructor. You will be missing out on necessary guidance and fitness benefits.

Using your cell phone on the exercise floor, in the locker rooms or during class is extremely inconsiderate. Excuse yourself only for important calls. Take it to the lounge, front desk or a conference area.

7

DOn’t USE THE MIRRORS

Club Mirrors are monitoring your form. Save the vanity for home. No one wants to see you spending time in the mirror checking out yourself, taking pictures, grooming and flexing. It simply looks cheesy!!

DO TIP

3

There’s no rule requiring you to tip your trainer at the conclusion of a session or when you have reached a specific fitness goal, but chances are he or she will be grateful for it.

3

do OFFER HELP (POLITELY)

If you see someone struggling with a set, quietly and encouragingly ask if you can lend them a hand. It creates a sense of community.


POWER FRUITS EVERY GENT SHOULD EAT

7

DON’T OFFER ADVICE (RUDELY)

Unless you’re being paid as a personal trainer, keep tips to yourself. For one thing, you don’t know members’ goals and limitations.

DO LIMIT EXPOSURE

3

Nudity is par for the course in a locker room, but keep it in check. When you’re changing, put a towel down on the bench. No one wants to put their gym bag where you had your butt.

For a Better Workout Bananas provide fuel and help reduce dehydration, cramping and fatigue. For a Sharper Memory Blueberries contain falconoid, antioxidants that can improve learning and retention.

DON’T SNACK

7

Sip — don’t snack: You may like to recharge with a Power Bar or an apple just don’t do it on the exercise floor. Stick to water or sports drinks.

3

DO avoid chitchat in the buff Wrap up in a towel as you make your way to and from the shower.

For Sounder Sleep Cherries are a natural source of melatonin which helps induce sleepiness. For a Trimmer Waistline Grapefruit may lower insulin levels, which enables the body to better metabolize fat. For Smoother Skin Tomatoes are packed with leucopenia, a powerful antioxidant that protects the skin from age-enhancing UV light. For Hotter Sex Watermelon contains citrulline, an amino acid that helps increase blood flow. For Less Stress Plums are a source of photogenic acid, which studies in mice show can keep anxiety at bay.

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DON’T TAKE OVER THE TV

Don’t just start flipping stations on a shared screen. Get the attention of the people in front of that TV — first to see whether they are watching it. You are better off asking for help at the front desk. The club may have picked certain channels, music TV, morning shows and sports networks to set the mood for their guests.

don’t cross the line

7

For Thicker Hair Strawberries’ vitamin C content boosts collagen production and iron absorption — two key factors in keeping hair strong and resilient.

Shaving naked at the sink is a no-no. Also be a gentlemen and refrain from blow-drying any body hair that isn’t on your head.

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ONTHEMOVE REFURRL

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BY RACHEL PARKER DICKERSON

WINNER

60 SECONDS AND COUNTING The CEO of Refurrl, Conway’s latest tech startup, recently discussed the origin of the new social networking site for buying and selling. Zack Hill heads up the company that won the Gone in 60 Seconds elevator pitch contest hosted by Innovate Arkansas and Michelangelo’s on Oct. 23. His partners are Alex Chalupka, Jonathan Peoples and Gabe Couch. They have also taken part in the Ark Challenge mentoring program for entrepreneurs in northwest Arkansas. Hill said the idea for Refurrl started with a problem. “(Peoples) was selling his house for sale by owner. He was trying to post it on Facebook and other social networks. The problem was there was no way to easily incentivize his friends to share the house he’s trying to sell, because if they’re not interested, that’s as far as it’s going to go.” Refurrl provides that incentive. Users of the site can help their friends find buyers and in return get paid an incentive, or Refurrl. For example, if a bicycle is priced at $30 and the Refurrl on it is $10, the person who shares the link to the buyer receives $10. “Every time someone shares it, it’s a new and unique URL,” Hill said, explaining how the site keeps track of who wins the Refurrl. “Everyone is backed up by a profile so you can see who they are. You can follow them, and their items will show up in your personal feed. When transactions take place, we will assign a score to those transactions so people can tell if this person is legitimate or not. If they have referred an item to a friend, their score will go up.”

The site is meant to benefit buyers and sellers, Hill said. “Why put your stuff on Craigslist or eBay and risk dealing with people you don’t know or don’t have a connection to when you can sell it to people you do have a connection to? It’s a little bit of competition; it’s a little bit of helping each other out. There’s a lot of social science to it.”

IT’S ALWAYS COOL

Users can share items on their Facebook, Twitter or Pinterest accounts, send them in an email or copy and paste the link, he said. “We’re working on a way to imbed the code so you can put it in a blog or something,” he added.

Refurrl also has a game aspect to it. Badges may be earned for various accomplishments, as on Foursquare and other social networking sites. For example, Hill said, anyone who helps a friend sell a car gets a “Wheeler Dealer” badge. The company has also started work on an iPhone app, he said.

WHEN PEOPLE SAY, ‘THAT’S REALLY COOL.’ YOU KNOW YOU’RE ONTO SOMETHING.

Zack Hill

-ZACK HILL

Winning the elevator pitch contest was a validation that the Refurrl concept is on the right track, Hill said. “It’s a good thing to get in front of people and share your idea with others. There’s potential to lead to other things like an angel investor who might come along and fund your project. We see it as a big deal to win from the fact that it helps you improve your concept. It’s always cool when people say, ‘That’s really cool.’ You know you’re onto something. Where I see the biggest hurdle is going from the pitch contest and taking it to executing your idea.” He said he and his partners see Conway as a great place to launch their company. “We’ve always wanted to be in Conway,” he said. “We see it as an up and coming tech area. Acxiom’s always been around. They’re a startup that’s years in the making. Being Conway-based hasn’t hindered them one bit. You have other companies like Privacy Star. These are building the foundation for what we want to build on.” 17


ICONGIFTS HOLIDAY SHOPPING

Hambuchen Home Furnishings

Hand-carved and painted, reclaimed wood night stand. $379.

SAS ARKAN GOLF R CENTE

AY’S CONW C I CLASS TOUCH

RUSTIC BIRD CAGE PHOTO HOLDER. $52.

AY CONW AL OPTIC SHOP

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ES12 PORTABLE LAUNCH MONITOR, MOBILE FRIENDLY RANGE FINDER. $249.99.

RAY BAN SUNGLASSES. $166.


HANDS-FREE CAR AUDIO KIT FOR CELL PHONE, WORKS WITH CAR AUDIO SYSTEM. $199.99.

SON’S WILKIN L MAL

AR STATE OF MIND T-SHIRT. $26.99.

RD DEBOA ICS RON ELECT

ELAN

SPA

HAND-MADE NECKLACE BY LOCAL ARTIST MARGARET BEASLEY. $35.

LIFE, HYDRO LY ER FORM TS A MC BO

INDO EXERCISE BOARD AND ROLLER. $180.

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ICONGIFTS HOLIDAY SHOPPING

UCA STORE BOOK

WIRELESS ECHO SMART PEN DIGITAL AUDIO AND NOTE RECORDER. $119-189.

O GORD RY GALLE

ACRYLIC PAINTING ON CANVAS BY LOCAL ARTIST KRIS BAXTER $175.

AT THE B CAVE

22

E VILLAG T SA BOOK X I HENDR

JAMES HAYES ART GLASS, HAND-BLOWN VASE. $45.

CLASSIC COMICS. $5-5,000.


DEREK DEYOUNG ART COLLECTION ANGLING ACCESSORIES. $15-20.

OW MONR E QU BOUTI

STAR GAZER POUCH, AVAILABLE IN BLACK, GRAY AND TEAL. $98.

INDOOR/OUTDOOR PLANTER. $19.99-39.99.

AD THE TO FLY

THE HOG ZONE

RAZORBACK DOLMAN. $48.

O STUDI SKIN

HOLIDAY COSMETIC AND BRUSH KIT. $75-90.

AINS, FOUNT , POTS S& PLANT MORE

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ICONMUSIC LEARN TO PLAY

AFTER SANTA’S GONE Christmas has, for many of us here at Preston Palmer Studios, been inextricably linked to music. When we were younger, it was the carols and hymns sung at family gatherings, church services and played on every radio in every car, every shop and every house. Looking out the windows at the lights, the songs of the season were a perfect backdrop. Even now, hearing one of those classic songs can take us right back to our childhoods in a flash. But what really made Christmas special for a lot us was that it was when we were given our first instrument. Our parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, siblings and friends worked hard during the year and saved up to give us more than just a piece of wood with some strings attached or a metal tube to blow through — they gave us the gift of music. They may not have known it at the time, but that one gift was going to change our lives in ways that neither they nor we could have imagined. For an instrument in the hand of a novice holds a world of possibilities and can lead a person to do and experience wonderful things that would never have been possible without it. But without proper instruction, those possibilities may never become reality. For many 22

of us, the excitement of holding our instrument for the first time was tempered by the frustration that came from not having a clue what to do with them! So we were thrilled to learn that after our families had gone home, the decorations had come down and the carols ceased, the music was going to continue, because we were going to get to take lessons and continue to experience that same feeling each time we learned a new song, riff or progression. Any of you who have had instruction in the playing of an instrument know that learning the ropes is not always fun and thrilling; often you want to throw the thing out the window! But in those moments, what has helped us is to remember when we pulled back the wrapping paper and saw our instrument for the first time. To relive the excitement and wonder we experienced then has often rekindled our desire to stick with playing and learning, even when it’s not always fun. Hopefully, this resonates with you. Preston Palmer Studios exists to create and foster the talent of new musicians — creators of music who would not have existed otherwise. We hope that in sharing our musical history and experiences, we can help you to make sense of your own.

BY PRESTON PALMER



Icon December