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Level 25 ArtJournal

Level 25 Artjournal ...art should be shared

Lee Allane Amy Cameron Leah Crossley Oxana Jad Froso Papadimitriou Joao Santos Belen Velasco Mendoza

Issue #6; April 2014

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Level 25 ArtJournal

Lee ALLANE...4

Amy CAMERON...14

Leah CROSSLEY...24

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Level 25 ArtJournal

Oxana JAD...34

Froso PAPADIMITRIOU...44

Joao SANTOS...54

Belen Velasco MENDOZA...62

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Level 25 ArtJournal

Lee Allane (UK) If we look at a painting only with our eyes we will never see the blood mingling with the paint. If we listen to a symphony only with our ears we will never hear the tears falling between the notes. I know that my senses are mere conduits between the world outside and the world within - a bridge over which perception and knowledge may eventually pass if I dare to overcome my fears and bid it welcome. Seeing only with my eyes – I am blind. Hearing only with my ears – I am deaf. So when I stare at a blank canvas I rarely have any clear idea what I want to achieve, why I choose to make a particular mark or where that mark might eventually lead. Sometimes a stray image sneaks into my head... sometimes the remnants of a song morph slowly into physical form... sometimes a vague emotion whispers in my ear, demanding a face. All I know is that I make a mark, follow the directions hidden in the paint and eventually arrive at a destination, never quite sure where I am or how I got there, but with the vague knowledge that the train has stopped and that that particular journey has come to an end. There is always a train waiting in the station, always a stranger standing on the platform, always another town flickering on the destinations board. Sometimes the stranger boards my train and directs it home. What I have to say about my work is of no importance. A painting either impacts on the emotions of the viewer or it doesn’t - and no amount of detailed insights into motivation, intention or subliminal meaning will compensate for what is lacking in the work. Reputation, status, ego, reward and previous successes or failures are irrelevant. Only the work matters and it should be allowed to speak for itself

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lallane@aol.com


Level 25 ArtJournal

“Orphan on a Dresden Street” 30 in. x 40 in. Oil on canvas Lee Allane

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Your statement is a very poetic one and I love the imagery you invoke in it. You do a very good job of telling the story of what it is often like to be an artist. What kind of writing have you done, and do you find writing to be a nice respite from painting? LA: Writing may be the last refuge of the otherwise totally unemployable, but it has the distinct advantage over other artistic mediums in that it’s much easier to earn a living. So in addition to poetry, short stories and other ‘creative’ work that I’ve written largely for my own enjoyment, I’ve also published numerous articles on subjects ranging from investigations into the international drugs trade and institutional corruption to more trivial (sometimes humorous) pieces on lifestyle, business, politics, social history, sport, design and varies aspects of esoteric philosophy for a wide range of magazines and other publications, as well as four books on Islamic and Oriental arts and crafts for Thames and Hudson. And yes – it is a nice respite from painting. Writing – even creative writing – requires a different ‘skills set’ and more factually-based work necessitates, not only a different range of intellectual and motor skills, but also an entirely opposite state of mind and intellectual approach..

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“Orphan on a Winter Road” 30 in. x 40 in. Oil on canvas Lee Allane


Level 25 ArtJournal It’s very much a right-brain/left-brain balancing act – with the right brain dominating when the driving force is intuition and emotion, and the left-brain taking charge when the requirement is to control and target the information. All life exists somewhere along the spectrum between stasis and chaos, order and disorder, total control and total abandon. For me, painting leans towards the chaos/abandon end of the spectrum and writing swings more in the direction of stasis/control. So when I’m painting the last thing I can allow to filter into my consciousness is how the work is going to be received. The moment I start envisioning the finished product or wondering about whether people will like or understand it is the moment I lose focus and direction and the painting moves inextricably towards a slow and whimpering death. In contrast, if I’m writing an article for a specific publication it is essential to be constantly aware of both the brief and the target audience – whether the readership will understand what I’m saying, whether I’ve conveyed too much or too little information, whether the piece needs to be primarily serious or humorous, factual or speculative - and if I lose sight of any of these factors I need to brace myself for a dreaded rejection slip rather than a welcome cheque. I am very lucky to be able to work at both ends of the spectrum and I feel that not only does one approach give me a welcome respite from the other, but also in some strange way each compliments and feeds something into their retrospective demands. I like artists who do not want to say much about their works. I believe that too many times a work can be over-explained and I prefer it when an artist leaves the journey of discovery entirely up to the viewer. Have you encountered resistance to this? I mean, have viewers of your work insisted you explain a piece to them? LA: I’ve rarely had this problem with members of the public – who usually seem willing to let the painting do the talking – but it has become an increasing problem when dealing with members of the art establishment who often seem to be more interested in the contents of the ‘artist’s statement‘ than the quality of the work itself. A couple of years ago one of the largest publicly funded regional galleries in England invited submissions to its annual open exhibition on the basis that selection would be by ‘artist’s statement only’. Not surprisingly, the work in exhibition was remarkably similar in appearance and, with very few exceptions, uniformly dire in quality. When I suggested to one of the curators that she might like to promote the gallery’s interesting ‘submissions initiative’ by asking the chairman of the neighbouring town’s international piano competition whether he might like to select next year’s entrants on the basis of a drawing or short essay, rather than a boring recording of them playing the piano, she couldn’t quite make up her mind whether I was being serious or sarcastic. This obsession with artist’s statements and the cerebral analysis of motivation, structure and meaning would be amusing if it weren’t for the fact that the art establishment’s approach to funding and exposure (certainly in the UK) is systematically stifling individual creativity and promoting ‘art by bureaucrat’ as the dominant genre of the 21st Century. In simple terms, if an artist wants financial assistance or an opportunity to show their work in any publicly funded gallery they have to conform to the criteria of the funding body. This is an anathema for someone like me because not only do many of the individual criterion have nothing whatsoever to do with art (e.g. educational value, public participation, demographic sensitivity etc) the very process of making an application requires the artist to work out exactly what they are going to do before they start and this is the death knell to any form of creative spontaneity. But this is the nature of the bureaucrat. He ticks boxes and needs to know exactly how the money will be spent. The idea of trusting an artist to produce interesting and original work without the aid of an approved structural blueprint, financial projection and intellectual justification goes beyond the realms of mere heresy into that dark and dangerous realm abandoned by the gods of sharp pencils and double entry accounts. (Continued...)

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Level 25 ArtJournal (...continued) I don’t blame artists for wanting to eat with their meals but unless they are prepared to challenge the control exerted by the funding bodies they will inevitably produce work that at owes more to political correctness and public accountability than to their own creative integrity. The art establishment talks about wanting to stimulate ‘originality’ but being bureaucrats they can’t grasp the concept that the only way an artist can produce original work is by being true to himself. In your statement, you make painting seem almost like an out-of-body experience; or like a trance-like state in which you lose your self-awareness because the paint has taken over. Are you often surprised at the result, once that “train” has stopped? And as a follow-up question: are you often disappointed? LA: There is a passage in the book ‘Zen and the Art of Archery’ where the author talks about the gradual stripping away of individual identity until there is no distinction between the archer, the arrow and the target. They have become one - and at that point the archer cannot miss. It’s easy to dismiss this as some obscure esoteric philosophy that has little practical application to everyday life, but to varying degrees this state of ‘Zen-like’ focus permeates everything we do. Athletes talk about being in the zone, musicians about slipping into the groove, poets about sojourning with their muse. It’s all the same. Total focus. Total concentration. A cloistered world in which nothing exists except the participant and their goal. The perfect sate of ‘non-thinking’ when muscle memory, intuition and inspiration take over and the participant becomes a conduit between their inner world and the world beyond. In very simply terms, you’re not going to achieve or create anything unless you concentrate on what you are doing and rid your mind of any thoughts about yesterday’s achievements, tomorrow’s possibilities or what your friends will say. When I’m working and things are going well I’m oblivious to everything around me. I don’t know whether it can be described as a ‘trance-like state’ but there are certainly moments when I feel surges of euphoria and a lack of connection to everyday reality. It could be described as an ‘out-of-body experience’ but it could be just that I’m as mad as a bag of squirrels and people excuse me because I paint. Fortunately these hyper-intense moments don’t last very long. Like any journey, most of the time you’re on a straight road, putting one foot in front of the other, and it’s only when you reach a cross-roads or obstacle that you need a moment of inspiration to tell you which way to go. Sometimes it’s obvious. Sometimes you need to walk away, stop thinking about what to do next and allow the conduit to refresh itself. I know that thinking is often the biggest obstacle to achievement and creativity. Scientists spend years trying to solve a problem and then suddenly – when they step back and allow their minds to drift – seemingly out of nowhere a solution appears. Newton under the apple tree. Archimedes in the bath. Inspiration, intuition enlightenment, comes when it is ready to come and the best thing we can do is stop trying to push the river and trust that at some point the water will flow in the direction that it was always meant to flow. (Continued...)

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I know that thinking is often the biggest obstacle to achievement and creativity.

“Lake of My Forgotten Daughters� 29 in. x 39 in. Oil on canvas Lee Allane

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Level 25 ArtJournal (...continued) I am often surprised by the finished painting – although I rarely have more than a vague inkling of meaning or provenance until long after its been put to bed – and, regardless of the final outcome, I’ve learned not to be too disappointed with the end result as long as I’ve given of my best. I know that not everything can be a masterpiece - not everything can be perfect – but I also know that our failures are just as important as our successes because each contributes to the creation of the other, and I believe - to paraphrase the preface to The Tales of the Arabian Nights – that truth is not in any one story but in the telling of them all. So if 5% or 10% of what I produce exceeds what could be reasonably expected in terms of quality and craftsmanship then I’m doing okay. There is no formula for creating a masterpiece. Why one painting leaps off the wall to embrace the viewer and another doesn’t is a mystery. It’s as if some unknown force sprinkles magic dust on one piece of work and ignores the others - and only the sprinkler of magic dust knows which to choose and why it was chosen. So, typically, I do like to have each artist talk about one or two of the works they submitted to Level 25. However, I am going to avoid that with you. Instead, I will ask you to expand a bit on the declaration in your statement that “Seeing only with my eyes, I am blind. Hearing only with my ears, I am deaf.” When you now look at art or listen to music, what have you done to expand your senses so that it is not only the eyes or ears at work? LA: I try very hard to never look at a new painting through the eyes of an artist because I know that it’s too easy to linger on the brushstrokes, admire the composition, study the nuances of form and totally fail to see beyond the technique into the heart and soul of a world waiting beneath the surface of the paint.

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Level 25 ArtJournal We should always look at a painting first through the eyes of a child – without prejudice or preconceptions, open to wonderment and willing to believe that there is magic in the world - close our eyes and try to sense the secret music in the paint, ask the figures where they’ve been, where they’re going, why they are where they are today. Look beyond the confines of the canvas and imagine the world from which the painting is only a snapshot, enter the landscape, wander through its streets and pathway, talk to its inhabitants, laugh, cry, scream, love, hate, fear, share their emotions - become for a moment a stranger set adrift in a strange land. Once we’ve entered the heart and soul of a painting we can then look at it again through the eyes of an artist, study the brushstrokes, analyse the forms, learn what the artist has to teach us about composition and technique – but not before we have bypassed technical accomplishment and seen the tears, love, hope, fear or laughter hidden in the paint. Similarly, when listening to music I try to see the images hidden in the melodies or conjured by the words. Music plays an important part in my painting process – it helps to clear my mind, create the mood, set a subliminal atmosphere that complements the overall tone and feel of the painting. Sometimes the music dictates the painting. One of my most recent works was based almost entirely on the music of Anna von Hausswolff (an extraordinarily talented young Swedish singer songwriter) who I’d been listening to for several months. One day, for reasons that are still unclear, I put on one of her albums, stood in front of my easel, closed my eyes and began to paint. I don’t know exactly when I opened my eyes, but not before there was the recognisable outline of an image on the canvas and a clear vision of the world conjured by her music imprinted on my mind. (Continued...)

“Stockings For Sale” 22 in. x 34 in. Gouache and pastel on paper Lee Allane

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Level 25 ArtJournal (...continued) I’d boarded the train and my role was to sit by the window and continue the journey to whatever destination the music was writing on the departures board. When I talk about not seeing only with your eyes I am trying to describe in my own imperfect way the existence of an invisible receptor somewhere inside of us – something that registers and channels the emotional impact of everything we see, hear and experience. Our eyes, ears and other external organs may be the means by which the experiences are transported, but they are neither the ultimate destination nor the sole arbitrator of whether the things we perceive turn into nourishment, poison or just an easily digested passing snack that will keep us going until some real food arrives. What happens when that “stray image” sneaks into your head and you are out and about, nowhere near your paint and canvas? What steps do you take to ensure you remember that image until you can bring it to life on canvas? LA: Sometimes I scribble on the back of a till receipt or napkin or old theatre ticket, but mostly I just try to remember - fix a mental snapshot in my mind and do my best to keep it alive until I have the opportunity to transfer it onto paper or canvas. Developing a good visual memory is part of the skill-set that you need to be a visual artist. In the same way that musicians need to remember melodies, writers need to remember words, visual artists must be able to retain mental images of what they see. Even if an artist is working from life it is impossible to look at the object and the canvas at the same time. One has to look at the object, take a mental snapshot and then concentrate on transferring the image onto the canvas, and the longer one can focus on the painting before looking back at the object the more chance one has of preserving the continuity of mood and form. There are always three stages to the creative process. First we absorb the data via our external senses, then we digest, process and edit the information before expressing the resultant image on paper or canvas. If we can’t remember what we have seen the entire process breaks down. There are of course advantages and disadvantages to working from memory as opposed to using detailed sketches or photographs. The main advantage is that memory tends to edit out all the extraneous details, leaving only the essence of the image imprinted on your mind – uncluttered by things that digress from the main narrative – but unless you have a good visual memory there is always danger that something important will be lost. Sometimes I follow the old maxim of ‘trust in God but keep your powder’ by working primarily from the remembered image but having a sketch or photograph somewhere in the background just in case I need a second or third glance. However, the reality of life is that you are never fully prepared for the unexpected and some of the most poignant images will always come along when you don’t have a camera or pencil and paper at hand. So unless you develop your visual memory it’s almost guaranteed that you’re going to miss out on something important and miss the opportunity to bring it to life. And it’s usually the opportunities that I’ve missed rather than the mistakes I’ve made that I most regret.

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“Lipstick” 20 in. x 30 in. Soft pastel and pencil on paper Lee Allane


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Amy Cameron (Scotland) One must always maintain one’s connection to the past and yet ceaselessly pull away from it. To remain in touch with the past requires a love of memory. To remain in touch with the past requires a constant imaginative effort. Bachelard, Gaston. Poetics of Fire. Memory, identity and history are intrinsic to my artistic practise. I am an obsessive collector and hoarder, fascinated by memories and traces retained by people, objects and spaces. Time layers these histories and stories – this is what informs and feeds my practice. Working in layers, I use a mixture of materials to create fragmented, growing pieces, where images and words appear and disappear again, like the layers of a distant memory. Text plays an important role in my work. Memory is all about storytelling and I incorporate this in the form of confessional writing, diary extracts and poetry. I layer new stories into timeworn objects and create work that preserves the moments and materials gathered in my research. My work explores the tensions between holding on and letting go. I have an obsessive need to record and retain my experiences; the fear of forgetting, of losing who I am, what I know, permeates through me. This is what pushes me to create.

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www.amycameron.net


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“Virtues of Memory II” (detail) Amy Cameron

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“Memory Box III” Amy Cameron

“Memory Box III” (detail) Amy Cameron

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Level 25 ArtJournal That obsessive need you have to record your own experiences…How does that manifest itself? And how closely do you guard those records? AC: When I was very young my dad passed away and as a keepsake my mum made me a small box of his things to remember him by. This “memory box” has continued to grow ever since. It has always seemed natural to me to hold on to a part of everything I have experienced. My collections cover anything I come across but some of the most common things include letters, cards, ticket stubs, receipts and maps. All these small and seemingly insignificant objects hold some sort of link to my past. They all have a story. Another part of my collection involves my many volumes of diaries. I have been obsessively recording my life in this form since about the age of six. I have a strong fear of forgetting, these records help to relieve my fear of loss. I keep my memory box very much to myself. I have long enjoyed artists who incorporate text into their works. There is something about the melding of the two forms of communication, writing and artistic expression, which appeals to me. How do you decide what snippets of text to include in a work? AC: The written word has always been a source of fascination to me. Memory lends itself to storytelling and comes hand in hand with the written and spoken word. When it comes to deciding what text to use I have experimented with various ways. Most often I begin with a specific thought of what I want to work with. I then allow the making process to dictate what snippets come through. I work in layers, allowing certain elements to become prominent and other to be obscured. I play around with this layering until I find what works for me. Sometimes this can lead to the meaning of the original text being changed. I enjoy this ambiguity; the ease at which meaning can be manipulated in text is an interesting mirror to the way our memories work. We are constantly susceptible to misremembering and inventing our histories to a certain extent. So I bet you have amassed quite a collection of objects from your hoarding. Can you tell us what some of your favorite objects are that you’ve collected but which you have not used yet in your artwork, and which we will eventually see? AC: In my work so far I have tended to utilise mostly documents but I have a vast and varied collection of objects picked up on various travels that I would love to incorporate at some point. I have pieces of stone that have crumbled off the Taj Mahal and the pyramids at Giza; vials of water from the Ganges and the Venice Canals; pressed flowers from all over the world and shell fragments from a least seven seas. I can pick up any one of these objects and instantly be transported right back to where I first found it. I am still surprise by the power an object can hold when it comes to triggering memories.

We are constantly susceptible to misremembering and inventing our histories to a certain extent.

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“Little Princess” 110cm x 125cm Oil and Mixed Media on Board Amy Cameron


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One of your most interesting works is “Little Princess.” What I especially find interesting is the backward-facing text. Talk to us about that one, please. AC: “Little Princess” is part of a body of work in which each piece was a direct response to a very specific memory. I first decided on the memory, made studies and writings from my current perspective and then looked back through my diary collections to find the event as I had experienced it at the time. The initial reason for the backward text was to ease myself into sharing very personal writing without being too obvious about it. Confessional writing is often seen as a self-indulgent and narcissistic thing for an artist to do. The reverse text allows for an element of separation between my “confessions” and the idea of collective memory that I am also trying to portray. Another reason I do this is simply to allow the words to be enjoyed as purely visual things rather than always as a means of communication. I have lifted and enlarged sections of text directly from my diaries as they were written at the time. By having sections of the text backwards the actual movement and form of my childish writing can really be appreciated and “history” more clearly captured in the work. I find “Attempted Rescue” to be one I keep staring at. No lines of text in that one; no images of the past; nothing that suggests memory or recollection. Tell us, what are we to make of those three canvas frames tightly bound up with string? AC: “Attempted Rescue” was made when I was going through a particularly stressful time. I became frustrated with what I was producing and ended up completely destroying the canvases I was working on! Not wanting this to be the end of the work I decided to attempt a crude form of “rescue”. With the string and rope attempted a crude repair job. The piece is essentially my attempt at “rescuing” the failed work. I chose the use of string and rope for its strong binding ability and for its obvious visual portrayal of that. It became a work of deep catharsis. Rope and string are also of interest to me due to their use in some cultures as a means of communication. The Inca, Maori and Chinese have all used cuts and knots in rope to record information and stories for future generations before the invention of the written word. I wanted to tell my story of frustration and eventual catharsis through this use of string.

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“Attempted Rescue” 25cm x 35cm each (3 parts) Rope and String on Destroyed Canvas Amy Cameron

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And, finally, for someone like you who is obsessed with recording and collecting and making sure nothing is forgotten, can I interpret “What Was Removed” as being representative of those times when we do forget, or perhaps when others force us to forget? AC: Forgetting comes hand in hand with memory. However much I try to record all the details of my past I have to admit that there are things I am losing all the time and elements I am re-creating too. We can never be fully sure if we remember things as they were because each time we think back we are given more hindsight and more time to evolve our thoughts. With time we may also experience complete loss of memory through illnesses such as Alzheimer’s where even a box full of memories will not help. In “What Was Removed” I attempted directly to address my fear of forgetting by a laborious process of removing. The prints are made by writing various memories directly onto squares of mirror and then blocking parts of the text out with tip-ex and paint. The memory then becomes trapped between the mirror and the paint, the mirror is still reflecting but unable to be seen. A print was then made using photocopies of the mirrors. This makes any of the still exposed areas of mirror appear black, ending the potential of the mirror’s reflecting power. This was the final step in “removing”. Potentially all the information is still in the final print but really it has all been lost.

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“What Was Removed” 35cm x 35cm each (4 parts) Fabric Transfer Print on Canvas Amy Cameron


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Leah Crossley (UK) … to observe, encounter, capture, collect and transform Performance is the catalyst through which Leah explores her visual practice. Leah’s work is the result of first-hand, practical engagement with performance - as both participant and as creative, documentary image-maker. With additional research and personal collections of disparate objects and materials, Leah seeks to generate personal responses and performative documents inscribed by new contexts of appearance. Digital-photography is Leah’s medium. She creates digital-collages by compressing her chosen materials (e.g. natural objects – flora and fauna; textiles; images of surfaces such as water, glass, cracks in the wall) into a unified, re-imaging of an original digital-photograph, reflecting the original poetics of initial ideas and performances. Leah’s work shifts between the virtual and the live-event, creating images that migrate between live performance and visual practice; she embraces performance, physical workshops, collaborations and photography-shoots, transforming documentary into discreet works of art. Beyond documenting a creative process, Leah endeavours to generate beautiful works that can be read like chapters of a larger whole. Leah’s images thus far have had life as suite/series/ sequences, slideshows, photoblogs, small paginations, posters, postcards, invitations, a bookmark design and projections. Leah endeavours to establish and disseminate creative projects, with beautiful, meaningful and magical outcomes.

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http://www.themagdalenaproject.org/en/category/image-galler


Level 25 ArtJournal “Secret Girl 9� Digital Photograph Leah Crossley

ries/images-archive/legacy-challenge-2011/secret-girl

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“Secret Girl 7” Digital Photograph Leah Crossley

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Level 25 ArtJournal I have to be honest: I typically ignore digital photographers who overwork their photographs on the computer. There are too many photographers out there who abuse the power that the computer gives them and they end up losing the impact of the original photo and creating a confusing mishmash of noise. You, however, have gotten it right! You have found the proper balance between creating a fabulous photograph with your camera and then enhancing it with the artistic possibilities of the computer and software. So my first question is, How much of a learning process was that for you? LC: It took a lot of wrong twists, turns and experiments before I managed to achieve what I hope is a seamless, overall effect. I had been researching the painterly technique, sfumato deriving from the Italian noun fumo (smoke), and the verb sfumare (to rub/blend together the edges of colours, the way smoke diffuses); it references the intriguing light and shadows captured by Italian renaissance painters. The Secret Girl suite is infused with elements of this research and a creative ambition to achieve an outcome of painterly photographs or contemporary expressions of sfumato. As a non-painter, Adobe Photoshop became a tool with which to explore and refine this. It offered a creative way of compressing colours and collaged-elements into a unified whole. It also started to reveal the types of images I might collect or exploit in order to achieve painterly effects, eg. images of water and very wet lychees, when compressed, became ideal components to replicate paint stains, smudges, mists and blurs in which to hide or from which to emerge. Important to my process was the use of my own filters and layers as alternatives to the ready-made or pre-programmed filters in the software. The creation of an appropriate filter is as rewarding as the capturing of the image; I aim for the two elements to come together with the right balance or emphasis. This “practical engagement with performance” which you speak of in your statement… Can you speak more on that? How does Leah the performer differ from Leah the image-maker? LC: One of the exciting processes of the Secret Girl project as a performance-workshop was being able to get up really close to the performers, sharing the space, the languages, the movement; I was able to experience the creative-process at first-hand and take images from within - from ‘the inside’. Subsequently, I was able to take the language out of the rehearsal room and merge it with my own visual responses, whilst retaining and reflecting the original poetics of initial ideas and performances. ‘Leah the performer’ hasn’t performed for a very long time. But I hope my experience of performing lends weight and understanding to my images of performers, allowing me to empathise with the performers and capture an alternative but complementary perspective. You are from Wales, which is a beautiful country. How much does your Welsh-ness inform your artwork? LC: I live in Wales and I love its landscape, its folklore and mythology. I’m also inspired by the creativity of individual artists (choreographers, directors, writers) currently working in Wales, who welcome collaboration and exploration of different artistic disciplines. I’m extremely fortunate that I’ve been able to develop creative conversations and collaborations with some of them. Collaboration is crucial to the way that I am currently working.

Collaboration is crucial to the way that I am currently working.

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All of your submissions to Level 25 Artjournal are from your “Secret Girl” suite. Talk to us about the genesis of this series; in particular, what is it you want your viewers to discover about women through your photography? LC: The Secret Girl was inspired by a workshop and performance, The Seven Kings – Secret Girl, originally conceived and directed by Gabriella Sacco. The images began as documentary-footage and evolved into creative extensions of both the process and the performance. As an active participant in the event – as performer and observer – looking, listening and learning, I invested the resulting documentary-images with elements of my own experience (what I felt, sensed, saw, heard and over-heard) and introduced additional layers, including separately generated collections of fruits and flowers (eg. decomposing lychee and pears, wet clay, rose petals). For me, Secret Girl is a suite of images that shows women of no name, neither arriving nor departing. Women in a place apart, or a space between; a reflection left behind or, perhaps, a premonition of something or someone yet to come. Ambiguity is probably a key term here and these are ambiguous spaces. Perhaps Bjork sums it up best when she sings… I am a phantom in the shape of a girl…

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“Secret Girl 1” Digital Photograph Leah Crossley


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“Secret Girl 6” Digital Photograph Leah Crossley


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Level 25 ArtJournal I would love to have “Secret Girl 6” on my wall and come home to it every day. What an impactful piece! She is like something out of a dream, beckoning me to her. And there seems to be such spontaneity in the moment you captured. How did you create that image? Was it directed, as in, “Stand like this and do this with your face?” Or was the model feeling something in the moment which you just happened to capture? LC: I didn’t direct the action at all. My encounters through the lens in this Project are with people who are embodying various spaces with movement, gestures and choreography that is improvised and spontaneous - albeit around an agreed idea or theme. The female subjects are performers not models; they were usually oblivious to the fact that I was capturing an image because they were so engrossed in their own responses. It has become very important to my creative process that the photographs I take are not staged. I enjoy working in this way: partly because witnessing the creative process of a performance being made - in real time - is never static; partly because of my love of movement-blur, blurred photography and fascination with sfumato, ambiguity, mists and veils. It is as much about the Kodak moments that were missed, the accidents that happened, as well as capturing a moment in time that will never happen again. And right next to “Secret Girl 6” on my wall I would want to have “Secret Girl 4.” When a photograph makes me want to be in the photograph, then I know the photographer has created an image that speaks to something in my soul. What do you see in “Secret Girl 4?” What is the story that Leah Crossley imagines when she looks at that photo? LC: I can feel sad when I look at this image, despite its vibrant colours. But there is also an undertone, a sense of danger - is it her despair or her longing that could explode or implode… the rope in her hands is not necessarily for herself. I am not a prude by any means, but one of the things I love most about your “Secret Girl” suite is how you managed to convey sensuality without nudity. Was that purposely done or was that a happy accident? LC: Initially - at the documentary stage - many spontaneous and happy accidents were occurring as we explored the performance materials and props. I decided to work only with those photographs of women performing behind plastic sheets - the viewer is immediately one step removed from the action happening behind the plastics. As a viewer we are aware that we might be entering private space and witnessing someone bearing all - exposing themselves or their Secrets - all features that can be associated with nudity. I’m glad that those connections can be made. Secret Girl is as much a personal project as it is a collaborative one; it is a song by Sonic Youth, a universal myth and maxim. As a collaborative project with a variety of other performers, artists and writers it continues to evolve through many different media and interpretations - this suite of images is just one of them.

“Secret Girl 4” Digital Photograph Leah Crossley

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I can feel sad when I look at this image, despite its vibrant colours. But there is also an undertone, a sense of danger - is it her despair or her longing that could explode or implode‌ the rope in her hands is not necessarily for herself.

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Oxana Jad (Russia) Oxana Jad’s work focuses on the development of artistic cross-media projects which address body-image-identity. Her work thereby encompasses an interest in the human psyche from a philosophical, religious and mythological point-ofview; the exploration of the human body and its social codes in terms of ethnic, historical and art historical perspectives; and the body within the context of advancing scientific research and discoveries. Currently, her photographic compositions focus particularly on staging complex personal interactions.

www.oxanajad.com

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“La Chatte” Photograph Oxana Jad


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Your photography seemingly stimulates the viewer’s psyche and consequently works on both a conscious and a subconscious level. How did you decide to focus on this form of photography? OJ: Psychology has been my passion for a very long time and the world of emotions is an incredibly exciting field. To transfer this to a photograph is not an easy task but I love the challenge and try to make use of all available means to make visible that which lies “behind the facade.” If my intention is successful, the viewer can hopefully be transferred to a respective emotional state. The five images you submitted to Level 25 Artjournal make me feel as if I’m the proverbial “fly on the wall”, voyeuristically peeking at the hidden life of a family. At times I am thrilled; at other times I feel guilty - like a sort of voyeur. As a photographer, do you ever wish you could sneak into people’s homes and capture their lives without their knowledge? OJ: The primary focus of my work is the act of story-telling. I feel like a writer who describes characters and situations. He/she grants an insight into the psyche of another person and transports us to places to which we would not come otherwise. Only the writer does it through words and I use the language of the image. I would of course not want to intrude upon the privacy of other people like a paparazzi … although I must admit that I do like to take a voyeurisitc view-point. Four of the works you submitted (“La Chatte”; “Foreign EgoRS”; “Oscar” and “The Secret”) all seem to be set in a common era…I’m guessing the mid- to late-1960s. Why was this done? And what is it about that era which captured your imagination? OJ: Even as a child I had a special fascination with photographs. The 60s represent the time when my parents were young. I have often looked at the photo albums of my parents. There were many photos, most in black and white, image cutouts from magazines, photos of famous actors and postcards. These albums were for me a sort of book of fairy tales that I could look at for hours. Perhaps that is why I associate the Sixties with something special - a little mysterious, strange and intimate simultaneously.

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“Oscar” Photograph Oxana Jad

... I must admit that I do like to take a 37 voyeurisitc view-point.

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“The Secret” Photograph Oxana Jad

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Level 25 ArtJournal On to specific works, I would like to begin with “The Secret”… Please tell us about the story of “The Secret”. In addition, please tell us how you selected the two models. OJ: For me artistic work only has special value if it avoids ambiguity. I have a story that I tell yet at the same time I always try to give the viewer plenty of room for their own imagination and interpretation. Many symbols are hidden in my photographs. How the viewers put together the puzzle is up to them. As to the models: I discovered the young man on Facebook. He is a law student who has a talent for acting, which I believe to be very valuable. The lady was a well-known model in the 60s and was even friends with David Kennedy - something I couldn’t know at the time as I had met her in a supermarket... Next is “The Stairs.” In the foreground there is the focused sharpness of the beautiful woman reclining on a couch, her dress on the floor and the sharp, clean lines of the floor lamp. Then, in the background is this surreal and confusing montage of stairs. My interpretation? I see on the woman’s face boldness but also an expression of hope; in her nudity I see pride but also vulnerability. I feel as if she is inviting me to come join her in her home so that we both can find a sense of direction in the world, a sense of clarity that will enable us both to choose the right set of stairs from the chaos behind her. But that’s just my interpretation! Why don’t you tell us the story of “The Stairs?” OJ: I would very much like to convey something about the symbolism of the image. I associate the stairs with descent and ascent - with the complexity of life. They are connections and disconnections at the same time, they are bridges between the levels of life. The open door with a strip of light is a symbol of hope and at the same time of uncertainty. The nudity is associated, on the one hand, with truth and, on the other hand, with sin. The mirror represents the inverted world.

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“The Stairs” Photograph Oxana Jad

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Level 25 ArtJournal Viewers can discover some common objects in your photographs - objects that lend themselves to different interpretations and which can be laden with symbolism: lamps, mirrors, some kind of media device - such as a radio or a television. Please describe the process with which you decide on what objects to include in your sets. OJ: As you have noticed, all objects play a certain role in my pictures - each represents a sort of statement, a word, a symbol. Each image is completely constructed and using the various items I try to create an atmosphere that emphasizes the emotional state of the person portrayed in the image. Last but not least, I cannot let “La Chatte” go unnoticed in this interview. This is another work that I love because of the many different ways it can be interpreted. Please tell us about “La Chatte”. OJ: I draw inspiration from many different sources and subsequently the material is mixed and rearranged. For a long time already I had the idea for the space which you can see on the picture but no matching story. One day I discovered a French novel by Colette, “La chatte” (“The Cat”) which is about a woman jealous of her husband’s cat. Yet the work doesn’t intend to stage a scene from the novel, it is merely a free interpretation of the theme of jealousy and thereby hopefully intriguing...

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... I try to create an atmosphe the emotional state of the pe image.


ere that emphasizes erson portrayed in the

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“Foreign EgoRS� Photograph Oxana Jad

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Froso Papadimitriou (Greece)

Froso experiments with different art forms such as painting, sculpture, video and theatre performance. Her work is a product of continuous reinvention of the self as part of the evolution of natural and social relations. Through observation, personal experiences and testimonies that arise amidst different social mindsets the work explores the isolation of the self from public involvement whilst constantly interacting with the greater collective assembly and opens different paths of conversation about the diversity of modernity, its understanding and our perceived place in the social environment.

www.neverinthemiddle.net

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“Index series 01006� 45 cm x 30 cm Photocopier Ink on Paper Froso Papadimitriou


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“Big Manifesto Series 01” 125 cm x 128 cm Fabric, acrylic, ink, newspaper, glass paint, pigment on recycled wood Froso Papadimitriou

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Level 25 ArtJournal Wow, you do a lot: video, painting, sculpture, theater… How do you decide which Froso is going to be present on any given day? FP: Hahaha I like how you pose this question. Well split personality has always been an advantage...but mainly being nosy and indecisive helped in undertaking a variety of studies that allow me now to have the flexibility to experiment with different artistic mediums. Having the urge to try out different ways of being creative, not always successfully I admit, is what makes my practice to be so multifaceted. The use of different mediums most of the time is not intentional but rather spontaneous; usually I get an idea for a project that fits best to a certain medium and then I work around the logistics for its realisation. The outcome most of the times is unknown until the very end. Collaboration with other artists and exchanging skills has also helped in expanding the field of experimentation and the variation of mediums. With my partner in crime Jonathan Bradbury we run Collaborative Art, a non-profit organisation that aims to bring artists with different skills together to explore different mediums and ways of expression and create events that promote these collaborations. So in a way getting involved with ‘a lot’ is how my practice works. “The isolation of the self from public involvement…” is something you mention in your statement; and it certainly does seem that in this era everyone is more isolated despite being more connected. Do you hope that your art can make people more aware of this situation and then collectively try to change it? FP: I believe that this isolation from public involvement, and I agree with you that is a characteristic of our times and steadily increases, is the cause of many problems we face and it might sound a bit of an oxymoron but this lack of unity can and is turning us into naïve herds, too self focused but desperate to fit in, mostly in superficial ways. Awareness would be the ideal goal of my work, although I believe that the intention of the artist ends when the work is presented to the public and it is their time to connect and personally interpret it, not necessary reaching the initial intention of the artist. What I have achieved, based on feedback and discussions, is that my work can create room for discussion amongst people, and for me that is a step towards my aim. Elements in my work, such as newspaper cuttings/ semi abstract figures etc. allow people to find something familiar yet out of context, which is intended to create a personal connection whilst becoming a threat to the serenity of art enjoyment and therefore require further exploration. I believe that creating room for questioning and answer-seeking can eventually lead to awareness and attaining of knowledge.

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Level 25 ArtJournal Talk to us, please, of what it is like to spend a day with you. With all the various creative projects you take part in, I imagine you are a bundle of energy and a force to be reckoned with. FP: My friends say I am a headache, but don’t believe them hahaha. I have to admit that these projects are usually one or two at a time (maybe three) and due to other commitments, are realised slowly, except when a deadline is involved; to quote Douglas Adams ‘I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by’. But I do have a lot of support and understanding from my family and friends and that keeps me going, especially in times that I forget what social life means, paradoxically whilst trying to deal with self-isolation in my work. Your work, “The Price of Oil Gone Up” is so arresting! It captures the eye and holds onto it. What I enjoy about it is that it points out that there is not only a natural impact to oil usage but also a human impact. Walk us through that piece, please. I am most interested in hearing specifically about the creation process of it: How did you cast the hand, for instance? How did you decide to have the piece seem to grow out of the wall? Things like that… FP: Firstly I would like to thank you for taking time to look and find connection with my work. The work is a commentary about the ‘oil wars’ and the sacrifices made. In a way the work is UK specific, due to the use of the paper poppy that is worn here on Remembrance Day and since the inspiration came from the paper poppies that are now sold to support the UK troops and injured servicemen in Afghanistan/ Middle East. The purpose is mainly to question the intentions of governments and the strategies behind these types of wars in comparison to the value of human life. The reason that it grows out of the wall is to resemble architectural features from ancient temples and create a reference to the mythologies of bloodthirsty gods, the sacred and sacrificial, whilst the glass container with the poppies in oil and the stained feather are symbolising the offerings. So for the making of the work, the casted hand was a kindly offered by my friend, who for 3 hours patiently withstood the torture of the itchy plaster and the painful removal of it. Once I managed to have the cast I accidently destroyed it (I reassure you not intentionally) so he had to do a second sitting, not so wilfully this time. The second attempt was successful so then I worked with thread and fabric to create the finish.

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“Forget Me Not 01” 50 cm x 40 cm Thread, ashes and acrylic on paper Froso Papadimitriou

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“The Price of Oil Gone Up” 38 cm x 36 cm x 30 cm Fabric, thread, clay, wood, glass, ink, soap, pigment, feather, remembrance poppies Froso Papadimitriou


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“Ripped Series 02” 100 cm x 90 cm Fabric, acrylic, ink, newspaper, glass paint, pigment, thread on recycled canvas Froso Papadimitriou


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Onto “Ripped Series #2:” a compelling work and one I feel is very urban. Moreover, I like that it took me looking at it a few times to see various “hidden” things in it, like that outstretched hand, for example. What I am most curious about is the choices you made as far as the words included in the piece. “Agony;” “Crime Victims;” “Bailout…” and the others. Explain for us what this piece represents, please, and how strongly do you feel about its message? FP: Ripped series 02 was created during the outburst of the Greek economical problem and was inspired by the knock-on effect it had to the public. The words and the symbolism of the work, such as the outstretched hand you mention, the crumbling towers, the stitched canvas etc are all referring to the failing economical system and the impact it has to the average worker, who usually pays the price. Whilst it is a work that encompasses the general idea of poverty and fiscal segregation, it is also very personal as it reflects the economical turmoil that my friends and family have since gone through. Time is something we need to invest in order to identify ‘hidden’ things in this financial regression that many countries in Europe face and where this phenomenon sits within the global economical strategies.

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Joao Santos (Portugal)

rigel3040@yahoo.com

His photography blends a variety of influences from design to abstraction and minimalism, exploring new forms of communication while also developing his own unique style and techniques. The work takes documenting the world around us as a point of departure but through Joao’s vision becomes an exploration of visual sensation.

“Self ” Photograph Joao Santos

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You certainly don’t take what could be termed “boring photographs.” Your vision is unique. Explain to us your philosophy of photography and why you obviously strive to stand out from the rest. JS: To me taking photographs means more than a relation with the camera, actually the camera is just a means to an end. Nowadays people seem to rely much upon technology rather than themselves. I perceive things as an artist does: I always try to ‘show’ them according to my personality and sensibility. Whether it is a portrait, landscape, or even some photojournalism type of work, I always try to put much of myself in it. My approach to photography is like drawing; a spontaneous exercise that draws all my thoughts and feelings. I don’t believe that things and objects have an obvious configuration for everyone. Actually I do believe that despite an object’s shape and form, it can never be perceived the same way by two different persons, not even the most basic object. Then you live to tell your own story, your own experience. Your subject matter is diverse. What is it you look for in a subject that will make you lift your camera to your eye and begin shooting it? JS: First of all I have to feel some kind of inspiration, something from within that draws my attention and captivates my senses. It all depends on the situation: the type of light, the objects in front of my eyes, and the whole concept behind it. I’d say that the first impression strikes the most, and from there I can start ‘composing’ the photo, organizing my feelings towards the objects in front of me. Again, there is no rule, no logic with this exercise of creating images. I’d rather say that one should always listen and follow his own instincts. The more you let yourself go, the easier this process will enable you to go beyond the first impression. You see, taking photos is like unfolding what shines out (in)there. JS: Talk about your inspirations. Every artist has idols, people whose works speak to them. Who are yours? Surprisingly my photography knowledge is quite standard and classical. I have attended the Cinema school (college) in Lisbon, Portugal, where I had to learn it all, from the basics to other more creative approaches. Apart from the technical learning we also had to get familiarized with the best photographers in History. Actually I am very fond of some of the top photographers from last century such as: McCullin, Doisneau, Bresson, Eugene Smith, Capa, Lang, Man Ray (among others). Probably you can’t even tell much of their influences on my works, but the thing is that when it comes to name my favorite photographers I always come across these names and a few more. Everyone of the above mentioned photographers has his own style and aesthetics, and they all have played a major role in the History of photography, still I deeply admire and respect each one of them, for what they gave us... their insights, their visions, love and enduring mastery of taking photos. With McCullin, I felt for the first time, if I can say so, a both poetic and tragic view of the war. One can see the souls, the lives and deaths of the soldiers, a redemption like tableaux about the absurd. With Eugene, I get into a deeply scarred life, but also filled with much love and tenderness. So when I look at their photos, no longer I get their initial views, but more what I feel when looking at their photos. It is an enormous legacy, and part of my inspiration lies on this process... what is given, and what you see.

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You see, taking photos is like unfolding what shines out (in)there. 56

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Level 25 ArtJournal “Acqua Series” Photograph Joao Santos

I don’t believe that things and objects have an obvious configuration for everyone.

“Istanbul, 2013” Photograph Joao Santos

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“I Am Watching You” Photograph Joao Santos

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Level 25 ArtJournal One of your most enigmatic works is “Did You See the Light?” A deceptively simple field of yellow at first glance; but once you stare at it and examine it there is so much there open to interpretation! Talk to us about “Did You See the Light?” and tell us if creating such abstract works with your camera is something you take much joy in. JS: I take joy in composing a photo within my feelings. It is like bringing out my innermost thoughts and emotions, and to draw it with light. The famous cliche says it all: taking photos is to draw with light. This specific work ‘Did You See the Light?’ deals with my, lets put it this way, ‘religious’ view of Life. Wether you approach this photo through its complex gradings of light (different tonalities of yellows, ending with a mysterious dark circle), or just by visualizing its impact, it all comes to the beauty and the unknown of things (objects) and the different emotions you can experience when looking at them. A significant part of my photographic work is either minimalistic or abstract, thus reflecting and always questioning shapes, forms, meanings, status and functions. Light is pure energy, and energy is embedded everywhere (at different levels); in the other hand taking photos is just to capture the light of the objects and nature surrounding us. “I Am Watching You!” is a fun piece to examine. In it I see the connection between photography and voyeurism. Is this work a statement on how much we all are watched by others nowadays? JS: This panel which is composed of 4 different digital photos and is meant to be printed and mounted on a fairly large sized print, is a tribute to the master Hitchcock. When I took the photos I immediately thought about Hitchcock movies. Every photographer is a potential voyeur (it is an implicit concept that resolves the relation between the camera and the eye – the sight). One can imagine the chilly feelings of someone who’s being watched over and over without being noticed. The idea of something more powerful that invades your self, your privacy... breaking the line of the forbidden. Probably in a near future we will face an even more invasive and controlling technology (virtual, digital, holographic, brain induced), like in the stories of K. Dick, Huxley, Kafka, or Burroughs, thus posing more questions regarding our private lives. As we evolve and develop into a highly technological society where the media (processed info and images) tend to be the center of our lives, we will certainly lose our identities and mingle to the point where things will be completely unnoticed. Hitchcock wasn’t the first realizing this problem, but he was surely a master revealing the hidden eye, the voyeurism! Finally, imagine you are teaching a class of novice photographers. What is the most important message you want to give them? JS: Forget everything you have learned about taking photos!! Actually if you’re honest with yourself, if you have that keen eye, and that insight to unfold, then you most probably will be noticed. It all comes with experience, maturity, and a genuine and creative personality. You surely may have your idols, and I can assure you that it is almost impossible to create anything completely new without any sort of influences; but you gotta listen to your inner voice, to find your own path, to tell your view... your story. One can learn to write, but that doesn’t necessarily makes him a writer; same applies to photography. It has little to do with the camera, as I said – the camera is just a means to an end. If you don’t have it, you will never strive. Most of the times I find myself conflicting with the camera, contradicting it too; but this exercise is what brings the best out of you. It is a synergy that enables you to tell the story... a permanent thrilling, always like the first time, a love story type. You wake up to the world to show what you see when you look at things... differently!

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“Did You See The Light?” Photograph Joao Santos

Forget everything you have learned about taking photos!

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Belen Velasco Mendoza (Mexico) The art is discovery of what is around and inside of you; it is the emotion that runs from your being and the exploitation of your body. Creation; start with the idea, process the evolution of an image, see her form far in the distance as if submerged in water, little definition, lines and colour removed and dried with my physical body and viewed with our eyes just as she was with in my mind. The definition or classification of my work is distracting for me; the technique is only the means and not an objective in itself. My approach to art is as when I was a little girl in MĂŠxico, the colours were my world and inspiration like the trees, the movement all the creation of forms that were still not apparent in my head. Through oils, acrylics, water colour, aerosols and pastels, texture is a big part of my expression and the telling of a story through series. Inspiration and artistic creation is a mysterious energy, a magic, it exists without limitation. It is a moment that allows me to be alive, a part of life and to feel existence as part of a larger organism. My goal is to share my emotion through strength and colour, to ignite passion and to provoke emotion. To share in the inspiration of those who I come into contact with though my art.

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http://belvelascowright.tumblr.com/


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“Reves” 101 cm x 76 cm Oil pastels and acrylic on canvas Belen Velasco

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“Llavero” 76 cm x 76 cm Oil pastels and acrylic on canvas Belen Velasco


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Texture is very important to you. Outside of your art, do you enjoy discovering stories in the textures of the world around us all? In the stones of a field? In the wood of a forest? In the fabrics of the clothing people wear? BV: Absolutely! we hold the universe in our hands, are able to touch, taste, view the world we live in. The shapes and colours transported through our finger tips, our eyes and ears, they flow in and out again like waves. I love to work with fabric, it makes my mind fly with inspiration to imagine what it might become, it’s potential. I love to follow the figures in the trees and the path of the insects. All these things are creation they are creativity. So to create texture on my canvas excites me very much. Mexico as a country seems to have embraced color as part of its identity more than just about any other nation on Earth. Everything in Mexico is so vibrantly colorful: the walls of the buildings, the tables in restaurants, the uniforms of schoolchildren, even the taxis and bicycles on the roads. Describe for us, please, how wonderful it must have been being an artistically minded young girl growing up in such a colorful nation. BV: I was born in Ciudad Guzmån, a small town then I moved and grew up in Guadalajara, everything there was about Jose Clemente Orozco, my school had his name and my city his revolutionary murals; I was surrounded by color. I could get lost for hours travelling through the tiles on the walls, the smell in the air and music in the street, I feel my art and I are the total of my life experience. I feel I lived a lot of intensity, adrenaline, happiness, all really strong feelings. I lived through experiences that made me grow up and make me strong, make me be real.

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Your work “Llavero” is intriguing to me because it makes me think of a cross between science fiction and traditional Mexican imagery. As a Mexican artist, do you often desire to modernize or bring a fresh new look to your country’s classical artistic styles? BV: Honesty, that art is sacred to me, it is in every Mexican heart. I think of sugar skulls, equipales, indigenous craft, murals. It makes my breath quick now to think of those images! Of course they are influential to my own concept of imagery. I think that it is a natural evolution of an ancient form of communication, a method of releasing some of the burden your eyes take as they soak in the world, my world was those images and I do not wish to distort the memory but use it to enhance my vision. I can stare at “Pies Abajo, Huesos Arriba” and see so many different things because my mind wants to create the story behind why those skeletal legs are set in the middle of a scene of soft, girly pastels. But I will leave the storytelling to you. Why don’t you tell us what “Pies Abajo, Huesos Arriba” is all about. BV: She walked along that road on earth, alone but for the ghost of the trees, her feet like roots tie her down but she does not know where she belongs, where is she supposed to be? The soft pastels were how she started, I tried to leave the dark colours but they bloomed naturally from her soul.

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“Pies abajo, huesos arriba� 60 cm x 90 cm Watercolor, oil, oil pastels and acrylic on canvas Belen Velasco

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“Tu y Yo” 90 cm x 95 cm Oil and acrylic on canvas Belen Velasco

In your statement, you declare that your art is the “discovery of what is around and inside of you; it is the emotion that runs from your being and the exploitation of your body.” I can see that reflected in “Untitled;” I can also see it reflected in “Tu Y Yo.” What emotions do you find most contribute to your painting? And also, in what ways do you feel all of us are having our bodies exploited? BV: We allow ourselves to be exploited to relent control, pass on and submit whether that be to a loved one, an enemy an external. Equally the internal, to give our bodies to our subconscious allow something to develop within our thoughts, become exploited by our own being. Definitely when I feel excited, optimistic, enthusiastic, positive it moves me to paint, negativity consumes my creativity. “Tu y yo” started life and was abandoned, an old harlequin kissing a woman surrounded by the circus, their universe, but they bored me and I left them alone; then one day I met someone that blew my mind and “tu y yo” became a part of my world again and I let out all of my emotions on top of the old circus to create our universe.

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“Untitled” 64 cm x 84 cm Fabric paint on soft cotton Belen Velasco

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Level 25 Artjournal; Issue #6