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Fall 2016

THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS

transformed

FAR ABOVE: the story


FALL 2016

KU Giving is published by KU Endowment, the private fundraising foundation for the University of Kansas. You are receiving this magazine because you support KU. CHAIR, BOARD OF TRUSTEES Deanell Reece Tacha PRESIDENT Dale Seuferling SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, COMMUNICATIONS & MARKETING Rosita Elizalde-McCoy PUBLICATIONS MANAGER Valerie Gieler CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Rosita Elizalde-McCoy Lisa Scheller Michelle Tevis SENIOR ART DIRECTOR Sarah Meiers We welcome your comments, suggestions and questions. KU Giving magazine P.O. Box 928 Lawrence, KS 66044-0928 785-832-7400 kugiving@kuendowment.org Postmaster: Send address changes to: KU Endowment P.O. Box 928 Lawrence, KS 66044-0928

LET’S BE SOCIAL

30% POST-CONSUMER RECYCLED PAPER To do more for the planet and our readers, we changed to a recycled content paper with a smooth matte texture that conserves resources and makes KU Giving easier to read. Even if you didn’t notice, we are sure the 61 trees and 59,038 gallons of water that were saved did.

ON THE COVER Artistic view of the Hill’s evolution during Far Above. Illustration by Gavin Snyder. PHOTOGRAPHY Mark McDonald, all except listed: Lloyd Emerson, 6–7 | James Ewing, 21 | Brian Goodman, IFC–1, 20 | Abby Greenawalt, 10 | Tommy Peterson, 8 | Earl Richardson, 4, 5 | Ryan Waggoner, 4


2 KU GIVING | FALL 2016 | FAR ABOVE: THE STORY


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FAR ABOVE:

t he story IGHT YEARS AGO, A BOLD MISSION KICKED-OFF THE START OF SOMETHING EXTRAORDINARY — FAR ABOVE: THE CAMPAIGN FOR KANSAS. THE CAMPAIGN SOUGHT SUPPORT TO EDUCATE FUTURE LEADERS, ADVANCE MEDICINE, ACCELERATE DISCOVERY AND DRIVE ECONOMIC GROWTH TO SEIZE THE OPPORTUNITIES OF THE FUTURE.

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Our belief was that with the support of alumni and friends, we could build capacity, expand opportunities, spark innovation and achieve aspirations — and we did, thanks to you. The community rallied for the University of Kansas and The University of Kansas Hospital with unprecedented support. More than 4,700 volunteers gave their time to the cause by participating in events and serving on boards and committees. Donors from all 50 states and 59 countries contributed, and many of them gave more than once. Some donors gave because as a student they received support. Some wanted to honor a loved one, a favorite professor or a program that inspires them. Others wanted to provide hope for a cure or to update facilities to better serve the university’s goals. Keen to address statewide needs, donors enabled expansion of the School of Medicine–Wichita to four years and creation of a Salina campus. These campuses are educating physicians to serve underserved populations, particularly in rural areas. Involvement on campus was noteworthy. Students, faculty and staff shared their insights and experiences about how philanthropy makes a difference on campus

every day — and a number became donors themselves. Just a couple of examples: a crowdfunding initiative spearheaded by the Student Endowment Board inspired 1,200 students to give; and even in the wake of reduced state funding, faculty and staff giving to the university increased 75 percent. Each person who was a part of the campaign contributed to its story; and with more than 131,000 donors, we could fill novels. We are extraordinarily grateful for your support. If you haven’t visited the KU campuses in a while, you are in for a surprise. Positive changes are happening inside and out, and the atmosphere is buzzing with energy. “The impact of philanthropy is already visible across our campuses — in buildings completed, renovated and rising, in students who can now attend KU thanks to new scholarships, in faculty who have either joined the university or stayed thanks to support they have received, in lives both saved and changed by philanthropy,” said Kurt and Sue Watson, campaign co-chairs. “All of this and more has been made possible by donor contributions during Far Above.” The University of Kansas has been transformed. KU will be greater for years to come, because of you.

FARABOVE.ORG 5


6 KU GIVING | FALL 2016 | FAR ABOVE: THE STORY


$1,661,458,928 total philanthropic support given during the Far Above campaign

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CHANGING lives IFTING UP TALENTED STUDENTS, INSPIRATIONAL TEACHERS AND INNOVATIVE RESEARCHERS by supporting

their dreams creates ripples of influence. One scholarship may be the support a student needs to attend KU or finish a degree. One professorship could ignite hundreds of minds. One research award could fuel a discovery that helps countless people.

Now imagine the potential with the 735 new scholarships and 53 new professorships established by donors during Far Above. Four students and two faculty who benefited from this support shared their stories. An MBA student hopes to serve nonprofits. A law graduate wants to help people overcome difficulties. A journalism graduate works to elect effective leaders. A medical student helped develop implants for scoliosis

patients. A professor strives to understand how ocean currents and weather influence life. An internationally recognized oncologist aims to save lives. Read on to learn about them. One act of generosity can make a difference for generations. The possibilities are endless because donors invested in KU people, the heart of our university. So many changes are already happening, and we can’t wait to see what is next.

SCOTT MITCHELL, M.D.

at Children’s Mercy Hospital and

M.D. 2016

helped develop implants for

Bachelor’s in chemical

scoliosis patients in partnership

engineering 2012

with KU engineering students.

Salina, Kan.

What is your goal for the future? Far Above Scholarships:

I plan to return to Kansas after my

• Berkley Memorial Scholarship

orthopedic surgery training at the

in Medicine

Mayo Clinic. While I was working in

• Glen and Flora Warren

Quinter, Kan., a 6-year-old patient

Memorial Scholarship

with a broken leg had to be flown

• Madison A. and Lila Self

for treatment because the nearest

Engineering Leadership Fellow

surgeon was hours away.

• Dane Hansen Leaders of Tomorrow Scholar

What do you love about KU? The thing I love most about KU

What is your passion?

is the people. I come from a long

I want to become a doctor to help

line of Jayhawks. At the School of

people. Seeing patients improve

Medicine, there is a corridor listing

their outcomes and become pain

every graduate since 1905. I love to

free motivates me.

see the evolution of graduates.

How have scholarships

What would you say to

helped you?

KU donors?

My scholarships have meant a great

Thank you for the generous gifts.

deal; they have supported me for

I would have been in a difficult

eight years. Instead of taking a

position without their support.

job to just pay the bills, I worked

It has been a life-changer.

8 KU GIVING | FALL 2016 | FAR ABOVE: THE STORY


GRECIA RUCOBA

What are your goals for the future?

Bachelor’s in accounting 2016

Most of the talented business professionals work for big

Anthony, Kan.

corporations. My goal is to bring essential business skills to nonprofits. I have a summer internship and am coming

Far Above Scholarships:

back to KU for my master’s in accounting.

• Leonel E. and Helen L. Tustison Scholarship in Business • Multicultural Business Scholars Scholarship

What do you love about KU? I love the sense of community. It feels like everyone

What is your passion?

wants you to do well. Potter Lake is my favorite spot

My family is really important. My mom especially instilled

on campus. It’s so relaxing; I don’t need to put on

in me that you can do whatever you want no matter your

headphones there.

background. I want to prove that.

What would you say to KU donors? How have scholarships helped you?

I couldn’t have done this without them. I wouldn’t have

Neither of my parents went to college. They were both

been able to walk down the Hill without these scholarships.

born in Mexico and are hourly employees. I am paying for school myself by working multiple jobs and taking out

What advice do you have for new students?

loans. Without my scholarships, I couldn’t have afforded

Get an on-campus job. My bosses have been some of the

to come to KU.

most influential people in my life.

FARABOVE.ORG 9


ROBIN RANDOLPH J.D. 2016 Amelia, Va.

Far Above scholarship: • Mark V. and Stacy A. Parkinson Student Support Fund

What is your passion? I love helping people get through their difficulties and solve their problems. That’s why I went to law school. I love my family, friends and mentors who encourage me to strive for my best.

How have scholarships helped you? The Parkinson Fund made the Sixth Semester in Washinton, D.C. program possible for me. There, I interned with lawyers at the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts. Additional scholarships helped support my education and reduced my student loan debt.

Have you overcome any obstacles in pursuing your education? Lack of confidence and lack of funds were my biggest hurdles. I gained the confidence working as a paralegal for five years. I helped pay for school by working for myself as a SpanishEnglish document translator for a year and continued part-time during school.

What is your goal for the future? I have a few practice areas in mind, but I mostly look forward to using my legal education in public service.

What do you love about KU? By far the chant — Rock Chalk, Jayhawk, KU! I came here because I wanted to attend a public law school with national recognition and a good value.

What would you say to KU donors? Thank you. For me, this was a dream come true.

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ERIC PAHLS

What do you love about KU?

Bachelor’s in journalism 2016

I love so much about KU — the tradition, the journalism

Beloit, Kan.

school, KU Info. My favorite place is the Dole Institute. I loved working there and at KU Info. Sen. Dole also is a

Far Above Scholarships:

hero and mentor to me.

• Joel Zeff Chicken Picata Scholarship • Cynthia Bregin Crouch Broadcast Scholarship

What are your hobbies and interests?

• Dale L. and Esther I. Puckett Family

I enjoy cooking just about anything. I also love music.

Journalism Scholarship • Max C. Page Memorial Scholarship

I have a collection of vinyl records, and I play four musical instruments.

• Dane Hansen Leaders of Tomorrow Scholar

What would you say to KU donors? What is your passion?

I would not be here without their support. They’re a big

I am inspired by improving systems to help people and

part of my educational journey and my Jayhawk family.

by working to put leaders in places to make that happen. That is why I am involved in political campaigns —

What advice do you have for new students?

because I believe good leaders can lift all people.

Try everything on campus once, and then go for those things you love.

How have your scholarships helped you? My scholarships allowed me to take on internship opportunities, including MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” in New York and John McCain’s senate office and Carly Fiorina’s presidential campaign, both in Washington, D.C.

FARABOVE.ORG 11


GENE RANKEY, PH.D. Hubert H. and Kathleen M. Hall Professor of Geology Kansas Interdisciplinary Carbonates Consortium Doctorate in geology 1996

What is your passion? I strive to understand the way the world works. I study waves, tides and ocean currents and how they transport sediment, construct the seascape and influence life. I’m also interested in using modern systems to better interpret the history of the planet.

How does your professorship support you? My professorship, established during Far Above, helps me do things quickly or that fall outside of available funding. I recently did an expedition in a new-to-me geographic area to test ideas that could lead to larger projects. I also was able to send two students to see a unique core in the Netherlands.

What brought you to KU? KU has the best program in carbonate geology. When I was a doctoral student here, I had the pleasure to work with Hub Hall on the department’s alumni advisory committee. I also feel fortunate that I was able to personally express my appreciation to Kathleen Hall.

What makes KU a great place to teach and do research? KU is a challenging, supportive atmosphere with opportunities to learn. As a teacher, I love seeing students begin to develop intellectually and become passionate about excelling.

What interests you outside of work? Two of my kids were field assistants on a research trip to Kiribati, a low-lying Pacific island nation being affected by rising sea levels. My kids played soccer with the children and noticed that many of them were barefoot and used old jugs for balls. We started the nonprofit Goals for Good Foundation to send them soccer equipment.

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CAROL FABIAN, M.D. Director, Breast Cancer Prevention & Survivorship Research Center University Distinguished Professor Mark and Bette Morris Family Endowed Chair in Cancer Prevention Research Associate Director of Clinical Research, The University of Kansas Cancer Center

What is your passion? I am focused on developing more accurate methods of short-term breast cancer risk prediction, reducing breast cancer risk without inducing menopause symptoms and reducing the side effects of treatment.

How has National Cancer Institute (NCI) designation made a difference? NCI designation, achieved with Far Above support, has provided new opportunities for research and clinical trials. It also is expanding cancer prevention efforts and giving patients more access to the most advanced treatments.

What makes KU a great place to teach and do research? I received my bachelor’s and medical degrees from KU. I came back here because of the collaboration and team approach to teaching, treating patients and scientific discovery.

How does your professorship support you? My professorship gives me the freedom to explore ideas that wouldn’t receive funding from other sources. It also supports my professional development.

How do you explain your research to students? By analyzing tissue samples from women at high risk for breast cancer, we found that a pattern of precancerous cells in women without a clinical breast problem predicted short-term risk of breast cancer. This led to studies on prevention, including assessing the effects of lignans (found in flaxseed), omega-3 supplements, weight loss and exercise.

What are your interests outside of work? I enjoy spending time with my family and three grandchildren. However, patients and research are never far from conscious thought. FARABOVE.ORG 13


MAGNIFYING opportunities HE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS STRIVES TO PROVIDE TRANSFORMATIVE EXPERIENCES for each and every Jayhawk — students and faculty alike. And when KU programs and research initiatives receive support, knowledge expands. Ideas are bigger than one person. Emerging concepts amplify when programs have the resources for students and faculty to collaborate with each other and with peers around the world. Sometimes this requires support for study abroad or to bring an expert to campus; resources to do field research or kick off a new project; or help with expenses so a student can serve others or gain realworld leadership experience. Private giving provides the freedom for exploration on campus and beyond. It fuels the ability to be bold in our ideas and approach — that’s how “eureka” moments often happen. Providing the vehicle for innovation is vital to recruit renowned faculty and promising students to KU. As faculty mentors conduct groundbreaking research and share the latest knowledge, they cultivate the scholars and professionals of the future. These experiences expand horizons, stretch abilities, instill confidence, build career paths and may even lead to discoveries that change our world. Thanks to Far Above, new doors are opening every day.

Honors students Cody Christensen, Jake Doerr, Sam Eastes and Katherine Wipfli (left to right) have participated in off-campus programs with the help of opportunity awards.

14 KU GIVING | FALL 2016 | FAR ABOVE: THE STORY


EXPANDING THE STUDENT EXPERIENCE THE UNIVERSITY HONORS PROGRAM HELPS STUDENTS make the

most of their college experience on campus and off. Opportunity awards are among the tools that fuel that success. Far Above support has made possible 16 new funds that enable honors students to experience internships, service learning, study abroad and research. The program more than doubled the awards given to students in the past three years. Just in the 2015–2016 academic year, donors funded 250 student opportunities.

INTERNSHIPS One summer, Jake Doerr worked for a historical society in Cleveland. He followed that with a Coro leadership program in Kansas City, Mo. “It was a great internship to learn how different groups work to gain consensus in the city,” Doerr said. “It inspired me to apply to KU’s Masters in Public Administration program.” Doerr, from Shenandoah, Iowa, graduated in May with a bachelor’s degree in history and a minor in public policy. He received the Sailors London Review Award and the Kala Mays Stroup Intern Award.

SERVICE LEARNING Katherine Wipfli, a junior from Oklahoma City, received an award for an alternative break trip. Her experience took her to Alamosa, Colo., and La Puente Home, a shelter with a children’s program, pantry and transitional housing. The James C. and Julia Markham Piper Fund made it possible. “I really enjoyed it because it was something I wouldn’t get to do on campus,” said Wipfli, who is studying chemical engineering. “I got to work with people in the community, and it was very humbling.”

RESEARCH Cody Christensen’s opportunity award took him to Washington, D.C., for a policy research internship at the Brookings Institution. “I was looking for a little bit of extra funding to help cover the costs of D.C.,” he said. “The scholarship allowed me to focus on the research.” Christensen, a senior from Topeka, Kan., is a School of Education research assistant and received support from the Kala Mays Stroup Intern Award. He is majoring in economics and political science.

STUDY ABROAD Sam Eastes’ education has gone south since coming to KU. Eastes, a senior from Pratt, Kan., received a Young Family Opportunity Award to study abroad in San Jose, Costa Rica this fall. Eastes is majoring in journalism and global and international studies. His goal is to become bilingual and immerse himself in a new culture. “My study abroad opportunity wouldn’t be possible without this help,” he said. “I’m very grateful.” FARABOVE.ORG 15


The Hall Center connects faculty and students doing research in the humanities. Left to right: Clarence Lang, professor of African and African-American studies and chair of the Hall Center’s Executive Committee; Sarah E. Ngoh, doctoral student and Sias dissertation fellow at the Hall Center; Victor Bailey, director of the Hall Center; and Ellen Bertels, undergraduate Hall Center Scholar.

BUILDING CONNECTIONS IN THE HUMANITIES THERE’S MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE behind the arched

OPENING DOORS

columns of the Hall Center for the Humanities. A new

Private contributions are expanding career options

way of thinking about discovery is unfolding.

for graduate students through the center’s Applied

Humanists tend to be individual researchers. But Hall

Humanities program, which helps students land jobs

Center Director Victor Bailey has made collaboration

outside of academia by connecting them with employers

central to its mission, and private philanthropy is helping

in other fields. The center also awards 10 scholarships

pave the way.

per year to outstanding undergraduate students. It gives them the opportunity to meet and dine with

LAYING A NEW FOUNDATION

renowned international scholars visiting KU as part of its

A challenge grant from the National Endowment for

Humanities Lecture Series.

the Humanities, matched by other donors, will assist

“There is a strong commitment at KU to the student

humanities faculty members conducting innovative

body, which sets us apart from other large universities,”

research who are willing to collaborate with other faculty,

Bailey said. His work exemplifies this: In addition to

within or outside their disciplines, or even with other

running the center and holding the Charles W. Battey

organizations. The center also received private backing

Distinguished Professorship of Modern British History, he

for a post-doctoral program in the digital humanities.

also teaches a freshman class.

“You can’t do digital humanities without collaborating with librarians and other academics,” Bailey said. Another impetus for the center has been to bolster

Bailey’s dedication and leadership have brought global attention to the humanities at KU. This motivated the Hall Family Foundation to permanently endow the

support for graduate education in the humanities. The Hall

directorship of the center to ensure it continues to

Family Foundation provided seed funds for a program

attract the same caliber of leadership in the future.

that provides four dissertation fellowships for exceptional

The support the Hall Center received during Far

students. “The more we can bring in high quality graduate

Above cemented its stature at the forefront of the

students to KU, the happier the faculty are,” Bailey said.

humanities and as a point of pride for the university.

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LEADING THE WAY AGAINST ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE AS ALZHEIMER’S ROBS A MIND, IT STEALS A LIFE. It’s a

EXPLORING NEW DIRECTIONS

tragic diagnosis that is all too common, with more than

Center director Russell Swerdlow, M.D., leads the

5.4 million Americans suffering from the disease today.

Alzheimer’s Treatment Program. Swerdlow and the other

Predictions are alarming — by 2050, it’s estimated that

KU researchers belong to an elite network of scientists

10 million Americans will have Alzheimer’s Disease.

nationwide who are seeking better ways to prevent,

By far the most prevalent form of dementia,

treat and reverse the progression of the disease. Their

Alzheimer’s affects one out of every nine Americans over

research is supported in part by federal grants; how-

the age of 65, and one out of every three people over

ever, he said private gifts during Far Above were vital to

age 85. But that could change, thanks to research into

establishing the Alzheimer’s Disease Center.

prevention and new treatments at KU Medical Center’s Alzheimer’s Disease Center.

“Philanthropy-supported research differs from grantsupported research,” Swerdlow said. “Philanthropy emboldens you. It lets you take risks and explore

A PATH TO PREVENTION

new directions. Support from Frank and Evangeline

Jeffrey Burns, M.D., co-director of the center, said if the

Thompson made all the difference in the world for my

onset of Alzheimer’s symptoms could be delayed for

Alzheimer’s Treatment Program.”

five years across the population, the prevalence would decline by 50 percent. Burns’ research suggests that something as simple

The center includes research laboratories, clinical spaces and treatment areas for patients and other volunteers to participate in studies. The center opened

as a healthy diet and 75 minutes a week of moderate-

in 2011 after earning designation through the National

intensity exercise may delay the onset of the disease

Institute of Health’s Institute on Aging. It is one of only

and slow the progression of brain atrophy in Alzheimer’s

31 nationally designated centers in the United States.

patients. Burns recommends that patients “sit less and move more.” And he is quick to add, “what’s good for the heart is good for the brain.”

FARABOVE.ORG 17


ELEVATING spaces RENAISSANCE OF NEW AND TRANSFORMED FACILITIES IS ONE OF THE LEGACIES OF FAR ABOVE.

Donor generosity has supported 16 construction projects — new buildings, additions and major renovations — that are enhancing learning, research and patient care. The views are breathtaking, but more importantly, these projects have modernized the spaces where concepts become inventions, students emerge as leaders and patients regain health. Improvements have touched all areas — with expanded dining, learning and collaboration areas; updates to spaces for art, music and architecture; and new facilities for business, engineering, health education and patient care. State-of-the-art spaces are supporting the growing needs for learning in small, problem-solving teams with access to the latest technology. Our campuses can now welcome community leaders and businesses as never before with areas to host workshops, training and conferences, consistently partnering industry practitioners with our faculty and students. Students also have more access to advising and career services, helping them to be successful on campus and in their professions. These dynamic new environments, made possible thanks to Far Above donors, will help position KU at the forefront of progress and as a center for innovation: • Bloch Cancer Care Pavilion

• LEEP2 Engineering Center

• Capitol Federal Hall

• Lied Center Pavilion

• Cambridge North Tower at The University of Kansas Hospital

• Marie S. McCarthy Hall

• DeBruce Center • The Forum addition at Marvin Hall • Health Education Building • Hill Engineering Research and Development Center • KU Clinical Research Center

18 KU GIVING | FALL 2016 | FAR ABOVE: THE STORY

• Ritchie Hall • Slawson Hall • Spencer Museum of Art renovation • Swarthout Recital Hall renovation • Zamierowski Institute for Experiential Learning


Capitol Federal Hall

Cap Fed

A lead gift from the Capitol Federal Foundation made possible this new home for the School of Business. It doubles the space for students and provides collaborative, interactive work spaces with the latest technology. The building’s auditoria, reception areas, cafeteria, team meeting rooms and spaces for visiting executives are designed to bring the campus and wider communities inside. It opened its doors in May 2016.

FARABOVE.ORG 19


Swart hout Recital Hall

The renovation of Swarthout Hall — originally built in 1957 and KU’s primary venue for student, faculty and guest recitals — improved every aspect of the hall. The new performance space opened in 2015. It has an enhanced structure and design, acoustics, lighting, audio, and technology that includes recording and webcasting capabilities. Donors also funded two new Steinway concert pianos.

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Far left: Spencer Museum of Art Thanks to donors, the museum will open Phase I of a major renovation in fall 2016 that reflects its emphasis on university engagement. The revitalization of nearly 30,000 square feet includes a complete renovation of the lobby and central court, expanding the teaching gallery, introducing an object study room, and enlarging research and storage areas. Left: Lied Center Pavilion The Lied Foundation Trust was the lead donor for the expansion of the center’s lobby and the construction of an education pavilion that serves as a space for events, receptions, recitals and meetings. It opened in 2011. Below: The Forum addition at Marvin Hall Donors enabled Studio 804 students to design and construct The Forum, the students’ most ambitious project to date. The LEED Platinum addition opened in 2015 and includes a lecture hall, breakout space and central commons for the School of Architecture, Design & Planning.

FARABOVE.ORG 21


Marie S. McCart hy Hall

Alumni Kent and Missy McCarthy contributed to construct this new apartment-style residence hall for 38 athletes and upperclass students next to Allen Fieldhouse. Each apartment consists of a living room, dining room and full kitchen. It opened in 2016.

22 KU GIVING | FALL 2016 | FAR ABOVE: THE STORY


Left: DeBruce Center The DeBruce Center opened in 2016 as a new student and visitor center adjoining Allen Fieldhouse with dining, café and event space. It was funded by a lead gift from alumnus Paul DeBruce and the DeBruce Foundation and displays the original “Rules of Basket Ball” as written by James Naismith. The rules were donated by alumnus David Booth. Below top: Ritchie Hall Alumni Scott and Carol Ritchie made possible the construction of Ritchie Hall, which will bring geology and petroleum engineering together in one of two buildings to comprise the new Earth, Energy and Environment Center (EEEC). Ritchie Hall will open in 2017. Below bottom: Slawson Hall The family of the late KU alumnus Don Slawson provided the lead gift for Slawson Hall, as part of the EEEC. Opening next year, it will be a new landmark in collaborative research on energy and environment.

FARABOVE.ORG 23


Cambridge Nort h Tower

Cambridge North Tower will enable The University of Kansas Hospital to serve more patients, with 11 new operating rooms, 28 intensive care beds and 96 acute care beds. Annette Bloch, president of the R.A. Bloch Cancer Foundation, was the lead donor. The first phase of the tower will open in late 2017, the second in 2018.

24 KU GIVING | FALL 2016 | FAR ABOVE: THE STORY


Left: Health Education Building KU Medical Center’s new home for interprofessional education will promote interaction with students and faculty from the schools of Medicine, Nursing and Health Professions, and from KU’s other campuses. Made possible by lead gifts from the Hall Family Foundation and David and Mary Zamierowski, this building will create a community for students, foster innovation, and build a workforce pipeline for communities throughout the region. The Zamierowkski Institute for Experiential Learning will be intregal to the Health Education Building and also includes renovated space in Sudler Hall that opened in 2015 (pictured above). The institute’s full-scale operating room and patient suites are outfitted with mannequins and up-to-date medical equipment so health care students and providers can collaborate and learn in simulated patient care scenarios.

FARABOVE.ORG 25


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THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS

Future bequest expectancies

18%

87% of total gifts were $500 or less

Total amount of gifts $500 or less —

$42,617,774

570,752 Total number of gifts

Campaign priorities

4,771 campaign volunteers

$523M Students

$451M Programs

= 100

$447M Faculty

$240M Facilities 26 KU GIVING | FALL 2016 | FAR ABOVE: THE STORY

131,240 49% Total number of donors

of donors were NEW donors


47%

of donors are alumni

27%

of all alumni gave to the campaign

Donors came from all

53%

50

of gifts came from Kansas

and

states

47%

59

of gifts came from out-of-state

countries

53 New professorships

75%

Increase in faculty and staff giving

=1

735 New scholarships

16

major new or renovated building projects

= 10 FARABOVE.ORG 27


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28 KU GIVING | FALL 2016 | FAR ABOVE: THE STORY


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KU MEDICAL CENTER KANSAS CITY CAMPUS 12

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14

Health Education Building

RAINBOW BLVD

19TH ST

Zamierowski Institute for Experiential Learning

14 15 OLATHE BLVD

16

BELINDER AVE

ROE AVE

15 12

Cambridge North Tower at The University of Kansas Hospital

13 12

SHAWNEE MISSION PKWY

FARABOVE.ORG 29


TOGETHER,

we rose

EVERY GIFT, EVERY DONOR, EVERY VOLUNTEER. THEY EACH CONTRIBUTED TO THE SPECTACULAR SUCCESS OF FAR ABOVE: THE CAMPAIGN FOR KANSAS.

The generosity of alumni and friends generated sparks of creativity, optimism and inspiration at the University of Kansas and The University of Kansas Hospital. The effects of Far Above already are reverberating in every corner of the state of Kansas and spreading throughout our nation and the world. The largest campaign in Kansas’ history proved that legions of people believe that KU is a beacon of hope for the future. Their contributions elevated KU’s stature, opened doors to new opportunities, saved patients’ lives and accelerated the pace of discovery. The ambitious $1.2 billion goal was surpassed two years ahead of schedule, topping $1.6 billion at its conclusion. We accomplished much through Far Above and yet, some of our imperatives remain. As the cost of tuition increases exponentially and state support wanes, we will redouble our efforts on encouraging support for our most precious resources: our students and faculty. Our future is inextricably tied to their success — they are the strongest economic engines for our state. The Jayhawk spirit of hard work, intellectual honesty and a positive outlook has never been stronger. From Mount Oread, we see a horizon full of opportunities, a place where eager minds arrive to push the boundaries of knowledge and give rise to greatness.

30 KU GIVING | FALL 2016 | FAR ABOVE: THE STORY


THANK you

FAR ABOVE STEERING COMMITTEE David Booth


Joe and Susan Morris


Joe and Jean Brandmeyer


Mark and Stacy Parkinson


Linda Zarda Cook


Charles and Anne Rhoades


Tom and Jill Docking


Linda Ellis Sims

Ed and Helen Healy


Michael Shinn, in memoriam

Jay Howard


Kurt and Sue Watson


Drue Jennings

Tom Wiggans


Brian and Buffy King

Forrest and Sally Hoglund, honorary members

FARABOVE.ORG 31


T hank You It is with heartfelt gratitude that we close this chapter in KU’s history, proud of its legacy and hopeful for an even brighter future.

Far Above

“For investing in KU and rallying behind this campaign: Thank you!” DALE SEUFERLING, PRESIDENT OF KU ENDOWMENT


“Because of you, KU will continue to serve our state and create new opportunities for the future.” CHANCELLOR BERNADETTE GRAY-LITTLE


“Thanks to you, we are providing patients more advanced, innovative care and saving more lives.” BOB PAGE, PRESIDENT AND CEO, THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS HOSPITAL


“The success of Far Above is a shining moment in the history of KU and our state.” KURT AND SUE WATSON, CAMPAIGN CO-CHAIRS


P.O. Box 928 Lawrence, KS 66044-0928

KU Medical Center’s Health Education Building and Cambridge North Tower at The University of Kansas Hospital will transform health education and health care in the region.

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Lawrence, Kansas Permit No. 72

KU Giving Issue 23 - Far Above  

KU Giving is published by KU Endowment, the private fundraising foundation for the University of Kansas. We welcome your comments, suggestio...

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