Issuu on Google+

Buddhism I became interested in Zen Buddhism in the springtime of my last year in high school when I looked up the entry in the Britannica in my father's library. Immediately I knew this was what I had been searching for hitherto. From then on I devoured most of the twenty books in English on the subject by Dr. Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki, the gentle, wonderful Professor in Buddhist Philosophy who almost single handedly brought Zen to the Western World early in the Twentieth Century. Dying at 95, just the summer of my newly stimulated interest (1966), he remains my Mentor of mentors ­a fully enlightened man described by Alan Watts as ' at once the simplest and most Sophisticated man I ever met.' In university, and beyond, I read everything I could find in the books stores on Zen ­ at this time the stores were full of books on Zen, not all of them reliable. But I soon progressed to The Middle Way ­ the journal of the Buddhist Society, London, GB; The Eastern Buddhist, the journal Suzuki started with his wife, who died while he was relatively young; and Zen Notes , the wonderful record of the life and writings of Sokei­an, the splendid Zen Master who was the first Master to settle in America. About this time my illness, which was to last until my middle fifties in various stages of recovery and relapse, began to exert its influence on my soon to be desperately sick brain. As I have recorded in other


Budddhism