__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

JULY 2021 RECIPES FOR TROPICAL TREATS

MEET EDUCATOR KIA’RAE HANRON

HOME DÉCOR THRIFTING TIPS

TEEN WITH AUTISM FINDS HIS VOICE

Summer

BUCKET LIST PAGE 16

BROUGHT TO YOU BY


IT’S 7THANNUAL ANNUAL IT’S OUR OUR 6TH

Selfie Contest! Enter now until

Labor Day

1 Snap a picture of yourself doing something fun this summer.

ORTHODONTICS

DRS. RYAN &RYAN EATON& EATON DRS. PETERSON,

ST. ALBANS OFFICE 80 Mapleville Depot 527-7100

(802)864-9197 www.earlsbikes.com k4t-Earl's0621 1

3 Create a funny hashtag and like and share the post to be entered to win $200 Visa Gift Card!

Braces for Children & Adults — champlainortho.net

5/28/21 5:39 PM

2021

WILLISTON OFFICE 277 Blair Park Road 878-5323

2 Post the selfie to our Facebook and/or Instagram page @champlainortho

WINDSURFING

CAMP

k4t-ChamplainOrtho0721 1 k4t-ChamplainOrtho0620.indd 1

6/24/21 11:27 AM 6/4/20 11:59

Summer of dinosaurs EXPLORE THE LIVES OF DINOSAURS, BIG AND SMALL

WND&WVS IS OFFERING WEEKLY HALF-DAY WINDSURFING CAMPS FROM JUN 21 – AUG 27 AT OUR BURLINGTON SURF CLUB LOCATION. THE CAMP RUNS FROM 8:45 AM TO 1:45 PM, MONDAY THRU FRIDAY.

Braces for Children and Adults

VISIT WNDNWVS.COM/PLAY OR CALL 802 540-2529 FOR MORE INFO.

Burlington Williston St. Albans 862-6721 878-5323 527-7100 www.champlainortho.net

SPONSORED BY

RESERVATIONS REQUIRED. Plan your visit at montshire.org

688 PINE ST, BURLINGTON 2

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2021

k4t-WNDWVS0321 1

WNDNWVS.COM

802.540.2529 2/25/21 1:02 PM

MONTSHIRE.ORG k4t-MontshireMuseum0721 1

6/23/21 3:48 PM


SUMMER MUSIC SERIES

LIVE ANIMALS & DEMOS

FIZZY FEST JULY 16 & 17

AWESOME FORCES

ENGINEER IT!

CHAMP LANE

K1-ECHO0721 1

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2021

3

6/28/21 11:29 AM


It’s time to press play.

CAMPS | CLASSES | THEATRE | CONCERTS | GALLERY Fun with friends. New adventures. Making a difference.

ARTISTREEVT.ORG

Join us today at girlscoutsgwm.org.

2095 Pomfret Rd, So. Pomfret, VT | 802-457-3500

k4t-GirlScouts0721 1

4

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2021

k2h-TaminAcademy0421 1

6/24/21 2:56 PM

3/18/21 9:11 AM


CONTRIBUTORS’ QUESTION

EDITOR’S NOTE

What’s a big change you’re excited about this summer?

STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS

I can’t wait to go back to visit all our favorite MUSEUMS after a summer of nothing last year! Both of my kids will have jobs, so it’s going to be important to find time together while we are not working.

COPUBLISHER/ EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Cathy Resmer

cathy@kidsvt.com COPUBLISHER

Colby Roberts

colby@kidsvt.com

ASTRID HEDBOR LAGUE, “MEALTIME” COLUMNIST

CONSULTING EDITOR

Alison Novak

alison@kidsvt.com

First SLEEPAWAY CAMP happening here. Not sure who’s more nervous, him or me!

ART DIRECTOR

Kirsten Thompson MARKETING & EVENTS DIRECTOR

Corey Grenier

HEATHER FITZGERALD “GOOD NATURE” COLUMNIST

corey@kidsvt.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Kaitlin Montgomery kaitlin@kidsvt.com PROOFREADER

Elizabeth M. Seyler PRODUCTION MANAGER

John James

A big change in my family is a BABY, due in August, and we’re nervous and excited. :)

Graham, Cathy and Ivy Resmer at Seb’s Snack Bar

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Don Eggert DESIGNERS

John James, Rev. Diane Sullivan CIRCULATION MANAGER

Matt Weiner BUSINESS MANAGER

Marcy Carton CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Luke Brassard Heather Fitzgerald Astrid Hedbor Lague Emily Jacobs Elisa Järnefelt Maria Munroe Ken Picard Benjamin Roesch PHOTOGRAPHERS

Andy Brumbaugh Cat Cutillo ILLUSTRATOR

Marc Nadel

P.O. BOX 1184 • BURLINGTON, VT 05402 802-985-5482 • KIDSVT.COM

Published 11x per year. Circulation: 35,000 at 800 locations throughout northern and central Vermont. © 2021 Da Capo Publishing Inc. All rights reserved.

Editorial content in Kids VT is for general informational purposes. Parents must use their own discretion for following the advice in any editorial piece. Acceptance of advertising does not constitute service/product endorsement. Da Capo Publishing shall not be held liable to any advertiser for any loss that results from the incorrect publication of its advertisement. If a mistake is ours, and the advertising purpose has been rendered valueless, Da Capo Publishing may cancel the charges for the advertisement, or a portion thereof as deemed reasonable by the publisher. Da Capo Publishing reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including inserts, at the discretion of the publishers.

Ready for What’s Next

I

dropped my kids off at sleepaway camp on Sunday, after stopping for frozen treats at Seb’s Snack Bar in South Hero. Ivy, 12, will spend a month at Camp Hochelaga, a summer program for girls. Graham, 15, will enjoy three weeks at Hochelaga’s all-boys’ rival, Camp Abnaki. These two campers are even more excited than usual to get back to their bunks after last summer’s pandemic-related cancellations. My wife, Ann-Elise, and I are excited for them, too. We know they’re craving time outdoors and time with friends. It’s good for both of them to split up and have a chance Ivy at Camp Hochelaga drop-off 2017 to be moreinindependent. But I can’t help feeling a little sad, too. The four of us haven’t spent much time apart over the last 16 months. Ann-Elise is a nurse at the University of Vermont Medical Center, but I’ve been working mostly from home; the kids attended school remotely most of the year. We’ve become a tight-knit group, with our own inside jokes and our own lingo and rituals — like watching a daily episode of “Murder, She Wrote,” which has been surprisingly comforting and entertaining. We’ve learned to depend on each other and forgive each other. We’ve learned when to listen sympathetically, when to apologize and when to give each other a gentle nudge. The kids’ departure for camp feels like an end to that era. I know that when they come back, they’ll have new inside jokes with their friends. We may not immediately recognize who they’ve become. And that’s OK. It’s a natural part of growing up. I think we all agree that it’s the right time for a transition. That’s true of Kids VT, as well. In the June issue, managing editor Alison Novak penned her farewell editor’s note. She’s been covering K-12 education for Seven Days ever since — and doing a great job. We’re so fortunate to have Alison, a former classroom teacher and a parent, reporting those stories. We’re taking this opportunity to make some changes to Kids VT, too. We’ll have some news about those in our Back to School issue. Look for it inside Seven Days in mid-August. In the meantime, savor this glorious summer. In this issue, you’ll read about exploring old-growth forests at Vermont State Parks, scoring high-quality home décor at secondhand stores and whipping up papaya-avocado salad. Find a few suggestions for a Vermont Summer Bucket List on page 16. And enjoy Luke Brassard’s account of how he found his voice — with a little help from “Weird Al” Yankovic; the newly minted high school grad penned this month’s “Use Your Words” essay. We’ll see you again before it’s time to head back to class.

COREY GRENIER, MARKETING & EVENTS DIRECTOR

In comparison to last summer, even the smallest things — meeting friends, allowing our daughter to play freely with her friends, GOING TO BUY CREEMEES without thinking about contagion simultaneously — those all feel like huge changes and make me feel so happy. ELISA JÄRNEFELT “MOM TAKES NOTES” COLUMNIST

My kids are now 13 and (almost) 11, old enough to travel alone. When I put them ON A PLANE last week, just the two of them, to visit their grandparents in the Midwest, I felt elation, but also a little bit of sadness at how fast they’re growing up. BENJAMIN ROESCH, “MUSICAL NOTES” COLUMNIST

CONTRIBUTOR’S NOTE (“Use Your Words,” p. 23) has been writing song parodies since 2018. He submitted a version of this essay as part of his application for the Spring 2021 Making a Difference for Autism Scholarship. Find Luke’s parody music videos, including “Livin’ La Vie Corona,” on his YouTube channel.

LUKE BRASSARD

CATHY RESMER, COPUBLISHER/EXECUTIVE EDITOR KIDSVT.COM JULY 2021

5


Join Us!

L E A R N . C R E A T E . P L AY.

Summer Camp is Open Circuits, Coding and Illustrator Design

Create, design, and program your own robot using circuits and a laser machine for your projects to come to life! 40 SEARS LANE BURLINGTON, VT 802-540-0761 • GENERATORVT.COM

generatorvt.com/summer-camps k6H-Generator0721.indd 1

6/24/21 2:06 PM

LEARN &GROW

webinar

Are You Ready to Buy a Home? Thursday, July 22nd, 2021 12:00 - 12:30 pm

Registration is required & easy! Sign up today by scanning the QR code or call 800.400.8790

follow us

Future Webinars Using Technology for Better Money Management Thursday, August 26

, h A ! r e m Sum y l i m a F , n u F Enjoy a n i m o d e e r F & k r a P e t a t S t n Vermo by. e s lo c o S . o d So much to

Visit VTSTATEPARKS.COM for more information and reservations FEDERALLY INSURED BY NCUA 6

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2021

k3v-NEFCU0721 1

6/23/21 3:47 PM

k2v-VTStateParks(DeptofForest)0721.indd 1

6/24/21 2:01 PM


JULY 2021

12

Window to the World Kia’Rae Hanron teaches African American history though arts engagement

Columns Mom Takes Notes 8 9 Good Nature 10 Mealtime 11 Musical Notes 12 Vermont Visionaries 14 Art Lesson 18 Secondhand Style 19 Check Up 23 Use Your Words Just for Kids 20 Coloring Contest

Summer Bucket List 10

Tropical Treats Stay cool with a pair of summery recipes

How to savor Vermont’s shortest, sweetest season

16

Discount Décor Seven great items to thrift for your home

23

Word Puzzle Coloring Contest Winners Puzzle Answers

On the Cover

18

Photographer Cat Cutillo captured this carefree image of Bert Sheehan, 2, at North Beach in Burlington.

Do Your Kids Like to DRIVE FAST? Spend a week honing your driving skills on the virtual tracks with our coaches. Perfect your braking, cornering and overtaking techniques.

Ages 10-17 DATES

July 26-30 & August 23-27 HOURS

Monday to Friday 9:00am-3:00 pm

Cost $450.00

BOOK ONLINE AT vtsimracer.com | 294 NORTH WINOOSKI AVE | BURLINGTON, VT 05401 | 802-448-3107 K4h-BurlyAxe0721 -1 1

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2021

7

6/25/21 10:23 AM


MOM TAKES NOTES BY E L I S A J Ä RN E F E LT

D

uring previous summers, my daughter and I have explored nature in Vermont by observing the animals and plants around us. “Look, there’s a chipmunk running on a tree trunk! Look, can you see how the flowers have turned into berries now?” This summer, these notions are accompanied by the kind of questions from a 4-year-old that make me ponder the very existence of nature, including humans. Not surprisingly, these questions often leave me struggling to provide a satisfying answer. Why don’t animals realize that roads are dangerous? Does the snapping turtle mom know that a predator ate its eggs? If mom birds like daddy birds who have bright colors (as they signal good health), who wants the daddy bird who is not in good health? Do turkey vultures eat dead beetles? When do humans die? When do humans become a different species? Being the mom of a 4-year-old has made me resort to the toolkit from my academic research years. I often start with a classic conference maneuver: “That’s a really great question,” which buys me more time to think. After having collected my thoughts a bit, I do my best to give an honest reply. Rather than offer a clear answer, I often end up wondering out loud about several different options as I acknowledge that I only have a hunch, or that I really don’t know. But in the end, I always add: “We can figure out if someone has studied this. If not, it’s something that still needs to be researched.” Our conversations remind me of something I ended up somewhat forgetting when I was doing research and focusing so much on the testing and answering: how to wonder. K

8

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2021


COURTESY OF LAUREN ESSERMAN

COURTESY OF KAITLIN ALFORD

GOOD NATURE B Y HE AT HE R FIT Z GE RA L D

Button Bay State Park

On the hunt for ancient forests at Button Bay and Kingsland Bay Trees at Button Bay State Park

W

hen I think of Button Bay and Kingsland Bay State Parks in Ferrisburgh, the first thing that comes to mind are the large picnics, weddings and festivals I’ve attended there. But, according to my copy of The Sierra Club Guide to the Ancient Forests of the Northeast, both sites also have old-growth forest. So during Vermont Days — an annual weekend in June when state park admission is free — I set out to investigate them. Most of the old growth my guidebook highlighted at these spots consists of one of my favorite types of forest, known to ecologists as Limestone Bluff Cedar-Pine Forest. These are rare and occur only on cliffs of calcium-rich bedrock, with northern white cedar trees basically growing right out of the rock. Many years ago I read an article in Discover magazine about similar forests along some cliffs near Toronto. Botanists there were startled to discover that some of the diminutive trees growing out of the rocks had tree rings thinner than 0.1 millimeter and were up to 700 years old. The oldest dead tree they found there had been more than 1,600 years old when it died. I’m not sure how thoroughly the

cedars of Lake Champlain’s bluffs have been sampled, but my guidebook mentions trees at these parks that are 300 to 500 years old. I imagine that, like in other places in Vermont, the trees that escaped cutting are hard to reach — perhaps only accessible through rock climbing. The botanists found that a tapered-growth form — wide base, thin at the top — was most predictive of great age. These cliffs are pretty special places. In addition to the impressive age of the old-growth cedars, the Canadian botanists noted extreme conditions, including temperatures ranging as high as 110 degrees Fahrenheit and as low as -20 and plants usually found in Arctic regions. Button Bay State Park has campgrounds, a playground, a swimming pool, a picnic area and other amenities that might be the highlight of a young child’s visit. I am a veteran of many nature outings with my vehicle-obsessed son, who many years later is apt to ask about an amazing natural place we once visited: “Oh, is that the place that had those green golf carts?” I am going to remind us all that this is fine. One of our jobs is to give our kids chances to find their own

At Kingsland Bay, my guidebook highlighted the trail just beyond Hawley House and the other facilities at the park. We walked the approximately mile-long loop, and it was lovely. But my favorite part of the park is a separate chunk of land on the other side of the bay. To get to this wilder tract, leave the park proper and turn right onto Town Beach Road. There is free parking in the town beach lot or along the road when the beach is crowded. You’ll enter on a path that leads you through an old pasture with lots of scrappy red cedars Kids at growing in the field, Kingsland then you’ll emerge into Bay State the old-growth white Park cedars. The contrast helps me appreciate the wildness of the white cedar forest even more. Field naturalist Alicia Daniel’s YouTube video, “Old Growth Forest at Kingsland Bay: A Tale of Two Cedars,” is a nice guide to this amazing old forest; find it on the Vermont Master Naturalist channel. When I visited these two parks, it was a hot day, and I dragged us along at a fast clip to get to all the sites I wanted to check out. We didn’t even have time for swimming. If you take a trip to one of these parks, don’t rush like I did! Find one or two magical places and linger there. And, as always when the temperature is above freezing, check for ticks when you get home from your adventure in the woods. K COURTESY OF KAITLIN ALFORD

Old Growth in Plain Sight

moments of flow, whatever that may look like. All we have to do is expose them to nature, model our interest — “Now it’s Mom’s turn, and we’re going to go look for a very old forest” — and ask them, and ourselves, questions about the obvious things we see all the time and don’t usually pause to think about. For example, How can a tree grow out of rock? Answer: According to the Canadian botanists, they grow by taking advantage of tiny pockets of soil and moisture found in indentations in the rock, along with phosphorus and nitrogen collected by fungi that infiltrate the tree’s roots — and perhaps even from algae that grow inside the rocks. Why does a tree have rings, anyway? Answer: Because trees put on new growth each year. They grow fastest in the late spring and early summer, adding larger, lighter-colored cells, and slower in the late summer and fall, adding smaller, darker-colored cells. I have to believe that these teachable moments will eventually amount to something meaningful. The old-growth forest on Button Point has a magical feel. In addition to the cedars along the shores, there is what my guidebook calls “conventional” old-growth forest in the middle of the peninsula, with hemlocks as old as 450 years and some very large white pines (40 inches in diameter), white oaks (38 inches), red oaks (32 inches) and red pines (18 inches). You can also look for fossils and scratches in the bedrock made by glaciers.

My guidebook mentions trees at these parks that are 300 to 500 years old.

Heather Fitzgerald teaches field ecology and environmental science at the Community College of Vermont, the University of Vermont and Saint Michael’s College. KIDSVT.COM JULY 2021

9


MEALTIME BY A S T RI D H E D B OR L A GUE

Papaya-Avocado Salad and Watermelon-Coconut Refresher Stay cool with this pair of summery treats

W

WATERMELON-COCONUT REFRESHER (Makes 8 glasses)

INGREDIENTS:

• 1 mini watermelon (or about 6 cups watermelon chunks) • 1 can reduced-fat coconut milk • 1 liter coconut water • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh mint • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice

10

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2021

PHOTOS: ANDY BRUMBAUGH

hen summer gets underway in Vermont, I like to make dishes that hail from warmer climates. This month, I went with a tropical theme: papaya-avocado salad and a thirstquenching drink made with watermelon and coconut. Papaya is a popular ingredient in a wide range of countries, from Mexico to the Philippines. When unripe, it’s green and crunchy and is often used in curries, stews or the popular Thai salad som tam. In its ripe form, it’s a deep orange color, sweet and so buttery that it almost melts in your mouth. To ensure that your papaya is ripe, make sure it’s a little soft to the touch and has plenty of yellow or orange skin. Though avocado toast and guacamole are popular dishes now, avocados have been enjoyed for millenia. Some sources say they were first eaten about 10,000 years ago in Mexico and cultivated 5,000 years ago. They are full of healthy fats and rich in vitamins, and they have more potassium than bananas. Because avocado and papaya have similar textures, they pair well together on top of a spinach salad with a zesty lime vinaigrette. The watermelon-coconut refresher is a great beverage for a hot day. With both blended chunks of watermelon and coconut water, it’s super hydrating. I used reduced-fat coconut milk in it, so the drink doesn’t feel heavy. Whip up a batch and keep it in a frosty pitcher in the fridge so it’s ready to drink when you need to beat the heat. K

PAPAYA-AVOCADO SALAD (Serves 4-6)

DIRECTIONS:

INGREDIENTS:

1. Cut papaya in half lengthwise, and remove and discard its black seeds. Scoop out the flesh and cut into small pieces (or use a melon baller like I did). 2. Cut the avocados in half and carefully remove the pits. Use a spoon to remove the flesh from the skin, and cut into small pieces.

• • • •

1 ripe papaya 4 ripe avocados 4 cups baby spinach 2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint

DRESSING: • • • •

1/4 cup lime juice 1/8 cup avocado oil or olive oil 2 teaspoons honey pinch salt

3. Make the dressing by putting the lime juice, oil, honey and salt into a small jar. If there is any leftover papaya juice, add that as well. Cover and shake vigorously. 4. Add the papaya and avocado to the spinach, then toss with dressing. Top with fresh mint and serve.

DIRECTIONS: Make this recipe in two batches unless you have a very large blender. 1. Puree half of the watermelon in a blender, then add half of the coconut milk and half of the coconut water and blend well. 2. Pour into a large pitcher and repeat with the second half. 3. Stir the lime juice and mint into the drink. (If you prefer the mint in smaller pieces, you can add it to the blender.) 4. Serve chilled, over ice if desired.


MUSICAL NOTES BY BE N J A M I N ROE S CH

Playing Together, Apart The pros and cons of virtual music lessons PHOTOS COURTESY OF BENJAMIN ROESCH

I

was in the kitchen making dinner recently while my son, Leo, had his trumpet lesson in the living room. I watched him hold the instrument to his lips, then blow a note into the air. “Leo, Leo,” a voice immediately called out, “hold on a second.” The note died. Leo, 10, turned to the tiny, headphone-wearing figure on my wife’s iPad — his trumpet teacher, Jason Whitcomb. “Is the Original Sound on?” Jason said. “Umm,” Leo said. Forgot the Original Sound again!, I thought. I was chopping onions like an actor in a silent movie so I couldn’t be heard by the iPad’s surprisingly sensitive microphone. I dropped the knife and ran into the living room. Now, I don’t quite know what Original Sound actually does, only that it’s very important in Zoom land, and I always forget about it. I fiddled with the iPad, clicked on the Original Sound, waved to Jason, then went back to my onions. “Okay, let’s try that again,” Jason said. Welcome to the world of virtual music lessons. I know it well. When all contact with the outside world ceased during the pandemic, somehow, the music still played. Every other week, we’d click on the Zoom link at the appointed time, and voila, either Jason, Leo’s trumpet teacher, or Craig Olzenak, my son Felix’s saxophone teacher, was there waiting, smiling, ready to teach. The lessons were consistently fun and thoughtful. The sound quality was decent. There was no commute. And I could cook dinner during the lesson. It all seemed rather miraculous. Original Sound gaffes and occasionally spotty Wi-Fi not withstanding, my kids have enjoyed their virtual lessons. And my wife, Shannon, and I have been grateful to keep this part of their lives consistent. “I was surprised how much I liked it,” Felix, 13, told me, “how similar it felt. Craig and I picked it up really quick and were able to just keep doing what we were doing before.” “It’s cool that you can stay home and do it in your living room,” Leo added. “You don’t have to worry about being late. But it’s a little distracting if my dog barks.” Ah, yes. The dog. Even with teachers

Craig Olzenak reunited with student Felix during the Burlington Discover Jazz Fest

as excellent as ours, all things virtual have their limits. As we’ve all learned by now, videos freeze, dogs bark, faces look pretty weird on Zoom, and nothing can replace the connection of being in the same space with other people. The most obvious limitation to virtual lessons is the loss of one of music’s central components and greatest gifts: playing together. “Not being able to play along with students has been very tough, as it creates a bond like nothing else can,” Jason said. Jason, who lives in Colchester, is an affiliate artist at both the University of Vermont and Saint Michael’s College, and he also teaches in

the South Burlington School District and at Harwood Union High School. Additionally, he and Leo have learned that the trumpet, an instrument dependent on subtleties of lip position and breath control, presents unique challenges to virtual learning. “Teaching someone to hold the instrument and make an embouchure are not as easy when only describing it,” Jason said. Leo agreed. “It would be a lot easier in person because he could show me what to do on the trumpet.” And though virtual lessons, at least in theory, give students convenient access to teachers anywhere in the world, there has been some pandemic attrition,

Trumpet instructor Jason Whitcomb, ready for a virtual lesson

according to Craig. “I have lost a number of students these past 15 months, and I’m sure I’m not alone,” he told me. “I’m keeping my fingers crossed that musicmaking on all levels will come back strong this coming fall.” A Burlington resident, Craig has spent nearly 50 years teaching in a wide variety of settings: Burlington middle schools, Northern Vermont University-Johnson, Grinnell College, and even in Spain. He said he has also missed being able to give his students hands-on support with their instruments: reed placement, assembly, disassembly and cleaning. Luckily, as Vermont surpassed the 80 percent vaccination threshold, it seems there’s light at the end of the Original Sound tunnel. Leo’s trumpet lessons are about to become a hybrid of in-person and virtual, and Felix and Craig recently reunited to perform together as part of “50 Saxophones” for the opening night of the Burlington Discover Jazz Festival. Though I can’t deny I’ll sort of miss being able to cook while my kids have their lessons, I’m excited to get them back side-by-side with their amazing teachers. “I’m looking forward to playing together in the same room,” Craig said. “Looking at one music stand, making music. How sweet!”  Jason couldn’t agree more. “The connection I feel with my students and music is something that makes this profession so rewarding,” he said. “I look forward to giving my students a high five and playing music together. It has been way too long.” K KIDSVT.COM JULY 2021

11


VERMONT VISIONARIES WORD S & P H OTO S B Y C AT C U T IL L O

Kia’Rae Hanron , K-12 Learning Advisor

Kia’Rae Hanron with Ava Mirembé and Esmé Ssanyu Grundy Bruce at the Clemmons Family Farm Juneteenth celebration

B

urlington resident Kia’Rae Hanron is a teacher, artist, poet, activist and the K-12 learning advisor at Clemmons Family Farm in Charlotte. At 25, she’s helping to write a curriculum for the farm’s online learning platform. Called Windows to a Multicultural World, it will teach African American and African Diaspora history through arts engagement. Black artists and educators are writing and implementing it, and a portion of it will be available during the 2021-2022 school year. Hanron, who is biracial, grew up in Montpelier and was among only a handful of other students of color throughout her years of schooling. Hanron did not have her first Black teacher until she started college at the University of Vermont, from which 12

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2021

she graduated in 2020 with a degree in art education. What follows are distilled quotes from our wide-ranging conversation.

Hair has always been a thing. I was always straightening it until it burned to a crisp. The smell of my hair burning would wake my mom up in the morning.

On growing up in Montpelier: My mom was diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome when I was 2 years old, so we relied on a lot of community support. I didn’t have my first Black hairdresser until my freshman year of high school. My mom is white, and [my dad] lived out of state, so it really was just me and my mom. We’re very close, and, God bless her, she tried her best, but we talk all the time about how she did not do my hair justice [laughing].

On Hanron’s early experiences with racism: I really don’t think I became super aware of my race until middle school. And then once I became aware of it, I suddenly was, like, Was all the bullying I experienced in elementary school because I’m Black or because I’m weird? In sixth grade I was playing on the playground, and this girl called me the N-word, but she said it casually in conversation. I don’t know if she got in any other trouble aside from just

getting a talking to. The second time was also in middle school. It was a dead-end hallway, and she literally pins me against the locker and calls me a dirty N-word. In my poem that I perform for the farm now, I talk about that instance and how the school responded, but it was too casual. Without the exposure to Black people, nobody in the school system knew how to respond. On the teacher who inspired her: When I got to high school, I met my art teacher, Barbara Austin Hutchins, who is my absolute idol. She’s who I aim to be with everything I teach. She passed away a few years ago, and I have a tattoo inspired by her. It says, “Life is short. Art is long.”


Maya Northern at Clemmons Family Farm’s Juneteenth celebration

Kia’Rae flexes her tattoo, which reads “Life is short, art is long”

Kia’Rae at Clemmons Family Farm

We have so much to learn from our history. KIA’RAE HANRON

On starting college at the University of Vermont: Being in Burlington, I found myself in the presence of a lot more Black people, and it’s not even that many, but that just shows how scarce it was in Montpelier. I felt so much more connected to being Black. My freshman year of college, I learned my dad had terminal cancer. The following summer, he passed away. There was a lot going on with my mental health, with my family. I decided to take a medical leave of absence spring

Ava Mirembé and Esmé Ssanyu Grundy Bruce listen to Hanron’s instructions at the black eyed peas and collard greens planting station at the Juneteenth celebration

semester my second year. I got an assessment on my depression so I had some validation. I love my dreadlocks because of what they represent and the time in which I got them. To reset my hair felt like I was resetting my identity, as well. Dreadlocks hold some of your life’s energy in them.

They go through this process where they naturally change. Over time, part of it will break off. It’s like I’m shedding that energy. The symbolism of that is so beautiful to me. We have so much to learn from our history. There’s a lot of value in taking some of it with us, and there’s a lot of value in letting some of it go.

On what it’s like to have become the very person she once needed: It’s such a personal connection to me to be working through my identity as I’m developing a curriculum that’s based off of hard history but also centered around finding joy and resilience in the history, and seeing how that aligns with my own history. I’m mentoring a biracial high school student from the Montpelier-Berlin area, and they are such an incredible artist. The way they’re moving through their identity and using art to do so, I was, like, I wish I had someone like me when I was their age! I was the first Black role model that they’d had. Another student I taught during an art engagement came out to their whole class as biracial. For three years it had gone unsaid. For the first time after watching my poem they finally addressed their identity as a biracial student. I end my poem “Black Teachers Matter: A Poem to Check My Own Privilege” by saying I am now what no one was. That’s why this is a dream job. K Learn about bringing Windows to a Multicultural World into your classroom at clemmonsfamilyfarm.org. See Kia’Rae’s art at kiaraebrynn.wixsite. com/kia-rae-brynn. KIDSVT.COM JULY 2021

13


ART LESSONS B Y E M I LY J A COBS

The Power of Place Creating art that celebrates the culture and climate of places around the globe

T

his spring, as part of a cross-curricular “learning expedition,” Winooski middle schoolers explored the impact of location on different cultures around the world. This lesson on the power of place will provide you with the tools to explore this concept on your own. A region’s location on the globe affects countless aspects of life there, from the crops grown and the food eaten, to holidays and celebrations defined by the seasons, to the different styles of clothing people wear over the course of a year or at different elevations. After learning about the powerful impacts of climate on cultures around the world, each Winooski student studied a particular place and the ways in which location affects its culture. These places included Japan, Mongolia, Peru and Greenland, spanning Earth’s hemispheres. Students who chose Japan learned about the country’s four seasons — similar to those we experience here in New England — and the celebrations that come with them, such as the country’s spring cherry blossom festivals. While studying the impact of place on culture in Mongolia, students learned about the harsh, colder climate of the Mongolian mountains, as well as the warm clothing and sturdy, windresistant houses Mongolian people utilize to protect themselves against the elements. Even here in Vermont, it’s easy to see how our location influences our way of life, from the clothing we wear to the houses we live in to the types of food we grow and eat. For your own Power of Place project, consider the impact of place on culture here in Vermont, or choose a region in another part of the world. Use Google Earth’s This Is Home tool and other resources listed here to learn about different places and cultures. Once you’ve picked a place, use the steps provided to guide your learning and your artwork! K

14

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2021

RESEARCH Before you can create your artwork, you’ll need to choose a place you are interested in studying and that you find inspiring! You might decide to choose from the four places that our Winooski students studied. Or you can choose a different place — including Vermont! Find detailed cultural information about tribes or groups of people in each of these four places using Google Earth’s This Is Home tool at earth.google.com/web.

OTHER TOOLS ducksters.com/science/climate.php kids.kiddle.co/culture wonderopolis.org/wonder/ how-does-earths-surface-affect-culture YouTube.com can also be a great place to find video resources about the location and culture you have chosen to study. And if you’re striving to spend less time on screens, you can always visit your local library.

ART RESOURCES • • • •

https://app.peardeck.com/student/tzfpatgcf kids.kiddle.co/cubism https://kids.kiddle.co/surrealism kidsvt.com/vermont/ celebrating-identity-through-portraiture

Clockwise from top: “Mongolia” by Childe S.,age 14; “Lily Pond” by Mea Ree J., age 14; “Peruvian Night” by Ashlyn P., age 14; “Peru” by Eliza W., age 13; “Japan” by Aung B., age 14


New Collection Jamie Two Coats ThursdaysHas Arrived Toyshop 9:30-11:30

Playground Paddle

Lo c at e d i n t h e of Shelburne

Ages 8+

Summer Camp Style on the water Games, Races and Challenges for all levels

Sign up for one week or all ten!

5 4 fa ll s• rvtcanoeandkayak.com oad 802-644-8336 • vtcanoes@gmail.com • Daily-8:30-3pm

M o n - S at 1 0 - 6 S u n da y 1 1 - 5 8 02 - 9 8 5 -Fun 3 2 2 1 with Bathing Suits and Sprinklers! Summer

k8h-VTCanoeKayak0721.indd 1

“Mongolian Dreams” by Winner M., age 14,

6/24/21 1:57 PM

“Mongolian Beauty,” by Albina R. age 13

ART MATERIALS Suggested materials: pencil, colored pencil,drawing or painting paper, watercolor paint

k6h-JamieTwoCoats0516.indd 1

4/27/16 3:37

Other possible materials: crayon, marker, oil pastel, acrylic paint

STEP 1: BRAINSTORM 1.

Once you have researched your chosen place, write a list of important parts of the culture that you learned about.

2.

Sketch or doodle ideas of pictures to represent those different parts of the culture. For your brainstorm, you can sketch these randomly all over a page.

STEP 2: PLAN YOUR COMPOSITION 1. Next, think about how you’ll organize all of these images and aspects of the culture into one work of art. 2. Consider the layout and focal piece of your artwork. Will you create a portrait of a person wearing typical cultural clothing? Will you draw a landscape showing the landforms and architecture of this place? See the examples shown here for inspiration. If you choose to draw a portrait, you can use the June Kids VT Art Lesson to help with drawing steps and techniques! 3. Don’t limit yourself to a realistic scene. Infusing your artwork with surrealism or a bit of fantasy can allow you to be more creative with how you organize your picture. 4. Be sure to include a foreground (things that appear closest in the picture), a middle ground (parts of the picture that appear mid-distance from the viewer), and a background (the part or “layer” of the picture that appears farthest away). Drawing things in your picture so that they appear closer or farther away will create a sense of depth.

Jamie Jamie Two Coats Coats Two Toyshop Toyshop LoLoccatateedd i ni n tthhee

Jamie oof f S Shheel lbbuurrnnee Two Coats

Toyshop 5 45 4fafalllls sr or oa ad d S at1 01 0- 6- 6 MMo on n- S- at S uS nu ndaday y1 1 -1 5- 5 8 02- 9- 98 58 -5 3- 23 2 12 1 8 02

Lo c at e d i n t h e

2.

Draw neat, careful outlines using pencil. Try to represent each of the most important parts of your place’s culture through the images you draw. Carefully color and paint in your picture! Consider using colored pencil on the smaller details for greater control and precision — and using paint to color larger spaces in the image.

of Shelburne

5 4 fa ll s r o a d • 8 02 - 9 8 5 - 3 2 2 1 M o n - F r i 1 0 - 5 ; S at- S u n 1 1 - 4

STEP 3: CREATE! 1.

NewCollection Collection New HasArrived Arrived Has

k6h-JamieTwoCoats0516.indd1 1 k6h-JamieTwoCoats0516.indd

k3v-JamieTwoCoats0621.indd 1

Say you saw it in

housep32-4.75x.75.indd 1

4/27/163:37 3:37 PM 4/27/16 PM

5/26/21 3:50 PM

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2021

15

4/27/17 2:58 PM


CAT CUTILLO

Bert Sheehan, 2, at North Beach in Burlington

You-Pick berries, Colchester; Last Resort Farm, Monkton

VISIT A SWIMMING HOLE Nearly everyone in Vermont has a favorite swimming hole, but people are tight-lipped about where to find them. Explore a collection of them, along with directions, at madrivervalley.com/swim. Stop at Canteen Creemee in Waitsfield for a frozen treat.

LEARN SOMETHING There’s no admission fee at the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum in Vergennes this summer. Some of the exhibits are closed, but there’s still plenty to see. Snag a scoop of small-batch, artisan ice cream at Lu•lu.

Summer Bucket List

How to savor Vermont’s shortest, sweetest season

OTHER OPTIONS: Rokeby Museum, Ferrisburgh; Vermont History Museum, Montpelier; Montshire Museum, Norwich; ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington; Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, St. Johnsbury

BY CATHY RESMER

WATCH A GAME

W

A CONCERT, ride through the VermontATTEND Mountain Bike the nearby Museum of Everyday Life. PARADE OR FESTIVAL Association. Grab lunch at Parker Pie.

e made it! School is over, COVID-19 restrictions have loosened up, and many of our favorite places are open again. To help you get out and enjoy them, we pulled together this list of tried-and-true summer activities. Look for more details about location and hours online. And remember to pack sunscreen — and face masks; some attractions still require them.

Find out which ones are happening

in 2021 by searching OTHER the Seven DaysCold Hollow Sculpture OTHER OPTIONS: Stowe Recreation Path, OPTIONS:

event listings, at sevendaysvt.com. Missisquoi Valley Rail Trail, Montpelier Park, Enosburg Falls; Lemon Fair Recreation Path Sculpture Park, East Shoreham; Shelburne Museum

APPRECIATE ART

If you’ve never seen Bread and Puppet Theater in action, now’s your chance. The iconic Glover-based theater troupe will present “Our Domestic Resurrection Circus” on Saturdays and Sundays from July 10 through August 29. Tack on a visit to the Bread and Puppet Museum — a big barn packed to the rafters with political art — as well as

If you’re looking for a place to build sandcastles or go for a swim, head to the Champlain Islands. Both Sandbar State Park and Alburgh Dunes State Park offer beach access. Stop at Seb’s Snack Bar in South Hero for lunch or a killer creemee. OTHER OPTIONS: North Beach, Burlington; Elmore State Park, Elmore; Boulder Beach State Park, Groton

OTHER OPTIONS: The Tokyo Olympics takes place July 23 through August 8. Vermont Mountaineers, Montpelier; Thunder Road Speedbowl, Barre K

PICK BERRIES Few things taste quite as sweet as fresh-picked berries. Raspberries and blueberries will be ready in July at Adam’s Berry Farm in Charlotte. OTHER OPTIONS: Isham Family Farm, Williston; Owl’s Head Blueberry Farm, Richmond; Sam Mazza’s

KEN PICARD

HIT THE BEACH

Word on the street is that the Vermont Lake Monsters are pretty good this year. See them in action at Centennial Field in Burlington.

HOP ON A BIKE For a scenic ride, try the Island Line Trail, which connects Burlington to South Hero via the Colchester Causeway. A bike ferry runs daily until October to bridge the gaps. For something a little more adventurous, head to Kingdom Trails in East Burke, or find a place to

16

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2021

Lemon Fair Sculpture Park

SALLY POLLA

Find out which ones are happening in 2021 by searching the Seven Days event listings, at sevendaysvt.com.

K

ATTEND A CONCERT, PARADE OR FESTIVAL

Maplechocolate twist at Canteen Creemee


k1-McKenzie1220 1

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2021

17

11/19/20 2:12 PM


SECONDHAND STYLE BY M A RI A M UN RO E

Discount Décor Seven great items to thrift for your home

Gold hippopotamus figurine

PHOTOS: MARIA MUNROE

Vintage glassware

Thrifted furniture

Wooden ware finds

M

oving out of my childhood home into my first dorm opened up a whole new world of thrifting for me: the homeware section. For the 10 years since then, thrifting has become my go-to way of decorating in my style without breaking my budget. In a few months my little family will be moving into our first home. Buying secondhand is a great way to create a unique look without spending much. Here are some of the things I’ll be thrifting for my new space. GLASSWARE: Glassware is a great choice

to thrift, because it’s easily cleaned and sanitized, can look brand new for decades, and there’s just a lot of it available. I am always a sucker for unique glass vessels for storing small items such as cotton pads or Q-tips, but I also love thrifting drinkware and food storage containers for my kitchen. If you find yourself in need of any type of glassware, try the thrift store first! You’ll most likely find what you’re looking for.

BASKETS: Baskets are another item commonly found secondhand and a stylish solution for storage around the house. I personally love the eclectic look of a

18

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2021

mismatched basket collection, but if you’re looking for more uniformity, take your time collecting baskets of similar colors and/ or shapes. Most natural fiber baskets can be cleaned in a bath of warm soapy water and then set out in the sun to air dry. I’ve found some unique and beautiful baskets secondhand and know I’m getting a great deal compared to retail prices. FRAMES: Frames elevate your photos and artwork for display, but they can cost quite a bit at retail prices. And if you, like me, are looking to buy a lot of frames at once, they can add up quickly. Luckily, this is another item that is available in abundance at your typical thrift store. You can create custom photo mats for your frames with poster board or any other thick paper by using a craft knife and a straightedge to cut a rectangle out of their center. Once again, I’m a personal fan of a mismatched collection, but if that’s not your style, a can of spray paint can give a diverse array of frames a more cohesive look. LARGE FURNITURE: Secondhand furniture

is where I think you can get the most value for the least amount of money. For example, I’m searching for a desk for our

a landfill. If you’re committed to finding your perfect faux plant secondhand, I’d recommend turning on notifications for a search on Facebook Marketplace and keeping in mind that the pot the plant is in can be replaced with something that better suits your style. In the meantime, smaller faux florals and greenery are easier finds and can be combined into permanent arrangements around the house! WOODEN WARES: Well-made wooden pieces

future home office at the moment. I’ve capped my budget at $50. I could definitely find a desk brand new within that budget, but those options are typically made from cheaper materials that can be easily scratched or damaged. My secondhand options in that range have included solid wood desks that could definitely go on to live a long second life in our home. Secondhand furniture is a great way to buy big pieces on a small budget and still find high quality. FAUX PLANTS: In all honesty, these are a rare find, especially if you have a particular style or plant in mind. But I’m still including them on this list because I think it’s worth taking a look to keep these shockingly expensive, plastic plants from making their way to

are built to last multiple lifetimes, so when you find one secondhand, you pay amazingly low prices without having to skimp on quality. And wood can easily look new again with some refinishing or paint. I love thrifting large wooden bowls to use as fruit bowls, and one of my favorite finds is a classic wooden recipe box. The box needed a bit of sanding to bring it back to life but is now a piece that will last us forever that I found for just $3.99.

TRINKETS: This might be my favorite category on this list because it’s the most fun. In my experience, the little trinkets or figurines you pick up are never planned but things you happen upon and just fall in love with. It’s those finds that make thrifting so exciting and make your home décor unique to you. My favorite little trinket at the moment is a golden hippopotamus statue. Even though I love hippos, I’ve definitely never even thought to seek out a gold hippo figurine, but I love mine so much I brought it all the way from Hawaii. K


CHECKUP WIT H D R. L E WI S F I RS T - I N T E RV I E W C O M P IL ED & C O N DEN S ED B Y K EN PIC AR D

How Can Parents Prevent and Treat Common Summertime Burns?

S

ummer is the time of year most often associated with sunburns. But the sun isn’t the only seasonal hazard: Kids get burns from other items, too, such as metal slides, swings, sparklers and campfires. Dr. Lewis First, chief of pediatrics at the University of Vermont Children’s Hospital, says that the best approach is to prevent burns from happening. But if they occur, he offers some simple advice for soothing the pain and speeding the healing. KIDS VT: What are the three types of burns parents should know about? LEWIS FIRST: A first-degree burn is basically like a bad sunburn. It has redness but no blistering or broken skin and usually can be treated at home, unless it’s more than three inches long. A seconddegree burn is when you see blistering. A full-thickness or third-degree burn is when all layers of the skin and nerve endings have been destroyed. This child will require skin grafting to replace damaged skin and possibly underlying tissue. This is a true medical emergency and requires immediate attention. KVT: How do burns commonly occur in the summer? LF: The vast majority of burns to children result from contact with hot liquids such as tap water or items cooking on a stove. But about 20 percent result from contact with a hot objects. Each year there are 10,000 visits to emergency rooms due to fireworks-related injuries, 3,000 of which are injuries to

children under the age of 15. Half the fireworks injuries to children are caused by sparklers, which are not as benign as many parents assume. Sparklers can get as hot as 1,800 degrees and their sparks can cause burns to the face, hair and clothing. KVT: When is it safe for kids to hold sparklers? LF: Never give a sparkler to any child under 6, and children under 12 should never be allowed to light sparklers without adult supervision. Sparklers should be lit one at a time, and children should be instructed never to run with them or poke others. Never insert lit sparklers into someone’s clothing, and once they’re out, douse them in water. Ideally, kids should wear eye protection when holding one. My recommendation is to take children to see professional fireworks shows instead. KVT: What do you recommend for kids at campfires? LF: If there’s a fire pit available, use it. If there is none, clear an area at least 10 feet away and downwind from where you’re setting up tents and sleeping bags. Always have a shovel, plenty of water and, ideally, a fire extinguisher on hand. Never start a fire with flammable liquids such as gasoline. Once the fire is going, kids should remain beyond a 10-foot radius around the fire until they’re invited in to roast a marshmallow, and always under adult supervision. Even in summer, kids should wear long pants and covered shoes to prevent burns from sparks, ashes and hot

coals. Tight-fitting clothing is safest for young children. For roasting marshmallows, kids should use long sticks to avoid getting too close to the fire. Long hair should be pulled back and tucked into a shirt. There should be no running or horseplay, and kids should never be permitted to poke the fire or add more wood. Beforehand, every child should know the directive to “stop, drop and roll” if someone catches fire. If this occurs, remove the clothing immediately unless it’s stuck to the skin. Most importantly, never go to sleep until the fire is completely out. Don’t bury coals in the sand, because they can remain hot for 24 hours or more and can cause burns to bare feet. KVT: What are the burn hazards on playgrounds? LF: The good news is, many pieces of metal playground equipment are being replaced by plastic or metals treated with heat-reducing paints. But even slides, swings and other playground surfaces made of plastic or rubber can get very hot. In summer, it’s best to go in the morning before the sun heats the equipment. Parents should touch the equipment with the back of their hand. If it’s too hot to the touch, it’s too dangerous for a child. Kids should wear closed-toed shoes that protect their feet from hot surfaces. KVT: How should parents treat minor burns? LF: Whether it’s a minor first-degree burn that can be treated at home, or a more

serious burn that requires medical attention, begin by running cool, but not ice-cold, water over it for at least five minutes. This helps ease the pain and reduce swelling. Never rub a burn or put ice on it, as this can cause frostbite. Never apply butter or grease, because they can actually generate heat and make it worse. Wash the burn with mild soap and water a day or two after it occurs. KVT: What about using ointments or aloe? LF: Aloe is fine on first-degree burns. But because it’s not sterile, talk to your doctor before applying it on any open seconddegree burns. If the skin is broken, your doctor is more likely to recommend an antibiotic ointment. The best approach is to keep it clean and covered with a loose, dry bandage, which should be changed every 24 hours. Acetaminophen or ibuprofen are fine for treating the pain. KVT: When do burns require medical attention? LF: If a blister forms or is more than two inches across, parents should seek medical attention. Additionally, any burn to a child’s eyes, face, hands, feet, genitals, buttocks or joints should get examined because of the risk of scarring. Any electrical burn or a burn more than three inches long should be seen by a physician. An expert in pediatric burns can address cosmetic concerns, as well as the trauma of an injury that can be quite painful. Finally, if the child develops a fever, the wound oozes or the pain seems to be getting worse, seek medical care, as these may be signs of an infection. K

Do Your Kids Like to DRIVE FAST? Bring them to Burlington’s newest activity! Drive any of over 100 cars in our E-sports simulators. On Paved or Dirt track, or oval, we have the kind of driving that you, or the kids want. BOOK ONLINE AT vtsimracer.com | 294 NORTH WINOOSKI AVE | BURLINGTON, VT 05401 | 802-448-3107 K4h-BurlyAxe0721 1

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2021

19

6/28/21 10:34 AM


JUST FOR KIDS Coloring Contest! Three winners will each receive an annual family membership to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium. Send Kids VT your work of art by July 30. Be sure to include the info at right with your submission. Winners will be chosen in the following categories: (1) ages 5 and younger, (2) ages 6-8 and (3) ages 9-12. Winners will be named in the Back to School issue of Kids VT. Send your highresolution scans to art@kidsvt.com or mail a copy to Kids VT, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

20

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2021

Matching Puzzle................................21 Coloring Contest Winners..........22 Puzzle Answer...................................23

Title _______________________________________ Contest sponsored by

Artist ______________________________________ Age _______________ Town ___________________ Email ______________________________________ Phone ______________________________________


JUST FOR KIDS

CHAMP’S CHEERFUL CHALLENGE BY MARC NADEL

We all love Champ, our very own lake monster. She loves to swim and to follow boats from below, and she’s especially good at playing hide-and-seek. Why do you think no one has ever seen her?! Lately she’s heard about other monsters who aren’t so much fun. They prefer to wreck skyscrapers and destroy ships. But now, you can help Champ cast a Monster Magic Spell to make the others as kind and sweet as she is. Just use the hints below to change the word “MEAN” to “GOOD” one letter at a time.

Answers p. 23 KIDSVT.COM JULY 2021

21


COLORING CONTEST WINNERS

W nderfeet Kids’ Museum Say you saw it in

K16-PetraCliffs0721 1

6/28/21 11:44 AM

5/25/12k12v-Wonderfeet0621 9:40 AM 1

5/28/21 9:25 AM

WANT TO CHANGE SOMEONE’S LIFE?

house-2.3x.8-orange.indd 1

BECOME A

SURROGATE Don’t wait, book a party today! Jungle Party • Admission for 10 Children • Private Party Room – 2 hours • A pair of grippy socks for each guest

Unlimited Play Time

$249

EACH ADDITIONAL CHILD

$17

Juice boxes, plates, cups, utensils & napkins We provide a party room assistant to help. You bring the cake, camera & kids!

We’re welcoming surrogates to apply for future matching! Our screening process can take several months before anyone is matched, so start now. Plan ahead for your family’s future while helping others.

HONORABLE MENTIONS “THE INDIAN ELPHANT”

Oona Perry, 11 Castleton

The winners of annual family memberships to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium are…

“Pastel Elephants” Althea Russell, 5

5& under

BERLIN

“RESCUE SQUAD ”

Eli McCreight, 9 Stowe “BRIGHT SUNNY DAY”

Sy Crowther, 10 St. George

“ELEPHANTS ON THE MOVE”

Electra Tremblay, 9 Ferrisburg

“RAINBOW ELEPHANTS”

Luke Langan, 6 South Burlington

“TWO ELEPHANTS WALKING IN A MEADOW”

Sada Gray, 5 Winooski

“Imagination Parade” Reed Hubbard, 7 BURLINGTON

6 to 8

“FAMILY OF ELEPHANTS”

Funky Monkey Surrogacy compensation starts at

Everything in the Plus Jungle Special $325 2 Large Pizzas EACH ADDITIONAL Soft Serve Ice Cream

Our judges were charmed by the stupendous submissions mailed in as part of this month’s coloring contest. Cami, 11, filled the page and the elephants with geometric shapes in hues of blue and a rainbow-colored flower. Sevenyear-old Reed amazed us with a grassy setting that includes a bright blue sky for an exciting imagaination parade. Althea, 5, brought an abstract nature to the scene with the use of acrylic paints in pastel colors. Thanks to all who entered! We can’t wait to see what you have in store this month.

$35,000

CHILD

Angeline Giallanella, 7 Burlington

TOP TITLES “SUPER ELEPHANTS”

Adam Cleary, 7 Milton

$19

Monkey Do! T-Shirt or Stuffed Monkey for MIM

“SWIRLY ELEPHANTS”

Molly Carpenter, 10 Warren

Most Important Monkey – Birthday Kid

“ME AND MY DAD”

Olivia Friot, 9 Worcester

64 Harvest Lane Williston, VT 05495 MonkeyDoPlaygrounds.com

802.872.7522 22

802-497-6579 info@vtsurrogacy.com • vtsurrogacy.com

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2021

Untitled-69 1 k6v-MonekyDo0220.indd 1

11/21/19k6v-VTSurrogacy0420.indd 1/22/20 12:26 2:43 PM 1

3/26/20 1:50 PM

“Stained Glass Savannah” Cami Densmore, 11 HARDWICK

9 to 12


USE YOUR WORDS B Y L UKE BRA S S A RD

Powerful Parodies How I found my voice as a teenager with autism

A DAY FOR PEACE Commemorating the Bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki August 5th 1-10 PM, City Hall Park, Burlington

B

ack in my first year at Montpelier High School, I EXCERPT FROM “TISSUES” wasn’t a very social or outspoBY LUKE BRASSARD ken person. But at our Fall Harvest Parody of “Issues” by Julia Michaels Celebration in 2018, I had an experiI’m jealous, of all you fellas ence that changed my perspective of When I wanted to go to town myself from an independent, talented Couldn’t even quite get around adolescent to a capable, confident, I was sickly, I had a fever talented young man. Before you leave for the day yet I had always seen myself as I need something for you to get an ordinary teenager — that is, an ordinary teenager with autism standing up there with everyone’s ‘Cause being, this way spectrum disorder. I also have a slow eyes on me. I had never done this I’ve been really congested here you know processing speed and attention deficit before. Was I going to mess it up? And being, this way hyperactivity disorder, aka ADHD. The music started, and I began I just can’t quite get out of bed for those As a young child, I struggled singing “Tissues,” a parody of the with communication skills. When song “Issues” by Julia Michaels. ‘Cause I need tissues I couldn’t express myself, I became I brought a tissue box with me on And you need ‘em too frustrated and overreacted by stage. So give a wad to me throwing tantrums, hiding or running I tried not to focus on the audiSo I’ll catch my nose goo away. This caused me to become ence, only on my performance. By I’ll stay home today separated from my peers and miss out the beginning of the first chorus, it Not on my basis on opportunities. My limitations in was apparent that the audience liked So that I don’t get people sick communicating with others proved it, in fact, they really liked it. They I’m quite contagious to be a big obstacle. Over time, I were cheering and laughing and learned step-by-step how to express clapping, and I was only one third of Yeah, I need tissues my thoughts and feelings. Today, I the way into my song. Because napkins or paper towels won’t do speak and write effectively in my Hearing the audience’s reaction daily interactions. Occasionally, I still made me more confident performI don’t sneeze on purpose struggle with understanding indirect ing and less worried about messing ‘Cause if that were just the case statements and tones of voice. up. When I finished my song, the Wouldn’t need to cover my face Also, due to my learning differcrowd stood up, cheering and clapBut you told me ences, I complete tasks at a slower rate ping even louder than they had for Couldn’t find the Kleenex than my peers. Others may find this others. It felt good. But strong was the growing need sets me back, but I’ve turned it into a Afterward, a lot of people came ‘Cause my nose was starting to bleed valuable skill because I focus more on to me with compliments. That made quality of work, which is beneficial for me realize that my performance had tasks where accuracy is critical. entertained many people. I thought For example: coming up with song parodies. Just like other my song would be just another number, but instead, it was the teenagers, I like listening to music and watching other people biggest hit of the show. perform. But in the summer of 2018, inspired by “Weird Al” Realizing how talented I was encouraged me to continue Yankovic, I started writing, singing and recording my own using my talents. I became more inspired to make and sing more original parodies of pop songs. parodies. And, in turn, I made and performed more parodies — I have to think about the song for quite a while. I mull over dif- often with my friends — and entertained more people. ferent combinations of words and rhymes until I find the perfect Additionally, because of the experience, I became more fit. This process takes a long time to complete, often months, outspoken and more apt to talk and socialize with people. I have since I do a lot of analyzing and generate a lot of lyrics. become more willing to try new things. I’ve gotten involved with When I started, I wasn’t sure how I would share my ideas with many new activities, like Masque, the school theatre club. The the world. Then that fall, at school, there was a need for people to experience helped me grow and develop as an individual. perform at the annual Fall Harvest Celebration, a unique event The 2018 Fall Harvest Celebration made me a more talkative, that features performances of various kinds by students and outspoken person. I had never done something like that before, teachers. but I took the chance anyway. As a result, my perspective of my I reached out to the advisor in charge of the event, shared my talents changed, along with overcoming aspects of my autism, parodies with him and asked what he thought about the idea of namely my struggles with communication. Now I can see who I me performing one. He said it would be great if I did that. truly am with my gifts and my disability, including as a valuable Still, I wasn’t sure about the idea. I had never performed solo and creative communicator. in front of that many people before. Then again, it was a great opI am determined to continue embracing my identity and these portunity to share my song with the community. After thinking skills as I go into college and my career beyond. K about it, I decided I was up for the challenge. Luke Brassard is a 2021 graduate of Montpelier High School. When the day of the Fall Harvest Celebration arrived, I was prepared. When it was my turn to perform, the MC anHe will attend the University of New Haven in Connecticut in nounced my song, and I walked up onto the stage. I was nervous, the fall. A version of this essay appears on kerrymagro.com.

Painting for Peace • Origami Crane Folding Sidewalk Chalk Drawing • Penny Spending Sadako Story • Info & Resource Tables 7:30-8:15 PM Banning Nuclear Weapons: A Discussion with Dr. John Reuwer 8:15-10 PM Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb Released in January of 1964 and directed by Stanley Kubrick, this highly-rated comedy caused a good deal of controversy. Ironically, almost everything in the film was true. SPONSORED BY Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom Burlington, Vermont International Film Festival, Burlington City Arts

Say you saw it in

k8v-WILPFBurlington0721.indd 1

6/28/21 12:01 PM

PUZZLE PUZZLE PAGE PAGE ANSWER ANSWER SEE PAGE 21 FOR PUZZLE SEE PAGE 21 FOR PUZZLE

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2021

23


Get the credentials you need for the job you want with a 100% ONLINE CERTIFICATE

GET JOB READY RIGHT NOW • 100% Online • 30+ Certificates

At Champlain College Online we believe in working adults. With spring comes renewal and growth, so now might be the perfect time to plant seeds for the next phase of your career.

• Reskill Affordably • Career-Focused • Finish in 6 Months or Less

Whether you’re just starting your education or you’ve already earned a degree, an Online Certificate in Business, Cybersecurity, IT or Healthcare can increase your knowledge, expand your skills, and help you get the job you want. Let’s go Vermont—we’ve got this.

• In-Demand Tech Skills

APPLY BY 7/30

Respected. Accredited. Nonprofit.

866.637.1102 | online.champlain.edu/Vermonters k1-ChamplainCollege0721.indd 1

6/24/21 11:08 AM

Profile for Kids VT

Kids VT — July 2021  

Recipes for Tropical Treats; Meet Educator Kia'Rae Henron; Home Décor Tips; Teen With Autism Finds His Voice

Kids VT — July 2021  

Recipes for Tropical Treats; Meet Educator Kia'Rae Henron; Home Décor Tips; Teen With Autism Finds His Voice

Profile for kidsvt
Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded