Page 1

A K LEO T H E

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 5 to THURSDAY, FEB. 6, 2014 VOLUME 109 ISSUE 50

Serving the students of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

V O I C E

www.kaleo.org

Legislation, university improvements top Veterans Affairs agenda

RO OMA MANC NCE E& SEX SE X GU G ID DE

NIGHTS FLIP TO CENTER

ILLUSTRATION BY NICHOLAS SMITH/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

NOELLE F UJII News Editor

The Task Force on Veterans A ffairs will continue to review its list of potential recommendations on how the university can improve its services to student veterans, along with a piece of legislation that will direct UH to create veteran resource centers on each of its campuses. “We anticipate that one of the recommendations we’re likely to make is that there needs to be some sort of a governing or a guiding body similar to the task force that continues to exist on a longer-term basis,” said Christopher Manaseri, Ph.D., Dean of Student Services at Leeward Com-

munity College and task force chairman. “So one of our recommendations is likely to be that a group like the task force continue to help coordinate the university’s work in support veteran students.” The 15-member task force was formed on Nov. 22 after UH Interim President David Lassner had an open call for nominations.

A L I S T O F R E C OM M E N DAT I O N S Manaseri said the task force’s list of recommendations varies from issues concerning a dedicated support staff on each of the campuses that is specifi cally trained to work with veteran students, to the university’s policies and practices. “We would like to explore making sure

that veterans are able to receive credit where possible for training and learning that may have occurred while they were in the military,” Manaseri said. One of the major issues the task force needs to deal with, according to Manaseri, is some uniformity of approach to the Yellow Ribbon program, which is a way of helping veterans to receive support toward instate tuition regardless of their residency. “We’re not sure that that’s something that we would end up supporting, but we do know that there’s a problem because students who might start at one of our community colleges where they’re eligible for Yellow Ribbon and then transfer to M ā noa, for example, are no longer eli-

gible for Yellow Ribbon and so their tuition costs can triple or quadruple in the process,” Manaseri said. The task force would also like to explore the possibility of creating some form of a veterans resource center, either physical or virtual, that would be available to every UH student regardless of how many students are actually on their campus. “So we know we’d like to look at potentially some sort of gateway or a portal that would be supported. So a veteran student on Kaua‘i could have access to many if not all of the same supports that a veteran student at M ā noa or at Leeward might have,” Manaseri said. Continued on page 2


Page 2 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Feb. 5 2014

Twitter @kaleoohawaii | news@kaleo.org | Noelle Fujii Editor | Fadi Youkhana Associate

News Are you a mobile app developer? • Preference to those with experience integrating GPS • Compensation is negotiable For more information please contact Matthew Ledet: Phone: 808.255.4526 Email: ledet@hawaii.edu

Want To Be Next?

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF HAWAI‘I REVIEW The Board of Publications is now accepting applications for Summer 2014 - Spring 2015 Undergraduate and Graduate

Application Deadline: Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2014 Contact James Gonser (808) 956-3217 jgonser@hawaii.edu

K A LEO T H E

V O I C E

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa 2445 Campus Road Hemenway Hall 107 Honolulu, HI 96822

Newsroom (808) 956-7043 Advertising (808) 956-7043 Facsimile (808) 956-9962 E-mail kaleo@kaleo.org Website www.kaleo.org

EDITORIAL STAFF Editor in Chief Bianca Bystrom Pino Managing Editor Joseph Han Chief Copy Editor Kim Clark Assoc Chief Copy Editor Wesley Babcock Design Editor Roselle Julian Associate Design Editor Lilian Cheng News Editor Noelle Fujii Assoc News Editor Fadi Youkhana City Editor Alex Bitter Features Editor Brad Dell Assoc Features Editor Nicolyn Charlot Opinions Editor Doorae Shin Assoc Opinions Editor Kristen Bonifacio Sports Editor Joey Ramirez Assoc Sports Editor Hayley Musashi Comics Editor Nicholas Smith Photo Editor Jessica Homrich Assoc Photo Editor Shane Grace Web Specialist Blake Tolentino Web Editor Joanne Hayag Web Editor Robert Chang

ADVERTISING

E-mail advertising@kaleo.org Ad Manager Gabrielle Pangilinan PR Coordinator Tianna Barbier Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 5,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit Ka Leo. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. ©2012 Board of Publications.

ADMINISTRATION

2445 Campus Rd. Hemenway Hall 107 808-956-7043 www.kaleo www.kaleo.org/hawaii_review

Apply Today!

VETS: ‘TWO DIFFERENT CULTURES’

The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Rebekah Carroll, chair; Nicholas Pope, vice chair; or Mechelins Kora Iechad, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.kaleo.org/board_of_publications

ILLUSTRATION BY NICHOLAS SMITH/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

from page 1

L E G I S L AT I O N F O R V E T E R A N R E S O U RC E C E N T E R S The task force will also be reviewing “The DOVE Program: Developing Opportunities for Veterans’ Education,” which directs UH to create veteran resource centers on each of its campuses, according to James Cavin, Military/Veteran Legislative Liaison for Sen. Will Espero’s office and executive director of the Hawai‘i Alliance of Student Veterans. “We know we want to consider the benefits of that bill and whether or not it meets some of the recommendations that we might have,” Manaseri said. Right now, only the Maui, M ā noa and Leeward campuses have these centers, according to April Brown-Kimbrell, program manager for Offi ce of Veterans Support Services at M ā noa, which was formed in September to help veterans graduate. Brown said the military culture and the campus culture are different. “They’re two different cultures, the military culture and the campus environment,” Brown said. “But it’s a transition that is unique because of the military culture. It’s not a

high-school student coming from high school to the campus.”

A TA S K F O RC E O N V E T E R A N S A F FA I R S

Student veterans make up about 4 percent of the student population at UH, according to Jan Javinar, Interim Associate Vice President for Student Affairs. The task force is charged with looking at what UH is doing in regards to student veterans, what it could do better, what it is not doing that it should be doing and what that would cost, according to Javinar. “So the main reason is the influx of vets coming to campus and the campuses wanting to be sure that the system, that we’re serving the needs of student veterans in the most effective, responsive way,” Javinar said. Cavin, who is also a member of the task force, thinks the task force is a step in the right direction. “UH has been for many years trying to get programs on the ground within the university that will better benefit the student veterans, but unfortunately the culture of UH has sadly been very non-veteran helpful,” Cavin said.


Advertising@kaleo.org | Gabrielle Pangilinan Student Ad Manager

Ka

eo

Come & Enjoy This

Page 3 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Feb. 5 2014

FREE Event!

Screening & Discussion

DISCOUNT OF THE WEEK

“Inequality for All” Thursday, February 20th 2014 Friday, February 21st 2014

4pm - 6pm 12pm - 2pm

QLCSS Rm.208 Sponsored by UH Manoa Service Learning

FREE POPCORN

Quality Surfboards Hawaii:

Are you energetic friendly and full of glee?

25% discount on surfboard rentals (until 10/11/2014) with your valid UH ID SERVICE LEARNING PROGRAM

Kennedy Theatre 50th Anniversary Season

THEN JOIN OUR PUBLIC RELATIONS TEAM!

NOTICE OF COMPLETION Pursuant to Section 50743, Hawaii Revised Statues, notice is hereby given that the construction by DDL Construction, Hana Ho Painting, Commercial Plumbing, Elite Fire Services, Selective Stone of that certain improvements situated at 500 Ala Moana Blvd, Suite 5G Honolulu, Hawaii 96813 located at Waterfront Plaza also known as “Restaurant Row” has been completed for Illuminati Group LLC. Owner(s), January 25, 2014.

UH ID Accepted Here

Want To Be Next?

K A LEO T H E

APPLY TODAY!

2445 Campus Rd. Hemenway Hall 107 808-956-7043 www.kaleo.org/jobs

Go to our directory for more discounts! kaleo.org/id

V O I C E

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Lady and Mu the Yang Family Generals

A legendary woman general is called to lead again in this theatrical spectacle; performed in English.

Feb 20, 21, 22, 27, 28, March 1 at 8pm Feb 23 and March 2 at 2pm UHM Student Specials (UHM validated Spring 14 ID required)

t$5 to any performance tBuy-One-Get-One Free Nights: Feb 27 and Feb 28

The Board of Publications is now accepting applications for Summer 2014 - Spring 2015 Undergraduate and Graduate

V O I C E

T H E

to 0112 to 20012 201 20 100,, 2012 10 C 10, EC E DEC D DE Y, DEC. AY, AY DA ND NDAY N OND ON MON MONDAY, M MO MOND 40 VOLUME 108 ISSUE

NICHO

0011133 2013 201 6 20 AN 6, AN JJAN. A JAN DA D UNDAY UN SUNDAY, SSUN SU

Application Deadline:

Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2014 ee fries & drink

Contact James Gonser (808) 956-3217 jgonser@hawaii.edu

K A LEO T H E

E V O I C

St. Honolulu, HI 96814 1295 S. Beretania 626-5202 (808) www.honoluluburgerco.com

Fr

h’d TIONS Flava NA ,

FOOD SERVICES /FOOD MANOA.HAWAII.EDU NOV. 6, 2012

Golden River BC Burrito, Le Crêpe Café Govinda’s,

MONDAY,

NOV. 5 to

TUESDAY 30 108 ISSUE VOLUME

ELECTION guide vote

Tickets available beginning at 5pm on day of show. Supported by Student Activity Fees.

Tickets on sale NOW at Kennedy Theatre, online at etickethawaii.com, Stan Sheriff Center, Campus Center, and at 944-2697. Visit www.hawaii.edu/kennedy for more info!

K A LEO

11-6-12

VS V

Apply Today! Monday f t.

ort

, HI 96814 a St. Honolulu 1295 S. Beretani (808) 626-5202 rgerco.com www.honolulubu

N: 8 -15+ f t. W: 5 -10 f t. S: 1-3+ E: 1-3 f t.

Tuesday f t.

N: 6-12 f t. W: 5-10 f t. S: 1-3+ f t. E: 2-5+

2445 Campus Rd. Hemenway Hall 107 808-956-7043 w www.kaleo.org/jobs

with UH ID.

Monda

Report

N: 5 -7 f W: 3 - 5 f S: 0 - 3 f E: 2-5 f


Page 4 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Feb. 5 2014

Twitter @kaleofeatures | features@kaleo.org |Brad Dell Editor |Nicolyn Charlot Associate

Features

O‘ahu’s hiking trails: a disappearing act?

After three HTMC hikes, applicants are eligible for membership. SHANE GRACE KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Anyone who harbors doubts that this island is paradise should spend a few hours on one of its hiking trails. Many trails offer sweeping vistas of mountains and the ocean, meander through forests of bamboo or fragrant native foliage or feature waterfalls with pools for a cool, refreshing dip. However, these trails did not magically materialize for our enjoyment. Many routes were scouted and developed into trails by early members of the Hawaiian Trail and Mountain Club.

clear and passable; only the driest trails are self-sustaining. As nature relentlessly endeavors to reclaim O‘ahu’s disappearing hiking trails, a determined group of trail clearers fi ght back. HTMC has taken on the responsibility, whenever possible, of preserving trails that aren’t maintained by the state. About 25 club members volunteer to clear trails each weekend, for a total of about 50 trails a year. Hefty backpacks and weed whackers must be carried, often through unforgiving terrain on trails up to 10 miles or longer. The work is hard, but the rewards are priceless.

THE MISSION

THE EXPEDITION

Contrary to logic, extensive foot traffi c doesn’t keep the trails

A typical trail-clearing expedition begins at 8 a.m. on Sun-

L AUR A M EYERS Contributing Writer

day mornings as the volunteers congregate near the trailhead to hear crew leader Mike Algiers give the day’s briefing. The minimum age for volunteering is 18, but most are much older. Nate Luzod, a web designer who is one of the youngest and newest crewmembers, de scribed his first clearing. “My first time hiking with the HTMC, everyone who showed up was middle-aged or older,” Luzod said. “My friend and I thought to ourselves ‘this hike is going to be slow and lame.’ About halfway up the mountain everyone was blowing past us, laughing and carrying on conversation like it was nothing. Meanwhile, my friend and I could barely catch our breath. The club definitely

earned my respect within the first few hours there.” “I’ve learned so much from crew members about native plant species, hiking this island and invaluable tips on just about everything,” said Betsy Fisher, a dance professor who has been clearing trails for three years. “Most fundamentally, though, our weekly trail-clearing sojourns have brought me closer to this place, this mud, this aina. Getting dirty with the plants, rocks and earth brings me deep joy and deep solace. ... Trail clearing is fortifying on many levels. Getting close to this land is always a good idea. The lessons are multifold and profound.” “We are the only volunteer organization dedicated to keeping Oahu’s trails open and accessible,” said Steve Davis, 12-year HTMC

member and trail-clearer. “ We do this for the love of nature and the mountains. Hopefully, this work will continue well into the future so that hikers will continue to have access to the most beautiful parts of the island.” Barb Bruno, a geologist who has been clearing trails for five years, noted that hiking is a fun, healthy activity for all ages, including kids and senior citizens. For more information, visit the Hawaiian Trail and Mountain Club’s web page at htmclub. org. Guests are welcome on many hikes, and the website publishes quarterly hiking schedules, along with facts and safety information. For more information, contact pr@htmclub.org.


comics@kaleo.org | Nicholas Smith Editor

Page 5 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Feb. 5 2014

Comics


Advertising@kaleo.org | Gabrielle Pangilinan Student Ad Manager

Page 6 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Feb. 5 2014

Games

Fuel Your Body Well At a market cooperatively owned by over 4,000 of your fellow students, faculty and community members

ACROSS 1 Really mix up 6 Fashion 10 Alma mater of many gens. 14 Manitoba natives 15 Other, to Diego 16 “Cool!” 17 Glass-halfempty sort 18 Polite refusal, in Nuremberg 20 Resistance units 21 Bottom row key 22 “A Death in the Family” author 23 North __ 24 “Fall on your knees” carol 27 Mammoth traps 30 “Hometown proud” supermarket chain 31 “How relaxing!” 32 Fighting stats 33 She dedicated Imagine Peace Tower to Lennon 34 Roy Rogers’ birth name 35 Somewhat 39 Mudbath offerers 42 Clear (of) 43 Ball honorees 46 Tulsa sch. named for a televangelist 47 __ leaves 48 Hardly the

latest buzz 51 Only just broke the tape 54 Through 55 Symbol for Macy’s 56 Prime time rating 57 Give a darn? 58 “You gotta be kidding!” 60 Big Apple restaurateur 61 Go-getter 62 Remedy 63 See 44-Down 64 Duel tool 65 “My word!” 66 Until now DOWN 1 Confront boldly 2 Arizona climate 3 Where Lego headquarters is 4 Luau neckwear 5 Top row key 6 Quite a while 7 New Mexico county 8 Boring activity 9 Quite a while 10 Eel, at sushi bars 11 Mali neighbor 12 Seize the opportunity, sunshine-wise 13 Had a bite 19 Comical Carvey 21 Private bed 25 “Son of Frankenstein” role

26 Everyday article 28 Supplies on TV’s “Chopped” 29 Prefix with bar 33 Multivolume ref. 34 Witnessed 36 Locale 37 Carnation genus 38 Byrnes who played Kookie 39 Piglet’s mother 40 Place to have a racket restrung 41 Opie’s guardian 44 With 63-Across, city whose zip code is suggested by the starts of 18-, 24-, 35-, 51- and 58-Across 45 Shortchange 47 Newbie 48 Taloned predator 49 Cut of lamb 50 Inhumane person 52 Dance studio fixture 53 __ barrel: in hot water 57 Bordeaux “but” 58 Dedicated lines 59 Cable co. acquired by AT&T in 1999 60 __ Na Na

Release Party Hear Hanale Live

ANSWERS AT KALEO.ORG

2643 S King Street

Open Daily 8 - 9

Feb. 7th

6-8 pm

Meet Hanale Bishop, Hamakua Recording Artist and founder of Homestead Poi

5-10 pm 941-1922

www.kokua.coop

Free WiFi in the Courtyard

Extreme

WEB EB DEVELOPE DEVELOPER E

KALEO EDITION

APPLY TODAY!

2445 Campus Rd. Hemenway Hall 107 808-956-7043 www.kaleo.org/jobs

2445 Campus Rd. Hemenway Hall 107 808-956-7043 www.kaleo.org/jobs


Twitter @kaleoopinions | opinions@kaleo.org | Doorae Shin Editor | Kristen Paul Bonifacio Associate

Page 7 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Feb. 5 2013

Opinions

Dissecting Kiev: a progressively international dispute

COURTESY OF LOS ANGELES TIMES/MCT

Protestors are split regarding the nature of their political demands. BR AD DELL Features Editor Ukraine’s capital, Kiev, has been rocked by protests and increasing fatalities since November. Sparked by President Yanukovych’s recent decision to back out of joining the European Union’s trade network, massive upheaval is being experienced by the east-European nation. Citizens have taken to the streets to stand up and riot for what they feel is best for their country. The situation is only made stickier by the admittance that pressure applied by Russia is what led to Yanukovych’s spontaneous turn-around. What are the desires of the European Union, Russia and revolutionaries? And what is the role of western powers in this debacle? What should be a purely domestic debate has bled onto international territory, and many outside stakeholders continue to disrupt the issue more and more.

E U RO PE AN U N I O NʼS S TAKE S While some argue that Ukraine needs Europe more than Europe

needs Ukraine, there is still much to be achieved from the eastern European country joining the ranks of the trade union. The EU offers the ability for Ukrainians to travel freely within the EU without visas, and it would also give Ukraine an economic boost. In return, the EU would augment its own economic prosperity, better monitor the rampant malfeasances of the Ukrainian government and reinforce its eastern fl ank with a stable state based on an established democracy that matches the standards of western powers. This translates into the likely adoption of hundreds of regulations and reforms stipulated by the Union. To the shock of European Union officials, who felt they were doing a service to the east-European country, the Ukrainian government demanded tremendous amounts of fi nancial compensation in return for its compliance. While the EU expresses willingness to grant small sums, nothing offered matches the immensity of what is demanded by Ukraine.

RU S S I A N P R E S S U R E S Russian

President

Vladimir

Putin has overshadowed the EU’s promises for fi nancial stability with instant gratifi cation by offering Ukraine the purchase of billions of dollars worth of government bonds, as well as reduced gas prices. The past also haunts Ukraine with memories of the Russian government implementing boycotts of Ukrainian products, as well as striking out all gas export deals with its neighbor. With Russia also looming over the country both economically and geographically, Ukrainians fear a repeat of history, especially with its current struggling economy. Putin aspires to reinstall Russia’s lost satellite states from the Soviet-era; a dream that is futile without the reclaiming of Ukraine. Russia’s questionable motives and enticing bribes further complicate an already shaky situation.

THE UKRAINIAN PERSPECTIVE Ukraine is currently split between advocates of Russia and Europe, as well as those who fi ght only for the fall of the corrupt government. Most in the eastern half of Ukraine share the same religion

and language as Russia. In a poll conducted by Kiev’s Research and Branding Group, it was revealed that half of Ukrainians have Russian relatives. Additionally, about 60 percent of participants claimed that they do not see Russia as being a foreign country. This has caused a concentration of Russian sympathizers in the eastern half. In the western half, the population is mostly Roman Catholic and speaks the vernacular Ukrainian language. This closer tie to the rest of Europe has fueled desire of Western Ukraine to join the EU. However, the protests for many are not necessarily pro-EU or proRussia, but were originally fueled by the insistence that the Prime Minister (who resigned on Jan. 28), Interior Minister and President Yanukovych resign. These particular protestors express outrage at the brutality with which the government treats them, the implementation of anti-protest laws (that were later abolished) and the earlier daily corruptions of Yanukovych and the Family (the president’s closest advisors and offi cials). The protestors

cry out for a leader that will refuse to be bullied by Russia and do what is best for the nation so that it might experience an economic resurgence.

T H E RO L E O F T H E W E S T President Putin has implied that western powers have interceded in the protests, claiming that they seem “pre-planned,” unlike most traditional independent revolutions. In the light of recent tensions with Russia over the Syrian civil war, as well as Russia’s progression in world prominence, it would be best not to rile this steadily waking dragon. The western powers have already stumbled through two world wars and even a cold war in the name of resisting imperialist expansion. Instigating further strains in relations with Russia would be anything but wise. In the words of the Ukrainian national anthem, “Let’s prove to everyone that we can be masters of our own fate.” This is Ukraine’s war, and if a civil war is to be fought in Ukraine, let it remain a civil war, rather than tugging the powers of the world into what should be a domestic dispute.


Twitter @kaleosports | sports@kaleo.org | Joey Ramirez Editor | Hayley Musashi Associate

Page 8 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Feb. 5 2014

Sports

‘Bows open season with key questions

K EN R EYES Senior Staff Writer @THEWRITER K EN In losing players like the AllAmerican trio of Kelly Majam Elms, Kaia Parnaby and Jessica Iwata, this year may seem like an intimidating ordeal for the Rainbow Wahine softball team. On top of that, nine new players have also been added to the roster — including eight freshmen — introducing a significant change to a team that has flourished in past years. “We’re missing some key ingredients to our successful season last year,” head coach Bob Coolen said. “We’re going to be young. We’re going to make some mistakes. We’re going to lose some ball games. We’re going to have to learn how to live with a little bit of adversity.”

FINDING THE PIECES

Sophomore outfielder Keiki Carlos led Hawai‘i with 57 hits last season. FILE PHOTO KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

ADMISSION WITH VALID

Assertiveness and leadership seem to be what Coolen is trying to drill into the team. However, he noticed that the team has been “quiet, even the upperclassmen.” “That’s something they have to come out of,” he said. “They have to break that silence mode and get a little bit more demanding of each other. That is leadership.” Sophomore outfielder Keiki Carlos mentioned that upperclassmen are trying to fi ll in the roles

that the past seniors left. But the current seniors have their own way of leading the group. “We’re a different style of leaders compared to our last year’s,” senior second baseman Jazmine Zamora said. “I think the best way we’re going to do this is to lead by example since we don’t have that (College) World Series (experience) to back us up. But we know what it’s like to play with the best, and so we just want to give that.” However, the kind of team that Coolen is trying to mold them into will not happen by chance but by their hard work, focus and, if needed, confrontation. “To play with confidence. To play with a swag that will allow them to be successful,” he said. “Don’t play with sort of a quietness that they think by being quiet, they’re fitting to the team because they’re not challenging anyone. They need to play with an aggressiveness.”

PRESSURES AND E X P E C TAT I O N S Now that the season is rolling in, certain expectations are placed on the athletes’ shoulders. One of which is the performance of their pitching staff without the arm of Parnaby. “We knew the ingredients to be a good ball club,” Coolen said. “We had a starting pitcher we thought could be a 20-game winner, and (Parnaby)

ended up being more than that. “But this year, we’re coming in with two freshmen, and we had only one sophomore. Now we’ve taken the other sophomore (Carlos) off of the shelf, out of the mothballs and put her back on the mound. So we’re trying to figure out four different pitchers rather than just three.” The Rainbow Wahine have been working on scrimmages and situational fielding to get ready for the upcoming season. “I’ve been trying to give them a lot of pressure situations,” Coolen said. “We’ve been doing a lot of scrimmaging, but that doesn’t even come close to what that first Division I game is going to be like.” “That’s how we prepare our practices, so we’re not pressing during the game,” Carlos said. “So we’re a lot more relaxed and believe in what we can do.” According to a poll voted on by eight Big West softball head coaches, UH is narrowly favored to repeat as Big West champions in 2014. But Zamora takes it more as “a goal, a dream” than just a mere pressure to play well. “We all know that feeling of winning and we’re all used to that, so for us personally we expect nothing but winning,” she said. “We need to instill in our newcomers’ brains that we’re a winning team and we expect the best.”

VISIT HAWAIIATHLETICS.COM FOR SEASON SCHEDULE S

UH MANOA ID RAINBOW WAHINE SOFTBALL

OCEANIC TIME WARNER CABLE PARADISE CLASSIC Thursday vs. Hampton @ 6:00PM Friday vs. Delaware @ 6:00PM Friday vs. #13 UCLA @ 6:00PM Saturday - Championship Rounds

RAINBOW WARRIOR BASKETBALL Thursday vs. UC Santa Barbara @ 7:00PM (Retro Aloha Shirt Night) * Saturday vs. Cal Poly @ 7:00PM (Superhero Night) * *FREE Manoa Maniacs t-shirts (while supplies last)

AND FOLLOW US ON

@HAWAIIATHLETICS

2014 February 5  

2014 February 5

Advertisement