The 'Ville - August 2022

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Aug 2022 | Vol.5 | Issue 8

Northville’s News and Lifestyle Magazine

THE

STONE GANG Dedicated Volunteers Keep Northville's History Alive


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THE GIFT OF LOCAL JOURNALISM Please consider a donation to support The 'Ville. Since we began publishing nearly five years ago, our goal has been to provide our readers with valuable information about the Northville community each and every month. Your support helps that mission survive and grow. And while The 'Ville is sent to every address in Northville at no cost to readers, it is not free to produce. LOCAL Matters! is the foundation of this magazine. If you find it of value, please consider supporting it. Every little bit helps! Please send donations to: Journeyman Publishing 16435 Franklin Northville, MI 48168 You can also make donations via PayPal to kurtkuban@gmail.com. Thank you in advance.

VOLUME 5

ISSUE 8

AUGUST 2022

16435 Franklin, Northville, MI 48168 • 734.716.0783 • TheVilleMagazine@gmail.com

KURT KUBAN – Editor/Publisher

Kurt Kuban is an award-winning journalist, having served as a reporter and editor for several local newspapers and magazines, including The Northville Record, over the course of a career spanning more than two decades. Kurt lives in Northville with his wife, Cheryl, and their three children, all products of Northville Public Schools.

CRAIG WHEELER – Creative Director

Craig has been in the creative industry for over 30 years. He has developed a diverse background in that time, but publication design has been his passion during the past 19 years. Craig enjoys chasing his young daughter and providing moral support to his lovely wife.

MICHELE FECHT – Writer

Michele Fecht is a longtime journalist whose first post-college reporter position was at The Northville Record before moving on to The Detroit News. A 30-plus year resident of the City of Northville and historic (old) house owner, she is an author, researcher, local history enthusiast, and community activist/advocate.

WENSDY VON BUSKIRK – Writer

Publisher Here is a list of people who contributed to local journalism last month. We appreciate your support! John & Sandy Dickson Frances Firek Russ & Bernice Schiller Margaret M. Zonca

ADVERTISE IN THE VILLE Our locally-owned publication is an affordable way to reach the Northville Market. We direct mail to all 21,000 addresses in the 48167 & 48168 zip codes.

To secure space in The Ville, contact Scott at (313) 399-5231 or scott@streetmktg.com. SCOTT BUIE - Advertising Director/VP of Sales

For more than 20 years Scott has worked with clients in Metro Detroit to create advertising campaigns to grow their business. After managing sales for radio stations in the Detroit Market for 17 years he purchased Street Marketing where he works closely with a variety of businesses and events. Scott and his family have lived in the Plymouth and Northville area for 25 years.

Wensdy graduated with a degree in journalism from Wayne State University. Her first job was working as a reporter for The Northville Record. Now, as a freelance writer and editor, she works for a variety of magazines, and is excited to get back to her roots in The ‘Ville. -Photo by Kathleen Voss

MARIA TAYLOR – Writer

Maria is managing editor at The ACHR NEWS, a B2B publication based in Troy. She has worked as a reporter for the Northville Record, Novi News and Plymouth Observer, and once had her photo on the cover of TIME. She lives in Farmington and, as a self-avowed history nerd, routinely risks her life by standing in the road to photograph old buildings.

TIM SMITH - Writer

Tim brings a penchant for telling powerful and personal stories that run the gamut from news to sports. During more than 35 years in journalism, he has earned numerous state and national awards. The Wayne State grad is a published author and rec ice hockey player.

LARRY O'CONNOR – Writer

Larry is a metro Detroit area journalist whose work has appeared in The Detroit News, Jackson Citizen Patriot and the Observer & Eccentric Newspapers. When he’s not meticulously chronicling people or events, he’s avidly rooting for his favorite soccer teams – Manchester United and Glasgow Celtic.

LONNIE HUHMAN - Writer

Lonnie graduated from EMU with a degree in creative writing. He is a longtime newspaper reporter, including two stints with The Northville Record. He is now a freelance reporter for a number of publications, including The Sun Times News in Dexter, where he lives with his wife and two young children. He is glad to be back covering the Northville community.

BRYAN MITCHELL - Photographer

Bryan started working as a photographer more than 30 years ago, and was the Northville Record photographer in the 90's. He has freelanced for The Detroit News, The Guardian, Reuters, and other publications. His photography has appeared in newspapers and magazines around the globe. The Northville resident also coaches mountain biking at Northville High School.


A View From The ‘Ville

Not Ready To Open Up

I

’ve always been a little skeptical of the word ‘permanent’ – especially considering we as individuals are on this rock spinning in space for such a short period of time. Few of the decisions we ever make are truly permanent, because circumstances and times always change. Yet, that is exactly the word the Northville City Council used Aug. 1 during a surprise decision to keep Main and Center streets closed to traffic -- permanently. Led by new Council members Andrew Krenz and John Carter (and joined by Barbara MoroskiBrowne), the Council voted 4-1 to keep Main Street (between Center and Hutton) closed permanently, and 3-2 to keep Center (between Main and Dunlap) closed in the future. Mayor Brian Turnbull voted to open up both streets to traffic, and Marilyn Price joined the mayor in voting to open Center Street to traffic. Most everyone knows by now that the streets were originally closed down in 2020 as a result of the Covid pandemic. It was a way to help restaurants, which could not offer inside dining because of social distancing rules. The effort proved a success, as several downtown

It Takes A Village

6

restaurants embraced the change by offering outdoor dining and they got through the pandemic. Something a lot of businesses could not say. The change lifted the profile of Downtown Northville, which became a regional destination, especially that first winter when there was no indoor dining to be found anywhere. There was a cool vibe that was hard to ignore. As the pandemic’s grip on us began to subside, however, indoor dining was back on the table, and the streets of Downtown Northville were pretty much empty last winter. And the great debate began. When and how should we open the streets back up? Of course, the answers to those questions varied widely, and really depended on who you asked. The Northville Downtown Development Authority conducted an online survey earlier this year, in which nearly 75% of respondents said they would like to see both streets remain closed in one way or another. A divided DDA board, which includes several downtown businesses owners, then voted to ignore the survey and made the recommendation to open

up Center Street and only close down Main Street on a seasonal basis, noting many who took the survey neither worked nor lived in the City of Northville and therefore had no real stake in the outcome. But, in a surprise move, the City Council decided to go against that DDA recommendation at a contentious Aug. 1 meeting, at which numerous downtown business owners voiced their displeasure with the decision. Many agreed with the decision. Krenz said the street closures have been the envy of many, and have even attracted more families and younger residents to the community, not to mention visitors who spend money at the downtown businesses. Yet, some of the business owners I’ve spoken to are furious, noting the closures have primarily helped the restaurants and some retail shops. For more service-oriented businesses, traffic access has been cut off and they have seen business tail off. There are other issues, as well. Even the biggest proponents of the street closures admit there needs to be better infrastructure in

'Big Lou' LaRiche NHS Football Outlook Left His Mark

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22

ON THE COVER: Members of the Stone Gang, volunteers who maintain Mill Race Village, pose in front of the J.M. Mead General Store, which they recently renovated. Photo by Bryan Mitchell

place if the changes are to be long-term. Road barriers and other infrastructure has been a mish-mash, and not exactly either inviting or attractive. To make the necessary upgrades is going to cost a lot of money, and business owners will certainly be asked to help the cause – one way or another. So, while the Council did use the word “permanent” when they voted earlier this month, my guess is that this issue is far from over. There’s too many unhappy people, including many of the movers and shakers in this town. What happens when the streets look like a ghost town this winter, or, God forbid, vacancy signs start to pop up in downtown windows? I do know when a business closes its doors, it’s usually permanently. And I’m pretty sure that’s not the permanent that city leaders are looking for. Kurt Kuban is the Publisher and Editor of The ‘Ville. He welcomes your comments at kurtkuban@thevillemagazine. com.

Your Voice: Letters to the Editor 4 A new ‘Spotlight’ hits downtown businesses 10 Novi Bowl approaches its final frame 14 Title IX tuns 50: Let’s hear it for the girls 26 Coach Patterson hangs up cleats 28 Dog sitters are alternative to boarding 32 Michigan Phil still in harmony 38 Community Bulletin Board 42


Your Voice Keep streets closed

Here are the reasons for keeping the streets closed in downtown Northville: 1. Northville became a destination city with the street closures and the social district. Customers tell us they see Northville differently now than they did years ago. We see young families, seniors and teenagers – all using the downtown and eating outside in a relaxed atmosphere. We must carry this brand experience forward, not backwards. If we don’t attract younger people with a vital downtown experience, we won’t have to worry about traffic or new developments. 2. Returning to the days of opening and closing streets creates an inconsistent experience. Customers are frustrated when they don’t know if the streets will be open or closed. 3. Returning to platforms is not viable. Platforms do not provide enough seating and the crowds on the sidewalk make it impossible for servers to get to tables. 4. No traffic on the streets makes things safe. Having crowds on the sidewalks, navigating platforms and traffic, is less safe. Mishelle Lussier Owner, Table 5/Lucy and the Wolf

Answers needed

The Citizens For Northville are awaiting answers regarding the Downs preliminary site plan review process. We would like the Planning Commission (and later the City Council) adopt and respond to the following criteria to assess compliance with Zoning Ordinance Section 20.05: “…..The proposed use or uses shall be of such location, size, density and character as to be in harmony with the zoning district in which it is situated, and shall not be detrimental to the adjoining zoning districts…” 1. Is residential density in harmony with surrounding neighborhoods? 2. Are residential architecture and housing types in harmony with surrounding neighborhoods? 3. Have walkability requirements been met? 4. Will impact on traffic improve? 5. Is commercial density and architecture in harmony with downtown? 6. Have landscaping requirements been met? 7. Will FAR restrictions be met? 8. Is parking adequate? 9. Has Farmers Market area been specified? 10. Has impact study been done for city, regarding infrastructure and utilities? Will a bond be required to fund improvements? 11. Has assessment been done concerning impact on surrounding neighborhood property values? 12. Has the City conducted a Pro Forma cost/benefit analysis? 13. Have required developer escrow accounts been determined? 14. Has the developer’s claim of $2.1 million net tax increase for Northville been substantiated and will it offset incremental costs to the city? 15. Has the developer’s ability to complete the plan been assessed? 16. Will the plan attract visitors to Northville? Bill Poulos Citizens For Northville (CitizensForNorthville.org)

SOUND OFF 4 The ‘Ville

A badly needed voice

I am writing to endorse Drew Augustine’s candidacy for Northville School Board. I’ve known Drew for about six years. Our kids are in class together at Silver Springs, and I’ve come to appreciate greatly his leadership in the community. We are both financial advisors, trained to always to think critically and ethically, and bound by a fiduciary responsibility to do what’s always in the client’s best interest. In this case, the clients are our children. As a leader in this capacity, I have every reason to believe that Drew will continue to do what’s best, by putting the kids’ interests before anything else. Drew has a unique perspective, having to think critically about business and finance issues as a very successful financial advisor. He has a truly global perspective, one that is large enough to know what’s been missing on our school board. After all, Drew is also a champion of small business, of Northville, of our school, and our kids. He is a champion of all things local. To be sure, local jurisdiction does not always usurp county, state, and federal requirements. But he will be a badly needed voice that inches the city and its children back to what is best for them. He will remind us where we we’ve been along that path, how we got here, and how we can put the pieces in place to regain our footing. Bryan Franco

Laws already in place

In response to comments from the last issue. With all due respect to Mr. Frank Murkowski, the self-proclaimed “moderate Republican,” his comments on gun control are ignorant of the fact that there are already laws for much of what he proposes. ATF Form 4473 requires the name of the firearm seller/dealer, purchaser, manufacturer, caliber, model, serial number, date of purchase. In addition, full disclosure must be made regarding mental competence, felony background if any, nationality, etc. This record must be maintained by the dealer/seller for 20 years following the transaction. In Michigan, a copy of the purchase must be presented to local law enforcement after purchase. Purchase is only allowed after purchaser passes the National Instant Criminal Background check. This is for all firearm transactions, including any at gun shows. All law-abiding citizens follow this law, criminals do not. He suggests a license be required to own any weapon. Why should a license be required to exercise a constitutional right? The founding fathers put the 2nd Amendment right behind the 1st because they felt it to be that important. Furthermore, civilians are not able to get “military” style automatic firearms. A special license is required to own fully automatic firearms and its extremely costly and hard to get. If any gun owner feels their firearms are a threat to the “safety of our fellow human beings,” they can certainly give then up anytime. It begs the question, why would they be a threat unless one intends on harming fellow human beings on purpose with them. Ray Ferrer

Please submit your letters by emailing Editor Kurt Kuban at kurtkuban@gmail.com. Letters must be 150 words or less. We reserve the right to edit all letters.



It Takes A Village

Story by Michele M. Fecht Photos by Bryan Mitchell

Stone Gang volunteers help preserve Northville’s historic Mill Race

A

s the Northville Historical Society readies for the 50th anniversary celebration of the Mill Race Village next month, there has been more than the usual buzz of activity at the historic site. With nine structures to maintain — nearly all dating from the early to late 1800s — as well as the grounds on the seven-acre site, there is rarely a time when there isn’t a project underway. The lion’s share of the preservation work is tackled by two dozen or so volunteers known as the Stone Gang. The moniker dates to the mid-1980s when volunteers working on construction of the J. Hirsch Blacksmith Shop (a replica of the original located at Main and Hutton streets) were laying stones on the building’s interior. The name — and the stones — stuck. By 1990, with nearly all structures in place in the village — save for the J.M. Mead

6 The ‘Ville

General Store — the Stone Gang turned its attention from large scale construction projects to preservation and maintenance of the village. Their workshop in the basement of the Yerkes house is a treasure trove of tools, vintage hardware and bits

and bobs of miscellany. Nothing is tossed. You can’t repair the doorknob on a 19th century building with something from Home Depot! On any given Tuesday morning, the gang — easy to spot in their matching

Charlie Smith trims back some bushes near the Gazebo, just one of many jobs done by Stone Gang members.

T-shirts — sets to work on a variety of projects. Their latest undertaking, completed last month, was replacing the board and batten siding on the front of the J.M. Mead General Store with more historically accurate clapboard. The project — one of the gang’s most ambitious this year — meant putting up scaffolding, removing existing boards on the front facade and then installing new clapboard, all in a week’s time. As is the case with any Stone Gang project at the Mill Race, work is scheduled around village events which are a major portion of the non-profit’s income. You can’t be running power tools during a wedding ceremony. Kirt Holder, crew chief and a director of the Northville Historical Society, said the project to replace the Mead’s front façade started two years ago when they discovered wood rot on some of the boards.


Though the building was structurally sound, replacing the rotting wood was necessary. It also gave them a chance to replace the board and batten siding. The decision to use 6-inch clapboard was made after reviewing historic photographs of Northville buildings of the same period (around 1850). Early images of downtown show that nearly all wood structures were sided with clapboard. “Six-inch clapboard is about as historically accurate as you can get,” Holder said. It

should be noted that the other three sides of the Mead store are clapboard; only the front was board and batten. Holder credits Northville Lumber for providing the materials at cost. Historical Society president Martha Michalak said there was unanimous agreement to replace the board and batten which had “a sort of Western look like something you would see on a saloon,” she noted. “The building now looks like the rest of the village.”

Volunteers Mike Defrancesco (left) and Dave Laabs fix a door frame on the Hunter House.

Members of the Stone Gang replace the seat on a historic wagon at Mill Race.

HISTORICAL ACCURACY Though the Mead general store is a reconstruction of the building once located at 168 Main Street, its distinction as the last timber-framed structure in downtown Northville made it a desirable fit for the historic village. Society volunteers in 2005 disassembled the building board by board and reconstructed it in 2010 using some of the original materials. Many of the buildings in the village previously were moved relatively intact by professional house movers from their original locations — a herculean undertaking. Records show the building took its name from multiple owners including Harper Bovee

and John Macomber. It served as the community’s first library — a reading room established in 1889 by Northville’s Ladies Library Association for young men and boys where they could “spend their time instead of at questionable resorts.” At that time it was known as the McKeand building. It would house a variety of retail establishments including a steam laundry, bakery, Saxton’s Northville Feed Store, Paul’s Sweet Shop, the Old Mill Restaurant and Little Caesars Pizza. When the society decided the building would serve as a

Continued on Page 8

Mill Race Village Celebrates Fifty The Northville Historical Society is pulling out all the stops for its celebration of Mill Race Village’s 50th anniversary on Sunday, September 18, during the Northville Victorian Heritage Festival. All are welcome at the historic site on Griswold at about 3:30 p.m. following the 33rd Annual Duck Race (a perennial favorite!). Historical society president Martha Michalak said plans include an ice cream social, food trucks, libations (beer and wine – cash bar), games, entertainment by the Shawn Riley Band, a tent on the green, catered nibbles and more. The showpiece of the event will be the village itself including its nine historic structures, lovely

gardens and grounds for strolling. Among the special events will be a fundraising opportunity like no other. Paul Hinz, a society board member and six-year Stone Gang volunteer, has crafted extraordinary replicas of each of the nine historic buildings on the site. And they are for sale. All nine models of the buildings are currently on display in the Hirsch Blacksmith Shop. Hinz said he has spent the last four years crafting each model. He estimates it has taken him about 1,500 hours working on the nine replicas. The models at the village are for display only. Those

interested in purchasing a model of one of the buildings — or a model of their home or any other structure of their liking — can reach out to Hinz at phinz@millracenorthville.org. Hinz noted that 100 percent of the proceeds from the models will go to the Northville Historical Society. So, mark your calendars for Sunday, September 18, and help celebrate Mill Race Village’s 50th anniversary. Party like it’s 1972 . . . in a setting that feels like it’s 1872. For more information, visit the Northville Historical Society and Mill Race Village website at millracenorthville.org.

The ‘Ville 7


Continued from Page 7 general store, it took the name J.M. (Jabish) Mead, owner of Northville’s first general store and the town’s first postmaster. Another Mead-owned store was the site where a committee in 1830 met to give Northville its name.

WHAT’S NEXT?

preferably an older hand-hewn structure that would be located between the edge of the parking lot and the mill manager’s house at 315 Griswold. As for the Stone Gang, the addition of a barn (Holder said he is on the lookout for that structure) and a new lane surface would be welcome projects. They also welcome any volunteers who wish to help their preservation efforts at the village. The job description is simple: All are welcome. Men and women, young and old, no special skills required and training on the job. Pay is in coffee and donuts, camaraderie and the satisfaction of preserving an iconic piece of Northville’s history. For contact information, check out the Northville Historical Society and Mill Race Village website at millracenorthville.org.

The village’s 50-year milestone has offered the Northville Historical Society an opportunity to look ahead to future projects. A strategic plan conducted in 2020 provided a guidepost for next steps. Michalak said one of the more ambitious projects is bricking the dirt lane. “It’s a huge undertaking,” she said. “It involves a lot of engineering, and we would need to relocate utility lines buried below the lane.” She noted the society would like to have a water permeable surface to avoid the runoff into the race which occurs with the dirt pathway. The stones from the current lane also damage the wood floors in the historic buildings when people trek through the structures. In addition to bricking the lane, the society is looking to Paul Hinz spruces up the area around the church after doing add a barn to some weeding. the village,

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“Spotlight Northville is focusing on our community and Main Street America,” she says. “I’ve noticed in most of the videos people talk about what a wonderful community we have. That’s just it, community is what’s most important. People helping people.”

Derek Blair and Jessica Poole (right) interview Maria Vasseliou, owner of Simply Wine, for a Spotlight Northville segment.

Sharing the Spotlight New social media campaign puts focus on Northville businesses By Wensdy Von Buskirk

W

hat’s the deal with this place? That’s a question two local entrepreneurs ask in their new social media campaign Spotlight Northville. Derek Blair of Northville Gallery, and Jessica Poole of The Little Salumi, have supplemented their day gigs by taking on the role of roving reporters, highlighting fellow downtown business owners in short videos they post on YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, and TikTok. During each interview, they ask the same thing: What’s the deal with this place? What’s new for ’22? What makes downtown Northville cooler than anywhere else? “Those are our three questions. It’s that simple,” says Blair, executive producer of the series. “The format is super fun. We’re just trying to spread some joy.”

10 The ‘Ville

TEAM EFFORT Before purchasing Northville Gallery art and custom frame shop in 2015, Blair worked in broadcasting for 25 years, most notably on Emmy-winning hockey coverage for Red Wings Weekly on Fox Sports Detroit. The Canadian native interviewed greats like Gordie Howe and Ted Lindsay and helped educate viewers about the sport. “I worked behind the scenes as a cameraman, editor, writer, producer — I was the guy behind the guy,” Blair says. He also taught high school journalism, as well as broadcast and cinema arts at Madonna University. For Spotlight Northville, he stepped in front of the lens for the first time along with Poole, a long-time restauranteur with no prior experience on-camera. They’ve both risen to the challenge, hitting the town to film several episodes at a time.

“Jessica’s been awesome. She’s got great energy on camera,” Blair says. “Her smile is infectious.” Blair said he got the idea for Spotlight Northville in the spring and planned to shoot quick little videos on his iPhone. Instead, his passion project snowballed as he found a professional crew to make it happen. Digital filmmaker Cory Snyder, who does highend real estate videos, came on board as lead cameraman and took quality to the next level with sweeping drone footage of downtown Northville and professional editing. Cullen Tabaczynski signed on for second camera and audio, and professional model and singer Giovanni Reyes as social media manager. Everyone lives in town. Poole says the project is completely out of her wheelhouse, but she’s glad she joined the team.

GOOD KARMA Spotlight Northville highlights a mix of businesses from retail to restaurants, like Dear Prudence, Mod Market, Simply Wine, and Design Du Jour. Ryan Racine, owner of Toria, said he was thrilled to have his restaurant featured first. “I think what they’re doing is really great for Northville businesses,” Racine says. “These days it really helps to have other social media accounts helping to spread the word.” Feedback has been positive, and the project is growing “like wildfire,” Blair says. Blair, who moved to Northville seven years ago and is active in Rotary Club, says he’s funding the project just for fun. “Everyone’s embracing the new vibe we have going in downtown Northville which is so nice to see and be a part of,” he says Blair never thought Spotlight Northville would get so big, and one more unexpected thing came out of it — ‘what’s the deal with this place?’ has become its calling card. “I end every video with “cheerio,” and that was supposed to be the catchphrase, but the other one just kind of stuck,” he says. You can view the Spotlight Northville videos on Youtube at www.youtube.com/channel/ UCriyq9PKisySUbKXm4gt3Hw.


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hose in one select bowling circle are finding the daunting 9-10 split easier than separating from a spot where they crashed pins and forged lifelong bonds with equal zeal. Novi Bowl Family Fun Center’s imminent closure brought a legion of former employees and acquaintances to the facility for one last hurrah on Aug. 13. All worked for or knew former owner Jerry Harris, who died March 1, 2021, after a lengthy illness. Harris sold Novi

A bowling pin commemorating a 299 game by late Novi Bowl owner Jerry Harris, displayed in the bowling center's bar area.

14 The ‘Ville

Bowl only a few days before his death. GHK Development has been working with the City of Novi to change the zoning at the site so they can build a multi-story single building selfstorage facility that is climate controlled. Those who came to the Aug. 13 gathering shared hugs and handshakes in the bowling center’s bar area. They weren’t mourning a structure’s demise as much as paying tribute to the man whose spirit towers over the Novi Road facility 1½ years after his death. “It wasn’t about working for him; it was working with him,” said Tari Rutkowski, who worked for Harris for 33 years, choking back tears. “This is what he built. This was his life.” Rutkowski started working for Harris in 1979 after arriving from New York with no family here. Rutkowski worked at Novi Bowl before moving on to 700 Bowl in South Lyon, which Harris also owned, 10 years later. “I followed him everywhere,” she said. Her family members were not far behind. She and her husband Michael held their wedding at 700 Lanes — which is now Pinz Bowling

Longtime Novi Bowl owner Jerry Harris

Center — and renewed vows on their 25th anniversary at Novi Bowl. Son Josh Rutkowski grew up at his mother’s knee while she toiled at Novi Bowl. “I pushed a bowling ball before I could walk because of her,” said Josh, 31, pointing to his mother. He bowls five nights a week and proudly touts having the highest series 858 at Novi Bowl. The son met his wife, Ellie, a snack bar worker, at Novi Bowl where he was employed for 12 years, mostly as a mechanic. The boy helped around the joint before officially receiving a W2, handing his mother bowling shoes or assisting with the set-up during one of the numerous birthday parties held there. For 15 minutes of work, the owner might pass him a $20 bill, said Josh Rutkowski, who with Ellie is expecting the couple’s first child in February.

“To me, it wasn’t ‘Boss’ Jerry, it was always ‘Uncle’ Jerry,” he said. The familial current runs strongly throughout the Novi Bowl narrative. Kelly Royston of Novi worked “on and off” for 15 years at the Novi Road bowling spot. Her brother Erik, cousin, and sisterin-law also had employment stints. “It was my second home,” said Royston, mingling with the gathering in the bar. “This was a place to come and relax.” Skip Dietz, who described himself as the “voice of Novi Bowl” after serving as a karaoke entertainer for 25 years, said his youngest daughter is heartbroken because she won’t be able to work there. Dietz’s wife Shannon and oldest daughter Samantha were employed at Novi Bowl. “He was very father-like,” said Dietz of Harris, whom he described as a mentor. “He was a very protective father. Jerry commanded loyalty by showing loyalty.” The Harris name grew in stature around the Detroit bowling scene after patriarch Nathan Harris and Leonard Herman opened Novi Bowl in the late 1970s. Jerry’s father was a bread maker by trade. “He told his partner: ‘I don’t know anything about running a bowling center.’ ‘Well Nate,’ his partner told him, ‘We’re going to learn,’” said Jerry’s widow Wendy Harris, retelling the conversation. Novi Bowl’s opening became a boon for Joyce Bousquet, who was running two women’s leagues at the time and needed a new location after Northville Lanes closed in 1986. Northville Women’s League and Wednesday Wonder Women


moved to the Novi Road facility. “It was always a very friendly place,” said Bousquet, who was named Metro Detroit USBC Secretary of the Year in 2011 and ’20. “We worked with Jerry Harris a majority of the time … He was very good to work with. He was very receptive to anything we wanted to do.” Bousquet has moved her leagues to Super Bowl in Canton and Country Lanes in Farmington Hills. Sentimentality aside, Novi Bowl’s loss leaves a void. “People have to drive further to be able to bowl,” said Bousquet, who lives in Northville. “A lot of the alleys in the past few years have been shutting down.” The Harris’ also owned 700 Bowl in South Lyon and Drakeshire Lanes in

Former employee Tari Rutkowski greets Rob Harris, who worked six years at Novi Bowl. Photo by Larry O’Connor

Farmington. Nathan Harris, a holocaust survivor, died in 1994. Jerry Harris loved bowling, his widow said. He served as Northville High’s coach and his passion rubbed off on others. Novi Bowl became a hub for benevolent causes, hosting fundraisers for Northville High School and Northville Civic Concern as well as Goodwill Industries. The center was also a favorite place for Northville’s Cooke School, which serves students

with special needs. Jerry loved to teach students how to bowl. “They couldn’t wait to come in and say ‘hi,’ and bowl,” Wendy Harris said. “I remember talking to some of those teachers and they would say, ‘They only come to school on this day because they know it’s bowling day.’” Tari Rutkowski has been busy, retrieving memorial plaques and banners commemorating 300 games from the facility. She’s tracked

down some owners on Facebook to return their banners. “It might not seem important to some people,” she said, “but to me, it was important those things were taken out of there and not destroyed.” For those emotionally invested in Novi Bowl, the final chapter is bittersweet. “I am sad for the people who have grown up there or just loved going up there,” said Wendy as she began to sob. “They are not going to have that anymore, but I know there is a time and reason for everything. I feel maybe this is how it was all supposed to be.” Jordan Matti, the current manager of Novi Bowl, said the bowling alley will close in November or December, though there is no firm date.

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The ‘Ville 15


or on Vote absentee th November 8 !

Northville School Board

If you seek School Board Trustees with proven leadership, civility, and demonstrated pursuit of excellence for our students, teachers, and families, the choice is clear. These leaders are committed to positive, future-oriented action for our district:

Retain

KIM CAMPBELL-VOYTAL

Campbell-Voytal

Current Northville School Board Trustee Master teacher/administrator in public health, Clinical Nurse Specialist Northville Senior Advisory Council Secretary, active Amerman PTA member, 34 year Northville resident www.KimVoytal.com

CARIN MEYER

Meyer

Current Michigan PTA Board of Directors Federal Legislative Chair, and Northville High School PTSA Secretary; served as Northville Council of PTAs Advocacy Chair Compassionate certified teacher with degrees in elementary and special education www.MeyerForNorthvilleSchoolBoard.com

MELISSA STUART

Stuart

Current Hillside PTSA President. Former Moraine PTA Membership Chair, V.P., President Collaborative parent leader for Science Olympiad, Boy and Girl Scouts Career military upbringing; adaptable, determined, resilient, dependable, family-focused www.StuartForNorthville.com Paid for by CTE Kimberly Campbell-Voytal to Northville School Board, 113 West Street, Northville, MI 48167; CTE Carin Meyer, 437 Grace Street, Northville, MI 48167; CTE Melissa Stuart, 47188 Dunsany Rd, Northville, MI 48167.

Vote absentee or on November 8th!

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If you seek School Board Trustees with proven leadership, civility, and demonstrated pursuit of excellence for our students, teachers, and families, the choice is clear. These leaders are committed to positive, future-oriented action for our district:

Retain

• Expungement of OUIL/OWI and most felonies/misdemeanors KIM CAMPBELL-VOYTALfor first time convictions Current Northville School Board Trustee for expungements, Detroit Bar Association) (Certificate Master teacher/administrator• in public health, Clinical Nurse Specialist Guardianship: Incapacitated Person, Developmentally Disabled, Minor Northville Senior Advisory Council Secretary, active Amerman PTA member, 34 year Northville resident • Conservatorship • Social Security Disability/Worker’s Compensation www.KimVoytal.com

Campbell-Voytal

Meyer

• Employment/Age Discrimination/Sexual Harassment • Complex Family Law Current Michigan PTA Board of Directors Federal Chair, and Northville • Multi-Million Dollars in Legislative Case Resolution

CARIN MEYER

High School PTSA Secretary; served as Northville Council of PTAs Advocacy Chair Compassionate certified teacher with degrees in elementary and special education Commissioner, Michigan Civil Rights Commission www.MeyerForNorthvilleSchoolBoard.com Alum of Catholic Central High School, Henry Ford Community College, MSU, U-M, U-D Law School, Wayne MELISSA STUART State Law School Current Hillside PTSA President. Former Moraine PTA Membership Chair, V.P., President Proud lifetime member Boy of the American Legion Collaborative parent leader for Science Olympiad, and Girl Scouts Richard J. Corriveau, ESQ. Career military upbringing; adaptable, determined, resilient, dependable, family-focused State Bar of Michigan: Council Member/Senior Lawyers Attorney at L aw www.StuartForNorthville.com

Stuart

Paid for by CTE Kimberly Campbell-Voytal to Northville School Board, 113 West Street, Northville, MI 48167; CTE Carin Meyer, 437 Grace Street, Northville, MI 48167; Stuart, 47188 Dunsany Rd, Northville, MI 48167. 324 East Ma in Street, Nor thv i l le,CTE MMelissa I 48167

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Northville’s Lou LaRiche helped fund Miracle League of Plymouth’s ballfield.

‘Big Lou’ LaRiche Left His Mark On Community Northville resident’s Chevy dealership was about more than just selling cars By Tim Smith

U

ntil slowed by declining health in recent years, Northville’s Lou LaRiche always made sure he had time to make the rounds at the Chevrolet dealership he helmed for over half a century. “He used to tell me that when someone comes into the dealership, you should be treating them like they’re coming into your home,” said Scott LaRiche, who recently reminisced about his legendary dad affectionately known as ‘Big Lou’ – who passed away on June 9 at age 90. “And he went so far as to, every morning when he was here, walk through the dealership, say hello to all the employees, go into the customer waiting area and see if anybody needed a water or a coffee.” Scott LaRiche, who now is president of Lou LaRiche Chevrolet at 40875 Plymouth

18 The ‘Ville

Road in Plymouth Township, tries to stay true to his father’s vision of always being the consummate host and community champion. “I emulate him every day,” said the Northville resident, who has been a salesman and executive with his dad’s dealership since 1996. “Just because what he did was the right way to do it. Take care of people. The better you take care of your employees, the better they are going to take care of anybody that comes through the doors looking to do business here at Lou LaRiche Chevrolet.” Lou LaRiche’s legacy is strongly felt far beyond the dealership, which opened in 1972. The LaRiches and Plymouth are part of a stillblossoming mutual affection society, too, with Lou LaRiche Chevrolet recently winning the

community’s Large Business of the Year Award. “Everybody knew Lou LaRiche, he was a very humble person, very unassuming,” said Wes Graff, president of the Plymouth Community Chamber of Commerce. “You wouldn’t even know he owned the dealership when he came up to you. And he gave back a lot to everything. He meant a lot to so many groups in our community and all-around metro Detroit.” Of course, family itself always was first in the elder LaRiche’s heart with the auto business a close second. Lou and Gail LaRiche were married in 1954 and during 60 years together (Gail passed in 2014) they had seven children including Michele, Jacqueline, Scott, John, Jim, Bob and Suzanne. They made their home in Northville.

mental disabilities the chance to play organized baseball. When the concept of bringing a Miracle League facility to town took root more than a decade ago, it was Lou and Gail who immediately stepped up with an important financial contribution. The LaRiches donated a check for $25,000 to the project before construction on the field began in 2011, and they gifted another $20,000 in 2017 for the addition of a pavilion, said Miracle League of Plymouth president Mark Madonna. “My mom always had a very soft spot in her heart for anybody with disabilities,” Scott LaRiche recalled. “So when my dad heard about the Miracle League, he went ‘You mean kids with disabilities get to play baseball? We have to find a way to help.’ So that’s when we made

Lou LaRiche with his son, Scott LaRiche, the Northville resident who now runs Lou LaRiche Chevrolet.

Considering that Chevy’s longtime marketing jingle is “baseball, hot dogs, apple pie and Chevrolet,” it is no surprise how important Lou LaRiche was to local youth baseball and softball endeavors (sponsoring numerous Little League teams over the years) and especially to the non-profit Miracle League of Plymouth – dedicated to giving kids with physical and

the donation to build the field.” A decade later, visitors to Bilkie Field spend a few hours every summer Saturday morning under the Lou and Gail LaRiche Family Pavilion as they watch the youngsters from all over Metro Detroit play ball. The LaRiche family’s dedication to community staples such as the Miracle League didn’t just begin in


recent years. From the start of Lou and Gail LaRiche’s move from Ohio to Michigan in the late 1960s, being there for people has meant more than selling a car, truck or SUV. “When he first came to town, his job was to run the dealership, get things going, sell a lot of cars and trucks,” Scott LaRiche said. “But his love was the community and how they accepted him with open arms.” Lou LaRiche also loved the automobile business and was a mover and shaker in metro Detroit, serving as president of the 1985 Detroit Auto Show. (Scott LaRiche followed suit in that role by guiding the 2015 event at then-Cobo Hall). Louis Henry LaRiche himself grew up immersed in the automobile business as his father owned a Ford dealership

Lou LaRiche (third from left) supported many charitable causes. Here he is presenting a check to the Miracle League of Plymouth.

in the Italian community in Cleveland. “He learned early on how important it was to be part of the community,” Scott LaRiche continued. As Lou LaRiche grew older, coupled with health concerns stemming from the global pandemic, the patriarch rarely came by the dealership in the last couple years of his life. “He did come in a few

times, but we didn’t want him catching Covid,” LaRiche said. “Eventually he did, but he had a very, very mild case. … Mobility kind of lessened as far as him getting around, but boy, I’ll tell you what, if you said we were going to the dealership his ears would perk up.” Scott LaRiche and the dealership’s staff plan on keeping Big Lou’s love of community and Chevrolet going

strong for many years to come, largely because of customer loyalty that was cultivated by his father. “We have great-grandfathers that are sending their greatgrandchildren in, because they’ve always done business here,” Scott LaRiche noted. “And that’s one of the things my father was probably proudest of, that long-time customer dedication.”

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ess on gridiron c c u s to in s te la s n od summer tra n Mitchell Mustangs hope go s | Photos by Brya Story by Brad Emon

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igger, faster, stronger and just get better every single day. That’s been the team’s mantra during the off season for the Northville High football program. “We’ve actually had a great off season . . . the energy and the results in our weight room has been phenomenal and we’ve really had a good summer,” said Northville’s Matt Ladach, who enters his 15th varsity season as head coach. “We’re not necessarily bigger, but we have good enough size and we’re definitely stronger.” Exhibit A might be 6-foot2, 235-pound junior two-way offensive and defensive lineman Graham Gilmartin, who earned a starting position as a sophomore. “Graham is five pounds away from breaking the bench press

22 The ‘Ville

record from all the years I’ve been coaching here,” Ladach said. “He’s doing a phenomenal job. We’ve got more kids hitting milestones in the weight now than we’ve ever had.” Gilmartin eats, drinks and sleeps football and Ladach hopes it rubs off on the rest of the squad. “He’s one of those guys that is so hungry for football it’s phenomenal,” the Northville coach said. “You look at weekly totals of guys that are watching film on Hudl, and he’s leading by far. He’s a film junkie. He’s a football junkie and he’s doing an excellent job.” Ladach, who is 74-53 overall with eight playoff appearances during his 14-year tenure, wants to make more of a stand at the initial point of attack as the Mustangs are coming off a 3-6 season, including a 2-5 record

in the West Division of the Kensington Lakes Activities Association. “That strength is going to be that key,” Ladach said. “We have some bigger kids on the defensive line. Last year we had some strong kids, some athletic kids but we were definitely undersized based on the defensive line. And against certain teams they were able to push us around a little bit when we played against some of the bigger teams – I mean teams that had bigger offensive lineman – they were able to push us around a little bit open up holes, get four yards a carry and just move the ball and move the chains, and that was tough. But this year I anticipate we’ll be a little bit bigger, a little bit stronger and faster.” The Mustangs gave up an average of 30 points per game in

2021, so one point of emphasis is getting better defensively. “In the trenches last year, we struggled at times a little bit, especially defending the run and I think all the work we put in the off season is going to pay off this year,” said returning senior defensive back Max Anderson. Because he played basketball during the winter for the Mustangs, the 6-foot-1, 170-pound Anderson was a little late to the off season football party, but he’s been working diligently putting in the time in the weight room ever since. “I could tell the guys that played last year are putting in an extreme and awesome amount of work,” said Anderson, who is also contending for a running back spot. “And once I got to work and got in a great routine, not only do I think I made


tt Ladach yells Mustangs Coach Ma ce. cti pra at s on instructi

extreme strides towards getting stronger and bigger . . . the rest of my teammates did. I think it will really benefit us this year.” Giving 100 percent effort all the time can be the difference between winning and losing, according to Anderson. “We lost a couple of games last year by one point and it’s going to be the little things that are the difference between those games,” he said. A year ago, the Mustangs averaged 24.5 points per game and hope to increase that number exponentially. “We try to make sure that our offense is complementary to the skill that we have, and we definitely will,” Ladach said. “We’ll make some changes and we will have some changes as to what we’re doing. We’re going to look the same, but our play selection will be a little bit different based on players that we have.” The trigger man at quarterback will be 6-1, 170-pound senior Luca Prior, who got his feet wet by starting a pair of games last season while appearing in several others. And Ladach believes Prior has the goods to lead the Mustangs back into the playoffs. “He has a great arm,” Ladach said. “He can throw it a mile. He’s super confident and he’s got some good weapons to throw to. Nolan (Thomson) is a returning receiver. He was

our number one receiver last year. Angelo (Rodriguez) is a returning receiver as well and they’re both very dynamic with the ball in their hands.” Meanwhile, Prior is also a dual threat. “I’m comfortable in and outside the pocket,” he said. “I like running the ball more than I used to . . . whatever it takes to make the team successful and our program.” Prior said he has a little Cam Newton in him when it comes to the end zone celebrations and running the football. But he also has a couple of other NFL favorites QBs. “That’s a guy (Newton) I looked up to and a pro style guy like Matt Ryan and Ben Roethsliberger,” the Northville senior said. “Those are guys I try and emulate a little bit in the pocket. Coach (Joe) Rohrhoff and the

offensive staff have worked so hard in the offseason developing kind of a new strategy for us. We’re going to do a whole lot of everything, whatever it takes.” Prior will also have plenty of help in the backfield. “We’ve got three guys competing right now – Max Anderson, (senior) Blake Presley and ( junior) Caleb Moore (off the JV) are all very, very good backs,” Ladach said. “We’re going to have a good mix of running backs in the backfield.” Seniors Nathan Lee and Zach Hoshaw, both starters a year ago, may be a bit undersized on the offensive line, but they bring experience and lead a formidable group that also includes Gilmartin. Ladach lost one son (Parker) to graduation, but his younger son Hunter, a senior, also returns as a starter to help anchor the defense.

“He was able to fill in a couple of games on the line last year,” the proud father said. “He’s mostly an outside linebacker and he’ll play H-Back for us this year as well.” Northville opens its season Thursday, Aug. 25 at Wayne Memorial before starting the KLAA West Division schedule Thursday, Sept. 1 at Plymouth. Their first home game is Friday, Sept. 9 against Howell. “You know everybody in our league is good,” Ladach said. “There’s not a lousy team in our league, so there are no breaks. We need to stay healthy and our offseason has put us in a good position to do that. They’re strong, they’re confident and being strong and being confident go a long way as it relates to injuries and certain things like that. So, staying healthy is important and maintain that confidence and that belief in ourselves is important.” And the preparation for the 2022 season began way back in early December. “Since December 4th when we started our offseason program I think the goal for us, and as a quarterback and a team, has been to get stronger and tougher,” Prior said. “Personally, I spent the offseason getting stronger and working on the game physically and mentally as well. I’ve been doing a lot of quarterback training with a lot of different guys and getting out with receivers and I feel everything we’ve done this offseason is going to pay off personally and as a team so I’m excited about that.”

(11) ck Max Anderson Senior defensive ba of y da t firs the g durin breaks up a pass s. ng sta Mu the practice for

The ‘Ville 23


2 2 0 2 arsity Sports S G Fall V N A T E S L L U I V M H T R O N VARSITY BOY’S TENNIS

VARSITY FOOTBALL Thur

8/25

Wayne Memorial HS

7:00 PM

Thur

9/1

Plymouth HS

7:00 PM

T

L

Sat

8/27

8:00 AM 9:00 AM 8:00 AM

Howell HS

7:00 PM

Thur

9/1

Canton HS

7:00 PM

Thur

9/8

Canton High School

4:00 PM

Fri

9/23

Brighton HS (Homecoming)

7:00 PM

Fri

9/30

Salem HS

7:00 PM

Sat

9/10

OPEN Quad (Ike, Stoney, WLC)

8:00 AM

Fri

10/7

Hartland HS

7:00 PM

Mon

9/12

Troy Athens High School

4:00 PM

Fri

10/14

Novi HS

7:00 PM

Tues

9/13

Novi High School

4:00 PM

Fri

10/21

OPEN (KLAA Crossover)

7:00 PM

Thur

9/15

Plymouth High School

4:00 PM

Tues

9/20

Salem High School

4:00 PM

Wed

9/21

Ann Arbor Huron High School

4:00 PM

Tues

9/27

OPEN KLAA Crossover

4:00 PM

Fri

8/26

Ann Arbor Huron HS AA Invite @ Huron

TBA

Thur

9/1

OPEN Black and Orange

6:00 PM

9/7

Canton High School

Sat

10/1

6:30 PM

Mon

10/3

KLAA Conference Tournament Groves High School

Tues

10/4

Brother Rice High School

9/15

Novi High School

6:30 PM

Sat

9/17

Holland Public Schools Holland Invite

TBA

Thur

9/22

Salem High School

6:30 PM

Sat

9/24

Salem High School Rock Mauer Invite (B Team)

TBA

Sat

9/24

Northville Quad

TBA

Thur

9/29

Plymouth High School

6:30 PM

Thur

10/6

Brighton High School

6:30 PM

Fri

10/7

OPEN MISCA (10/7 and 10/8)

TBA

10/13

4:00 PM

TBA 4:00 PM 4:00 PM

VARSITY GIRL’S GOLF Mon

8/15

OPEN Highest Honors

7:30 PM

Mon

8/22

OPEN Sentech Golf Tournament

6:30 AM

Tues

8/23

OPEN Pre-Season KLAA

TBA

Mon

8/29

OPEN Flint Golf Club

TBA

Thur

9/8

Plymouth High School

3:00 PM

9/10

OPEN Next Tee Golf Tournament

8:00 AM 3:00 PM

Howell High School

6:30 PM

Sat

Thur

10/20

Hartland High School

6:30 PM

Tues

9/13

Hartland High School

Sat

10/29

OPEN KLAA JV Meet

TBA

Thur

9/15

Canton High School

3:00 PM

Fri

11/4

OPEN KLAA Conference Meet @ Novi

TBA

Mon

9/19

OPEN Dow Girls Golf Invite

1:00 PM

Thur

11/10

OPEN Dive Regional

TBA

Tues

9/20

Brighton High School

3:00 PM

Thur

11/10

OPEN Last Chance Meet

6:00 PM

Thur

9/22

Howell High School

3:00 PM

Tues

9/27

Novi High School

3:00 PM

Thur

9/29

Salem High School

3:00 PM

Fri

9/30

OPEN Post Season KLAA

TBA

Home

L

8/24

10:00 AM

9/9

Thur

- WA

Wed

OPEN vs. Rochester and CC OPEN Quad (Troy, Greenhills, Okemos) OPEN East vs West (Triple Duel) OPEN Quad (B. Hills, Skyline, Okemos) OPEN Quad (Pioneer, Skyline, CC)

9/16

Thur

HE

8/22

Fri

Wed

LE - IN HO

8/18

Mon

Fri

VARSITY GIRL’S SWIMMING

SPONSORED BY:

Thur

Away

Visit northvilleathletics.org for complete up-to-date NHS schedules.


VARSITY BOY’S SOCCER VARSITY GIRL’S CROSS COUNTRY Sat

8/27

OPEN Pete Moss Invite

10:00 AM

Tues

8/30

OPEN Mustang Invite

TBA

Tues

9/13

@ Cass Benton

5:30 PM

Fri

9/16

OPEN MSU Spartan Invite

2:50 PM

Sat

9/17

OPEN Faffin Festival of Races Invite

12:40 PM

Tues

9/20

@ Huron Meadows

4:45 PM

Sat

9/24

OPEN Jackson Invite

9:40 AM

Sat

10/1

OPEN Shepard Invite

10:00 AM

Wed

8/17

Detroit Catholic Central HS

7:30 PM

Fri

8/19

Livonia Stevenson HS

6:00 PM

Tue

8/23

Plymouth High School

7:00 PM

Fri

8/26

Salem High School

7:00 PM

Mon

8/29

Howell High School

7:00 PM

Wed

8/31

Brighton High School

7:00 PM

Tues

9/6

Novi High School

7:00 PM

Thur

9/8

Canton High School

7:00 PM

Tues

9/13

Hartland High School

7:00 PM

Thur

9/15

Plymouth High School

7:00 PM

Sat

9/17

Skyline High School

1:00 PM

Tues

10/4

@ Hartland

4:45 PM

Tues

9/20

Salem High School

7:00 PM

Sat

10/8

OPEN Portage Invite

10:40 AM

Thur

9/22

Howell High School

7:00 PM

Tues

10/11

Novi High School (@ Cass Benton)

4:30 PM

Tues

9/27

Brighton High School

7:00 PM

Fri

10/14

OPEN River Rat Invite

5:15 PM

Thur

9/29

Novi High School

7:00 PM

10/4

Canton High School

7:00 PM

Thur

10/20

KLAA Championship @ Huron Meadows

Tues

4:00 PM

Thur

10/6

Hartland High School

7:00 PM

10/29

OPEN MHSAA Regional

TBA

Mon

10/10

OPEN KLAA Crossover

7:00 PM

11/5

OPEN MHSAA State Finals Weekend

TBA

Sat

VARSITY BOY’S CROSS COUNTRY Fri

8/19

OPEN Lamplighter Invite

8:00 PM

Tues

8/30

OPEN Mustang Invite

TBA

Sat

9/10

OPEN Bath Invite

8:30 AM

Tues

9/13

@ Cass Benton

5:00 PM

Fri

9/16

OPEN MSU Spartan Invite

4:00 PM

Tues

9/20

@ Huron Meadows

4:15 PM

Tues

10/4

@ Hartland

4:00 PM

Sat

10/8

OPEN Portage Invite

TBA

Sat

10/8

Tues

10/11

Thur

10/13

OPEN Wayne County Championships Novi High School @ Cass Benton OPEN Bob Brown Invite (JV athletes) KLAA Championship @ Huron Meadows

10:00 AM 4:00 PM 3:45 PM

Thur

10/20

Tues

10/25

OPEN Lake Fenton Invite (9/10) 4:00 PM

11/5

OPEN MHSAA State Finals Weekend

Sat

3:30 PM

VARSITY GIRL’S VOLLEYBALL Wed

8/24

Grand Haven High School (Quad)

TBA

Sat

8/27

OPEN Mercy Power Cup

TBA

Tues

8/30

Canton High School

6:30 PM

Thur

9/8

Plymouth High School

6:30 PM

Sat

9/10

Legacy Program Cup

TBA

Tues

9/13

Howell High School

6:30 PM

Thur

9/15

Dearborn High School

6:30 PM

Sat

9/17

OPEN Mercy Power Cup

TBA

Tues

9/20

Brighton High School

6:30 PM

Tues

9/27

Salem High School

6:30 PM

Sat

10/1

Varsity Invite

9:00 AM

Tues

10/4

Novi High School

6:30 PM

Sat

10/8

OPEN Mercy Power Cup

TBA

Tues

10/11

Hartland High School

6:30 PM

Sat

10/15

Beast of the East

TBA

Tues

10/18

OPEN KLAA Crossover @ East

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Sat

10/22

OPEN KLAA Tournament

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LET’S HEAR IT FOR THE GIRLS After 50 years, Title IX has created opportunities for female athletes By Tim Smith

Allison and Abby Dunn hold up a copy of Sports Illustrated. Both athletes are featured on the bottom left of the cover.

T

he 50th anniversary of the passage into law of Title IX is celebrated by Sports Illustrated in a striking cover collage of important female athletes of the past half century. Billie Jean King, Serena Williams, Pat Summit and many more are honored in the usergenerated illustration, which was weaved together by graphic designer Gabriela Bury. But the SI cover also features photos of not-so-famous females who still point to the influence and importance of a law that was placed on the books decades before they even were born – including 20-year-

26 The ‘Ville

old Northville sisters Abby and Allison Dunn. The identical sisters (they actually are triplets, along with sister Noelle Dunn) are depicted in the lower left corner of the collage, with Abby and Allison competing for their college teams in hurdles and rowing, respectively. “My mom’s former classmate from elementary school (reached out) on Facebook and was like, ‘Hey, my sister works for Sports Illustrated and she needs female athletes to send in their pictures,” said Abby Dunn, a track and field standout at Northville High School (where

she and her sisters graduated from in 2020) and who now competes at Wayne State University. “I didn’t realize it was for something so big. It’s bizarre to have us be on the cover of something that’s so known around the world.” Allison Dunn, who is on the Michigan State University rowing team, said participating in the SI effort to spotlight the importance of Title IX to gender equality and opportunity in athletics proved to be empowering. “I feel validated, too, in my effort and my workouts and my competitions,” she said. “That really pushed me to be something more than just an athlete. Now, I feel I represent women athletes that don’t get enough recognition in the world of sports.” Abby Dunn’s coach at Northville High School, Tim Dalton, underscored why being part of the Sports Illustrated cover is a big deal – because it highlights how important Title IX itself continues to be in the lives of girls and women even though much more still needs to be done to balance the scales.

“I took over the girls track and field program here 10 years ago,” Dalton said. “It’s very important to me personally as a coach of a female sport. I think every single year you see the progression made. Just this past weekend, at the MHSAA finals, just seeing the times and marks continuing to get better for female sports is super impressive.” PROGRESS SLOW, BUT SURE And Title IX’s impact remains strong even without it being the subject of a SI cover feature. “It’s really just equality,” said Dalton. “Obviously, Title IX is more than sports.” Dalton points to Abby Dunn, a stellar athlete to earn a college scholarship in track and field. But he added that Title IX has helped many others reach the next level via scholarships, walk-on opportunities “and all of the above in all different levels” from Division I to local community colleges. “Definitely there’s more


Abby Dunn (above) and sister Allison (at bottom) both excelled at track for NHS.

opportunities and I’m a huge believer that high school athletics is a big piece of the overall education of our youth. I see it (equality) continuing to move forward, but I think there’s still room to go,” said Dalton, noting the USA women’s national soccer team fight for equal pay. Earlier this summer, a class action lawsuit was settled with $24 million going to the U.S. women’s national soccer program. No longer are varsity girls and women’s sports marginalized by those in power, as they were for many years before the 1972 decision – which prohibited “sex discrimination in educational institutions that receive funding from the federal government.” Even in the years following the Title IX ruling, however, its impact is a mixed bag. Not the least of which is the way college football and men’s basketball still are the straws that stir the drink in the world of big bucks, scholarships and television exposure. “At Wayne State, we only have women’s track because of Title IX,” Abby Dunn said. “Men’s football takes up so many spots so we don’t have a men’s track

team. But I found, in many situations, … we get less gear, we don’t travel as far, I think our funding is less, which makes no sense.” According to Allison Dunn, female athletes tend to deal with “minimal gear compared to basketball and football even though I do acknowledge that that is a big money maker for the university itself. “But it doesn’t feel good to see that, when you have athletes who are so good and so strong that you get like two tank tops and a pair of shorts and that’s it,” Allison noted. “I feel like it’s definitely going to take time for this (equality) to happen, for women to get more recognition.” WORK YET TO DO Gender issues surrounding Division I men’s and women’s basketball prompted a 100page report issued in 2021 by independent firm Kaplan Hecker & Fink. Top-line findings included that “in both practice and perception, women’s basketball essentially reports to and is subordinate to men’s basketball.” Attach to that a disproportionate level of resources, including staffing

levels, budgets and TV exposure to name a few. Among the firm’s recommendations included the NCAA change its leadership structure in D-I basketball to prioritize gender equity and coordination between both the men’s and women’s tournaments. There is no doubt that work remains in the important task of reducing disparities. Moreover, the amount of scholarship dollars for men and women might not be balancing out the way the authors of Title IX might have hoped 50 years ago. But attitudes at least are starting to change, something the Sports Illustrated cover story certainly fosters. “At our level I think we do a great job,” Dalton said. “We run a combined (track and field) program here at the high school. Our boys and girls practice every day together, they train together, we go to the same meets with each other. It’s essentially one big program. But (it’s) continuing to open those doors and making sure they have opportunities at the next level for those kids that want to go on and compete.” The Dunns agreed that the SI exposure helps move the needle in the quest for gender equality in athletics. “We can’t forget where we’ve come from,” Abby said. “Because in order to improve, you have to think about what has happened that led us to this point. “I just feel special to be part of this movement, to be the ones that are pushing (for) change and actually working towards it and not just saying empty words. We’re changing the rules and making it better for all the female athletes in the world.”

Patterson tips hat to Title IX Northville resident Barry Patterson just retired after spending the last 37 season coaching female athletes at Garden City High School (Page 28). He’s seen big improvements because of the implementation of Title IX. Patterson stressed that Title IX was well into effect when he began coaching at the youth sports level in the 1980s (he began as an assistant coach at Garden City in 1984-85). “Back in the day, when I first started coaching, the very first softball team I coached – not at the high school – we played in blue jeans and t-shirts,” Patterson said. “The boys had uniform pants and all that. “It wasn’t taken seriously at all, it was just something they offered because they offered something for the boys and they should offer something for the girls. But it wasn’t sponsored, it wasn’t promoted.” Despite improvements and more acceptance in society, Patterson would like to see more efforts to level the playing field. Yet, there is no denying that he has seen Title IX’s impact on females, particularly those interested in becoming college athletes. “There’s no doubt, it’s improved certainly over the last 10-to-15 years in terms of scholarship opportunities available to them,” Patterson said. “The biggest difference is in the drive, they see these opportunities now. “They know other people that have gotten scholarships, they know other people that have had opportunities to play at the collegiate level and maybe beyond.”

The ‘Ville 27


Barry Patterson with his longtime assistant coach Chuck Drewicz at a recent retirement party.

Northville’s Barry Patterson spent 37 seasons coaching softball at Garden City High.

‘Quite A Ride’ Patterson’s legendary coaching career comes to a close By Tim Smith

W

ay back in 1992, Garden City softball coach Barry Patterson turned in his resignation letter to the high school’s athletic director. But Bob Dropp merely folded the letter up and stashed it away in a pocket. That turned out to be a prescient move as Patterson, a Northville resident, went on to lead the Cougars to nearly 900 wins (including the 2008 Division 1 state championship) and a berth in the Michigan High School Softball Coaches Association Hall of Fame. “Bob took it (the letter) from me and said ‘No need to be a martyr here,’” said Patterson, who turns 62 in July. “We had a good year, we won districts, we maybe lost in the regional final, but I didn’t feel I was making a big enough difference in the program. I always judged myself very harshly, in terms of whether I was doing a good job or not.” Thirty years later, the veteran coach – who also coached varsity girls basketball at Garden City High School for

28 The ‘Ville

Barry Patterson with his biggest supporter and wife Diana Patterson, retired principal from Northville High School.

over a decade along the way – indeed is leaving the third-base coaches box for good. At the conclusion of the 2022 season, in which his team won a district title before bowing out June 11 in a regional game, Patterson, who is married to retired Northville High School assistant principal Diana Patterson, announced he’d be stepping aside after a total of 37 seasons. He finished with an incredible record of 847-334. “It has been quite a ride,” Patterson said. “When you look back it seems so short.

During the course of it, … you’re just doing it and one year leads to the next. But it’s been incredible. I love the game, I love teaching strategies and all about the game. But the really important thing I’ve gotten are the relationships. To me, life and coaching are all about relationships.” One of those relationships was with Chuck Drewicz, his longtime assistant coach. “I walked together with him on the field for my first game coaching Garden City in 1996,” noted Drewicz. “And walked off the field with him for our last time together in 2022. It has been an awesome time no matter what we (were) doing together during (those) years. He is my best friend.” Drewicz and a number of people connected with Patterson’s coaching orbit – including former players, coaches and parents who Patterson got to know during the past few decades – attended a type of farewell party at Barry Patterson Field on June 14. The lighted venue itself is another

demonstrable example of the legacy Patterson is, in this case, literally leaving behind. Although Patterson said he is dealing with ongoing health issues, specifics of which he did not want to publicly disclose, he emphasized that now is the right time to leave the prep coaching spotlight. There will be road trips to look forward to, as well as helping Diana with her in-home business Bear Hug Cookies & Boutique (www. bearhugcookiesandboutique. com). “All custom orders for decorative cookies and boutique items,” he said. “She’s real creative so she’s loving being able to do that. I told her … we’re going to travel a little bit, too.” Cookies and traveling are nice, of course. But for Patterson, his retirement means he’ll not have the same opportunity to link coaching with community outreach. And, he emphasized that the importance connecting with others is a regular topic of conversation with his wife, Diana. “We talk all the time about every single relationship that I have,” he said. “Friendships and so on, were forged through my coaching opportunities, whether in basketball or softball.”


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Vacationing Without Rover? In-home dog sitters are an alternative to boarding By Tim Smith

H

ow in tune is Cozy Care co-owner Karissa Parran with the pooches Northville-area families hire her to do sleepovers with? Parran, and her husband, Rick, employ a handful of dog sitters who conduct thorough meet-and-greets – to ensure the maximum comfort level for those on either end of the leash – and get up-close cues on a particular dog’s tendencies, habits and personality. “We want to make sure we are reading the body language of the pet,” said Karissa

Parran, whose mobile care business covers Northville, Northville Township, Novi and surrounding communities. “How is their tail, their ear placement. How are they responding to the ‘snuggles,’ so to speak. So we try to dive deep into their emotions and make sure they are as comfortable as possible.” Cozy Care is among a growing number of companies that provide home care for dogs for families who would rather not board their pooch while away on vacation. The Parrans say they have always been

Cozy Care Pet Services owner Karissa Parran (left) with some of her clients and their pooches.

32 The ‘Ville

dog people, so starting their business was a no-brainer. “We had looked into purchasing some existing businesses a while back,” Parran said. “When those doors closed we decided there’s got to be another way to make your passion come true. So that’s when we decided to do mobile pet care and we love it. “You have to be compassionate, loving and definitely have to be a caregiver (to dogsit) because it’s a lot of work,” continued Parran, who previously managed a pet rescue and pet resort. “But it’s so much fun.” Clients for Cozy Care (www.cozycarepets. com) often are found through a Facebook page or word-of-mouth from satisfied friends and customers. The Parrans and their staff are completely vetted and bonded. Their rates are typically $75-$100 per night, very competitive with boarding facilities. Cozy Care also goes the extra mile – literally, which is no small thing considering the high price of gas these days – to make sure family and caregiver are in complete agreement on what a particular dog might need during an overnight or long-term stay. “We provide a complimentary meet and greet, to make sure the pets feel comfortable and make sure the pet parents feel comfortable and that we do as well,” Parran noted. “We want to make sure the pets seem happy with us. Sometimes they don’t. Sometimes we have to do two or three of


Karissa Parran, of Cozy Care Pet Services, said the demand for in-home dog sitters is growing, and is an alternative to boarding.

those visits, … then they relax and let loose.” Families do have many options if they would rather try somebody else to stay with their pets while they finally get to take that much-deserved vacation. There are several pet boarding facilities in the vicinity, including: Four-Legged Friends on Eight Mile near Farmington Road in Livonia; Dogtopia on Haggerty Road in Northville; Happy Hounds Dog Day Care on Main Street in Plymouth and Canine College on Research Drive in Farmington Hills, among others. In those places, however, the animals must be shown to do well with a number of unfamiliar dogs and human handlers. “You might want to keep them at home. You’re more comfortable, you get peace of mind they’re not going to be around other dogs,” Parran said. There are popular websites such as Rover. com and Wag.com that give numerous options to dog owners on the lookout for temporary companions for their pups. The caregivers advertised through those

websites typically are bonded and insured, also. Meanwhile, Northville-area families also can hire Menlys Pet Care, described as a mom-and-pop operation where the focus is on giving personalized attention to canines and cats, alike. Menlys offers dog walking and cat-sitting services. The Parrans strive to give Cozy Care’s four-legged clients an up-close and personal experience. Although caregiving duties sometimes are shared during lengthy stays, Parran said the best situation is for one person to be in a home for the entire gig. “Sometimes we do like to give the caregiver a break,” she explained. “We try to match up what needs to be done depending on the pet and the caregiver.” In addition to overnight stays, Parran said Cozy Care does offer daily walks, training plans (to help dogs who pull or twirl around on their leashes, for example), grooming, transportation and pet waste removal. Caregivers also apply fluids to diabetic pets when requested. The key to a good relationship, Parran said, is for pet owners to be honest and communicate as many details as possible about their dog’s personality traits and idiosyncrasies to potential dog sitters. With pet ownership on the rise, especially as a result of Covid – the ASPCA reported more than 23 million U.S. households adopted a pet during the pandemic – the dog sitting business is booming. Cozy Care is happy to scratch that itch. “We’re growing (more than 200 clients) and we’re trying to keep all our clients happy because we love what we do,” Parran said.

FINDING THE RIGHT DOG SITTER

So, you’re going on vacation and need someone to watch your dog while you’re gone. But you don’t want to board the dog. Here are some questions to ask potential sitters, according to thesprucepets.com: • What experience do you have with dogs? • Have you ever watched a dog similar to my dog (size, breed, temperament)? • What’s your plan if my dog gets sick or injured while I’m gone? • How many times will you walk my dog per day? How long will the walks be? • How long will you leave my dog alone every day? • Can I see some testimonials or talk to past clients? Some of the best ways to find a pet sitter is by asking friends and neighbors, veterinarians, groomers or a dog training facility.

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In Harmony Michigan Phil remains a regional musical jewel after 77 years By Ken Voyles

T

he Michigan Philharmonic, now getting ready to kick off its 77th season, remains one of the region’s cultural jewels. At the head of this “Phil” family is the music director (conductor) and executive director working hand-in-hand. By their side, working with their younger musicians, is a director of the youth philharmonic and his team. On the stage itself the Philharmonic is a diverse group of performers, who unite to form small “sections” (such as strings, woodwinds or brass) and they in turn come together to create amazing music. Lastly, giving the family direction is a diverse board of community leaders vested in its success, and supporting it all are volunteers, sponsors, donors and music lovers who buy season tickets and attend the concerts. “It’s true in many ways that we’re like a family,” says Beth Stewart, who has been executive director of the Phil for 15 years. “We have all the challenges

38 The ‘Ville

Hektor Qyteti, Nan Washburn and Beth Stewart of the Michigan Phil.

and joys of being close, from performing to organizing to ensuring we have the funds we need, and the support that is so critical to our survival. “And it’s all for people who love music and the community we represent,” Stewart said. For Stewart, as well as Nan Washburn, now in her 24th year as music director and conductor, and youth leaders Hektor Qyteti and Dennis

Carter, there is nothing quite like being part of an organization that cares, that celebrates togetherness and a sense of place. It’s what motivates, drives and pushes them to be the best they can be. Working closely with Washburn and the other leaders reminds Stewart of just how “lean and mean” the Phil operation is. But she prides herself on what she calls

the group’s unique business model, something often in play especially during the busy summer season and at the holidays. “We can give a community their own orchestra,” she explains. “We bring music to your town, we handle all of the administrative issues and the planning, you just have to sell tickets and reimburse us.” Over the years the Phil has performed in downtown Detroit, Brighton, Grosse Pointe, Milford, Canton, Northville and more, this year adding Garden City and Port Austin to the list. “This is an orchestra for people who don’t think they like symphonic music,” Stewart says. “My dad brought classical music into our home but I grew up thinking that was what old people did. Now I know what it’s like to be innovative, creative, edge-cutting and more especially thanks to Nan and her approach to accessible but unique concerts.”


CONDUCTING THE MUSIC At the center of any philharmonic is the conductor. Nan Washburn has led the Phil for over 23 years, the second longest tenure in its history. She is also the only woman conductor and music director in the orchestra’s history. An award-winning conductor with 19 ASCAP awards for adventuresome programming from the League of American Orchestras, Washburn is the visible face of the orchestra to most audiences. Though she has her back to them most of the time, it is Washburn’s musical choices, direction and passion that helps propel the Phil family. “We’re really a traditional institution that plays classical music but we’re cutting edge in terms of programming and approach,” says Washburn. “We’re all about inclusivity, diversity and accessible. We don’t want to be stuffy but welcome everyone and make it fun and educational.” As music director she is also constantly assessing that connection. “What we’ve created is one of trust,” she says. “They know there will be new music, they know we will perform women composers and they trust we will give them the best. I absolutely believe that myself.” As a Phil leader Washburn also focuses on her own style as conductor. She is not “old school” when it comes to being a “tyrannical” conductor type. She certainly has a clear vision of what she wants and the sound she is after, but her relationship with the musicians is critical. “I don’t make the music, it’s the musicians who play,” she says. “I just have to do everything in my power to

Training youth musicians is an important part of the Michigan Phil’s mission.

bring it together, the music, the performers, the performance.” FOCUSED ON YOUNGSTERS Hektor Qyteti, director and conductor of the Michigan Philharmonic Youth Orchestra, and Dennis Carter play a special role leading the organization’s youth groups, an important part of the Phil’s mission. Qyteti came to this country from his native Albania in 1998 and joined the Philharmonic

in 2004. Studying violin at a fine arts conservatory in his native land, he has always been passionate about music. He has now led the youth group since 2008 and is currently the Phil’s principal second violin. “I’ve worked all my life with kids. I love it,” says the Macomb resident. Besides leading the youth group, which includes five different ensembles, Qyteti maintains a studio in

Youth musicians often play side by side and are mentored by professional musicians in the Michigan Phil.

Plymouth’s PARC, where he teaches more than 30 students. “All young kids need to be involved in music,” he says. “Music is life. We all have stress but when I pick up my violin it goes away. I tell them it’s fun and important even if later they become a doctor or whatever.” Carter has been with the Phil for 20 years but has a busy freelance career across the country (he spent the summer in Lake Placid, New York). He has taught most of his career and loves working with students, especially as the Phil’s director of its youth flute choir and wind ensemble “They’re the next generation,” he says, “and we try to nurture them and teach them. It’s pretty cool – you see yourself in a lot of them. I love what I do and I pretty much go everywhere when I can perform or teach.” Carter finds the Phil’s culture of family both wonderful and supportive. “We’re pretty tight,” he says. “We care about each other and you don’t always feel that in other places. Our leaders care, our volunteers care. It’s amazing this culture that we continue with music for a community that is so supportive.” The Michigan Philharmonic kicks off its 77th season on Sept. 24 with “Enchanting Nights” at the Dr. Edwin J. O’Leary Performing Arts Center in Garden City. The show will feature pianist Anastasia Rizikov performing a Prokofiev piano concerto, plus the world premier of “Scheherazade” by Rimsky-Korsakov. For tickets to this or any of the concerts in the 2022-2023 series, visit www. michiganphil.org.

The ‘Ville 39


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BULLETIN BOARD Pushing the Boundaries

City Lights Hit National Stage

City Lights Chorus, Northville’s all male acappella ensemble, represented Michigan at the 2022 Barbershop Harmony Society International Chorus Contest held July 9 in Charlotte, NC. It was a strong showing for the group, which was making its debut on the international stage. They took 15th place out of 37 choruses. For more information about City Lights Chorus, visit www. citylightschorus.com or send an email to citylightschorus@gmail.com. You can also follow them on Facebook.

The Northville Art House will present the 14th annual West of Center: Art That Pushes Boundaries all-media exhibition from Aug. 30–Sept. 24. The exhibition, juried by Detroit sculptor and instructor Sergio de Giusti, features 52 works created by 40 artists from Michigan and around the country. This year’s theme is centered on pushing beyond what is comfortable to create the unexpected. Artists were encouraged to use tools, processes, and skills in unconventional ways; to take risks with style by experimenting with color, media, detail, and technique; to consider scale, materials, ideas, and subject matter; and to release expectations, be playful, and have fun. Some of the featured artists include Peggy Kerwan, Brenda Beene Shackleford, and painter Zoe Beaudry. Exhibition hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday and 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Friday-Saturday. There will also be a special Live @ 5 reception help from 5-8 p.m., Friday, Sept. 9 at the Art House featuring songwriter Michelle Chenard (pictured). Tickets cost $35 and can be purchased at www.northvillearthouse.org/liveat5. The Art House is located at 215 W. Cady in downtown Northville.

Celebrate Our Victorian Heritage

The Northville community will celebrate its past during the annual Victorian Heritage Festival, Sept. 16-18, in and around the downtown area. The festival kicks off with the annual Victorian Parade at 6:30 p.m., Friday, Sept. 16, and then continues all weekend with a variety of activities. Hours are 5-9 p.m. on Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on Sunday. Mill Race Village will be hosting many Victorian-themed activities on Sunday, including games, crafts, live music and the big Duck Race, which closes out the festival. For a complete schedule of activities, visit www.northville.org or www. millracenorthville.org. Non-profit organizations looking to have a booth during the festival can contact Matt Zook at (248) 349-7640.

42 The ‘Ville

Muthusamy Excels At Geography Championships

Northville’s Ved Muthusamy earned the overall Silver Medal at this year’s International Geography Championships held July 3-10 in Burlington, VT. Ved, who was the state of Michigan’s only representative at the competition, earned 11 medals overall, including six golds. He is a 2022 graduate of Northville High School.


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On the Road With Back To Europe Now that travel is a little easier with the easing of covid restrictions, The ‘Ville made it back to Europe recently. Northville’s Marita Smith took her copy all the way to Greece. She finally made it after the trip had been cancelled three times in two years. Here she is (right) in Oia Village in Thira on the islands of Santorini. “The whitewashed houses and narrow streets that line the steep cliffs are accessible by foot, cable car or mule, and the blue domes are a picture seen around the world,” Smith said. Back in May, Mike Traicoff of Northville, and his son Brian Traicoff, of Phoenix, Arizona (Northville High School Class of 2009), attended the Formula 1 Grand Prix of Monaco in Monte Carlo. The ‘Ville was with them on their two-week trip to the French Riviera, which included visits to Nice and Cannes, as well as the Grand Prix in Monte Carlo (top right).

In July, Anna and Nick Gill, after dropping their three children off with grandparents in the UK, took a five-day trip to Portugal. They did plenty of sightseeing, including visiting Padrão dos Descobrimentos, a monument that celebrates the 15th and 16th century Portuguese explorers and visionaries who established Portugal as one of the most powerful seafaring nation of the era. Anna is pictured with her copy of The ‘Ville (at right) in front of the Palácio Nacional da Ajuda, the royal national palace that is now a museum.

A Ride To Remember Vickey and David Raimondo took a copy of The ‘Ville on their epic three-week motorcycle trip that covered more than 6,000 miles and 11 states. They traveled west eventually taking Highway 1 along the Pacific coast into California. The return trip took them through Lake Tahoe, across U.S. 50 (“the loneliest road in America”), Moab National Park, and Rocky Mountain National Park’s Trail Ridge Road, which is over 12,000 feet in elevation. Here they are pictured on Hwy 1 in northern California, their furthest point of the trip. “For some, traveling and seeing the United States by motorcycle is the only way to go. 44 The ‘Ville

Whatever is your favorite way of travel you will always appreciate returning to Northville,” Vickey said. “By the way, don’t forget to take your copy of The ‘Ville. It will be a piece of home with you while on the road.” The next time you head out of town, take along a copy of The ‘Ville, snap a photo, and let us know where your travels take you. Our readers would love to know! Please email the photos to kurtkuban@gmail.com. We’ll feature the photos in an upcoming issue.



Dishin’ With Denise

I

Denise Jenkins is a member of the Northville Chamber of Commerce and Tipping Point Theatre. An avid writer and proponent of the arts, she is also plugged into what’s happening in Northville. Contact her at denisemjenkins@aol.com.

Time Flies As Summer Wanes

t’s August – summer vacation is over. Kids are getting ready to go back to school. Halloween decorations are popping up. Hallmark has Christmas stuff out. I admit, I have started my Christmas shopping. I consciously try to slow down, but no matter how hard I try, time continues to fly by.

spotted the Stinson. Miles and miles of airplanes and I find the one from my own hometown. Pretty cool.

Jamie Warrow (left) and Julia Glanders at Tipping Point.

Rick Evans at OshKosh.

According to Wikipedia, the Stinson Detroiter SB-1 made its maiden flight from Packard Field in January of 1926. The plane had a rare, enclosed cabin, heat and an electric cigar lighter. The aircraft was a big success and Eddie Stinson bought the building in Northville on Cady Street just east of Griswold. Stinson employed over 250 workers at that Northville factory. They outgrew the facility by 1929 and moved out of town. Many Northville folks head to EAA AirVentures OshKosh year-after-year. I always wanted to go, and this year I finally made it. It was as cool as I imagined. War planes, performances by daring pilots that took my breath away and a firework display like nothing I’ve ever seen. But I really couldn’t believe my eyes when I

46 The ‘Ville

Next door to the historic Stinson building you’ll find Tipping Point Theatre and they have two new faces at the charge. It’s a pleasure to announce Julia Glanders and Jamie Warrow will be picking up where James Kuhl left off. Both women have decades of experience in theatre production, management, art, and education. I had the pleasure of working on stage with Julia in “Love, Loss and What I Wore” a few years back. Many remember her as the “Lady With All the Answers.” I’m looking forward to getting to know Jamie. A round of applause for both. Traci Sincock has been named District Governor (2022-2023) for the Rotary Club. In this role she will work as liaison between local Rotary clubs and the Rotary International president Jennifer Jones, who happens to be the first woman selected in the group’s 117-year history. Traci shared her thoughts with me: “Serving in the district governor role, as a member of

the Northville Rotary Club, is an amazing honor. It provides an opportunity to see firsthand the amount of service provided by our members in communities across the globe.” Traci and her husband have hosted numerous Rotary Youth Exchange students and are passionate about this life changing program. The Northville Community Foundation is looking for homes to showcase on their Holiday Home Tour, which they are pleased to say is back “in-person” this year. It will be held November 18-19 and if you are interested, please contact them now. Reach out to carol@mayburyfarm.org. And again, while Christmas is coming – the Corn Maze is happening sooner. It will take place at Maybury Farm September 9 thru October 30, weekends only. This year there are two mazes – one is 1-acre, the other is 9 acres. “We have a little bit of everything happening on the weekends,” they told me.

The Ansara family at last year’s Farm-toTable event.

The Main Street League will once again host the unique farm-totable fundraising event, September 10 on the grounds

of Living & Learning (801 Griswold Street). The culinary arts of Chef Brian Psenski will be featured. Tickets are still available – but they do sell out. The event will have a Spanish inspired dinner in the garden with beer, wine and live entertainment. Complete details can be found at www. mainstreetleague.com/farmto-table. My condolences to the family and friends of Betty Allen, who passed away in July at the age of 95. She had moved up north recently to be by family. But everyone knows she was Northville through and through. She was born to a prominent local doctor, and grew up to be a Northville First Lady. But she always stood on her own two feet. I am very blessed to have had Betty Allen the opportunity to spend a little time with her before the move and talk about the “good old days.” She was a gem. I don’t wear a watch. I’m shopping for a large face clock without hands to hang in my recently repurposed home. I can’t imagine how fast time would be going if I wasn’t trying to slow down. Then again, someone told me “Make plans and live” – so – I highly recommend OshKosh as a great weekend adventure for a change of scenery. Save the dates July 24–30 for next year.


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