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SOUTH Indy’s southside magazine

Fall 2011

the

Clements family

Also Inside:

Home entertainment systems | Indulge in the coffee culture | Get away close to home in Bloomington


We helped David return to the things closest to his heart. Franciscan St. Francis Health is recognized as a pioneer in complex heart care and innovative heart repair. We were first in the world to rebuild heart tissue and first in America to use next generation heart valve technology. So when David needed treatment, he gladly traveled from his farm outside Bloomington to the St. Francis Heart Center. One of David’s heart valves was repaired, another replaced and he underwent bypass surgery. David can look forward to the things he loves: raising cattle and watching his grandkids grow.

Embracing the future. To learn more, visit MyHeartCare.net.

MyHeartCare.net


At the IBT Banking Gift Shop, Jeff’s jersey is only the 4th-best seller. (But the Scott Hines replica pinstripe suit just flies off the shelves.)

What fan doesn’t want to look like their favorite banker? With all that experience, knowledge, and extramile customer service, who wouldn’t want an authentic Jenni Gill scarf or a pair of those Linda Ramsey heels?

From simple checking to mortgage loans to complex commercial loans, IBT’s banking team can help you and your business succeed. Call us today to find out how. We think you’ll be a fan.

Jeff Saturday—All-Pro Football Player And IBT Customer—with the IBT Banking Team. From L To R: Scott Hines, Jenni Gill and Linda Ramsey

County Line Road at Emerson Avenue (317) 887-6554 Southport Road at Harding Street (317) 882-3865

myIndianaBank.com

AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY LENDER


contents

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on the cover

Feature Stories

62 Visit Bloomington 92 Fall Festivities Get away to the rolling hills of this vibrant college town.

The southside is teeming with Autumn fun.

70 Unseen Southside 70 Brosmer Household A focus on unique hidden treasures in Johnson County.

Brady and Teresa Clements with their children Tyler, Yura, Tatiana and Courtney—photographed at their home by Dario Impini. Story page 34.

Where elegance meets comfort.

Samaritan 80 Good Spotlight Meet some selfless volunteers and agencies devoted to helping others.

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contents

Departments

15 This & That 21 InStyle

Southside news and views

Pink power

25 Taste

The coffee connection

34 Personalities 40 Home Trends The Clements family

Audio-visual entertainment

54 Worth the Trip Ethnic eats in Bloomington

In Every Issue

8 Editor’s note 111 Our side of town 118 South weddings 121 Calendar of events 130 A Look Back

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LIVE FOR GREATNESS EVERY ROLEX IS MADE FOR GREATNESS. THE COSMOGRAPH DAYTONA, INTRODUCED

IN

1963,

WAS

DESIGNED

TO

MEET

THE

DEMANDS

OF

PROFESSIONAL RACECAR DRIVERS AND QUICKLY EARNED ITS ICONIC STATUS. WITH ITS PATENTED CHRONOGRAPH MECHANISM AND BEZEL WITH TACHOMETRIC ELAPSED

SCALE,

CIRCUIT

IT

ALLOWS

TIME

AND

DRIVERS

TO

CALCULATE

PERFECTLY AVERAGE

THE COSMOGRAPH DAYTONA

Feature Stories

MEASURE SPEED.


welcome

W

Without fail, I start each morning enjoying a cup of coffee. I take mine fully leaded (regular), black, no additions necessary. At home I brew freshly ground beans in a French press. However I am somewhat of a snob and prefer not to drink just any cup o’ joe, so the task of upholding this daily routine can get cumbersome when things are out of the ordinary. For example, when on vacation I always locate the specialty coffee shop nearest to my hotel. Once after suffering from a 24-hour stomach flu, I drank my coffee as usual even though it didn’t taste right. Obviously coffee is a part of me. Even now as I’m expecting my first child this winter, I savor my one-cup allotment daily. The wonderful thing is I’m not alone. In fact I’m sure there are some even more neurotic than I. It is amazing that a simple drink can affect one’s mood, create a booming retail industry and unite people of varying races, socio-economic backgrounds and general interests. That’s why, since the weather has begun to cool, we decided to celebrate all things java in this issue’s cuisine section.

Grab your own cup — just the way you like it — and settle in for a taste of the unique southside coffee culture. Also in this issue we explore another passion in many people’s lives: volunteering. Just a tad more noble than the pursuit of a good cup of coffee, huh? The holidays get us all thinking about those less fortunate, but there are tireless southsiders who make this a year-round priority, and it’s time to give them the recognition they deserve. Be sure to check out our special section on the art of giving back. Fall also means football season, and ticket prices, large crowds and seedy hot dog stands can be enough to make even the most avid fan want to stay away from the stadium. We explore the rising trend of home entertainment systems and show you some southsiders who have created their own media mecca. Well, after a summer like the one we had, we all deserve the crisp, refreshing feel, smell and tone of fall, so enjoy it while it lasts and as always, thanks for reading!

kdeclue@indysouthmag.com

Keep up with SOUTH happenings on Facebook.

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INSTEAD OF A PHOTOGRAPH OF THE ENTIRE BANK,

WE THOUGHT WE’D SHOW ONE OF THE PILLARS.

Mike Combs Bank Officer and Market Manager

Mike will show you how the Indianapolis area’s largest locally owned national bank is taking superior service to a whole new level.

West Smith Valley Road and SR 135

882-8200

©2011 The National Bank of Indianapolis

www.nbofi.com

Member FDIC


experience

rustic charm, & fine wine on the southside

SOUTH Indy’s Southside Magazine

Fall 2011 | Vol. 7 | No. 2

Publisher Home News Enterprises Chuck Wells Editorial Editor

Kelsey DeClue Copy Editor

Mallow Run WineRy

6964 W. Whiteland Rd. Bargersville | mallowrun.com | open daily 12 - 6pm

(317)422.1556

Katharine Smith Contributing Writers

Ashley Petry Jennifer Huber Greg Seiter Alisa Advani Julie Cope Saetre

Art Senior Graphic artist

Margo Wininger contributing advertising Designer

Amanda Waltz Contributing Photographers

Dario Impini Joe Saba Jennifer Cecil Andrew Laker Alton Strupp Melinda Secord Scott Roberson Matt Quebe Image technician

Bob Kunzman Stock images provided by ŠThinkstock

Advertising Advertising Director

Christina Cosner ACCOUNT Executive

Miranda J. Stockdall 10

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SOUTH Indy’s Southside Magazine

reader services mailing address 2575 N. Morton St., Franklin, IN 46131

phone

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Please send letters to the address aboveor to e-mail address. Be sure to include your full name, city, state and phone number. Letters sent to SOUTH magazine become the magazine’s property, and it owns the rights to their use. SOUTH magazine reserves the right to edit letters for clarity and length.

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Back issues

Mike Cagle, CRS, gRi RealtoR /BRokeR 317-888-3311 offiCe 317-216-4149 voiCe Mail MCagle@talktotuCkeR.CoM www.MikeCagle.CoM ®

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agent SinCe

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South offiCe “aSSoCiate of the yeaR”

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To order back issues of SOUTH magazine, please send $5 per issue (includes S&H) to the mailing address above or call (800) 435-5601 to order by phone. ©2011 by Home News Enterprises All rights reserved. Reproduction of stories, photographs and advertisements without permission is prohibited.


CENTER FOR COSEMETIC DENTISTRY


Compiled by Ashley Petry and kelsey declue

this & that

Bright Idea Samantha Carson started making her own soy-based candles from home in 2009. Demand grew quickly, and this summer the former transportation logistics manager opened a retail shop on Main Street in Greenwood. In addition to stocking soy candles in a range of sizes and scents, Carson assembles gift baskets and offers candle-making sessions for individuals and groups. “Everything revolves around the soy candles,” she said. The shop’s most popular scent is cinnamon vanilla, but Carson also offers seasonal scents like cranberry, holly berry, pumpkin pie and caramelized praline. Need another reason to buy? Soy is a renewable resource grown by American farmers, so it’s both eco-friendly and economically sound. Soy candles also burn cleaner and longer than other candles, Carson said. Prices range from 35 cents for tea lights to $19.99 for large candles in glass apothecary jars.

Carson Candle, 239 W. Main Street, Greenwood, (317) 709-3910

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this & that

Q&A

Homegrown Farm Girl When the Concord Community Development Corp. wanted to launch an urban farm, it turned to Amy Matthews, a Perry Township native who has spent years working on urban farms across the globe. Together, they created South Circle Farm on South Meridian Street. After just one season, the farm is already changing the landscape of its neighborhood and providing produce to local farmers markets. And if you think the farm’s first harvest was fruitful, just wait until next year: Matthews recently added more than a thousand strawberry plants, plus many of her other favorite farm-fresh foods. find out more

South Circle Farm 2048 S. Meridian St., Indianapolis (317) 446-9448, www.southcirclefarm.com

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What was the impetus for developing the farm? This site was up for sale last summer. It’s almost a three-acre site, and the CCDC wanted to protect it from industrial scrapyard-style development. … They had a greener vision for the site. Being on Meridian Street, it was pretty important to their community concept. How did you get involved? I got involved last winter, because the CCDC was looking for a grower to manage site development. … I felt very ready to do farming for my own business, but the infrastructure and start-up costs can be pretty substantial even if you have land, so I like the hybrid of getting to be within a community that wanted a farm and also tap their support in setting the site up. How did you get involved in farming? I was in social work and was working in food banks, and through that I had my eyes opened to how the food system isn’t meeting all of our needs currently and the big gaps in our food system in terms of healthy food and accessibility to people of all income levels.


this & that

What do you hope to accomplish with South Circle Farm? We want to grow food where people live and work, so that it’s more prominent in people’s daily lives, so the idea of eating healthy and local food is right there in people’s viewpoint all the time. How can the community get involved with the farm? Right now we’re still getting things in place—moving soil, getting beds built—so we have some amount of community involvement in just volunteering to get the place going. The way it will be set up in the future is that most of the site will be used for entrepreneurs to grow on, and one night a week, we’ll have an open house where people can stop by to buy produce and tour the farm. We’ll also have community partners who want to host educational programming here.

Pizza, wine and pancakes, oh my! A rash of new dining establishments is spreading on the southside, and options for patrons will range from coal-fired pizza to wine and cheese to an infamous fast-food joint. Vino Villa, scheduled to open in early September, will mark the southside’s first wine bar and gift shop. Owners Paul and Laura Jacquin said the 1,000-square-foot shop will offer a variety of wines, cheeses, gift baskets and wine supplies as well as special wine tastings and dinner parties. Vino Villa, 200 N. Madison Ave., Greenwood. A new locally owned pizza joint opened this summer in Greenwood and boasts gourmet pizzas cooked perfectly to order in a 1,000 degree coal oven. Tony Sacco’s first Indiana location opened on the northside. Now Franklin resident and owner Justin Furr opened the newest location on the southside near the Greenwood Park Mall on U.S. 31 in the former Paradise Cafe location. Tony Sacco’s is known for its pizza, however the restaurant also serves a variety of salads and sandwiches as well as beer and wine. Information: tonysaccos.com A popular Indianapolis breakfast spot plans to open a second location on the southside. Hotcakes Emporium offers gourmet pancakes, French toast, crepes and egg-based creations as well as a few lunch items. It is open 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily, and the new location is scheduled for the corner of Bluff and Southport roads. Information: hotcakesemporium.net And for faster fare … After a year of trying to break into the central Indiana market, Jack in the Box has announced a 3,000-square-foot restaurant planned for U.S. 31 and County Line Road in Greenwood. Indiana-founded Subacos, a taco and sub shop, has opened a location in the Greenwood Park Mall food court.

Don’t forget!

Bird’s the Word

Moody Meats Lagoda, (765) 942-2442, www.moodymeats.com

This Thanksgiving, set a table brimming with local produce—and even a locally raised, free-range turkey. They might be more expensive than grocery-store birds, but they’re also free of growth hormones, antibiotics and other nasty chemicals. Just be sure to call the farm in advance to reserve your bird.

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Schacht Farm Bloomington, (812) 842-6425, www.schachtfarm.com Seven Sons Meat Co. Indianapolis, (877) 620-1977, www.sevensons.net

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this & that

Book Nook Reading recommendations from Viewpoint Books in Columbus Children’s fiction

Adult fiction

“Look What I Did with a Leaf!” By Mortiza E. Sohi

“Mike Tyson Slept Here” By Chris Huntington

Children and parents alike will enjoy this science/craft book for suggestions and advice for helping children create their own “leaf animal” collages. In this book, Sohi includes a Field Guide with pictures, descriptions, and sizes of leaves from different kinds of trees and plants. Saw-edged leaves may work best for capturing the texture of a rooster’s body; lobed leaves are excellent to use for frog’s feet, and long, narrow leaves work well for fox’s legs. Sohi includes his own collages of a rooster, a frog and a fox to show readers how he used these specific types of leaves to create these three different leaf animals. Other collages in the book include those of a butterfly, elephant, parrot, owl, cougar, cow, mouse, lion, peacock, fish, cat and turtle.

Every May, college graduates across the country ask themselves one very important question: Now what? For Brant Gilmour, the answer is prison. With little thought to a long-term career, and in spite of his parents reservations, Brant takes a job teaching GED classes to inmates at the Indiana correctional facility made famous because Mike Tyson was incarcerated there. “Mike Tyson Slept Here” is an eccentric and funny novel based on the real-life experiences of author Chris Huntington, a Columbus, Ind. native who spent 10 years working in the American prison system. As Brant observes, we are all like Mike Tyson: we hurt people for no good reason, except that it’s a living, and that it seems some of us are powerful, lucky and invincible until suddenly we aren’t.

Making a Cameo Appearance Growing up in Perry Township, Leena Ceraveeni knew few other Indian Americans—and often felt isolated. After college, she fled to Texas, where she experienced Southern culture shock and developed a better appreciation for her hometown. Now, she’s channeled those experiences into her first novel, “The Hometown,” which is set in Greenwood and Houston. Locals will recognize familiar settings such as Greenwood Park Mall and Steak ’n Shake, as well as landmarks at Indiana University in Bloomington. “The biggest challenge was to sit there and really write it,” Ceraveeni said. “It was worth it. I had always wanted to write a book, and it is very fulfilling to have accomplished that goal.”

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Voted Indy’s Best Day Spa in ‘07, ‘08, ‘09 and ‘10!

transformations sa l on + spa


in style

Photography by Andrew Laker

Pink power Breast Cancer Awareness Month will be observed across the nation in October, and whether you’re battling the disease, living as a survivor, supporting someone who’s affected or just plain loving the color pink, this is your time to shine. We scoured local retailers to find the latest in pink attire and accessories to help you get in touch with your inner goddess and support a worthy cause—the fight against breast cancer. All these products are available at Greenwood Park Mall.

Styling by Danielle Smith of Fresh Fettle.

Tote-ally cute Carry cosmetics in style with Vera Bradley’s Tea Garden collection. This hatbox-style tote comes with a few cosmetic basics, and Vera Bradley donates 10 percent of the net sales on any Tea Garden collection item to the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer. $46 at Merle Norman. SOUTH

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in style

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On the ball Attack the links and support the good fight with Pinnacle’s Pink Ribbon series of golf balls. Pinnacle is a member of the Susan G. Komen for the Cure’s Million Dollar Council. $14.99 at Dick’s Sporting Goods.

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Wrap me up Stay warm and dry as the weather starts to turn with Columbia’s Mom-o-gram GRT rain jacket in pink and white. One dollar of each garment sale goes to the National Breast Cancer Foundation. $59 at Dick’s Sporting Goods.

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3 Stylish utility Sephora created its own line of pastel pink cosmetic items in honor of breast cancer awareness. One dollar of every sale goes to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, including this eyelash curler. $16 from Sephora.

4 Embrace it These metallic “peace” and “courage” bracelets with crystal studs are a trendy and fashionable way to show support. Humanity Goodworks donates 25 percent of its net profits to charitable ventures. $28 each at Von Maur.

5 Toast in her honor Lolita’s pink ribbon handpainted wine glass makes the perfect gift for the woman in your life affected by breast cancer. Each glass comes with a special cocktail recipe. $24.99 from Macy’s.


in style

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Tag This 6 Pink flash Go pink even when you’re exercising. Move your tootsies in Nike’s Luna Fly2 Breathe running shoe complete with bright pink sole. $79.99 from Dick’s Sporting Goods.

7 Mix it up KitchenAid’s line of Cook for the Cure products is great for stocking the ultimate girly kitchen. KitchenAid donates 10 percent of sales from this line to the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. Mixing bowl set, $32.99 from Kohl’s.

What could be better than a cute, sexy bra that can also save your life? This awareness bra by Wacoal comes with a built-in reminder flag that encourages its wearer to conduct a monthly breast self-exam. The tag also comes with instructions on how to properly conduct a self-exam. $62 from Macy’s.

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taste

By Jen Huber // Photography by Jennifer Cecil

Patrons relax at Strange Brew Coffee House on Smith Valley Road in Greenwood

Spilling the beans about coffee

Americans knock back billions of cups of coffee annually, and many of us can’t imagine starting the day without it. This simple beverage can be given away for free or sold for more than $5 a pop. Coffee can be used as a quick energy booster or sipped and savored slowly from the comfort of an oversized armchair at the local coffeehouse. The brew has created its own culture, and yet it appeals to the masses. Starbucks is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year, but coffee itself could easily be closing in on its 800th birthday. Though stories and folklore about the first usage of the coffee bean vary, most agree that coffee came into being in Ethiopia in the 1200s. By the 1500s, it had moved into the Middle SOUTH

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hearty still. Roasters, however, can vary their definitions, so the standardized Agtron scale cups of coffee per day. helps to rate the roast according to the color of the roasted beans. Buying the beans whole roasted is preferred, so that the consumer will wait to grind the beans when it’s time to brew. Whole beans can be frozen for several months, but last only a few Types of beans weeks once they have been ground. Interested in some Kopi luwak, or civet cat coffee? It’s only $800 for two pounds. Coffee beans eaten by this weasel-like creature are extracted from its dung (seriously) and Brewing methods roasted, making this type of coffee a strange fascination. When it comes time to brewing the perfect cup, there Who was the first coffee connoisseur to give that a try? are actually seven methods to choose from: Turkish, perBut if you’re looking for something a bit more tradicolator, regular drip, French press, vacuum, cold water tional, you’re not alone. and espresso, though regular drip is the most popular Coffee beans are categorized into three types: Kona, and easiest. Robusta and Arabica. The oldest way to brew coffee is the Turkish method, Kona grows in Hawaii and is expensive, yet is in high in which coffee beans and water stay in contact the entire demand. It has a rich taste and strong aroma. time, resulting in a thick, muddy brew. Robusta makes up almost half of the coffee production Most people, however, prefer plugging in the coffee in the world. It is cheaper and can be mixed easily with maker and letting the machine do the work. Drip makother coffee blends thanks to its strong, bitter flavor. In ers have filters, can be used with a medium-grind coffee, general, Robusta beans are lower grades of coffee but are and result in clear and smooth cups of joe. Just don’t let easy to grow and have higher caffeine content. the coffee pot sit on the warmer. Heating brewed coffee Arabica beans make up the rest of the world’s coffee destroys the flavor. production because of the large plant size. The beans are For those with more time on their hands, using the expensive but can be used with Robusta beans to create a French press or a plunger can result in a stronger cup of blend. Arabica beans create gourmet coffee, contain less coffee with an enhanced flavor. In that process, grounds caffeine than Robusta and are more aromatic with deare forced down to the bottom, resulting in a rich, dense sired flavorings. cup of coffee that brings out the flavor of the bean. Beans are labeled according to their geographic origins Some coffee shops use the cold-water brewing method because of variations in the growing conditions. Arabica to create something like a coffee concentrate that they can coffee beans grown in Kenya are called Kenyan, for examuse in their iced coffee drinks. Coarsely ground coffee ple. Three top variations of Arabica come from Ethiopia sits for six to 10 hours in a half-gallon of cold water, after in northern Africa and include the Yirgacheffe, Sidamo which it is filtered. The extract—which should be refrigerand Harrar. In the United States, Indonesian and African ated—is lighter and bland with no acidity. coffees are popular, but Brazil and Colombia—partially Of course, espresso is well known, though it takes a thanks to the marketing invention of Juan Valdez—are professional electric espresso machine to create the contwo of the biggest suppliers. centrated cups of coffee with the golden foam, or crema, In addition to the kind of bean, how the bean is roasted on top. can bring out the flavor and release When it comes to drinking and brewing coffee, the oils in the process. Most bottom line is to find what tastes best to you. Add cream, American coffee is drink it black or create your own blend—just enjoy! me d iu m-b o d ie d ; So as the weather turns, you’re probably wondering Brazilian roast is where the best places are to enjoy your favorite cup o’ usually a bit darker, joe. South magazine combed the area for the best locally and French-roastowned joints and found there’s a place for just about every ed beans are more type of coffee lover out there.» East, brewing its way through Turkey and northern Africa, then on to Italy, Europe and Indonesia. By the late 1600s, there were more than 3,000 coffeehouses in England alone. It wasn’t until the early 1800s that coffee was imported from Brazil into the United States, and for many decades, Brazil remained the biggest producer of coffee. However, higher prices soon encouraged other nations such as Colombia, Nicaragua and Guatemala to begin growing coffee.

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Americans consume

400 million


taste

Strange Brew Coffee House 4800 West Smith Valley Road Greenwood (317) 881-5282 strangebrewcoffee.com Hours Monday to Friday » 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday » 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday » 8 a.m. to noon

Spotlight

A community hub that’s on a roll Dan and Toni Carr, owners of Strange Brew Coffee House in Greenwood, have managed to combine all their passions under one roof: science fiction, knitting, roller derby and of course, coffee. When they opened their shop seven years ago, little did they know that one day friends would be hanging paintings on the walls, Toni would be selling her yarns and knitting books from the shop and—perhaps most SOUTH

surprising—the idea of the Naptown Roller Girls, a nationally known Indianapolis-based roller derby team, would be hatched at a small table near the back. “We’ve gotten to meet a lot of cool people and make some great friends,” says Dan, who goes by the name Dill Hero when he is working as an announcer for a Roller Girls bout. Toni also has a connection to roller derby, skating under the name Joan of Dark until her retirement from the sport earlier this year. “My knees were begging me for mercy!” she says with a laugh. But they aren’t getting much of a rest. Back at the coffee shop, Dan and Toni spend a lot of time and effort making sure their coffees and foods are local and of the highest quality. “We use a local roaster for our beans,” she says, “and we make muffins, scones, sandwiches, vegetarian soups and bread. If we have to buy something, we make sure it is from Indiana, because we want to keep our money here in the state.” The freshness of the beans and the quality of the water are the most important factors, says Toni. The water must be filtered, and the beans are never more than seven days old. Grocery store beans, she explains, can sometimes be weeks or even months old. Strange Brew serves flavored coffees, but “nothing with a flavor crystal in it,” she adds quickly. “Our roaster roasts the beans until they are dry so that you get the coffee flavor first, and then a bit of the added flavor,” she explains. “If you look at beans in the grocery, you’ll see that they can look oily, and that’s because the flavor additive is just sitting on top of the bean, not roasted into it.” |

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Loyal customers have easily identified their favorite drinks, most notably the Blond Bombshell, which is a white mocha with blond espresso, and the Neil Gaiman, a latté with cinnamon, a bit of honey, some raw sugar and espresso with cacao ground into it. Brewed chai drinks also are quite popular, as is the Thai iced tea, a homemade creation that Dan spent months working on and recently perfected. The Carrs also know which brews go best with which foods. Toni, for example, favors pairing Arabian Mocha Java with a chocolate muffin. Or a Blond Bombshell with a cinnamon streusel muffin. “We know exactly what to pair a certain coffee with,” she says. “It’s like pairing a wine; there are just certain things that you want to eat with a certain coffee that helps enhance the flavors.” For those who need their Strange Brew at home, beans can be purchased in the store or online, including a custom blend that Dan and Toni created called Rage Against the Bean. “Rage Against the Bean is a dark roasted African coffee with a light roasted Brazilian bean so it has a nutty flavor, but with more caffeine,” explains Toni. “Many people don’t realize that the lighter the bean is—not the darker—the more caffeine it has.” Online ordering has become a lifesaver for dedicated customers who relocate and leave their favorite brew far behind. “We ship all over the country,” says Dan. “Even to college kids who need their caffeine fix at school.” Visitors to Strange Brew find that the shop is comfortable and homey, and the atmosphere encourages people to loiter while admiring the changing exhibits of local art on the walls or browsing the selection of books and games. Former employees painted colorful wall murals, and the Carrs are happy to help advertise for local art events such as the INDIEana Handicraft Exchange. They also go into the community to cater events. “When you come here, you’re not only getting an awesome cup of coffee or an awesome lunch,” says Dan, “but you’re support-

ing your local economy. We are the oldest coffee shop in Greenwood, and we’re good at what we do.” Customers who take time to browse around the shop notice several things, including random black tiles on the ceiling, some with neon writings or drawings on them. (“Though not too many with neon,” jokes Dan, “or we’ll start to look like an ’80s arcade.”) A church pew with kneelers bought at an auction offers interesting seating, and overstuffed couches provide more comfortable seating nearby. Online, people can even watch Fish Cam, a live video feed pointed at two giant fish tanks stacked on top of each other. “Those are the largest coffee shop fish tanks in the whole world,” says Dan. “At least until proven otherwise.” Behind the counter, a row of mugs given to Strange Brew lines a shelf, and the current winner of the ugliest mug contest sits

“I love making connections with people and introducing people to each other, such as a guy who does roofing and another guy who needs a roof.” — Dan Carr

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proudly nearby. Strange Brew also sells hand-thrown pottery mugs that are locally made and can be filled with a favorite drink. And if the customer comes up with an odd or unusual coffee creation, employees write out the order on a note card so that the other baristas can learn the order for next time. Toni comments that some people even use Strange Brew as their office. “They come in and buy coffee in the morning, then lunch at noon and then more coffee as they head out the door for home.” Overall, the Carrs want people to be completely satisfied with their coffee and their visit. “We are good for people who are in a hurry, and we are good for people who have time to relax and hang out,” says Dan, gesturing toward a group of knitters in the corner who meet at Strange Brew weekly. “I love making connections with people and introducing people to each other, such as a guy who does roofing and another guy who needs a roof. It’s a community hub of different people in here, and I love helping local businesses to succeed and making connections with some great people. That’s really what this place is all about.” (Coffeehouse profiles continue on next page.)


LARRY HEYDON TONY LENNEN

President and CEO, Johnson Memorial Hospital

President, Community Hospital South

TOGETHER, WE’RE EVEN STRONGER Since 2008 we have worked together to bring more cardiac services to Johnson County. But we’re just getting started! Soon we will provide even more: more access to cancer treatment, more diagnostic testing and more state-of-the-art facilities. The ownership of our hospitals has not changed, and won’t. Our partnership will strengthen us both to serve you even better. Watch in the coming months for announcements about new facilities, more services and new programs geared to bringing you more access to health care.


taste

Where everybody knows your order Do the flavors butternut cream, Georgia pecan and chocolate cinnamon hazelnut sound like decadent desserts? You might be surprised to learn that those are all flavors of coffee offered at Benjamin’s Coffeehouse in Franklin, along with up to 17 other flavors, depending on the day. It’s been two years since the Shively family— Ben, his wife, Ashley, and Ben’s parents, Jay and Cathy—took over as owners of Benjamin’s, located just across the street from the busy courthouse in downtown Franklin. Since then, Ashley has continued to bake the ever-popular scones every morning, and the coffeehouse has grown to include a full menu of breakfast sandwiches, deli sandwiches, soups, salads and pastries—not to mention a full array of cold drinks, hot drinks and about any coffee creation a customer can dream up. Benjamin’s features a different flavored coffee each day, plus a house blend, a decaf, a bold and a regional blend. “Lots of people enjoy the flavored coffees,” says Ashley. “Plus we have 27 different syrups in case they want to create their own flavor.” Italian sodas, flavored sodas and flavored teas are quite popular, especially during the summer. Can’t make it in to Benjamin’s? No problem—it also delivers. “We begin to know somebody by what they normally order even before we learn their name, which makes it feel homey and personal,” says Jay. “People really like that.” Beans are kept whole until it’s time to brew, and discounts are given for those bringing in their reusable mugs or Franklin College IDs. “We try to provide a comfortable atmosphere for people who want to hang out,” says Ben. “Peo-

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ple sit, read the paper and work on their laptops. It’s a place for everyone, from young to old.” Benjamin’s features works from local artists and hosts live music nights. (Ben and Jay are musicians themselves and have been known to take the stage once in a while.) “We wouldn’t be here without the customers,” says Ashley. “We have a lot of good support here in Franklin, and it’s a good feeling to know that so many people support us.”

Ben and Ashley Shively

Benjamin’s Coffeehouse 49 E. Court St., Franklin 317-736-0048 www.eatatbens.com Hours Monday to Friday » 6:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday » 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Closed Sunday


taste

What is the most popular drink? “I’d say the chai latte or a blended ice drink,” says Doug. “Or just one of our brewed coffees. We have a couple of different blends, including one from Guatemala called the Fletcher Place blend that is a medium roast. All of our beans come in weekly from Jameson Coffee roasters in Greencastle and are fair trade and organic.” What methods do you use to brew the coffee? “Our coffee is brewed into air pots, which are large containers designed to keep coffee hotter longer,” says Doug. “We also have a French press, which can brew a stronger coffee, but most of our coffee is made by traditional drip brewing.” What is one coffee drink that people should learn about? “I’d say the traditional macchiato,“ says Jeff. “Many coffee shops make it, but it has been Americanized and is more like a latté. In Italy where the drink originated, it’s more intense. It has two shots of espresso and a marking of steamed milk, since ‘macchiato’ in Italian means ‘marking.’ If someone comes in and orders a caramel macchiato, we often question them a bit and figure out if they are really wanting a caramel latté instead.”

Calvin Fletcher’s Coffee Co. Doug and Jeff Litsey

615 Virginia Ave. Indianapolis cfcoffeecompany@gmail.com 317-423-9697 Hours Monday through Thursday and Saturday » 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday » 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. Closed Sunday

What is the most outrageous order you’ve ever had? “I’d say just something with a lot of variations in it,” says Doug, “maybe something like a large, decaf, vanilla latté, no sugar, an extra shot—just a situation where you have to listen really carefully to the order and pay attention.”

Q&A

Philanthropist’s work continues When philanthropist Calvin Fletcher was living in Indianapolis in the 1800s, little did he know that one day he’d have a coffee shop named after him. Just down the street from where Fletcher’s family home was located, at the point of Virginia and Fletcher avenues, stands Calvin Fletcher’s Coffee Co., a dream of owner Doug Litsey. Doug, his son, Jeff, and three other employees run the nonprofit corporation, which opened in September 2009. The Litseys noticed that no other coffee shops were located in the Fountain Square area at the time and wanted to create a place where the community could gather—and where they could give back to that community. In warmer months, customers take advantage of the outdoor seating, but it’s just as nice to pull up a chair in the living-room-like setting inside that is complete with a chandelier, bookshelves and coffee table. Grab a sandwich, a pastry from the display case, a specialty soda or one of the many coffee choices (their baristas are known for creating beautiful latté art), and know you are helping a good cause. Each month, the collections in the tip jar at the register are donated to a different nonprofit that helps people, such as Second Helpings, Keep Indianapolis Beautiful or the Latino Youth Collective of Indiana. In June, more than $900 in tip money was given to Champ Camp, a camp for children who require respiratory assistance. “We are neighborhood-oriented and we are people-oriented,” says Doug. “We want to build relationships and help the community at the same time.” To get a better understanding of what it’s like to be a barista at the coffee shop, SOUTH sat down with Doug and Jeff, a giant chocolate chip cookie and a cup of coffee to learn more. SOUTH

What is the best dessert pairing with a cup of coffee? “Every morning I have a cup of Fletcher Place blend and a piece of our sour cream coffee cake, which is made by Circle City Sweets,” says Doug. “It’s very good, but I also admit that I tend to get stuck in a rut. Coffee would also go well with a pumpkin chocolate chip muffin or one of the pumpkin bars with cream cheese frosting.” “For me, I’d pick a cappuccino with a lemon shortbread that is made by How Sweet It Is,” says Jeff, “but then again, the sour cream coffee cake is a great pairing with coffee as well!” What sets your coffee shop apart from the others? “We are a community place,” says Doug. “We learn people’s names and get to know them. We serve great coffee that isn’t over-roasted and is affordable. In addition, we have rotating art exhibits, host First Friday art shows and even sell local pottery.” Has your opinion of people changed after working as a barista? “I’ve worked over 50 hours here each week,” says Doug, “and I can honestly say that the people who come in here are incredible, wonderful, caring and kind. They come from varied backgrounds and have a variety of jobs, but the greatest thing about this job is the people.” Jeff nods in agreement. “When I came back from a year abroad,” he says, “I didn’t have a lot of friends in the city. But because of this place, I’ve met so many new and great people. I love working here and getting to hang out with friends.” |

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taste

Brian Peters

A place to make connections

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Looking for a place to work out and snag a smoothie at the same time? Or would you rather go to church inside a full-service coffee shop instead? At Coffeehouse Five in Greenwood, it’s easy to do both. Located in the Gathering Place—an 82,000-square-foot sports complex that is part of Community Church of Greenwood— Coffeehouse Five (a play on Kurt Vonnegut’s book “Slaughterhouse Five”) occupies prime space near the main entrance, perfect both for athletes heading out and neighborhood folks passing by. “It’s been on my mind for a long time to open a coffee shop,” says founder Brian Peters. “I wanted to create a place where people can hang out and a place where we can serve coffee and baked goods. But most of all, I wanted to have a place where we can connect with people.” Brian, his wife, Michelle, their children and volunteers all help to keep the coffee shop open. In business since January, the coffeehouse also serves as the meeting location on Sunday evenings for One Hope, a daughter church of Community Church of Greenwood that Brian helped start a year and a half ago. “It was our vision from the beginning to be a coffeehouse church,” says Brian, who serves as the pastor. “We wanted to create an environment where people felt comfortable hanging out, but where we could also hold church. We aren’t here to force a church message on people when they walk through the door, but we are here if someone wants to

talk or needs some help. We want to be here to help people, and if you need something, that’s why we are here.” In order to block out views of the gym next door, Michelle added curtains to the windows and draped fabric over the harsh ceiling lights. To encourage reading—a passion for Brian and his family—they added bookshelves and plenty of comfy seating. “We feel that people don’t read enough anymore,” he says, “so we wanted to create a space where people could find good books and talk about good books.” Daughter Amanda creates the baked goods, such as chocolate chip cookies and muffins, and she and her dad created the variety of smoothies and specialty drinks served hot, iced or blended. “Our maple-flavored coffee drinks, such as our caramel and maple latté, are quite popular because it’s a flavor you don’t see very often,” says Brian. “My favorite is the Nutty Monkey smoothie, which is peanut butter and bananas blended together. But I like to add a shot of espresso and call it the Jumpy Monkey,” he adds with a laugh. Brian focuses on obtaining high-quality beans and buys from a supplier in Wisconsin called Ancora. The beans are fair trade, and Brian explains that they have a smoother taste and richer flavor when compared with other coffees. Coffeehouse Five also showcases local music talent, ranging from blues to pop to acoustic guitar. “It’s been fun to be here on the nights when we have concerts,” he says. “We hope to expand our musical lineup and also include coffee tastings, readings and special programs on weeknights.”

Coffeehouse Five In the Gathering Place 1495 West Main St. Greenwood 317-300-4330 coffee.onehopenow.com Hours: Monday to Thursday » 7 to 11 a.m. and 4 to 9 p.m. Friday » 7 to 11 a.m. and 4 to 6 p.m. Saturday » 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed Sunday


taste

Coffee, tires or tubes? Bicyclists need energy. Energy comes from caffeine. So it makes perfect sense to combine a bike shop and a coffee bar, right? Stop by Joe’s Cycles in Fountain Square, where it’s easy to take care of both needs. Four years ago, Joe Cox opened Joe’s Cycles in the oldest building in Fountain Square. The coffee bar was added soon after, serving $1 cups of coffee along with mochas, lattés, espressos, energy drinks, bottled water and flavored water. Now before you think that a $1 cup of coffee can’t be of good quality, think again. Joe’s purchases Equal Exchange Fairly Traded coffee from a local church, which ensures that the profits from the sale of the beans get back to the farmers who grew them. “It’s great to have a coffee shop and bike shop together,” says employee Kody Malone. “It helps to give people a relaxed feeling when they walk into our shop. Instead of just asking them what they need, we can offer them a cup of coffee while they browse, and people like that.” Joe’s Cycles is taking care of biking needs for many in Fountain Square, an area with plenty of bike enthusiasts already. In fact,

construction is under way to create a dedicated bike lane corridor on Shelby Street and Madison Avenue that will connect Fountain Square to County Line Road on the south side—so Joe’s Cycles shop is in the perfect location. The store specializes in building custom bikes, but it also sells parts and accessories as well as performing bike repairs and tune-ups. But it’s not uncommon to see people drop by for the coffee alone. The coffee bar is simple—a small corner of the shop with cups, saucers Joe’s Cycles and coffee-making essentials. Joe’s 1060 Virginia Ave. Cycles stays open late on First Fridays, Indianapolis (317) 602-3911 when area art galleries and other busijoescycles.com nesses cater to the after-work crowd. Hours “I love when people walk in to check Weekdays » 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. out bikes,” says Malone, “and then they Saturdays »10 a.m. to 5 p.m. notice the coffee bar and say, ‘Wow, Closed Sundays you serve coffee here, too?’ It’s a great reaction to hear out of people.”

Joe Cox

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profile

Growth opportunities

By Alisa Advani Photography by Dario Impini 34

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Clements family adds new properties at work, new children at home

Brady and Teresa Clements live and work by a simple philosophy that shapes their daily reality. “You deal with what you have control over, and you let go of the rest. You take what you have been given, and you do the best you can,” said Brady. This successful, dynamic husband and wife team owns Skyline Property Group in

Greenwood. Currently, the company manages approximately 1 million square feet of retail space, renting to about 290 tenants. About half of that space is in Greenwood. The remaining half of Skyline’s portfolio spans from Huntington to North Vernon and from Avon to Greensburg. Interestingly enough, this is not the first time the pair has worked side by side. Dur-


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ing college, they both took jobs at Sears to help cover expenses. Brady, being his usual charismatic self, far exceeded all of his managers’ expectations and not only sold merchandise, he sold entire display units that were not even priced. As a result, he often sent over orders that would frustrate the cashiers. One of those tickets showed up in front of Teresa, who worked the register and admittedly took her position a bit less seriously than Brady. In the middle of another sale and ready to close “on a screwdriver,” he

walked over and handed her the price tag without saying a word, refusing to leave his client for a second longer than necessary. “I thought, why have I not noticed him before? He’s really cute,” Teresa said, with a laugh. They married and had children. Tyler, their first-born, now 20, attends Ball State. Following in the footsteps of his father, he is majoring in entrepreneurship and economics. “He’s also on the radio,” said Teresa. Cortney, a 17-year-old junior at Center Grove High School, spent the summer working at the family business.


About four years ago, Brady felt he wanted to have additional children. “There was a hole in my family that needed to be filled,” he said. “We didn’t want babies, though, because we were in our 40s, and at the time, I had a busy position at Bank One that required me to travel a great deal,” added Teresa. “We also didn’t want to have two separate sets of kids. It works for some families, but we really wanted them to all be relatively close in age.” To fill their hearts with more love, they adopted two siblings, a boy and girl, from the Ukraine through a Christian outreach program that Brady serendipitously learned about from one of their tenants. “Brady was out talking to a tenant — because that’s what he does — and the tenant just happened to mention that he was participating in a program that brings children over to the United States from the Ukraine for a few weeks in the summer with the intent of finding them a home,” said Teresa. After researching the outreach, the Clementses decided to participate. Pictures

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For more information, visit StFrancisDoctors.org SOUTH

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taste

“There was a hole in my family that needed to be filled.” — Brady Clements

of Yura and Tatiana arrived quickly, and Brady and Teresa committed to them instantly. “We didn’t even do the program,” said Brady. We decided to move forward with adopting immediately. God chose my first two, and I believe he was choosing my second two for us.” The entire adoption process took about 14 months. Brady’s persistence prevailed. He made almost daily calls until the Ukrainian government sent over the much-anticipated letter granting the Clementses permission to complete the proceedings. Yura and Tatiana’s new parents made the trip overseas and spent 32 days filling out paperwork and getting to know their new children. “The kids knew very little English at first. They knew ‘momma’ and ‘poppa,’ so we got very good at playing charades. We hired an interpreter for almost the first year, and we still have funny episodes which I post on Facebook,” said Teresa. Yura, now 14, plays football at Center Grove, and Tatiana, now 12, enjoys music and art. Having integrated seamlessly into

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INDIANAPOLIS SOUTHSIDE

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their new family, most people assume them to be biological children, not adopted ones. Yura even looks like Brady. “We got to help two kids that needed help. But for us they really completed our family. The transition has been fantastic. If you were to spend any time in our household, you would not see any difference from one child to the other,” explained Brady. One thing is clear: Teresa and Brady draw upon their family to balance the stress and pressure of running a large, high-pressure company. On his calendar, Brady has family time scheduled from 6 to 9 p.m. Monday through Friday. “Read it,” he urges. “It says use it wisely. We are not allowed to talk about business. Sure, sometimes I have to work over, but it is my goal to be home with my family every night and break bread with them and to learn about what is important in their lives. Even if you fall a little short, if you have the goal in place, and it is a priority, you come together a lot closer.” Teresa and Brady own the majority of the commercial properties they handle through Skyline, but they also manage a smaller portfolio of five for outside owners. Tactically, Skyline plans to acquire the

majority of its new properties in the central Indiana area. On a day-to-day basis, Brady handles the acquisitions, negotiations and complicated number-crunching, while Teresa manages marketing and communications. It is clear that this duo loves working and playing together. “We complement each other’s strengths and weaknesses,” said Teresa. “I enjoy being hands on and getting to know people. I like to hear their stories,” said Brady. “I have my tenants’ best interests at heart. We are very careful about strategically placing companies within retail space to create cross-shopping. A motorcycle shop next to a kids clothing store isn’t going to drive the right traffic. Our goal is to see that everyone succeeds. To build a successful retail center, you have to do your best that the majority will share business with each other.” The company plans to grow in both ownership and non-ownership property management in the short term while taking advantage of the deals in the current real estate market. “We will stay mostly within central Indiana. It is where we want to make our home with our family and with our business,” said Brady. SOUTH

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home trends

A home entertainment room done by Galaxy Home Theaters.

Just add popcorn

Entertainment systems combine technological advances with all the comforts of home to produce superior sights and sounds

T

By Greg Seiter | Photography by Joe Saba

The Golden Age of Hollywood, a period that stretched roughly from the end of the silent film era in the late 1920s to the early 1960s, saw many technological advances in the movie-making process. Along the way, Americans grew increasingly interested in spending a hard-earned 5 to 7 cents at a time in order to enjoy a “modernized” cinematic experience at their nearest movie house. Today, while entertainment enthusiasts continue to maintain a strong interest in movie and television viewing, much has changed, not only in the quality of what is produced on screen but in how

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and where people can enjoy their favorite shows, movies, music and sporting events. Home entertainment systems are becoming increasingly popular in the United States, thanks in part to ever-changing technological advancements. “Our business has increased substantially in recent times,” said Chris Johnson, owner of and technician for Galaxy Home Theater in Greenwood. “People aren’t moving, but they’re still able to get loans to update their basements, and many are going with entertainment systems.


“For example, in the last five years, we’ve seen about a 300 percent increase in the demand for front-projection systems.” A front projector sends video images to a screen positioned in front of it and can allow for an enhanced viewing experience by potentially creating a high-quality display on a larger-than-standard television screen. “The average media set is 55 inches, but even if you get into one that’s 65 inches, it’s not going to match the 120 or 130 inches you can get with front projection,” Johnson said. “One hundred percent of my customers who have had front projectors installed say they will never go back. They enjoy them that much.” Projectors with 3-D capabilities are especially popular right now. “The hottest thing we sell currently is a 3-D front projection system from JVC,” Johnson said. “It’s so hot they can’t make them fast enough.”

Interestingly enough, despite a recent increase in consumer demand, the price of projectors has actually gone down. “When we first got into it, projectors were going for several thousands of dollars to even tens of thousands of dollars. Now, medium-sized projectors go for $1,500 to $4,500, and the quality is phenomenal,” Johnson said.

a movie down, audio is half the experience.” Bargersville resident Scott Percifield, an independent home entertainment system installer and electrical service technician, agrees. “A few months ago, I had a customer who wanted the best speakers he could get, so he ended up paying $1,200 to $1,500 per speaker,” Percifield said. “There are even some out there that are remote controlled, so if you’re not getting sound the way you want to hear it, you can push a button and the speakers will change position. “Generally speaking, it’s been my experience that the best home theater systems have in-wall speakers,” he added. “They provide the best sound, and they look better.” As far as in-home audio upgrades go, Johnson and Percifield have also noticed a growing demand for the incorporation of Apple “i” products. “We sell a lot of Marantz receivers, so through those people are streaming their

“People aren’t moving, but they’re still able to get loans to update their basements, and many are going with entertainment systems.” —Chris Johnson

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Of course, home entertainment options stretch well beyond projectors and visual enhancement. “We’re also starting to see an upswing in audio,” Johnson added. “Even as recently as five to seven years ago, people were going with cheap box systems, but now there’s an increasing demand to have higher quality audio integrated. After all, when you break


iPhones and iPads,” Johnson said. “You can even use your iPad to control your garage door or the lighting in your house.” One-touch technology can be applied virtually anywhere in a home. “A lot of times in new construction projects, people want me to wire their entire house for audio so they can share their iPod music wirelessly throughout the house, but with touch-pad systems, you can integrate audio, video, lighting, curtains and a lot more,” Percifield added. While industry experts say that most home entertainment systems are installed in basements, they also acknowledge that some homeowners prefer to design and incorporate their in-home units with little to no help from businesses that specialize in doing so. Southside resident Brian Tapp is one such individual. Before moving into his newly constructed home in December 2004, Tapp had his family’s basement pre-wired for surround sound, knowing that he would soon create what would later be affectionately referred to as his “man cave.” “At our other house, we had a huge great room with surround sound, but the system didn’t really work well there so we wanted to do this one right,” he said. “Karen (his wife) wanted this, too,” he quickly added. “She wanted there to be a place where I could watch football and my movies so that others in the house wouldn’t have to watch and listen to the same thing if they don’t want to.” Tapp’s setup consists of a five-speaker system, a 500-watt Yamaha audio receiver, a 200-watt JVC stand-alone sub-woofer, a Sony PS3 gaming system that also doubles as a Blu-ray disc player and a 52-inch JVC HD television. “I had to pay to have the surround-sound wiring done, but I installed everything else myself,” he said. “I’m a technology geek, and I really like doing this stuff.” Surprisingly, Tapp’s favorite basementsystem gadget is his PS3. “I like it because of its dual functionality,” he said. “It can be used as a gaming system, a Blu-ray player and to surf the Net. “We bought our television in 2005, and I’d like to get a better one, but that’s just not in the cards right now. It’s not in our budget or in my best interest to pursue it any SOUTH

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The home theater of Deryl Pittman.

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further at this time,” he said with a laugh. Tapp’s man cave also serves dual purposes. “The whole family enjoys it, and we even go down there when it’s storming,” he added. “It’s also our ‘fam cave.’” Southsider Deryl Pittman, a Galaxy Home Theater customer, is also extremely pleased with his newly installed basement home entertainment system. Pittman’s setup includes a JVC projector, a Marantz receiver, “quake” speakers and a Samsung Blu-ray player. “The sound quality is absolutely amazing and so is the picture,” he said. “We mostly use it to watch movies and sporting events. Very rarely do we just watch television.” When deciding where to install a home entertainment center, there are many things to consider. Those who work in the industry say the selected room should be one that can provide a comfortable setting while simultaneously allowing for controlled lighting and sound. Lighting is of particular concern when dealing with video-related components. After all, adjustable lighting can help


optimize picture quality. Another consideration relevant to screen-viewing quality involves the color of a room’s ceiling and floor. As far as audio goes, room dimensions should be a key point of focus since the shape of a room can positively or negatively impact sound flow and bass sounds, in particular. In many cases, for optimal sound quality, various treatments must be incorporated, including acoustic ceiling tiles, sound absorber panels and bass traps. Additionally, homeowners and professional installers should take into account where guests will sit in relation to the entertainment system, where the actual devices or components will be located and whether the targeted room will benefit most from stand-alone speakers or in-wall models. When selecting an appropriate system, consider one that can be expanded. For example, most music collections now reside on CDs, but DVD audio is becoming increasingly popular. Homeowners should also think of future expansion possibilities relative to power supply and consider the fact that surround sound systems require more power than stereo. Backward compatibility should also be considered. Though no longer prevalent in today’s society, many people still maintain a collection of VHS tapes and even vinyl records, which can be incorporated into modern system setups with the appropriate equipment. Generally speaking, today’s home entertainment systems fall into one of two primary categories. Some prefer a converted room to be for the exclusive purpose of watching bigscreen movies in a dark, theater-like setting. Others seek versatility and an area dedicated to promoting interaction where friends and family members can gather to enjoy HDTV, watch movies, listen to music and play video games together. “Every situation is uniquely tailored to each house,” Johnson said. “Each job is a challenge, but it’s always a lot of fun.” When first considering a home system, Pittman spent a significant amount of time asking questions and conducting research before deciding to move forward on his project. “Initially, I called Chris at Galaxy Home

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home trends

Theater, and he probably spent 45 minutes with me on the phone,” Pittman said. “Then I brought in a conceptual plan, and we went over it together. “A year before I was even ready to start on this, he spent hours with me and didn’t even know if I was going to buy. Chris and everybody at Galaxy really took care of me. Even now, if I have questions, I’ll give them a call, and they’re perfectly willing to spend the time necessary with me. “They have a customer for life.” Percifield says the most expensive inhome system he has ever installed totaled approximately $120,000 but is also quick to point out that high-quality systems are available for significantly less than that. “If someone wants a real nice home theater system, they’re probably looking at $10,000 to $15,000 with equipment and labor,” he said. “But obviously, there are also setups that can be done for less money than that.” Percifield is particularly excited about on-

The home of Brian Tapp.

going changes in audio-related technology. “They came out with the 5.1 surround sound system a few years ago, which included five speakers and a sub-woofer, and then the 7.1 system with two additional speakers,” he said. “With that setup, which includes left and right speakers directly behind you, there’s a very realistic feel, especially in gaming. “Now, they’re at 7.2, which includes another sub-woofer for additional bass. Next up, they’re going to be adding eighth and ninth speakers. Of course, speakers are only as good as the equipment you hook them up to.”

Despite an overall boom in home entertainment system popularity, many people still enjoy a periodic trip to their local movie theater. But when finances are of particular concern, Johnson emphasizes the importance of comparing home movie viewing to theater movie viewing. “Even though we have a theater system at our house, we still enjoy going out to see movies,” he said. “But I sat down once and tallied up the money we’ve spent on going out, and I found out that we’ve really wasted a lot of money. “I love movies and music. If you’ve had a bad day, music can change your entire mind-set,” he continued. “But as far as movies go, as fast as they come out of cinemas these days, I know I can catch them on Blu-ray in two or three months, and in most cases, I’m willing to wait for that. “If you’re a regular moviegoer, tally up what you spend there. An investment in a home theater system might actually be a realistic and money-saving option for you.”

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health & fitness

A calendar of causes Year-round vigilance, backed by special awareness campaigns, keeps focus on diagnosis and prevention

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By Alisa Advani

National awareness months are often overlooked by those not directly affected by the corresponding health issue. However, the next three months of awareness campaigns focus on health concerns that likely hit close to home with many, whether they suffer from one of these diseases or love someone who does. So in recognition of September’s leukemia and lymphoma, October’s breast cancer, and November’s diabetes months, South is providing readers with advice and insight from local physicians about these conditions that pose a real threat to wellness. September Leukemia and lymphoma are two distinct hematological cancers, both sharing their origin in the blood. According to the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, about 45,000 new cases of leukemia

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are diagnosed yearly in the United States, and 628,415 Americans are living with, or in remission from, lymphoma. “Leukemia” is a broad term covering the four ways in which the disease manifests within the cells of the blood. In general, leukemia is characterized by the uncontrolled accumulation of blood cells. The therapies used to treat people with each type are different. Generally, scientists categorize leukemia as either acute or chronic. In acute leukemia, the abnormalities are due to immature blood cells that are not able to function normally. A rapid growth in the number of these useless cells prevents the formation of healthy blood cells. This type of leukemia usually occurs in children and young adults. Chronic leukemia is a condition in which blood cells mature abnormally but still function well. In this situation, the unwanted


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accumulation of these blood cells slowly inhibits the formation of healthy ones. Because of the slow progression rate, it may take months or years before damaging effects begin to be felt. Adults usually receive this diagnosis. “We have a newer drug for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia called Rituxan. It is not a typical chemotherapy agent, but rather a monoclonal antibody that tags the tumor,” said Dr. Mary Lou Mayer, an oncologist and hematologist at the St. Francis Cancer Center. Rituxan binds to the surface of cancer cells, making it easier for the patient’s immune system to attack the malignancy as if it were a foreign pathogen. “Lymphoma” describes the many blood cancers that originate in the lymphatic system. This kind of cancer results when a lymphocyte (a kind of white cell) undergoes a malignant change and multiplies out of control. Eventually, healthy cells are crowded out, and malignant lymphocytes mass in the lymph nodes, liver, spleen and/ or other sites in the body. In Hodgkin’s lymphoma, cells in the lymphatic system grow abnormally and may spread beyond the lymphatic system. As Hodgkin’s lymphoma progresses, it compromises the body’s ability to fight infection. Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, the second form, occurs far more frequently. It generally involves the presence of cancerous lymphocytes in the lymph nodes. The disease can also spread to other parts of the lymphatic system, including the lymphatic vessels, tonsils, adenoids, spleen, thymus and bone marrow. Occasionally, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma involves organs outside the lymphatic system. Symptoms often overlap between leukemia and lymphoma. Both cause fever, fatigue, weight loss, night sweats and swollen lymph nodes. Easy bleeding, poor healing and tiny red spots on the skin can also indicate the presence of leukemia. Additionally, some lymphoma patients experience coughing and chest pain, itching and appetite loss. Patients have several viable options for medical treatment. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy is a noninvasive technique that delivers tightly focused radiation beams to destroy cancer without needles, tubes or catheters. IMRT uses computer-generated images to sharply focus beams of X-ray en50

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ergy that conform as precisely as possible to the outlined shape of the tumor treatment area. The increased precision of IMRT minimizes the amount of radiation exposure to healthy tissues surrounding the cancer. “Doctors are able to use higher doses of radiation, which increases the likelihood of successful treatment. The lower exposure to healthy surrounding tissues helps reduce the possible side effects of radiation treatment,” said Dr. David Lee, radiation oncologist with IU Health Cancer Services. Multiple programs assist the newly diagnosed. “The Patti Robinson Kaufmann First Connection Program is a peer-to-peer program that links newly diagnosed patients and their families with trained volunteers who have experienced the same type of

“We have to remember that over 50 percent of breast cancer cases occur in women who have no family history whatsoever.” — Dr. Anna Maria Storniolo cancer as their match,” said Claire Kammen, patient services manager at Leukemia Lymphoma Society of Indianapolis. “We try to match gender, ethnicity and age as well. It helps people to have someone who has walked in exactly their same shoes.” The society also gives a $100 annual stipend to leukemia and lymphoma patients to help cover the cost of parking and meals during treatments regardless of financial or insurance status. October About one in eight women in the United States will develop invasive breast cancer

over the course of her lifetime. A woman’s risk of breast cancer approximately doubles if she has a first-degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) who has been diagnosed with the disease. Although between 20 percent and 30 percent of women have a history of breast cancer in their families, more than 50 percent of breast cancers occur in women with no familial predisposition. These particular occurrences are due to the genetic abnormalities that happen as a result of the aging process rather than inherited mutations. “The most important risk factors that we as women need to be aware of are age and family history — those are the biggest. They are not the only ones, however. We have to remember that over 50 percent of breast cancer cases occur in women who have no family history whatsoever. It is a common disease. If you don’t have a sister who has it, that doesn’t mean that you can forget about your breasts and miss your mammograms,” said Dr. Anna Maria Storniolo, director of the Catherine Peachey Breast Cancer Prevention Program at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center. “Our program’s mission is to provide a place where women who feel they are at high risk because of family history or other risk factors can come and have their risks personally assessed. We do an individual risk management plan. For some that includes annual mammography, MRI and genetic counseling. We also offer not only a surveillance plan but treatment with the medications that decrease actual risk,” she said. Breast cancer symptoms vary widely — from lumps to swelling to skin changes — and many breast cancers have no obvious symptoms at all. Symptoms that are similar to those of breast cancer may be the result of noncancerous conditions like an infection or a cyst. Women can take additional steps to reduce their chances of breast cancer: • Limit alcohol. The more alcohol you drink, the greater your risk of developing breast cancer. If you choose to drink alcohol, limit yourself to no more than one drink a day. • Control your weight. Being overweight or obese increases the risk of breast cancer. This is especially true


if obesity occurs later in life, particularly after menopause. • Exercise. Being physically active can help you maintain a healthy weight, which, in turn, helps prevent breast cancer. If you’re just starting a physical activity program, start slowly and build intensity gradually. • Breast-feed. It may play a role in breast cancer prevention. The longer you breast-feed, the greater the protective effect. • Discontinue hormone therapy. Long-term combination hormone therapy increases the risk of breast cancer. During Breast Cancer Awareness Month, the Central Indiana Komen for the Cure organization will hold several fundraising events on the southside. One of the largest will be Oct. 22 at the Southland Skate roller rink on Bluff Road. “The rink will be all pink, and they are donating all proceeds from the day passes to breast cancer research,” said Elise LeBlanc, communications coordinator for Komen for the Cure. November In the United States, 25.8 million children and adults have diabetes, or a whopping 8.3 percent of the population. Approximately 2 million new adult cases were diagnosed in 2010, and that number continues to climb. Most doctors say that the reason for the explosion is obvious: Americans eat too much and exercise too little, and unfortunately, much of the world has followed our bad example. There is no question that excess pounds increase the risk of becoming diabetic, but weight explains only part of the problem. Diabetes also has a strong genetic component. “People inherit insulin resistance syndrome. Insulin is a growth hormone, so these patients gain weight. In response to the weight gain, their bodies produce additional insulin, and a vicious cycle is born. About 80 percent of the pancreas has to be destroyed before a patient develops Type 2 diabetes,” said Dr. Ana Priscu, who practices at Diabetes & Endocrinology Specialists at St. Francis Hospital. Diabetes always produces a destructive spike in the body’s blood sugar levels, but

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the disorder actually stems from two distinct disease processes. When patients are born with the inability to produce insulin, the hormone responsible for efficient carbohydrate and fat metabolism, they suffer from Type 1 diabetes, also referred to as juvenile diabetes. A later-in-life diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes arrives when the body’s cells no longer respond to the insulin that is produced. Type 2 diabetes is by far the most common, affecting 90 to 95 percent of people with the illness. Onset is more gradual, and a wider range of treatment options exists. “People slowly become insulin resistant. When you are diabetic, you initially make more insulin than you need because your cells can’t use it efficiently. Then the pancreas stops making it altogether from years of overproduction. In those cases, patients begin supplementing with insulin shots,” said Amy Kotansky, dietitian and diabetes educator at St. Francis Diabetes and Endocrinology Center. “If the pancreas still produces

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some insulin and the cells respond, there are medications that help that function along.” The most common initial symptoms include increased urination, unquenchable thirst, weakness and fatigue. Weight loss occurs more frequently in patients with Type 1 diabetes. Some people may also experience blurred vision, frequent infections, slowhealing wounds and numbness and tingling in the hands, legs and feet. “A lot of people feel nothing. In the early stages of Type 2 diabetes, patients may only feel a little tired,” said Kotansky. Serious complications arising from diabetes are numerous. Once the excess glucose (sugar) builds in the bloodstream, it wreaks havoc on multiple organ systems and does not discriminate. Adults with diabetes have heart disease death rates between two to four times higher than adults without diabetes. In adults 20 or older with diabetes, 67 percent had high blood pressure. Up to 70 percent of people with diabetes have mild to severe forms of nervous system damage. It is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults and the chief cause of kidney failure. “We have seen research in the past linking diabetes to increased cancer rates. We still need more research, but I am convinced that the insulin resistance is the likely culprit in the relationship,” said Priscu. There is some good news. In most cases, the devastating complications of diabetes — and in some cases the disease itself — are almost entirely preventable. Blood sugar control is paramount. Activity and a balanced diet can keep blood sugar levels in the healthy range. “When a patient comes in with a new diagnosis, we look at livable lifestyle changes to phase into their daily schedule to improve overall health and guard against these complications, particularly heart disease, which I see as the most prevalent complication,” Kotansky said. “I urge people to walk or to do activities in the pool. They also need to avoid fried foods with added salt and obvious sources of sugar. I also like to remind diabetics that of all the diseases out there, this one is very controllable through these gradual changes.” The St. Francis Diabetes and Endocrinology Center offers patients ample support and provides a multitude of educational programs recognized by the American Diabetes Association.

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worth the trip

Dining At Large Broaden your palate with an out-of-country eating experience south of the Indy border By Brett A. Halbleib | Photography by Eddie Price

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You needn’t go far to feel well traveled. Instead, just eat your way through Bloomington. Situated a little over an hour south of Indianapolis, the beloved cream-and-crimson town offers an abundance of ethnic restaurants, including two Tibetan eateries. (Few cities can even claim one.) Students representing more than 125 countries attend Indiana University there, and though Bloomington doesn’t have a restaurant for each country represented, give the small town a little more time and you never know. We stepped into five Btown restaurants to rank high on your cosmopolitan dining list. El Norteño (Mexican) 206 N. Walnut St., (812) 333-9591

Go ahead and drive yourself crazy by trying to figure out how the chef makes the spicy green salsa at El Norteño. With the consistency of a creamy dip, you’d naturally think it’s based on guacamole or tomatillos. And owner Socorro Vallejo would politely tell you that your guess is incorrect—the salsa contains neither. You might say sour cream is a key ingredient. Wrong again. Told you. It’s futile. “We add some peppers, I’ll tell you that,” Vallejo says. And that’s about all you’ll get out of the owner, who protects the secret family recipe as though it were part of the 54

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worth the trip

El Norteño

Witness Protection Program. (There’s a more traditional red salsa available, too, for green-averse diners.) So push aside your curiosity and dip away with those homemade chips while you decide amongst Mexican favorites like carne asada, mole enchiladas or pollo con mole. And if you think the salsa is tough to decipher, just try to whip up a batch of homemade mole poblano, which incorporates unsweetened chocolate among its lengthy list of ingredients. You’ll probably find the atmosphere as memorable as the food. El Norteño occupies a former theater, enhanced by a magnificent floor-to-ceiling, movie-screensized stained glass window. Plus, El Norteño often displays works by local artists. Friendly tip: Though it’s not bottled (“not yet anyway” Vallejo says), you can buy salsa to go.

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Samira Restaurant (Afghan) 100 W. Sixth St. (812) 331-3761

Any restaurant can add the word “authentic” to its sign or menu. But you know you’re the real deal when military bases call and ask you to feed soldiers so they know what to expect during a tour of duty. Such is the case at Samira, an Afghan restaurant in Bloomington. Owner Anwar Naderpoor, who grew up in Kabul, says he frequently caters to central Indiana military bases, giving soldiers a taste of what they’ll encounter in Afghanistan. Samira forgoes traditional communal serving (where everyone eats from one dish) in favor of American-style individual meals. But the menu itself? Straight from Kabul. Naderpoor makes the signature lentil soup with lentil, fresh tomatoes and a touch of dill and basil. Samira also boasts a variety of dumplings and kabobs, includ-


ing beef, Cornish hen, the ever-popular lamb, and tuna. “We didn’t have tuna back home,” Naderpoor says. “Here we have tuna and salmon, which are good for kabobs, and I season them in an Afghan way.” Ah, those seasonings. Whether you sample the manto (a ravioli-like dish with sautéed onions and a tomato-yogurt sauce) or the sabzi tchallao (spinach with lamb over white rice), you’ll find the dish seasoned enough to awaken your taste buds but not so much as to beat them into submission.

Applebees

Friendly tip: The lunch buffet includes complimentary baklava, while dinner guests enjoy a starter of grilled eggplant.

Grazie! Italian Eatery 106 W. Sixth St., (812) 323-0303

Look no further than the menu for a glimpse of Grazie’s commitment to a memorable dining experience. Read it and you’ll get the distinct impression a professional was hired to write it, as evidenced by such phrases as “a dome of fresh mozzarella” and “dredged in asiago cheese.” You put a “dome” of fresh mozzarella on just about anything, and it’s utterly delicious. And does it really matter what follows words “asiago crusted”? You’re still eating it. Such attention to detail extends to the food as well. For example, Grazie! insists on premium vodka in the penne alla vodka sauce. (Hard-core food lovers insist premium vodka gives the sauce a fresher taste.)

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worth the trip

Anyetsang’s

Grazie! also applies its cheesy and vodka excesses to many Italian favorites, like ziti, wild mushroom tortellini and sea scallops. And by updating that well-written menu with seasonal dishes, the selection of entrées stays as fresh as the homemade focaccia served with each meal. Friendly tip: Don’t panic if you’re running a little late. Grazie! will hold your table for 10 minutes after your requested time.

Anyetsang’s Little Tibet Restaurant 415 E. Fourth St., (812) 331-0122

The owners of Anyetsang’s take fresh flavor so seriously they make their own chai tea. They concoct their own homemade ginger salad dressing, too—a dressing some devotees claim is so delicious you’ll want to drink what’s left after you’ve eaten the salad. And if they’re this dedicated to the little things (like condiments and tea), just imagine the attention to detail reserved for the main attractions. 58

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worth the trip

The lineup of which includes Thai, Indian and Tibetan dishes. Familiar favorites such as green curry (beef, chicken, pork or tofu with carrots, green beans, zucchini, bamboo shoots and mushrooms) and aloo gobi (potatoes and cauliflower with seasonings) share menu space with some less familiar but equally intriguing combinations, including chura mo mo (steamed dumplings with cheese, green and yellow onions and seasonings) and sho go mo mo (steamed dumplings with potato, green and yellow onions and seasonings). Mo mo, by

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the way, is a traditional Tibetan dish, something like a dumpling or a pancaked pot sticker, and it’s accompanied by two dipping sauces (one soy, one spicy). The humble setup would surely make the Dalai Lama himself proud, as it includes seasonal outdoor dining to the sounds of a trickling fountain—a perfect backdrop for sipping a mango lassi (a sweet yogurt-based beverage). Friendly tip: Although bringing your own adult beverage of choice is no longer allowed, Anyetsang’s now serves alcohol, so sit back, relax and let the staff pair the right drink with your entrée.

The Trojan Horse (American and Greek), 100 E. Kirkwood Ave., (812) 332-1101.

Want to impress your friends with your culinary vocabulary? Ask them the name of the big rotating slab from which gyros meat is carved. When they give up, tell them it’s called a cone. Then suggest a visit to the Trojan Horse, a Bloomington establishment that makes its own gyros cones. General manager Greg Marshall says the Trojan Horse seals the juices and seasonings through a unique cooking method, then tops the gyros with tomatoes, onions and homemade zaziki sauce (yogurt, sour cream, cucumbers and garlic). The Trojan Horse also makes by hand just about everything else, including the popular falafel, hummus and cheesepa’rer, a spinach and feta cheese spread served with pitas (the menu refers to it as “hummus for cheese-heads”). If spanikopita, lamb kabobs and tabouleh (a Mediterranean salad) are too Greek for your tastes, the Trojan Horse offers an inventive selection of comforts as American as NASCAR. You’ll find traditional nibbles (onion rings, breaded mushrooms and a mean plate of fries) and a few twists, such as drunken salmon (salmon marinated in a base of bourbon with soy sauce and brown sugar, then charbroiled) and pork tacos, which Marshall says are almost as tasty as the fish tacos, which have inspired cult-like devotion. Friendly tip: Before or after dinner, head upstairs to the Horse’s Head Tavern for a mojito.

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Head for the hills of

Bloomington College town combines outdoor attractions with enough scholarly and artistic pursuits to satisfy any visitor

By Greg Seiter

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SoFA Gallery Show

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Bloomington

From Lake Monroe and the Hoosier National Forest to wineries, art galleries and Indiana University, Bloomington is recognized for many things. However, it may, in fact, be those lesser-known, outof-the-ordinary treasures that make the south-central Indiana region such a popular destination for weekend excursions and mini-vacations. Hikers and bikers flock to the rolling hills and forest terrain that surround Bloomington in search of adventure, while boaters and fishermen are similarly drawn to the many lakes and rivers. However, owning a watercraft is not a prerequisite for taking advantage of the offerings at places like Lake Monroe. Since 1992, locally owned and familyoperated Lake Monroe Boat Rental has been providing customers with temporary access to a variety of vessels, including double-deckers with slides, pontoons, jet skis, fishing boats, canoes and kayaks as well as water sport accessories. The facility is in the Paynetown State Recreation Area, six miles south of East Third Street, off Indiana 446. On the campus of Indiana University, numerous museums and special collections are open to the public. While a variety of films and related materials by and about African-Americans can be found in the Black Film Center Archive, the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology includes an exhibit devoted specifically to Great Lakes/Ohio Valley archaeology and ethno-history. The Hilltop Garden & Nature Center is home to one of America’s oldest youth gardening programs, and the Indiana University Art Museum, with more than 40,000 objects, includes works that represent nearly every art-producing culture throughout history.

At the school’s Lilly Library, which is internationally known for its rare books, a collection of puzzles can be found that is, perhaps, like no other in the world. The Jerry Slocum mechanical puzzle collection has more than 30,000 puzzles and 4,000 puzzle-related books. Unlike word or jigsaw puzzles, mechanical puzzles are hand-held objects that must be manipulated to achieve a specific goal, such as a Rubik’s Cube. There’s also the Wylie House Museum. Built in 1835, the stately brick home of Andrew Wylie, who was the first president of IU, is on the National Register of Historic Places.

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Speaking of museums, a world of handson experimentation awaits children at the WonderLab Museum of Science, Health and Technology, off Fourth Street near Kirkwood Avenue and Madison Street. Established in 1995, WonderLab offers two floors of knowledge-enhancing experiments and is a place where guests can climb a twostory grapevine maze, play with and learn about bubbles, examine a live and fullyfunctioning bee colony and even learn how to freeze a shadow. The museum (www.wonderlab.org) offers four types of memberships and is open most days from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Every Saturday from April through November, the city’s downtown area also plays host to the Bloomington Community Farmers Market where fresh, organic and locally grown foods can be purchased. Running from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at City Hall, the weekend market often includes live music and features vendors with a variety of other items for sale, including jewelry. More than a dozen self-guided walking tours are available around the downtown. History buffs can discover the secrets of the county courthouse, explore famous Indiana songwriter Hoagy Carmichael’s favorite hangouts or stroll through the Vinegar Hill Limestone Historic District among homes that once belonged to limestone cavers and IU faculty.

Additionally, for those wanting to learn more about Bloomington history, the Hinkle-Garton Farmstead Community Historic Site and the Monroe County History Center are worth a visit. One of Bloomington’s last historic farmsteads, the Hinkle-Garton site, which is operated by Bloomington Restorations, includes the main farmhouse, a Queen Annestyle home built in 1892, several outbuildings, a second home built around 1910 and farming artifacts. The Monroe County History Center has three galleries, a genealogy library and a museum store featuring items related to Monroe County and Indiana heritage. Bloomington is also home to a wide variety of art galleries, many of which participate in a downtown Gallery Walk several times each year. The By Hand Gallery boasts the largest collection of locally made contemporary crafts in the area. Inside Fountain Square Mall, it contains jewelry, hardwood furniture and accessories, pottery, blown glass, hand-woven goods, leather, prints, photography and more. Photography is the primary focus at gallery406 (406 South Walnut St.), while numerous styles from local and regional artists are represented at Gallery North on the Square (116 W. Sixth St.) and Glorious Moments Gallery (109 East Kirkwood).

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Taste of Bloomington

Farmer’s Market

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Visitors with an interest in the performing arts can enjoy a year-round schedule of shows at the Bloomington Playwrights Project, the only professional theater in Indiana focused solely on new plays. Music, theater, dance and film can be enjoyed at the Buskirk-Chumley Theater. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the 88-year-old Spanish mission revival silent movie house is said to be one of the busiest community theaters in the county. The city is also home to the Bloomington Speedway, an oval dirt track that features sprints, open-wheel modified racers and Indiana Super Stocks every Friday from April through September. Additionally, the Hoosier Heights indoor climbing facility offers challenging walls suitable for all skill levels. It’s hard to avoid associating Bloomington with its commonly known outdoor recreational opportunities, specialty farms and orchards or inviting restaurants and nightlife options, but an increasing number of travelers are quickly discovering the south-central Indiana city has much more to offer.


Bloomington

Stops along the way As you meander along the rolling, curving roads of south-central Indiana on your way to Bloomington, consider stopping at one of these towns:

Nashville The quaint village is regionally known for its unique collection of small shops, galleries and eateries. In fact, the area has evolved into a popular fall destination thanks to a seemingly endless canvas of colors that magically appear on trees each year. Thanks, in part, to those annual colors, many artists and craftsmen live and work in the area, reinforcing Brown County’s label as the “artist colony of the Midwest.” With hundreds of craft, specialty and antique shops to visit, travelers can watch artists create their works in galleries and studios while navigating Nashville streets. One hour south of Indianapolis, the town has also gained a reputation with country music fans. Known by some as “Little Nashville,” the area was actually home to the Little Nashville Opry for 25 years before that facility was destroyed by fire, but year-round specialty music celebrations still exist and are a cherished tradition for many locals. Some visitors come to Nashville for single-day shopping experiences or to simply watch the hubbub of foot traffic while enjoying a bag of popcorn from a park bench. Others, however, use Nashville as a base from which to explore other nearby offerings, like the many walking and biking trails in nearby Brown County State Park. In fact, the park’s Abe Martin Lodge now features a 12,000-square-foot aquatic center, too. In many ways Nashville hasn’t changed much over the years, and for the most part, that seems to be just fine with those who frequent the area.

Story A road that meanders south of Nashville leads to a tiny town that’s worth a visit for those wanting to take a momentary step back in time. Story was founded in 1851 and quickly became the largest settlement in the area. In fact, during its heyday (1880 to 1929), the village supported two general stores, a church, a one-room schoolhouse, a blacksmith’s forge and a post office. But the area failed to recover from the substantial population loss it suffered during the Great Depression and fell just short of becoming a ghost town. Today, a handful of structures dot the countryside, yet a popular destination for many hungry out-oftowners continues to be the rustic Story Inn (www. storyinn.com). Days-gone-by memorabilia, like retired Standard Oil Crown gas pumps, decorate the inn’s exterior. Inside, creaky wooden floors, a potbellied stove and artifacts combine to remind visitors that the facility was, at one time, Story’s 1916 General Store. Frequent visitors are said to favor Story’s version of tomato soup that uses red peppers instead of tomatoes and the Brown County Park blackberry barbecue sandwich.

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[Unseen] Southside

See the view from inside the clocktower on page 74.

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If you’re a fan of the History or National Geographic channels, chances are you’ve gotten caught up in one of their programs that shows the viewer a neverbefore-seen exotic locale or an insider view of a top-secret initiative. Most of us would agree, we’re intrigued by the unknown. We like to be taken places that seem off-limits. It’s human nature. Hence the reasoning behind this purely for fun feature we like to call Unseen Southside. We identified five spots in the area with intriguing features that most residents don’t get to see or may not even know about. See what it’s like inside the hyperbaric wound healing chamber at Johnson Memorial Hospital. Take a glimpse backstage at the Artcraft Theatre. Tour parts of Camp Atterbury usually closed off to civilians and enjoy the view of downtown Franklin from the courthouse clocktower. Each place will show you a different aspect of these well-known southside icons, so sit back, relax and step inside Unseen Southside.

Compiled by Kelsey DeClue | Photography by Joe Saba

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[Unseen] Atterbury Many of us, especially those living in southern Johnson County, are familiar with the distant sounds of gunfire coming from the grounds of Camp Atterbury and the military planes that buzz overhead. Above, a jet flies over a target practice area within the camp. Opposite page, Lt. Col. Craig “Merle” Haggard directs the flight from the control tower. Close-up photos show outof-commission military equipment now scattered in a “graveyard” section of Camp Atterbury. Soldiers use the dilapidated machinery for target practice.

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[Unseen] Artcraft Built in 1922, the Artcraft Theatre is perhaps Franklin’s most recognizable historic building. Painstaking renovation and commitment to its continued use in the community by the Franklin Heritage Foundation have kept the theater at the forefront of entertainment options in the community. It’s revered as a playhouse, movie theater and haunted attraction appealing to people of all ages and interests over the years. Above is a circa-1950s Peerless lamp house with a Simplex XL projector that the theater uses to show movies. On the opposite page, photos show the raffle ticket cage originally used for the theater’s “bank nights” in the 1930s. Artcraft staff still use the cage to announce raffle prize giveaways. Also shown is a view of the unused original dressing rooms, which store costumes and memorabilia, a backstage exit sign and the renovation process that is ongoing at the historic home located right behind the theater, off Madison Street. When finished, the house will allow handicap access to the theater’s backstage and serve as a dressing room, VIP area and green room for performers and special guests.

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[Unseen] Franklin College Home of the Grizzlies, the campus of Franklin College is a community staple in Johnson County. Franklin College was founded in 1834 and one of its most recognizable buildings is perhaps Old Main, which sits on the northwest side of the campus. In this panoramic view of the historic building shows the stained glass college seal lit from the sky above. A bust of Benjamin Franklin presides over the mouth of the stairwell.

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[Unseen] Johnson County Courthouse clock and bell tower Rising regally in the center of downtown Franklin’s square, the county courthouse is a community fixture seen daily by residents and visitors alike. Chimes from the clock and bell tower send notifications of the day’s progression, but how often do people think about the structure and mechanics it takes to send those hourly reminders resonating through the streets? The photos on the opposite page show the two-floor system of the clock and bell, as well as the historic, signature-covered walls and ladders leading to each floor of the tower.

[Unseen] Johnson Memorial Hospitals are full of amazing, state-of-the-art medical technology that the rest of us often don’t get to (and many times may not want to) see. One of these more intriguing and little-known devices is Johnson Memorial Hospital’s hyperbaric oxygen therapy chamber. Patients who suffer from a chronic wound that hasn’t healed in 30 days or a medical condition such as diabetic ulcers, pressure ulcers, bone infections, radiation skin irritations or vascular disorders resulting in poor blood circulation may be prescribed time in hyperbaric oxygen therapy by their physician. While receiving treatment, patients watch movies and relax on a bed encased in a large, see-through shell. They are surrounded by 100 percent oxygen at higher-than-normal atmospheric pressure that enables the oxygen molecules to pass through the plasma to the body more easily to speed healing. SOUTH

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Cause and effect

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By Julie Cope Saetre Photography by Melinda Davis Secord

Volunteers are the lifeblood of nonprofit groups

It’s a reality that Johnson County not-for-profit organizations know only too well. In a time when the economic environment has created unprecedented needs for their services, the grants, donations and other funding sources that fuel those services have waned. Thankfully, area residents are making time to help those organizations and their clients. Their reasons for volunteering are as varied as the people themselves. Here, we meet six Johnson County residents who are donating their time and talents to help neighbors in need. If you’re not already among the ranks of county volunteers, their dedication — and the unexpected rewards that come with it — might just inspire you to get out there and make your own difference.

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Elaine Maurer Elaine Maurer developed a passion for not-for-profits at a young age. As an elementary school student, she asked guests to bring canned goods for a local food pantry, rather than gifts for herself, to a birthday party. And she drew up floor plans for a new project she envisioned: a combination homeless shelter/animal shelter/food pantry. “When we would take vacations, I was always the kid that would beg my parents for dollar bills to give to homeless people,” she recalls. It’s no surprise, then, that when Maurer graduated from Ball State University in May, she started a full-time volunteer position for the Interchurch Food Pantry in Whiteland two days later. Now, as pantry manager, she tracks donations and distributions, helps other volunteers with distribution as necessary and organizes food drives and fundraisers, including the October Crop Walk and the planned chili cook-off in April. 82

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It’s no small level of responsibility. Last year, the pantry served some 33,000 clients, and it’s on track to surpass that number this year. Clients range in age from infants to the elderly, and many have never before needed such a service, Maurer says. “For some people, especially the firsttime people, it’s extremely hard to come in. They typically say, ‘Oh, I’m so embarrassed.’ We tell them, ‘There’s nothing to be embarrassed about. You’re not the only person in this boat.’” It’s important, Maurer stresses, that she and the 150 volunteers who keep Interchurch functioning provide just such a nurturing environment for the clients they serve. “It really warms my heart when a family comes in who has been struggling and we are able to help them. We don’t ask very many questions. We don’t judge them. We don’t tell them this is what they should or shouldn’t be doing to get out of this rut. It’s just really nice to be there for someone without having any expectation in return.” The clients, she adds, return the warm welcome. “Our clients are some of the sweetest people in all of Johnson County. When they ask you how you’re doing, they don’t just ask because you’re helping them. They genuinely want to know if everyone at the pantry is doing well. Everyone always says thank you. It’s a feeling that I can’t really describe.” Interchurch also accepts donations of cleaning supplies, hygiene products and other items one might find in a standard grocery store. Maurer hopes that other county residents will join the ranks of not-for-profit volunteers and nurture that spirit in their children, as her own parents did with her. “All it takes is for a new volunteer to talk to one person and see how much that volunteer changed that client’s day, and you’ll be hooked. You’ll just want to keep coming back and helping people.”


Barb Miller When Barb Miller joined the board of directors of Johnson County’s Girls Inc. in January, she brought with her a wealth of volunteer experience. Her charitable resume reads like a who’s who of the county’s not-for-profit roster. She has volunteered with organizations such as the Greenwood Chamber of Commerce, the Johnson County Community Foundation, the Humane Society of Johnson County, Johnson County Animal Control, Youth Connections, the Johnson County Eagle Riders, the Johnson County Shrine Club (her husband, John, is a member), the Greenwood Parks and Recreation Department and Franklin Heritage’s Historic Artcraft Theatre. No wonder, then, that Girls Inc. of Franklin/Johnson County named Miller its Woman of the Year for 2010 for her array of volunteer roles in the community, an honor that she says left her feeling “very, very flattered and humbled.” “Barb is a dedicated, involved and energetic volunteer committed to our mission and vision for the girls we serve,” says Sonya Ware-Meguiar, Girls Inc.’s chief executive officer. Miller’s fundraising skills are especially appreciated by many of the organizations she has served. She honed such skills throughout a career path in sales. She did not, however, immediately bring those talents to the not-for-profit world. For many years, the Johnson County resident worked in Marion County and “ never felt connected to the (local) community,” she says. That changed, however, in the early 1990s, when she began working for an Acordia office in her home county. She became involved with the Greenwood Chamber of Commerce and the Johnson County Community Foundation; for the latter, she served on the board and the grants committee. Her list of volunteer duties only lengthened after she retired in 2003. “Every agency needs two things: one’s money and one is volunteers,” she says. “And as a retiree, I have more time than money, so that was something that was easy for me to do.” In 2011 alone, she has worked on a wide variety of fundraising efforts, including the Girls Inc. annual gala and a motorcycle event to raise money for local youth agencies. In fact, since she worked on her first motorcycle fundraiser – the Going to the Dogs ride by the Johnson County Eagles to raise money for the county animal shelter – she’s become known as somewhat of an expert in this type of event. While her volunteer schedule seems exhaustive, Miller laughs off any suggestions that her packed days must be challenging. “I just told a friend of mine today, it gives me an excuse for my house not being clean and the yard not being perfect and having weeds in it….” She doesn’t envision her schedule slowing down in a time when many not-for-profits are struggling to survive in a still-sluggish economy lacking in grant funds and donation dollars. In fact, she wishes that more individuals would take the time to lend a hand. “I see people who don’t do anything and complain all the time, and I’m thinking, ‘Man, get off your butt and get involved in something,’” she says. “It’s always brought me a lot more satisfaction that I’ve ever expected to get out of it.” SOUTH

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LaTheda Noonan With a master’s degree in social work, LaTheda Noonan knows how heavily social service agencies rely on donations of time, skill and money. She first began volunteering in the late 1990s at St. Thomas Clinic and has maintained a strong commitment to charitable organizations ever since. For five years, she served as volunteer manager for the Interchurch Food Pantry before moving to Christian Help as executive director in April. There, she handles administrative and bookkeeping duties, works with and coordinates training for five case managers and other volunteers, oversees the organization’s Friendly Village mobile home park and does presentations on Christian Help’s mission: assisting the homeless and near-homeless in Johnson County. It’s a mission that has been especially challenging in the current economic environment. Christian Help receives more than 100 calls every month for assistance. “With the homeless, we try to find them shelter,” Noonan explains. “And with the near homeless, we try to help them with rent, mortgage assistance, utilities or transportation.” “We’ve had a lot of people who used to be donors and are now recipients of help. And we have a lot of the middle class who have lost their homes or are los84

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ing their homes because of the economic situation. It’s very difficult for them to come to us and ask for help because they’ve always been self-reliant. And they’re unfamiliar with social services. So once they get into this social service arena, they are lost. Our job as case managers is to get them through that.” Jennifer Petgen, who volunteers as a Christian Help case manager, says that many people don’t realize how easily a family’s situation can go downhill. “So many people are just making it. As long as everything is going well for them, they can collect their paycheck and they can pay their bills. But all it takes is one thing to go wrong: Somebody breaks their foot or there’s a death in the family or somebody gets their hours cut in half at work. And it can just send them into a tailspin. And it’s not just individuals; it’s whole families.” With families facing those kinds of struggles, Noonan finds herself volunteering 30 to 35 hours in an average week. Her husband works full time to support her and their 10-year-old son, Damien, and she says the family views her volunteerism as an extension of their faith. “Basically, what it comes down to is this: My husband and I use me as a mission.” She adds with a laugh, “My husband said, ‘I’ll make the treasures here on Earth for our family. You store them up in heaven for me.’ So I’m working for his treasure in heaven.” Her experiences in the not-for-profit world, she adds, have enriched her spiritual life. “I tell everyone that God is the best boss in the world, because he forgives me when I make mistakes. … He gives me an opportunity to learn from my mistakes. It’s helped me to grow in my faith, and it has helped me to help others grow in their faith.” It’s a message she and her husband have passed on to their children. She’s not surprised that the younger members of the family have so readily embraced volunteerism and charitable giving. “I believe that a volunteer works as the hands and feet of Christ, and there’s no better feeling in the entire world than knowing that you are working for Christ. Your heart is full, your head is full — you are so blessed to be able to do something like this.”


Thom Hord When Thom Hord was serving as pastor of local and global outreach at Community Church of Greenwood, he often traveled on mission work to Third World countries. During one trip to Africa, he found himself wondering exactly what goal he hoped to achieve. “I couldn’t bring all these people out of poverty, I couldn’t feed them all, I couldn’t clothe them all, I couldn’t house them all,” he remembers thinking. “It broke my heart.” Upon his return, he pondered the issue further. And he realized that his missionary work was preparing him to help people much closer to home. “The level of (local) poverty was really starting on an upward tick in 2008, to levels that, in my lifetime, I had never seen before. Even though the poverty doesn’t look as bad from the eye as it does say in Africa or El Salvador or Ecuador or Guatemala or Haiti, to me it was a thousand times worse, because it should never happen right here. How could I reach out to help others? And that’s how I started The Refuge.” As chief executive officer of The Refuge, Hord receives a small salary, but he also volunteers time and skills to the organization beyond his paid duties. The Refuge offers food, clothing and personal items to Johnson County residents in need, but Hord is emphatic that the services only start there. When a new client comes to The Refuge, he meets with a trained counselor, someone who can serve as a personal coach to, in Hord’s words, “build community” with visitors. The Refuge partners with area churches, businesses, other not-for-profit organizations and individuals to help clients with such life-changing efforts as obtaining GEDs, receiving counseling for personal or health issues, learning resume-writing and job-interviewing skills, understanding how to create and stick to a budget, obtaining needed medications — even getting car repairs so the person has transportation to a job. The Refuge also reaches out to children through tutoring and scholarships, enabling them to break out of the cycle of poverty through education. “It used to be the numbers would tell us if we don’t catch a child by sixth, seventh or

eighth grade, we’ll never get them,” Hord says. “Now the numbers tell us if we don’t catch them by third or fourth grade, we’re not going to get them. So we really try to get in and help the kids with that cycle.” The Refuge maintains an online database of some 300 volunteers, and more offer help via phone calls or personal visits. In 2010, 15,000 clients were served — almost double the 2009 figure. Many of those were first-time clients, a trend that is continuing in 2011. SOUTH

“Early on, we were getting maybe 5, 10 percent new people coming in. Now we’re at 40 to 45 percent new people coming in on a daily basis,” Hord says. Refuge volunteers range in age from young teens to 90-somethings, and Hord always welcomes more. “You really want to be able to connect and make a difference in people’s lives. Make a difference today. And then tomorrow’s a new day. Make a difference tomorrow. You’d be surprised how many lives you’ll touch.” |

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Julie Pinson For Julie Pinson, volunteering with Habitat for Humanity of Johnson County brings a unique sense of homecoming. While the design consultant at Plumbers Supply Co. in Franklin loves her “day job,” she also has another passion. “My sons tease me that I’ve had this lifelong dream of being a social worker, and I sell plumbing,” she says with a laugh. “So basically, (volunteering for Habitat) fills a niche in my lifelong dreams.” She first was introduced to the cause about five years ago through a fundraising lunch held by the Builders Association of Greater Indianapolis. She began volunteering for events, and her commitment grew. Today, 86

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she serves on the board and is a member of Habitat’s Family Selection Committee. In the latter capacity, she visits the homes of families hoping to become “partners” with Habitat and therefore able to purchase a Habitat-built house financed by an affordable, no-interest, no-profit loan. (Those mortgage payments to Habitat are in turn used to build additional homes.) “Getting to know the potential partner families a little bit better just opens your eyes,” she says. “We tend to live in a little shell of the nucleus of our family, and it really does open your eyes when you talk to people, when you hear the struggles that they’re going through and why they’re going through them.” Families who become a Habitat partner must have an established need for a home, be able to make a monthly home payment and be willing to volunteer to help build the house through 300 hours of “sweat equity.” “We do a criminal check,” Pinson adds. “And we emphasize to the homeowners that they will be representing Habitat for Humanity basically for the rest of their lives. That’s a heck of a responsibility, when you think about it. … We’re really working very hard on getting the message out there that we are not giving anything away. People are working their fannies off for this.” To help new homeowners adjust, Habitat volunteers work with families before and after they move into a house. Prior to movein, the partner families take preparatory classes. After they settle in, a Habitat advocate remains in touch for about a year to address topics ranging from new homeowner anxiety to common home repairs. And it’s not just the partner families who benefit. The volunteers, Pinson says, receive something invaluable. “The sense of giving back — it’s very, very rewarding. … Meeting the people and meeting the children, to feel their struggles and to feel their excitement. It’s so cool. A little part of you becomes a part of them, too.”


Amy Ward Amy Ward first heard about Host Homes — a program offering temporary shelter and care to youths in crisis — through her employer, Center Grove High School. Created by the Youth Connections organization, Host Homes was seeking volunteer families willing to host a young person age 7 to 17 for anywhere from one to 14 days. Such emergency, short-term stays allow Youth Connections time to work with the young person’s family to resolve conflicts and problems and either reunite the family or find a more longterm solution to the youth’s situation. The idea struck a chord with Ward. She and her husband, Mike, are the parents of three children: Whitney, a college graduate living on her own; Ali, a senior at Purdue University in West Layette; and Brock, a senior at Center Grove High School. In addition to being involved parents, the Wards have long been committed to youth causes in general. However, now the Ward children are young adults, and space in the home is more plentiful. “We already have a guest bedroom, plus we’re refinishing the basement,” Amy says, “so we have lots of room. And we wanted to be able to give back.” They enrolled in the Host Homes program and went through the detailed application process, which includes background checks, interviews and a home visit by Youth Connections staff. This past summer, the family hosted its first guest, a teen girl, for a one-week stay. Per Host Home rules, the young guest should participate in all family activities, follow house rules and share chore duties. The Wards’ visitor accompanied Ali on shopping trips, visited Whitney’s house to plant flowers and make friendship bracelets, and joined in family discussions. “My husband and I were able to have several mentoring types of conversations. And even my kids would ask questions. Really, all of us opened

up, she opened up, (we) shared. It was eye-opening for my kids to see some of the things that other people have gone through.” In turn, Amy adds, the Wards were able to offer their guest a glimpse into a new environment, and the couple have stayed in touch with the teen since her visit, “showing that we care. It’s OK with whatever you’ve done or whatever’s happened in your life before, whatever’s happening in your life (now), we’re still there.” Amy is quick to stress they are not trying to intervene in a parental capacity, but rather as a caring, interested mentor, “another person that some of these kids in these situations may or may not have. They don’t have a coach or a Brownie leader. They don’t necessarily have people that they come in contact with outside the family. … It’s just so important for the youth today, with everything they’re facing, to have people who care about them outside the family. Just other people who are making them be a little bit accountable, who care.” SOUTH

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Beacons of hope Johnson County’s nonprofits serve area’s less fortunate

Homework for families Habitat for Humanity of Johnson County 98 S. Edwards, Franklin habitatjohnsoncounty.org (317) 736-4454

When Rachael Goodwin heard about Habitat for Humanity of Johnson County, she was working as a pharmacy technician and raising two children in a one-bedroom apartment. Today, the Edinburgh mother and her children, ages 9 and 12, live in one of the first houses built by the county’s Habitat chapter, which was founded in 2006. The chapter was created in part by Franklin College students, who already had an active student chapter. In 2003, the students traveled to Georgia to volunteer during spring break, where they had the opportunity to meet privately with Habitat founder Millard Fuller. “He was the most inspirational, charismatic speaker,” said board member Doug Grant. “When he got done, we really felt that if we worked together, we could eliminate substandard housing around the world.” On the bus ride home, the students began to question why Johnson County didn’t have its own Habitat chapter. Midway through Tennessee, Grant recalled, they pulled the bus over to talk and said, “When we get 88

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back, let’s ask the hard questions and figure this out.” They did just that, researching the level of need in Johnson County and coordinating meetings of key players from the county’s communities. The organization applied for affiliate status in 2005, completing the two-year process in only 14 months. Because of the chapter’s connection to Franklin students, the university provided an office building that had previously been scheduled for demolition. This summer, the chapter completed its eighth home, relying on donated lots and building materials and a small army of volunteer labor. Partner families, who must meet stringent requirements in terms of income and debt levels, are required to contribute “sweat equity” by helping build their own homes and other Habitat homes. They also assist at Habitat fundraisers and other events. As a result, the organization builds long-term relationships with its partner families—and is quick to help families who encounter roadblocks. A few months after Goodwin moved into her Habitat home in 2008, her daughter was diagnosed with cancer. As a single parent, Goodwin needed to take time off work to be with her daughter in the hospital, but that created a financial strain for the family. The solution: The Habitat community organized a spaghetti dinner that raised enough money in one night to pay Goodwin’s mortgage for a year. “Habitat didn’t just help us build a house and say, ‘Here’s your house payment and good luck,’” Goodwin said. “When my daughter got sick, they were the first bunch of people to say, ‘We put her in this home, let’s do what we can to help her keep it.’” For Goodwin, the most important aspect of homeownership is providing a better future for her children. She recently took a class on juvenile delinquency, and she was surprised to see that—prior to owning her Habitat home—her children had been at especially high risk. “My kids had all of the top five (risk factors), and they included substandard housing and poverty,” she said. “Habitat eliminated two of those problems. We no longer have to choose between eating and paying our rent.”

Bringing the sound of music to all Franklin Symphonic Council, Franklin P.O. Box 988, (317) 738-8002 www.symphony.helpjohnsoncounty.com Each summer, the Franklin Symphonic Council makes headlines with its Fanfare and Fireworks event, a Fourth of July musical celebration at the Johnson County Park amphitheater. It is the council’s largest annual event, but it’s just one of many events and programs the FSC offers. “Sometimes people are so familiar with Fanfare and Fireworks, but in fact we’re doing things throughout the year,” said Candace Moseley, vice president of the FSC board of directors. Founded in 1998, the organization seeks to promote the participation, enjoyment and appreciation of music and the arts. Among its annual events are the holiday lighting concert in Franklin and, each April, a “Tunes and Tastes” fundraiser. It also sponsors Fourth Friday concerts as part of the Discover Downtown Franklin series. The FSC also offers school-based programs. It funds an annual trip for about 700 Franklin fifth-graders to attend a kid-friendly performance of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, and it sends fourth-graders from Edinburgh to a performance of the Columbus Indiana Philharmonic, called an Adventure Concert. In conjunction with Tri Kappa, the FSC coordinates the Young Audiences program, which brings professional musicians into elementary schools for assemblies and other learning opportunities. “We see students for whom this might be the only opportunity to see a symphony orchestra,” Moseley said. “It’s a wonderful thing to see, to make it possible for youngsters to see and experience that kind of concert.” Perhaps most important, the council offers several programs to support young musicians. Its instrument refurbishment program restores old instruments—often donated by members of the community—and passes the instruments along to local band directors. In turn, the band directors distribute the instruments to students who couldn’t otherwise afford to join the band. Another popular FSC program is its scholarship competition for musicians in local middle and intermediate schools. The winning musicians perform at the FSC’s annual membership luncheon and receive a stipend for equipment, lessons and other music-related expenses. The FSC also responds to unexpected requests, such as making a one-time grant to an elementary school music teacher who wanted to purchase keyboards for her classroom. “The quality of our lives is enriched by cultural experience, and music is a huge part of that,” Moseley said. “It’s a whole world out there that makes life more beautiful and meaningful.” SOUTH

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Seeing a need and filling it The Lord’s Locker, Trafalgar 101 S. Pleasant St., (317) 878-7708

Each year, the Lord’s Locker serves more than 10,000 people who come to the Trafalgar nonprofit for free food, clothing, housewares and other necessities. But the organization has surprisingly simple roots. It started in the early 1990s, when a local woman, Naoma Hicks, asked the community to donate used clothing to the foster children she was raising. “They put the clothing on the back porch, but that got out of control in just a short while,” said Madeline Harris, the organization’s volunteer coordinator. To distribute the extra clothing, Hicks tried to set up a clothing “pantry” at the local welfare office, but it soon became too much to manage. Instead, she asked her church’s women’s group for help, and they founded the Lord’s Locker in 1996 in a two-car garage next to the post office. Soon after, Harris came on board as the volunteer coordinator, and the group received nonprofit status in 2001. Today, the organization has 4,700 square feet of space and is supported by about 20 local churches. Needy families can “shop” for the clothing and housewares they need, and the organization provides food based on what it has in stock. In the early years, a few people took advantage of the organization’s generosity, so recipients must complete an application to prove their need, and they must submit identification such as a driver’s license, proof of residence and Social Security card. The organization does no marketing, but needy families find it anyway, usually via referrals from churches and social services agencies. Recently, for example, a firefighter came to gather items for a family in Morgantown whose home had burned to the ground. But the organization doesn’t just wait for people to ask for help. On the second Saturday of each month, volunteers drive to downtown Indianapolis and distribute items to the homeless, setting up temporary shop right on the sidewalk. (After being kicked out of a homeless shelter parking lot and a city park, the group now uses the sidewalk in front of Roberts Park Methodist Church.) The Lord’s Locker relies exclusively on donations for the items it distributes to needy families and the funds it needs to cover operating costs. It doesn’t organize annual fundraisers, but it does depend on churches, scout troops and other groups to hold fundraisers on its behalf. About a hundred volunteers also contribute by sorting donations, staffing the shop and visiting the homeless. These days, Harris said, those donations matter more than ever. “There’s a lot of need out there, and there’s a lot of people having problems who have never been in need before,” Harris said. 90

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‘What’s past is prologue’ Franklin Heritage Inc. 51 N. Main St., Franklin www.franklinheritage.org (317) 736-6823

Franklin is known for its tree-lined boulevards, brick streets and historic architecture, and much of the credit for that sense of character goes to Franklin Heritage Inc. The historic preservation group was founded in 1983 by a small group of residents, and in the late 1990s it began restoring historic homes in downtown Franklin. Its specialty: buying architecturally significant homes that had been abandoned or neglected, sprucing them up with historical accuracy and selling the homes to buyers. “Abandoned properties can lead to unstable neighborhoods and communities,” said Rob Shilts, executive director. “The restoration of these houses acts as a catalyst to encourage neighborhoods to invest in their homes, thus resulting in an overall improvement in the neighborhood.” The organization’s next move, in 2004, was purchasing the Artcraft Theatre. Built in 1922, the theater started its life as a playhouse, with productions such as “The Importance of Being Earnest” staged by Franklin College students. It later showed films but continued to support the perSOUTH

forming arts—not including an infamous 1976 concert by John Mellencamp (then known as Johnny Cougar) that was canceled because of low sales. After an extensive restoration project, the Artcraft Theatre now offers classic, family-friendly entertainment at affordable prices. To staff the theater, the organization relies on two full-time employees, two part-time projectionists and more than 200 volunteers, who do everything from selling tickets to sweeping up trash. Last year, more than 33,000 people attended a movie or other event at the theater, a 30 percent increase from the previous year. That generates foot traffic for nearby businesses, helping to create a more vibrant downtown community. “If FHI had not purchased the theater and without community support, there would not be an Artcraft Theatre today,” Shilts said. “It is FHI’s largest restoration project to date.” Beyond its work on the theater, Franklin Heritage participates in revitalization initiatives throughout the community, such as sponsoring the annual Fall Festival and holiday lighting ceremony in conjunction with other community organizations. Franklin Heritage also offers educational programs for school groups and hands-on preservation seminars for homeowners, and it organizes both walking tours and home tours. It also gives awards each year for the best commercial and residential restoration projects. Homeowners who need an antique finial or vintage light fixture can head to Franklin Heritage’s architectural salvage warehouse, which offers an eco-friendly way to reuse historic building materials that might otherwise go to landfills. For homeowners who need additional guidance, the organization offers general contracting services for renovation projects in historic homes. |

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Harvest –of– FUn

As temperatures drop, fall under the spell of this season’s cornucopia of festivals By Ashley Petry

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Harvest and reward at The Apple Works

Photography by Alton Strupp

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Harvest –of– FUn

Highlander Festival at The Apple Works

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In the fall, some of our favorite activities are right in our own backyards: leaping into piles of leaves, sipping a cup of hot apple cider or

gathering around a crackling bonfire with friends. Here on the southside, we also have a wealth of autumn activities in our collective backyard, including one of the region’s best apple orchards and one of the world’s few pumpkineating dinosaurs. Perhaps the premier must-visit spot for fall fun for Johnson County residents and visitors alike is a trip to The Apple Works. Each year, The Apple Works officially kicks off its fall season with the music of bagpipes and the taste of shepherd’s pie. Its Highlander Festival features Scottish and Irish dancers, as well as Celtic music from Travelers Dream, Highland Reign and many other groups. During the Highlander Festival, enjoy live music and folk dances and sample traditional Scottish and Irish cuisine. That weekend and throughout October, you can also catch a wagon ride to the pumpkin patch, take a train or pony ride, and Don’t miss: More than 60 supervise the kiddos at a harvest-themed craft stavarieties of apples, including tion. “We strive for quality,” said owner Sarah Brown, favorites like gala, honey crisp, “and we try to have … a lot of things for kids to do.” Fuji and crimson crisp—many of In addition to the well-attended Highlander Festithem too delicate or temperamental val, The Apple Works jampacks its fall season celebrato be shipped elsewhere. tion with activities and highlights for kids of all ages. Season highlight: Highlander Founded by Rich and Sarah Brown in 1989, the orFestival: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sept. 24; chard also offers more than 60 varieties of apples and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sept. 25; Fall 15 types of pumpkins, squashes and gourds. Rides to Harvest Festival: Sept. 24 to Oct. 30 the pumpkin patch for a traditional you-pick experience begin in September, and as the weather cools, Where: 8157 S. Road 250W, treats such as The Apple Works Bakery’s own hot ciTrafalgar; (317) 878-9317 der and warm apple dumplings are always available. Cost: $3 If you’re going to schedule a trip to The Apple Online: www.apple-works.com Works this fall, consider making a full day of it. Let the kids ride the Apple Express and explore Old McDonald’s Farm and Straw Mountain. Adults can take in a serene view of The Apple Works pond from the comfort of an Adirondack chair or take a romantic stroll through the sunflower fields.

What to do

A unique history

The Browns began The Apple Works by planting trees on what is now the southern quarter of the orchard. Each tree was planted the old-fashioned way — by hand, and they still follow that practice. In 1991 the trees bore their first crop. The first sales began when the Browns put two refrigerators in the middle of the field, and their daughters, Alison and Maggie, would run from a picnic table by the road to fill orders from passing cars.

Photography by Matthew Condon

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Harvest –of– FUn

Play at Kelsay Farms

And don’t forget... The area is teeming with fall celebration opportunities, so try these other locales for a well-rounded experience.

Kelsay Farms

Waterman’s Farm Market

For a moo-velous twist on the typical harvest festival, head to Kelsay Farms, where you can combine a visit to the pumpkin patch with a tour of a working dairy farm. Founded in 1837, the sixth-generation farm gets about 18,000 visitors a year— about 7,000 of them during the harvest festivities.

The southside has plenty of harvest festivals, but only one has a pumpkineating Tyrannosaurus Rex named Tyranny. The voracious dinosaur resides at Waterman’s Farm Market’s Indianapolis location, where visitors are often awed by the sheer volume of Fall Harvest Festival activities. Founded in 1978, the 50-acre farm welcomes more than 25,000 visitors a year.

What to do: Explore the five-acre corn maze, take a hayride to the pumpkin patch, ride a train, climb the straw mountain and visit the kids play area. On weekends, look for live music and unique food vendors.

What to do: Take a hayride to the pumpkin patch, explore the straw bale maze and two cornfield mazes, ride a carnival ride or a pony, climb a straw mountain, visit a petting zoo, listen to live music and grab a snack from one of the food vendors. Take the toddlers to the Waterman’s Tricycle Track, or shop for fall decorating items and make-and-take scarecrows.

Don’t miss: Free tours of the dairy facilities. “What makes us unique is that we are a working dairy farm,” said co-owner Amy Kelsay. “(Visitors) can enjoy the fall activities but also tour the milking parlor and see how it’s done.” When: 6-10 p.m. Fridays; noon to 10 p.m. Saturdays; noon to 6 p.m. Sundays; Oct. 1-30 Where: 6848 N. Road 250E, Whiteland; (317) 535-4136 Cost: $8 Online: www.kelsayfarms.com, www.twomaidsamilking.blogspot.com

New this year: A petting zoo of exotic animals, such as a miniature buffalo. Waterman’s is also increasing the number of activities at its Greenwood location; this year, look for a pumpkin patch and train ride. Don’t miss: The Pumpkin Smash in early November. Bring your past-their-prime pumpkins and jack-o’-lanterns to the farm, where you can shoot them across the field and watch them smash. Donations are accepted, and the event benefits local nonprofit organizations. When: 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays; 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. weekends; Sept. 24 to Oct. 31 Where: 7010 E. Raymond St., Indianapolis; (317) 357-2989; 1100 N. New Indiana 37, Greenwood; (317) 888-4189 Cost: $5 on weekdays; $6 on weekends Online: www.watermansfarmmarket.com

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Q&A: The Sultan of Scare

Southside Haunted House Directory

What’s lurking behind the scenes at your favorite haunted house? Scott Waterman knows. The owner of Hanna Haunted Acres—which includes six haunted attractions—has been in the business for nearly two decades, and he’s picked up a few tricks along the way. Why did you get involved with haunted houses? I had the land and the opportunity, and I found out that I was good at it — at being a good builder and understanding what scares people.

having) the patience to scare the right person in the group. That takes experience. Also, making really large and impressive scenes with animatronics and cool stuff to look at.

So, what scares people? Catching them off guard. We get you to look at one side and scare you from the other side.

What is one thing every haunted house must have – a guy with a chain saw? We have plenty of chain saws. But every haunted house doesn’t have to have any one thing because they all have different theories and different ways of doing it.

Tell us about the six attractions at Hanna Haunted Acres. Hanna Haunted Hayrides is the original attraction, and we have a six-acre cornfield maze and four different haunted houses. We’re bringing in a completely new haunted house this year and changing the ones we have. Which attraction is the scariest? It all depends on what gets you. Some people are scared by clowns, and other people are scared by the devil. What are the biggest challenges of running a haunted house? Teaching everyone the timing on when to scare people (and

Photography provided by Amy Kelsay

Hanna Haunted Acres 7323 E. Hanna Ave., Indianapolis (317) 357-0881 www.hannahauntedacres.com Frite Lodge 7525 S. Acton Road, Indianapolis (317) 862-6834 www.fritelodge.com Fright Manor 2909 S. Meridian St., Indianapolis (317) 650-5630 www.frightmanor.com

Why do people enjoy being scared like this? It gets the blood pumping and gives you a shot of adrenaline.

Southside Massacre 6004 Camden St., Indianapolis (317) 627-7576 www.southsidemassacre.com

What’s something most people don’t realize about haunted houses? There’s a whole lot more that goes on behind the scenes than anyone can ever imagine, from working with metal or latex or wood to doing makeup or special effects to building driveways and parking lots. There are so many different aspects of it. There’s not just one job title.

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Carey Brosmer enjoys the view of her family’s pool and the soybean field and tree line in the foreground.

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room to grow Custom Greenwood home blends vision of owners, builders and designer with latest technological bells and whistles

By Alisa Advani | Photography by Dario Impini


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Just down Morgantown Road, a bit past Hickory Stick golf course, stands a grand brick home. On eight pastoral acres, it beckons guests to enter while promising comfort and luxury inside and out. Jerry and Carey Brosmer’s quest to find the ideal lot for a place that could comfortably accommodate their growing family began two years ago when they decided to leave their cozy two-story in Franklin. Center Grove schools were appealing, as was staying on the southside. “We knew we needed to move. We had tried to turn our old house into something it wasn’t with multiple improvement projects, but we couldn’t make an older home into a new one,” Carey explained. “We looked for land for what felt like forever because we wanted privacy, and we needed proximity to all of our friends in Franklin. And most of all, we wanted the right place for Ava and Ashton.” Ava, a curly-haired, blue-eyed charmer, is the Brosmers’ 6-yearold. Ashton is their hide-and-seek-loving 2-year-old who appears to consider every corner of his new dwelling the perfect place to play peekaboo. 100

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The Brosmers entrusted their vision to Ron Wampler, a 22-year veteran in the home construction business, and his son and business partner, Ryan. They had several unique requests for the Wamplers, who build approximately six to eight custom homes a year. First, the couple needed four bedrooms on one end of the first floor in case a nanny needed to stay with their children, and that requirement also meant that three baths also had to fit. “We took our experience and that of Nathan Weiss, who works at McGinnis Design Group, and figured out a way to make it happen,” said Ryan. The Wamplers, along with interior designer Dale Hughes, then contracted area artisans and designers to complete the construction. “The home is a true community collaboration,” said Hughes. He owns Dale Hughes Interior Design in Franklin. He and the Brosmers have formed a friendship throughout the building process, and all agree that his relationship with the Wamplers led to the most positive experience possible. “Dale is the best interior designer we’ve ever had,” said Ron. “He really took Carey by the hand and guided her through the process while executing every detail in the timeliest, most efficient way.”


Stamped and dyed concrete tiles surround the family pool. The Brosmers prefer to keep the deck “uncluttered� to make it an idea environment for entertaining guests

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“I really wanted to come up with variation in color so everything wasn’t too ‘matchy.’ People shouldn’t be afraid to mix their elements.” —Dale Hughes 102

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Carey recalled a frantic moment just before move-in day when Hughes phoned to remind her to wash the sheets so he could easily set up the bedrooms. “What sheets?” she asked. The two giggled like old college roomies and said almost in unison, “It was another trip to Macy’s.” The interior designer and the homeowners concur that the Wamplers’ professionalism and care are unrivaled. “They are hands down the most pleasant builders around. Every request was met with a smile and a will-do attitude,” Hughes said. The clearest benefactor of this upbeat energy was the home itself. Hughes chose a warm, earthen color palette of 35 shades along with eclectic touches throughout to create rooms that offer something for everyone. Bold, impressionistic street scenes hang in the foyer and dining room. Stylish custom floral arrangements designed by McNamara Florists bring life to the dining room. Hand-scraped Brazilian walnut floors give the children an indestructible surface for play. “I use the distressed five-inch planks in most of my homes. It is known as the Dale floor. The stunning integrity allows for variation in color with both light and dark woods, and the larger planks generate an illusion of space even in the smallest of rooms. That is a trick of the trade,” Hughes explained. Turning the corner, a kitchen worthy of any top chef reveals itself. Top-of-the-line stainless steel appliances glisten beside maple cabinets and a cream-colored island. Storage and counter space abound. The soft beige and gray solid granite ties the woods together, serving as the anchor of the room. The granite is repeated around the fireplace in the great room.


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The kitchen flows easily into the dining room. The Brosmer’s great room is the home’s focal point. Ava and Ashton watch Disney cartoons on the plush mocha sectional couch.

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“Nichols Cabinetry did a wonderful job coming up with the design for the kitchen. They managed to take the idea that Carey found online and tweak it to make it work for this home. I really wanted to come up with variation in color so everything wasn’t too ‘matchy.’ People shouldn’t be afraid to mix their elements. The cream and white enhances the look very well,” Hughes said. A custom cherry 48-inch table made by Cannondale serves as the eating space in the kitchen, and it also marks the beginning of the upstairs play area for the children. Ava and Ashton have their own television nook, complete with an overstuffed sofa, flat screen television and subdued lighting. Just beyond the children’s upstairs area, a sizable screened porch acts as an outdoor den. “It is an extension of the family’s living space and will be furnished accordingly with relaxing seating and plenty of ottomans to throw the legs up on,” Hughes said. “We had to work hard to get this casual space into the floor plan,” said Carey. “But my friend said not having it was one of her biggest building regrets, and I told my husband, ‘Let’s face it. The 2-year-old 106

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won’t eat his mac and cheese in the formal dining room no matter how hard we try.’” The great room is the heart of the home. Its focal point is an elaborately built, cream-colored shelving unit where books, photographs and pottery are on display. Carey and Hughes chose most of the furnishings from Miles Furniture in Martinsville. The plush chocolate sectional and cherry wood coffee table help the room feel homey while also balancing its large scale. Alongside the remote-controlled window treatments, fashionable light fixtures and soaring ceilings hang multiple photographs of the children, including portraits leading down the hall to Ava’s and Ashton’s bedrooms. “This is Pottery Barn at its finest,” Hughes said, entering Ashton’s bedroom. “We chose blues and khakis so he could grow into it. He loves his little corduroy platform bed. It is low enough for him to climb on, and he plays all over it.” A clever piece of artwork hangs above the bed. Baseballs, which are also echoed on the quilt, replace the stars on an American flag print. His navy nightstand is loaded


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“I think the bar is the centerpiece down here — I love it at night. The backlights are mellow and peaceful.” —Carey Brosmer

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with his favorite storybooks, and a stuffed lamb joins the mountains of shams and pillows. Ava has the quintessential little girl’s room. Whimsical purple walls frame the white Hampton-style bed, desk and dresser. Pottery Barn Teen supplied the fun brightly colored patchwork bedding. A favorite doll collection lines the dresser, and she has a walk-in closet, complete with polka dot hamper that matches the towels hanging in her bathroom. When the adults of the house aren’t chasing their little ones, they can retire to their serene master suite. Hughes chose to use a soothing blue and midnight color motif with cream accents. He commissioned artwork by Keith Hampton from Brownsburg. “My favorite aspect in this room aside from Keith’s art is the storage for the television. I took the bed down to Nichols Cabinets, and I had them build an extension inside the footboard. The TV electronically goes back down into the built-in space and is completely hidden when not in use,” Hughes said. “It is ingenious.” The Brosmers’ master bath is a brick-toned tile and marble paradise. A bubble tub is waiting for an afternoon soak, and the rain shower is outfitted with multiple jets and a hand-held sprayer. “It is literally like a car wash,” quipped Hughes. The closet, by Closet Connections in Greenwood, provides ample storage. “Seasonal clothes pull down for increased space. Look at the shoe space. It’s very user friendly and every woman’s dream,” Hughes said. Two portions of the finished, walkout basement compete for most valuable place: the bar and Jerry’s office. “This is a bar that is literally a kitchen that is literally a bar,” said Hughes. They equipped the


back-bar with a built-in refrigerator, stove, dishwasher and roll-out keg. A sleek big screen TV hangs in the center of the backsplash. It was designed specifically for entertaining, and Hughes chose a sophisticated, yet lively, design. “Little details are so important for tying it all together. Then I added some choice pieces of their Colts memorabilia for fun,” he said. “I think the bar is the centerpiece down here,” said Carey. “I love it at night. The backlights are mellow and peaceful.” Jerry’s ample office houses the remainder of his considerable sports memorabilia collection. Jerseys hang in opposition to the serious, dark wood shelves and imposing desk. Candid pictures of his son and daughter pop up next to signed footballs. His adjoining bath also opens to the outdoors to operate as the cabana and pool washroom. “I had the idea for the fish in here for the kids. Then I used black ceramic for the sink, toilet and soap dispenser. I think it is just a little bit rock and roll,” said Hughes. A well-appointed second media area and fifth bedroom, along with two additional full baths and an exercise room round out the lower level. The leather sectional in the media room encircles a 65inch 3-D television chosen with family movie night in mind. “Carey is not knickknacky, so we chose a few strong pieces of pottery from my personal inventory to accessorize down here,” said Hughes. Surround sound pipes through the entire home, and it is controlled by a complicated “mother ship” housed in the exercise area. A digital security system keeps intruders out while helping Carey look in on Ava and Ashton. “I can pull them up on any of the televi-

sions in the house and watch them play,” she said. The overall look on this level is decidedly more masculine. Hughes described it as “man cave meets family.” Carey laughed and added, “It’s more man cave meets the new Harry Potter personal movie theater.” The outdoor amenities are plentiful. Stamped, dyed concrete surrounds the swimming pool. The area is wired for sound and will soon have its own television. The deep tree line behind the soybean plants adds a dash of natural allure. There is also a deck and roofed patio. “We plan to keep the deck fairly uncluttered,” said Hughes. “Guests will need space to mingle, and we will be able to set up cocktail tables here to emphasize the wonderful view.” At the rear corner of the lot, Jerry had a jumbo garage built to store his guy stuff. He owns multiple pristine Hummers, HarleyDavidsons and sports cars. “My husband collects muscle cars. Every guy needs space for his toys,” Carey said. Other features include a run near the attached, temperaturecontrolled garage for the family dogs, Milo and Maggie, and a geo-thermal heating and cooling unit. “I have been so lucky to have Dale because he can see everything in his head. Jerry let me pick every detail, and it was a big responsibility,” Carey said. “We are very grounded people. He will run to Walmart all the time. He did this for me and the kids, and every decision was important.” “The best of the best were lucky enough to come together. We used as many southside people on this project as possible,” Hughes said. SOUTH

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Greater Greenwood Chamber of Commerce Golf Outing Dye’s Walk Country Club | Thursday, July 14th

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2. Franciscan St. Francis Health team 3. Second Place Winners 4. Bravo Italian Kitchen team 5. Wells Fargo Insurance team 6. Winchester Place team 7. The National Bank of Indianapolis team

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Carmel Symphony Orchestra Mallow Run Winery | Saturday, July 9

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1. The Carmel Syphony Orchestra prepares to take the stage. 2. Emma Richardson, 3, daughter of Bill and Laura. 3. The Buckley family of Greenwood shares wine. 4. Bill and Laura Richardson, co-owners of the winery and members of the Carmel Symphony Orchestra. 5. Jeff Goben with Heartland Community Bank and his wife, Miche. 6. Jeff and Christie Jansing of Greenwood open a bottle of wine 7. Bill and Kelli Luallen of Greenwood relax on a blanket. 112

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8. Jason Pribble of Greenwood and Amy Babinec of Columbus enjoy the music 9. Marcia Casey pours wine for Mike Perry, center, and David Harrell, left, at the Johnson County Farm Bureau table. 10. Karla Wire of Southport applauds the Carmel Symphony Orchestra.

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11. Chelsea Bird of Greenwood and Neil Savage of Fishers enjoy the music 12. Stan, left, and Anita Dorrell of Brownsburg, along with friends Kathy and Bernie Auberry of Trafalger. 4


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Photography by Jennifer Cecil

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1. Sydney Hager, 10, and her sister Madison, 8, both of Franklin, ride the “Hammer� during their first day at the fair. 2-3. 4-H members wait to be judged. 4. 12 year-old Matt Jordan of Indianapolis loves on Frost in the cattle barn 5. Kids Day at the fair 6. 15 year-olds Emily Martindale of Whiteland and Kaylon Guyer of Franklin carry fair queen Hannah Goeb of Whiteland to a water troth during the annual water and shaving cream fight 7. Franklin residents Kristina White, Dylan White, 6 and Rianna White, 8, enjoy ice cream in the shade 8. 4 year-old Trey Williams tries to cool off in the cool mist of a fan

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Johnson County Fair July 17-23, 2011


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Photography by Matt Quebe and Scott Roberson

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Franklin Elk’s Lodge 1818 Raised $8200 for cancer research | Friday, July 29th

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1. Tk 2. Pink Team 3. Michelle and Joe Hughes 4. Green Team 5. Blue Team

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Main Street

Madison Ave.

Smith Valley Road

US Hwy

HUBLER MAZDA

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weddings

Jessica and Nick Engler Married July 2 at St. Francis and Clare Catholic Church in Greenwood. Reception held at the Columbia Club, Indianapolis

Nick and Jessica met at Center Grove High School when they had a few classes together, but did not become friends until both joined an intramural soccer team while in college at Indiana University. The two became fast friends and romance struck at the beginning of Jessica’s sophomore year in the fall of 2006. Four years later on a Saturday morning in August, Nick paid a visit to Jessica’s parents to ask for their daughter’s hand. With their approval, Nick planned a romantic private picnic in a southside park. The following Sunday morning, Nick proposed during the picnic and Jessica, of course, accepted. Photography submitted by Jordyn Byington, associate photographer, Photos by Jennifer. www.photosbyjennifer.com

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SOUTH presents

Ladies Night

2011

at the Greenwood Park Mall

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events

Compiled by Amy NOrman

John Mellencamp, Nov. 19.

September and October The Buck Creek Players perform “Bus Stop,” a warm and affecting comedy that examines the many facets of love. Downhome characters interact in a street-corner restaurant during the course of a hilariously turbulent night. Extraordinary qualities are revealed in seemingly ordinary people. Dates: Sept. 23, 24, 25, 30 and Oct. 1 and 2. Tickets: $14 adults; $12 children, students and senior citizens (62 and older). Location: 11150 Southeastern Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 862-2270 or www. buckcreekplayers.com

Through Oct. 16

Don’t miss the 87th annual Hoosier Salon at the Indiana State Museum. Paintings are selected by a panel of judges. Hoosier Salon is the oldest exhibition in Indiana to maintain consecutive annual exhibitions. Location: Indiana State Museum, 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 232-1637 or www.indianamuseum.org

Sept. 1

Cynthia Lane performs a mix of groovebased R&B and jazz as part of the JCB Neighborfest. Time: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: 300 block of Washington Street in front of The Commons in Columbus.

Sept. 2-5

The 16th annual Rib America Festival heads to Military Park in downtown Indianapolis featuring great food and performances by The Doobie Brothers, KC & The Sunshine Band, Jonny Lang, Everclear, Blind Melon, The Romantics, Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band, Beatlemania, Healing Sixes, Jennie DeVoe, The Last Good Year, Corey Cox, Borrow Tomorrow and more. Entry is free

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events before 5 p.m. on Friday and 1 p.m. Saturday, Sunday and Monday. Tickets: $7, which includes the concerts. Information: (317) 249-2710 or www.ribamerica.com

Sept. 3

Don’t miss the Labor Day Parade along the downtown Indianapolis parade route. Information: (317) 632-9147 The Hospice Community Concert, featuring Grand Funk Railroad with original drummer Don Brewer and bassist Mel Schacher, will benefit Hospice of South Central Indiana. The opening act will be local favorite 40 Years of College. Cost: Free. Location: Mill Race Park, Fifth and Lindsey streets, Columbus. Information: (812) 314-8053 Ladies, lace up your running shoes for the Indianapolis Women’s Only Half Marathon and 7K. Time: 7:45 a.m. Location: Indianapolis City Market, 222 E. Market St., Indianapolis. Cost: $35 to $55. Information: (317) 884-4001 Ball State takes on IU in football at Lucas Oil Stadium. Time: 7 p.m. Cost: $20 to $50. Location: Lucas Oil Stadium, 500 S. Capitol Ave., Indianapolis. Information: www. ticketmaster.com or (317) 262-8600 Enjoy the rhymes during Legends of Hip Hop: Dirty South Edition featuring Bun B, 8Ball and MJG at the Egyptian Room at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $35. Information: www.livenation.com

Sept. 3-5

Celebrate Mallow Run’s sixth anniversary with a hog roast. Slow-roasted pork and sides, plus great live music. Time: Noon to 8 p.m. Saturday; noon to 6 p.m. Sunday and Monday. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: (317) 422-1536 or www.mallowrun.com

Sept. 9 & 10

Enjoy authentic Greek cuisine, live dancing and music at the 38th annual Indianapolis Greek Festival. Time: 4 to 11 p.m. Friday; noon to 11 p.m. Saturday. Location: Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church, 3500 W.

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Bob Knight, Sept. 14.

106th St., Carmel. Information: (317) 7333033 or www.indygreekfest.org

Sept. 9-11

Don’t miss the 26th annual Heartnut Heritage Festival at the Johnson County Park. Enjoy tractor pulls, pre-1840 encampment depicting the fur trapper era, and so much more. Information: www.jcpark.org

Sept. 10

Enjoy the twisted songs and stories of Henry Phillips when he returns to the Yes Comedy Showcase. He has performed on Comedy Central and “Jimmy Kimmel Live.” Location: Yes Cinema, 328 Jackson St., Columbus. Time: 8 p.m. Information: (812) 378-0377 or www.yescinema.org

Visit the Penrod Arts Fair, celebrating its 45th year. Penrod is one of the nation’s largest single day arts fairs. This year’s fair features more than 300 artists, six stages of entertainment, more than 50 arts-related nonprofit organizations and an extensive children’s area. Time: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tickets: $12 in advance; $17 day of the fair; children 10 and younger free. Location: On the grounds of the Indianapolis Museum of Art, 4000 Michigan Road, Indianapolis. Information: www.penrod.org Enjoy the Mallow Run tradition of Pizza & Wine Night. Bloodshot Moon will perform. Time: 5 to 8 p.m. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: (317) 422-1556 or www.mallowrun.com


events Sept. 10 & 11

Sept. 14

Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com

Take in all things Scottish at the Scottish Festival. Enjoy highland dancers, clan tents, athletics, sheepdogs, European cars, bagpipes, re-enactors, Scottish country dancing, food and more. Location: Bartholomew County 4-H Fairgrounds. Information: (812) 546-6060 or www.scottishfestival.org

The Greenwood Community Band closes out the Greenwood summer concert series. Time: 6 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: Greenwood outdoor amphitheater, 100 Surina Way. Information: www. greenwood.in.gov

Sept. 11

Sept. 12-17

Spend an evening with Bob Knight as he highlights his coaching career from start to present day. He will discuss life and career events. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $25 to $75. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 940-9697 or www.cloweshall.org Katy Perry and her California Dreams tour stop at Conseco Fieldhouse. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $37.50 to $47.50. Location: Conseco Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 917-2727 or www.consecofieldhouse.com

The 2011 Quest for the West art show and sale opens at the Eiteljorg Museum, 500 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 636-9378 or www.eiteljorg.org The Script bring its Science & Faith Tour to Indianapolis. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $35 to $45. Location: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com

George Benson, Yellowjackets, Spyro Gyra, Trombone Shorty and more perform during Indy Jazz Fest. Tickets: $30 general admission; $75 preferred seating, which includes a chair, snack and private cash bar; $99 admission to all indoor and outdoor shows. Information: www. indyjazzfest.net

The Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra presents Earth, Wind and Fire. Time: 7 p.m. Tickets: $49.50 to $69.50. Location: The Lawn at White River State Park, 801 W.

Wilco stops in Indianapolis. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $25 to $43. Location: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com

Sept. 15

Sept. 13

Lewis Black brings his comedy style to the Old National Centre. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $29.50 to $59.50. Location: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com

Sept. 16

Guerilla Union & House of Blues presents

TIGER FOREST How Close Is Too Close?

Find out when you explore the all-new Tiger Forest. Come within an inch and a half of some of the rarest tigers on Earth. Enter their world, and tell your tale!

presented by

indianapoliszoo.com

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events Black Star at the Egyptian Room. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $43.50. Location: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com

Sept. 16 & 17

The ISO’s seventh music director, Krzysztof Urbanski, makes his debut with the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, bringing his artistry and power to Shostakovich’s most popular symphony. Time: 8 p.m. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www. indianapolissymphony.com

Sept. 16-18

Don’t miss your chance to celebrate during the 16th annual Indy Irish Fest. Time: 4:30 to 11 p.m. Sept. 16; 11:30 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Sept. 17; 10:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sept. 18. Tickets: $8 in advance; $13 date of the event; children 13 and younger free. Location: Military Park in downtown Indianapolis. Information: (317) 713-7117 or www. indyirishfest.com The inaugural Goodguys WIX Filters Speedway Nationals will feature 3,000 rods, customs, classics and muscle cars, plus vendor exhibits, an autocross performance course, swap meet, track cruise and much more at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Goodguys is the world’s largest rod and custom association. Information: www.good-guys.com

Sept. 17

Enjoy tours of the charming and picturesque Duck Creek Valley during the Hope Bike Ride. Enjoy live music, a pancake breakfast and root beer floats. Proceeds benefit the Hope Food Bank. Cost: $25 until Sept. 6; $30 until Sept. 16; $40 after Sept. 16. Kids 12 and younger ride free with a paying adult. Time: 7:30 a.m. Location: Hauser High School, Indiana 9, Hope. Information: hoperide.org Susie Park, internationally renowned violinist and member of the Eroica Trio, joins the Columbus Indiana Philharmonic in an opening night celebration of the philharmonic’s 25th season. Time: 7:30 p.m. Cost: $10 to $39. Location: Erne Auditorium, Columbus North High School, 1400 25th St., Columbus. Information: (812) 376-2638, ext. 110 or www.thecip.org

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Paradise Iron Pour and BBQ Cook-off, Sept. 23.

Country crooner George Jones comes to Indianapolis. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $25 to $55. Location: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com

celebrating the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra. Time: 6 p.m. Tickets: $40 to $90. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www.indianapolissymphony.com

Enjoy Bayou Night, a great night of spicy Cajun cuisine and incredible Cajun/zydeco music. Mojo Gumbo will perform. Time: 5 to 8 p.m. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: (317) 422-1556 or www. mallowrun.com

Don’t miss DJ Lance Rock, Brobee, Foofa, Muno, Plex and Toodee when they bring their mix of music, animation, games and dancing to the stage in “Yo Gabba Gabba Live!” Time: 3 and 6 p.m. Tickets: $30.75 to $40.75. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 940-9697 or www.cloweshall.org

The Christel House Academy is hosting a fundraiser to raise money for the Christel House. New this year, the Motorcycle Club Challenge and Motorcycle Show will award trophies designed by Christel House Academy students. Registration: $35 per person or $50 per couple. All event proceeds are used solely for programs and services for the Christel House Academy. Location: 2717 S. East St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 464-2378

Sept. 18

The unbridled passion of Krzysztof Urbanski and the charisma of Jack Everly come together for the Opening Night Gala

Sept. 23

Buckaroo Bash is the annual fundraising event for the Eiteljorg Museum. This year will feature the first ever Wild West Casino Night, featuring a live auction, dinner, dancing and gambling. Time: 6 p.m. Location: Eiteljorg Museum, 500 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 275-1333 or www.eiteljorg.org Don’t miss the annual Paradise Iron Pour and BBQ Cook-off. Time: 5 to 10 p.m. Location: Mill Race Park, Columbus. Information: (812) 376-2539


Sept. 24

The 15th annual Mill Race Race and Mayor’s Walk features scenic 15K and 5K courses that are flat, fast and USATF certified. The courses wind through the heart of downtown Columbus. Time: 7:30 a.m. Information: www.millracerace.org From the strumming of guitars, the aroma of food cooking near chuck wagons and the clink of iron against iron, WestFest will immerse visitors in the West. This year’s theme is the exploration of Western realities vs. myths. Tickets: $9 adults; $5 youths; $1 off for folks who wear Western clothing. Location: Eiteljorg Museum, 500 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 275-1333 or www.eiteljorg.org

Sept. 23-25

Enjoy concerts, food, crafts, a parade and more at Hope Heritage Days. Information: (812) 546-5115

Sept. 24 through Jan. 20

It takes 25 corn plants per person per day to support the American way of life. Explore the relationship between people and corn, arguably the most productive domesticated plant and the greatest plant breeding achievement of all time, during Amazing Maize: The Science, History and Culture of Corn. Location: Indiana State Museum, 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 232-1637 or www. indianamuseum.org

Sept. 25

Legendary blues musician Johnny Rivers performs. Time: 6 p.m. Tickets: $32. Location: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www. livenation.com

Sept. 29

Lecrae with special guests Trip Lee & C-Lite take the Egyptian Room stage. Time: 7 p.m. Tickets: $22. Location: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com

Sept. 30

What happens when Henson puppeteers are unleashed? You get a new breed of intelligent nonsense that is Henson Alternative’s “Stuffed and Unstrung,” a

Mallow Run

WINERY

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events live, outrageous, comedy, variety show for adults only. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $35. Note: This is for mature audiences (ages 18 and older) only. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 940-9697 or www.cloweshall.org Comedian Chris Tucker brings his style of humor to Indianapolis. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $47.50 to $57.50. Location: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com Jon Stewart brings his sharp wit to the stage. Time: 7 and 10 p.m. Tickets: $49 to $59. Location: IU Auditorium, Bloomington. Information: www.iuauditorium.com

Sept. 30 & Oct. 1

The Indianapolis Wine Fest provides an opportunity to sample more than 270 wines from around the world. Time: 4 to 10 p.m. Sept. 30; 2 to 8 p.m. Oct. 1. Location: Military Park in downtown Indianapolis. Tickets: $27 in advance; $35 at the door. Information: www.indianapoliswinefest.com Don’t miss the Franklin Fall Festival. Enjoy food, fun and great music. Location: Downtown Franklin.

October Oct. 1

Start training now for the Greenways of Greenwood 5K Run/Walk. The unique road race is run through historic downtown Greenwood and along part of the city’s trails system. The event features a competitive 5K run and a non-competitive 5K run/walk. Proceeds go toward future expansion of the city’s trails system. Time: 9 a.m. Location: Greenwood Community Center, 100 Surina Way. Cost: $18. Information: (317) 881-4545 or www.greenwood.in.gov The American Family Insurance Circle City Classic Parade takes to the streets of downtown Indianapolis. Time: 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Information: (317) 237-5222 or www.circlecityclassic.com Kentucky State University takes on Albany State University in the Circle City Classic.

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Wine at the Line 5k, Oct. 1.

Time: 4 p.m. Tickets: $10 to $50. Location: Lucas Oil Stadium, 500 S. Capitol Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 262-8600 or www.circlecityclassic.com The Avett Brothers take the stage under the stars. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $32.50 to $39.50. Location: The Lawn at White River State Park, 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com Wine at the Line is an annual 5-mile run and 5K run/walk on the winery grounds and country roads of Bargersville. Registration fee is $25 and includes a

long-sleeve T-shirt, commemorative wine glass, timing chip, food and beverage, and post-race entertainment. This year’s event also includes a charitable component as Mallow Run partners with the Tony Stewart Foundation to raise funds for its Special Camps for Special Kids program. Time: 4 p.m. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: (317) 422-1556 or www.mallowrun.com

Oct. 1 to Nov. 13

Midwest National Abstract Art Exhibition VII is on display at the Garfield Park Arts Center. This exhibit is presented by the


events Southside Art League and features abstract art from local artists as well as artists from around the country. All of the artwork is for sale. The opening reception is from 6 to 8 p.m. Oct. 1 and will feature art, music and wine. Location: Garfield Park Arts Center, 2432 Conservatory Drive, Indianapolis. Information: (317) 327-7135 or www. southsideartleague.org

Oct. 2

Celebrate the experience of being an American girl and learn about American Girl doll history at central Indiana’s only American Girl Fashion Show. Time: 1 to 4:30 p.m. Location: Factory 12 Loft, 1235 Jackson St., Columbus. Information: (812) 342-0446

negatives from the sinking Endurance. Location: Indiana State Museum, 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 232-1637 or www.indianamuseum.org

win a new vehicle or $25,000. Don’t miss the duck drop from a helicopter at 2 p.m. Eighty percent of each duck adoption will be retained by the participating nonprofit youth-serving agencies. Time: 12:30 to 3 p.m. Location: Round Lake at Mill Race Park, Columbus. Information: (812) 3424405 or www.kducks.com

Oct. 15 & 16

Enjoy the last hoorah of the season at the Mallow Run Fall Festival. Great food, bluegrass music and lots of fun. Time: Noon to 6 p.m. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: (317) 422-1556 or www. mallowrun.com

Charles Webb takes the stage as the pianist in Beethoven’s Choral Fantasy with the Columbus Indiana Philharmonic. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $10 to $39. Location: Erne Auditorium, Columbus North High School, 1400 25th St., Columbus. Information: (812) 376-2638, ext. 110 or www.thecip.org

Oct. 15-23

Oct. 3

Max & Ruby: Bunny Party hits the stage for two shows. Time: 1 and 4 p.m. Location: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www. livenation.com

Oct. 7 & 8

Grammy-winning bassist, vocalist and composer Esperanza Spalding performs with Chamber Music Society. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $30 to $40. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org

The Arctic Monkeys rock the Egyptian Room. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $27.50. Location: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www. livenation.com

Enjoy international cuisine, music and bazaar vendors at Ethnic Expo in downtown Columbus near City Hall. Time: 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Information: (812) 3762520 or ethnicexpo.org In the world premiere of “Do You Hear the People Sing?” Jack Everly and a cast of Broadway singers perform the greatest hits from Alain Boubill and Claude-Michel Schonberg. Times: 11 a.m. and 8 p.m. Oct. 7; 8 p.m. Oct. 8. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www.indianapolissymphony.org

Oct. 7-9

The North Central Region playoffs for the Monumental Mayhem roller derby tournament comes to Indianapolis. Monumental Mayhem is part of the Women’s Flat Track Derby Association. Location: Indianapolis Convention Center. Information: www.monumentalmayhem.com

Oct. 8

Up to 24,000 rubber ducks will be competing for $10,000 in cash and prizes at the Kiwanis Incredible Duck Splash. One lucky duck will have 10 chances to

The Heartland Film Festival, a 10-day celebration of film, honors independent filmmakers and helps promote the movies they make. Information: www. trulymovingpictures.org

Dan Zanes, Oct. 16

Oct. 11

Widespread Panic rocks Indianapolis. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $37.50 to $50. Location: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www. livenation.com

Oct. 13

Mac Miller “The Blue Slide Park Tour” lands at the Egyptian Room. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $22. Location: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com

Oct. 15 – Feb. 19

Discover the epic story of Sir Ernest Shackleton’s 1914 Endurance expedition. Haunting expedition photographs, diary entries and vintage film footage resurrect one of the most awesome man-againstnature sagas of the 20th century. The exhibit presents more than 150 photographs of the expedition’s ordeal taken by ship photographer Frank Hurley, who dove into frigid waters to retrieve his glass plate

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Dan Zanes & Friends, the Grammy awardwinning caravan of characters behind music from Playhouse Disney, team up with the

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events ISO’s Metropolitan Youth Orchestra in a fun family program. Time: 3 p.m. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www. indianapolissymphony.org

Oct. 21-23

Oct. 26

David Crowder Band rocks the Egyptian Room. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $27. Location: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www. livenation.com

Experts and vendors from all over the country come to the Indiana State Museum with fossils, rocks, minerals, jewelry and more for GeoFest. Time: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 21 and 22; 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 23. Location: Indiana State Museum, 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 232-1637 or www.indianamuseum.org

Singer-songwriter Ben Folds joins Jack Everly and the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra. Folds will showcase music from his diverse career including songs from his latest album “Lonely Avenue.” Time: 7:30 p.m. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www. indianapolissymphony.org

Oct. 22

Oct. 27

The Eiteljorg Museum presents !Mercado! a Hispanic art market and cultural festival featuring artist and vendor sales, artist demonstrations of traditional tinwork, workshops on papel picado, santos and tortillas, traditional Mexican food and hands-on activities, performances and games. Location: Eiteljorg Museum, 500 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 636-9378 or www.eiteljorg.org Huey Lewis and the News bring their contagious brand of rock ‘n’ roll to the stage. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $45 to $60. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org

Master organist Dennis James returns to IU Auditorium for his annual Halloweenthemed silent organ performance. This year, he’ll perform the solo organ work that set his career path more than 40 years ago: “The Phantom of the Opera” from 1925. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $14 to $19. Location: IU Auditorium, Bloomington. Information: www.iuauditorium.com

Oct. 28

Everyone is invited to a Halloween party that features a costume contest, hayrides, pumpkin painting, a kids carnival and a cookout at the Greenwood Community Center, 100 Surina Way. Time: 6 p.m. Information: (317) 881-4545

Historic Artcraft Theatre Don’t miss these classic movies on the big screen at the Historic Artcraft Theatre in Franklin. All movies start at 2 and 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and 7:30 p.m. on Saturdays unless indicated. Location: 57 N. Main St., Franklin. Information: (317) 736-6823 or www.historicartcrafttheatre.org

Sept. 9 & 10: “Monty Python and the Holy Grail”

Oct. 28 & 29

Don’t miss Night of a Thousand Jacks, featuring costume contests, a treasure hunt, tricks and treats, zombie crawl, scavenger hunt, pumpkin pond, music and more. Time: 5 to 11 p.m. Location: Historic City Hall parking lot, 445 Fifth St., Columbus. Proceeds benefit Advocates for Children. Information: (812) 372-2808

Oct. 29

Experience Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) at the Eiteljorg. Add personal mementos and messages to the public ofrenda. Other activities include making tissue paper flowers, skull pendants, felt skull pins and other paper decorations. Location: Eiteljorg Museum, 500 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 636-9378 or www.eiteljorg.org The Dia de los Muertos Festival, a traditional Mexican holiday with ancient ties to the Aztecs, honors the lives of the deceased and celebrates the continuation of life. The Indiana State Museum gives visitors a chance to learn about the traditions and history behind Día de los Muertos and to participate in hands-on activities and games, crafts, demonstrations and more. Location: Indiana State Museum, 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 2321637 or www.indianamuseum.org

Franklin Farmers Market

Every Saturday from 8 to 11 a.m. through Oct. 1, find locally grown fruits and vegetables, and more. Location: Parking lot on the corner of West Jefferson and South Jackson streets.

Sept. 23-25: B-Movie Celebration Sept. 30 & Oct. 1: “Ma and Pa Kettle Go to Town” Oct. 7 & 8: “Hush, Hush Sweet Charlotte” Oct. 14 & 15: “Little Shop of Horrors” Oct. 21 & 22: “The Day the Earth Stood Still” Oct. 28 & 29: “Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein” Nov. 11 & 12: “Titanic” Nov. 25 & 26: Heidi

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Columbus Farmers Market

Every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. through Sept. 24, the market offers locally grown fruits and vegetables, art and crafts, and fresh flowers. Location: Sixth and Washington streets, downtown Columbus. Information: columbusfarmersmarket.org


events Nov. 15-17

Shrek, the lovable ogre, comes to the IU Auditorium stage in “Shrek the Musical.” Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $38 to $60. Information: www.iuauditorium.org

Nov. 19

The Columbus Indiana Philharmonic presents “St. John Passion,” which is considered by many to be one of the greatest choral works ever written. Time: 7:30 p.m. Location: Erne Auditorium, Columbus North High School, 1400 25th St., Columbus. Tickets: $10 to $39. Information: (812) 376-2638, ext. 110 or www.thecip.org John Mellencamp wraps up his No Better Than This Tour at Clowes Memorial Hall. The show features a documentary and roots, acoustic and full band sets. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 940-9697 or www.cloweshall.org

November Nov. 4

Get ready to be swept up in the fun as Red Grammer sings, tickles and clucks his way through some of the silliest family songs ever. Time: 6 p.m. Location: The Commons, Columbus. Cost: Free. Information: www. artsincolumbus.org

Nov. 4 & 5

The ISO toasts Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, the songwriting pair that forever changed the face of Broadway. Memorable on-screen moments from “Oklahoma!” “The King and I,” “South Pacific,” “Carousel” and “The Sound of Music” will play on the big screen while ISO performs selections from the timeless soundtracks. Times: 11 a.m. and 8 p.m. Nov. 4; 8 p.m. Nov. 5. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www.indianapolissymphony.org

Nov. 5 through Jan. 8

Enjoy a locomotive wonderland with a network of trestles, bridges, tunnels and chugging trains. Travel west on the

Great Western Adventure and witness detailed replicas of national treasures while making holiday memories. Location: Eiteljorg Museum, 500 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 636-9378 or www.eiteljorg.org

Handmade treasures have been created in Indiana for hundreds of years. Learn more about and shop for handmade crafts by local artisans at Handmade Indiana. Time: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Location: Indiana State Museum, 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 232-1637 or www.indianamuseum.org

Nov. 6

Disney’s “Phineas and Ferb Live!” brings its zany fun to Indianapolis. Time: 1, 4 and 7 p.m. Tickets: $15 to $75. Location: Conseco Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: www. consecofieldhouse.com

Nov. 22

Heralded as the “hottest artist on the classical music planet” by the New York Times, Lang Lang has played sold-out recitals and concerts around the world. He returns to the ISO with Beethoven’s First Piano Concerto. Time: 7:30 p.m. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: www.indianapolissymphony.org

Nov. 10

Skrillex brings dance and electronic beats to the Egyptian Room. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $25. Location: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com

Nov. 30 & Dec. 2

Straight No Chaser brings its a cappella sound to Indianapolis. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $37.50 to $50. Location: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com

Nov. 11

Naturally 7 brings its rich harmonies, an unbelievable ability to replicate instruments and an amazing stage presence to Indianapolis. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $25 to $35. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 940-6444 or www.cloweshall.org

Submit your event to our calendar by visiting www.indysouthmag.com and clicking “Contact Us.”

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our side of town

School spirit and a sweet ride It’s another round of A Look Back — our end-of-the-magazine feature where we take you back in time via a historic photo from the analogs of Johnson County. This issue, in honor of another fall semester full of football games and cheer sections we bring you a flashback to Greenwood High School. Here four high school students, who’s names were unavailable, show off homemade signs before a game. Apparently cuffed Bermuda shorts and penny loafers were all the rage in the mid-sixties.

Photo courtesy of Johnson County Museum of History

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Cemetery and Mausoleum Park at

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