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welcome

Welcome to the Lower Lynn Town Centre Open House! The purpose of this event is to gain your feedback on the Draft Lower Lynn Town Centre Implementation Plan and Draft Design Guidelines. The event agenda is very open. We encourage everyone to view the display boards, watch the presentation and then discuss ideas and questions with District staff and the Consultant team.

Agenda

6:30pm – Open House Session begins 7:00pm – Overview presentation 7:30pm – Resume discussions at the boards 9:30pm – Session Ends

Your feedback is important to help shape revisions to the Plan and Design Guidelines. Please complete and drop off the feedback form at the registration table before you leave this event.

Thank you for coming!

For more information identity.dnv.org 604.990.2421


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PLANNING CONTEXT

IMPLEMENTATION PLANNING CONTEXT Urb

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Lynn Valley NATURAL AREAS

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City of North Vancouver

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Lower Capilano

LL LL BURRARD INLET

Lower Lynn is one of four key designated centres in the Official Community Plan’s (OCP) Network of Centres. Following adoption of the OCP (2011) the implementation planning process for the Lower Lynn Town Centre has involved: undertaking a series of technical analyses, establishing planning principles and a detailed Concept Plan, and drafting policy directions to inform the Lower Lynn Town Centre Implementation Plan.

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Lower Lynn

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Public and stakeholder engagement process Ongoing public engagement on the Lower Lynn Town Centre (LLTC) has occurred at every major milestone in the implementation planning process. Engagement has involved community and stakeholder workshops, open houses, focus group meetings, drop-in sessions, and community display booths that have enabled the community to be active participants in shaping the vision, concept plan and implementation policies for this Town Centre.

LLTC IMPLEMENTATION ENGAGEMENT PROCESS • LLTC public info meeting • Focus group meeting – key issues, vision, preliminary design considerations

• Series of public and stakeholder meetings through the OCP review process and development of Network of Centres

2008 - 2010

2011

OCP Adoption

• Open House on LLTC Implementation Plan principles and framework • Community display booths

• Public and stakeholder Open Houses on Draft LLTC Implementation Plan and Design Guideline elements

2012

TECHNICAL ANALYSES Transportation Utilities Community Amenities

2013

Next Steps PLAN Implementation

Implementation Draft Council Directions IMPLEMENTATION Consideration of Implementation Detailed Design PLAN plan

Current stakeholder and public engagement sessions will be used to help shape revisions to the LLTC Implementation Plan policies and design guidelines which are anticipated to be presented to Council for approval in late May/early June 2013.

LLTC Implementation Planning Process

What is an implementation plan? The LLTC Implementation Plan provides a set of policies and design guidelines to guide growth and change in the LLTC to 2030. Recognizing that it may take 20 years or more for the area to be fully redeveloped, the plan allows for incremental change over time so that areas outside the core area can continue to function as they do now until such time as they are ready for change.

Relationship to the Official Community Plan The LLTC Plan is intended to be used in conjunction with the District wide Official Community Plan (OCP). Guided by and consistent with the OCP, this Implementation Plan provides more detailed policies and implementation actions to guide redevelopment of this Town Centre in accordance with the OCP.

For more information identity.dnv.org 604.990.2421


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PLANNING CONTEXT

COLLABORATION WITH VANCOUVER COASTAL HEALTH TOWARDS HEALTHY BUILT ENVIRONMENTS The District of North Vancouver and Vancouver Coastal Health have formalized a partnership through a Memorandum of Understanding that achieves mutual objectives for the community’s well-being.

Healthy Neighbourhoods

Healthy Housing

Healthy Transportation

What is a healthy neighbourhood?

What is healthy housing?

What is healthy transportation?

• Complete and compact Village Centre • Public spaces such as public plazas and community centres

• A mix of housing types and incomes in developments • A variety of housing tenures • Housing that is affordable, appropriate and safe

• Human-powered transportation such as walking and cycling • Active transportation provides public health and environmental benefits

What is the District doing to improve public health? • Building mixed use communities to increase walkability • Building community centres to increase physical activity among children and seniors • Building public plazas that will increase social cohesion and a sense of belonging • Designating new park space and trails to encourage outdoor activities

FACTS

• 60% of population health outcomes are attributed to the places we live (the physical/built environment) and social and economic determinants • Places to meet (street, park, shops) decrease stress, which is associated with longer lives!

• Housing that allows aging in place

What is the District doing to improve public health? • Supporting a variety of housing types and tenures in the Village Centre • A mix of housing means that people can live independently and remain part of the neighbourhood as many residents age.

FACTS

• In the next 20 years, 56% more people will be 65+ on the north shore. • Aging adults that are more socially connected have lower stress, they are physically and mentally healthier, and they have lower mortality rates • The highest test scores for ‘school readiness’ are achieved by young children living in neighborhoods with mixed income

What is the District doing to improve public health? • Safer bike routes for all ages and abilities • Safer routes to schools • More sidewalks, trails and multi-use paths • Traffic calming • Safer roads • Streetscape improvements • Transit-oriented development • Compact, mixed land uses • Transit infrastructure

FACTS

• Active commuting is associated with 11% reduction in cardiovascular risk • Each additional 10% increase in physical activity in Canada would equate to annual direct healthcare savings of up to $150 million • 29% of BC’s children and teenagers (2-19 yrs) are overweight or obese • Every $1 on a sidewalk can be correlated with $4 in medical cost savings

As a pilot project, the District of North Vancouver has been working closely with Vancouver Coastal Health on this and other designated centres, to promote community health through healthy built environments and active living. VCH has played an important role in the Lower Lynn Town Centre implementation planning process, building awareness and providing a strong voice for proactive measures to promote community health.

For more information identity.dnv.org 604.990.2421


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URBAN STRUCTURE

CONCEPT PLAN (SEE ACCOMPANYING BOARDS) Vision Lower Lynn will be a transit-oriented, mixed-use community comprised of a wide range of housing types for people of all stages of life, all incomes, with accessible places of work, convenient shopping and amenities. Over time, Lower Lynn will seek to become an outstanding model of urban living in harmony with the North Shore’s natural environment.

Planning Principles Mixed Use: • Integrate residential, retail, employment and park uses in a complete, transit-oriented community

Housing Choice: • Neighbourhood revitalization with multi-family housing redevelopment

• Provide a community focal point by establishing a “heart“ and • Encourage a mix of housing types and tenures for people of “high street” on Mountain Highway all ages, abilities and incomes • Preserve the industrial lands to maintain economic vitality Multi-modal Network: • Enhance pedestrian, bike and transit facilities • Support the frequent transit network • Strengthen community connectivity (greenways and “green spine”)

• Innovative housing forms close to transit, jobs and retail shops and services Public Realm and Community Amenities: • Establish a unique community identity and sense of place and robust public realm • Add new neighbourhood parks and open space, a community facility and civic plaza to enhance livability • Design for public safety and security Environmental Protection and Green Infrastructure: • Protect and enhance the Lynn Creel corridor • Promote green infrastructure and building practises, energy efficiency and other sustainability best practices

Do you generally support the draft planning principles and Concept Plan? What suggestions do you have for improvement?

For more information identity.dnv.org 604.990.2421


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2.1

LYNN TOWN CENTRE CONCEPT MAP

URBAN STRUCTURE

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CHARACTER SKETCHES

URBAN STRUCTURE

Potential location for Community Centre

1 Seylynn Park and Community Centre Views to the south of Hunter Street from Seylynn Park. A community centre at this location could have an entrance (and civic presence) on Mountain Highway with the main building on Hunter Street to take advantage of relationship to Seylynn Park. Other alternative locations for the community centre in the Town Centre “heart” are also being considered. A new pedestrian/cycle bridge across Lynn Creek is proposed at the west end of the Hunter Street greenway to link Seylynn and Bridgman Parks.

2 Lower Lynn Town Centre - “The Heart” Views looking north-west across the central plaza towards Mountain Highway and Seylynn Park. The central plaza is wrapped by at grade retail with café seating, displays and weather protection which together with public art, pavement treatment, landscaping and water features create an inviting and animated public realm space. Above grade residential with articulated facades, balconies and green roofs, takes advantage of views to Seylynn Park and the local mountains as well as easy walking access to community amenities, services and transit. Out of view and to the east is a pedestrian “mews” connecting to an expanded Marie Place Park.

3 Crown Street Views along Crown Street looking east towards Orwell Street. Crown Street is proposed to become an important link in the Spirit Trail route connecting pedestrians and cyclists via a new bridge across Lynn Creek and into the City of North Vancouver. Ground level entrances, landscaped front yards, street trees (preserving existing trees where possible) with a variable mix of low rise apartment and ground oriented enrich the character of this medium density residential neighbourhood. Residential parking is located underground.

4 Oxford Street Transit Connection This sketch shows a new pedestrian/cycle greenway along the north side of Oxford Street connecting to Phibbs Exchange. Low profile landscaping, rain gardens, smooth rock infill areas, street furniture and lighting provide a safe and enjoyable route for pedestrians and cyclists to the transit hub. Low rise apartments and ground oriented housing, street trees and underground parking add to the residential experience and provide a buffer from heavy activities on Main Street located just south of Oxford Street.


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URBAN STRUCTURE

LAND USE AND DENSITY Key objectives Land use designations are used to identify the future land uses applicable to an area. Land uses in the Lower Lynn Town Centre encourage building typologies and densities to establish a vibrant higher density, mixed used town centre, close to transit, that protects employment lands and integrates parks, open space and community amenities.

Lands potentially impacted by future road improvements

Area for further planning and review

Key policies • Land uses and density of development is governed by OCP land use designations • Urban design, buffering and edge treatments provide transitions to lower density land uses • Concentrating local retail, service uses and civic amenities in the core area helps create community vibrancy • Typical development form in the core area is high density mixed use buildings with commercial space at ground level and residential above • Building massing to define the plaza space and provide street wall along Mountain Highway • Redevelopment to medium and low density multi-family rejuvenates the residential neighbourhood and diversifies housing stock • Regionally oriented retail uses within Main Street commercial corridor and local serving retail is directed to the community heart Lower Lynn Town Centre Land Use Map (from OCP): Official community plan land use map Map 8. Lower Lynn Land Use Map forms foundation for the Lower Lynn Town Centre Implementation Plan policies.

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• Industrial lands are preserved and uses intensified to preserve and generate employment • Parks and open space system improvements enhance livability and community identity

Do you generally support the draft land use policies? What suggestions do you have for improvement?

For more information identity.dnv.org 604.990.2421


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URBAN STRUCTURE

URBAN DESIGN AND COMMUNITY IDENTITY Key objectives Building on its existing setting, contextual patterns, climate and history and looking forward to what this area could become; redevelopment of the Lower Lynn Town Centre will create a unique community character and identity for this area that is both distinct from the other town and village centres and which will help to foster community connection and sense of place or belonging.

Key policies • Encourage and promote new development that: –– follows sound urban design principles; and –– contributes towards the creation of a unique community character and identity. • Promote a high quality attractive built environment. • Encourage new development and appropriate landscaping that complements and reinforces the character and roles of the different streets, neighbourhoods and open spaces in the community. • Encourage sound urban design and analysis of tower footprints, shadow analysis and spacing to protect view corridors, provide for sun penetration and to minimize potential visual or other impacts to neighbouring uses. • Employ sensitive urban design and built form heights to transition sensitively outwards from the Town Centre core. • Encourage stepping down of building elevations from the Seylynn Village as guided by Figures. • Consider minimum site assemblies (4-5 lots) to achieve the vision and land uses for the Lower Lynn Town Centre. All building locations and heights are approximate.

The Lower Lynn Town Centre Design Guidelines provide detailed direction for the streetscape and urban design.

Proposed elevation looking east through Seylynn Village and the Town Centre"heart".

Do you generally support the draft community identity and urban design policies? What suggestions do you have for improvement?

For more information identity.dnv.org 604.990.2421


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URBAN STRUCTURE

HOUSING

Key objectives To establish a mix of housing types and affordability to meet the expected housing needs of residents for the next 20 years, and contribute towards achieving overall housing objectives for the District as a whole. Current and future residents of this are anticipated to include young working adults, first time home buyers, young families, empty nesters and seniors looking to downsize.

Key policies • Through redevelopment, promote a diversity of multi-family housing choices including high rise, mid rise and low rise apartments, as well as ground oriented housing (e.g. townhouses and row-houses). • Encourage new development that is respectful of adjacent built forms and presents an appropriate scale and form along edges with lower density. • Consider opportunities for new and innovative housing forms including, but not limited to, restricted resale/ownership, fee simple row-housing, and co-housing. • Encourage integration of a range of tenure options including home ownership and rental (purpose built rental, strata rental). • Encourage new residential development to provide an integrated mix of unit sizes (bachelor, 1-bedroom, 2-bedroom and 3-bedroom units) to accommodate different household needs and sizes. • Promote application of established adaptable design measures to a portion of all new residential units to accommodate the needs of people with disabilities and/or to serve the needs of elderly residents. • Encourage inclusion of useable outdoor space with all new multi-family residential development. • Encourage the delivery of a range of affordable housing options to accommodate moderate to lower household incomes. • Consider allowing a portion of new market apartments to be built as smaller units (approximately 400ft2) as an affordable market option. • Work with developers, senior governments, non-profit society partners and the community to provide non-market housing (such as supportive, transitional and low income housing) for residents with special needs. • Where appropriate, and in partnership with other agencies, consider leveraging a portion of District owned lands in the Town Centre to contribute towards non-market housing.

Do you generally support the draft housing policies? What suggestions do you have for improvement?

For more information identity.dnv.org 604.990.2421


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TRANSPORTATION

ROAD NETWORK

Key policies Through redevelopment, enhance the street network through the following measures: • Enhance the street network. • Establish a new East Keith Road extension. • Downgrade Fern Street into a local, no-through street. • Reconfigure Mountain Highway to facilitate multi-modal movements. • Replace the Keith Road Bridge over Lynn Creek. • Add new commercial services lanes to facilitate circulation and commercial access. • Install signals at key intersections and enhance signal timing. • Consider extending Orwell Street all the way to Oxford Street. • Consider opportunities for right-of-way improvements to accommodate anticipated pedestrian, bike and vehicular movements.

Key objectives The Lower Lynn Town Centre is fortunate to have a pre-existing fine-grained street grid structure. Road network policies in the implementation plan aim to reinforce and enhance this existing street grid through redevelopment, as well as improve the efficiency of traffic movements, circulation and connectivity.

• Consider opportunities to close some lanes entering from the west side of Mountain Highway. • Encourage access to off-street parking and loading areas from commercial service lanes and not from Mountain Highway. • Encourage alternative forms of transportation and transportation demand management measures. Refer to the Lower Lynn Town Centre Streetscape Design Guidelines for recommended street sections and streetscape design.

Do you generally support the draft road network policies? What suggestions do you have for improvement?

For more information identity.dnv.org 604.990.2421


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TRANSPORTATION

PARKING STRATEGY

Key policies • Design street networks so traffic can easily circulate around the block. • Facilitate the establishment of on-street parking system. • Introduce initiatives such as car-sharing and transit pass programs. • Consider opportunities for reduced multi-family residential parking requirements relative to unit type and context: –– 1.5 spaces per unit for townhouses –– 1.1 spaces per unit for apartments –– 0.75 spaces per unit for rental apartments –– 0.1 spaces per unit for visitor parking

• Consider further parking reductions for non-market rental housing apartments. • Consider opportunities for shared parking for complimentary, adjacent uses in commercial areas.

Key objectives

• Consider time-restriction parking on Mountain Highway and other streets, as needed.

Consider on-street and off-street parking as an integrated system and ensure adequate on-street parking adjacent to employment lands and to support retail vitality.

• Encourage the unbundling of residential parking from strata units, so parking can be sold separately, where appropriate. • Encourage sufficient, secure bicycle parking and storage. • Encourage new developments to allow for the future installation of electric vehicle charging infrastructure.

Do you generally support the draft parking strategy policies? What suggestions do you have for improvement?

For more information identity.dnv.org 604.990.2421


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TRANSPORTATION

TRANSIT STRATEGY

Key policies • Integrate transit priority lanes on Mountain Highway and transit left turn onto Oxford Street from Mountain Highway. • Design for transit stops along Mountain Highway, Main Street, Oxford Street and East Keith Road. • Work with the regional transportation authority to accommodate future transit facility improvements and redesign of Phibbs Exchange including park-and-ride facilities and improved bus access routing. • Support a redesign of Phibbs Exchange that addresses pedestrian and public safety, reflects the quality design features and character of the Town Centre, and works to integrate this transit facility more fully with the Lower Lynn Town Centre community.

Key objectives Lower Lynn is a designated Frequent Transit Development Area. Residents of Lower Lynn will enjoy some of the best transit service in the region with 30-minute or less travel time to most of the region’s jobs. A key objective is to support frequent transit bus service on Mountain Highway, Main Street and Oxford Street.

• Ensure that the redesign of Phibbs Exchange addresses pedestrian and public safety, reflects the quality design features and character of the town centre, and works to integrate this transit facility more fully with the Lower Lynn Town Centre community. • Enhance the pedestrian and cycling network to and from Phibbs Exchange. • Encourage the regional transit authority to continue to provide services for bikes on transit and bike storage facilities at transit hubs. • Encourage transit ridership through various transportation demand management measures including but not limited to: reduced parking requirements for new development, enhancing the cycling and pedestrian network and bike end of trip facilities.

Do you generally support the draft transit strategy policies? What suggestions do you have for improvement?

For more information identity.dnv.org 604.990.2421


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TRANSPORTATION

CYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN NETWORKS Key policies • Promote active forms of transportation and community health through an integrated pedestrian and cycle network. • Improve pedestrian comfort with wider sidewalks, landscaped boulevards and street furniture. • Upgraded pedestrian linkages and trails along Lynn Creek, to Lynnmour Elementary School, and to Phibbs transit exchange. • Establish Crown, Orwell and Hunter Streets as greenways that prioritize walking and cycling. • Establish Crown Street as a key link in the Spirit Trail network and work with the City of North Vancouver, senior governments and the Squamish Nation to establish bike/ pedestrian crossings over Lynn Creek and Highway 1. • Improve cycling safety with consideration of: permeable medians, raised crosswalks, corner bulges, pavement markings and signage, crossing islands, and intersection features such as advanced stop lines, bike boxes or cyclistactivated signals. • Establish a “green spine” or publically-accessible pedestrian trail that connects residential neighbourhoods. • Establish a series of marked pedestrian crossings along Mountain Highway. • Where road widths allow, buffer the bike /pedestrian route from Main Street traffic with landscaping. • Establish an urban bike/pedestrian greenway to transit on the north side of Oxford Street. • Encourage new developments to provide adequate and secure bicycle parking and storage.

Key objectives The revitalized Town Centre builds on the existing network to provide opportunities for cycling, walking and active living. Key priorities are to improve pedestrian and cyclist safety and connections to key destinations including Lynn Creek trails system, Lynnmour neighbourhood, Phibbs Exchange and the Ironworkers Memorial Second Narrows Crossing.

• Complete the extension of the Sea-to-Sky trail to Harbourview Park. • Develop way finding measures and signage to direct pedestrians and cyclists to the community heart and other key destinations.

Do you generally support the draft cycle and pedestrian network policies? What suggestions do you have for improvement?

For more information identity.dnv.org 604.990.2421


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4.1 PUBLIC REALM & AMENITIES

PARKS AND OPEN SPACES Key objectives The Lower Lynn area enjoys access to a wide spectrum of parks and trails. Key objectives for redevelopment of the Town Centre include expanding and upgrading the parks and open space network to adapt to changing community needs and population increase, building linkages between parks, and protecting natural parkland areas along Lynn Creek.

Key policies • Undertake an integrated review of park and open space system addressing: –– Possible reconfiguration of the grass sports field –– Improvements to staging and parking areas –– Retention of the skate bowl –– Opportunities for community garden space –– Function as natural habitat including rain water infiltration –– Options for pedestrian crossing to link Seylynn and Bridgman Parks • Expand and upgrade Marie Place Park • Acquire new neighbourhood park space. • Enhance trail connections to Inter-River and to Harbourview Park. • Provide a central plaza in the Town Centre heart designed to accommodate community events and activities; casual seating and interaction; outdoor café/ restaurant seating; public art, and an interconnecting mews to Marie Place Park. • Consider smaller plaza spaces at key intersections along Mountain Highway.

Do you generally support the draft parks and open space policies? What suggestions do you have for improvement?

For more information identity.dnv.org 604.990.2421


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PUBLIC REALM & AMENITIES

COMMUNITY AMENITIES AND PUBLIC ART Key objectives Parks and open space, community facilities and public art are examples of community amenities that are important ingredients for community health, social cohesion and liveability in new urban centres. As a condition of rezoning, and to address increased demand on existing municipal facilities and services from new development, developers may be asked to provide a community amenity contribution (CAC) in the form of a built amenity or cash-in-lieu contribution towards community amenities. Proposed community amenities identified for in the Lower Lynn Town Centre include: new and improved bike and pedestrian connections and greenways

small urban plazas

Seylynn and Bridgman Park improvements

new central urban plaza in the Town Centre “heart“

new adult day centre or senior facility

public art new neighbourhood park south of Crown Street

modest scale community/recreational facility, potentially fronting Seylynn Park

new mid-block pedestrian expansion and enhancement “green spine“ of Marie Place Park new childcare facility

*Sizes of these facilities will be determined based on the results of a needs assessment.

Community amenity contributions may also be used towards operational seed funding for and furnishing of the community recreation centre, provision of services (programs for seniors, families, youth, etc.), enhancements to local parks and plazas, affordable housing and other amenities as recommended by the community and determined by Council.

Key policies • Pending the results of a needs assessment, plan for a new • Encourage the integration of public art (both aesthetic and/ community facility as a hub for a variety of recreational and or functional art) as a means to help shape local community community services where people can gather, meet, socialize, identity and character and to enliven public realm spaces. and access services, supports and information about their • Consider opportunities to include public art in a proposed community. second bridge over Lynn Creek at the west end of Hunter • Facilitate the programming of year round activities to Street. animate the Town Centre central plaza and to promote social • Encourage opportunities for urban agriculture in the Town interaction and cohesion. Centre (community gardens, farmers markets, active living

roofs etc.). • Identify opportunities to co-locate services and infrastructure to realize both capital and operating efficiencies. • Promote relationships and partnership opportunities with • Add new and enhance existing parks and open space, and the business community, School District #44, Squamish create new pedestrian connections in the Town Centre to First Nation, City of North Vancouver, arts and culture better serve the needs of current and future populations. organizations, social service and other agencies as appropriate.

Do you generally support the draft community amenities and public art policies? What suggestions do you have for improvement?

For more information identity.dnv.org 604.990.2421


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5.1 ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION & GHG REDUCTION

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

PROPOSED DISTRICT ENERGY NETWORK

Key objectives Redevelopment of the Town Centre is expected to provide net benefits to environmental health, energy efficiencies and greenhouse gas emissions reductions. A district energy system, coordinated by FortisBC, is proposed to collect and transfer industrial waste energy to supply heat to neighbouring communities including Maplewood Village Centre, Capilano University and the Lower Lynn Town Centre.

Key policies • Encourage and facilitate the protection and enhancement of Lynn Creek as a major salmon bearing watercourse, and maintain or enhance water quality and riparian forest integrity. • Encourage and facilitate the protection of the ecological services (rainwater infiltration, carbon sequestration, air quality enhancement, temperature moderation etc.) provided by the natural environment.

• Continue to work with stakeholders and potential partners towards the delivery of a district energy heating system. • Consider steps to require all new development to be “district energy” ready for hook-up to hydronic systems. • Promote the implementation of green building design measures and greenhouse gas reductions as part of the development process through the “Energy and Water Conservation and Reduction of Green House Gas Emissions” Development Permit Area guidelines and the District’s Green Building Strategy. • Promote the installation of electric vehicle charging infrastructure in multi-family, civic and commercial uses and buildings. • Promote energy efficient and more sustainable travel mode options. • Promote opportunities for urban agriculture and local food production.

• Connect the natural and urban environments by integrating natural elements into the urban landscape. • Require flood risk analyses be undertaken prior to redevelopment to assess potential constraints for parking and built form.

Do you generally support the draft environmental protection policies? What suggestions do you have for improvement?

For more information identity.dnv.org 604.990.2421


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Meters

• Request that land owners/developers submit geotechnical and groundwater investigations with development applications in the Lower Lynn Town Centre to assess onsite soil and water table conditions. • Facilitate the protection and maintenance of groundwater levels, to manage the amount of perimeter drainage and groundwater that is pumped into the storm drainage system. • Encourage water and energy conservation in accordance with the District’s Green Building strategy. • Direct appropriate upgrades to sanitary and water systems in response to anticipated population growth. • Encourage the installation of water meters for all new development. • Plan for the relocation of existing overhead utilities underground through redevelopment of the Town Centre. • Facilitate the provision of composting, recycling and organic waste collection facilities in new multi-family housing developments and at strategic locations in the Town Centre. • Encourage the integration of structural design measures to support fibre-optic infrastructure.

Do you generally support the draft infrastructure and utilities policies? What suggestions do you have for improvement?

For more information identity.dnv.org 604.990.2421


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WHAT'S IN A NAME?

The District is seeking your ideas on suitable street and place names for this centre. What do you think? What could we call the Centre itself?

How could we rename Mountain Highway in the Lower Lynn Town Centre?

What could we call the new community centre?

What about names for the new central plaza and the new neighbourhood park?

Give u s sugge your stions !


Lower Lynn Town Centre