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Daily Egyptian

Back To Campus

August 2010 About Us

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The Daily Egyptian is published by the students of Southern Illinois University Carbondale 50 weeks per year, with an average daily circulation of 20,000. Fall and spring semester editions run Monday through Friday. Summer editions run Tuesday through Thursday. All intersession editions will run on Wednesdays. Spring break and Thanksgiving editions are distributed on Mondays of the pertaining weeks. Free copies are distributed in the Carbondale, Murphysboro and Carterville communities. The Daily Egyptian online publication can be found at www. dailyegyptian.com.

Mission Statement The Daily Egyptian, the student-run newspaper of Southern Illinois University Carbondale, is committed to being a trusted source of news, information, commentary and public discourse, while helping readers understand the issues affecting their lives.

Reaching Us

Phone: (618) 536-3311 Fax: (618) 453-3248 E-mail: editor@dailyegyptian.com


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August 2010

Neckers cleanup nears completion RYAN VOYLES Daily Egyptian Though most of the damage caused by the chemical fire in June in the Neckers Building has been fixed, questions about research equipment have started to flare up. Jay Means, dean of the College of Science, said although repairs on the chemical fire caused less than two months ago have gone “surprising well” during the past month, not everything is all right in the college. “Right now we have a serious problem, and that is with the equipment that was damaged,” he said. “That we do not have a solution to right now.” The fire broke out June 2, when a student poured chemicals into a sink, which caused a chemical reaction. No one was hurt in the fire, and the student was not held liable for damages. SIUC spokesman Rod Sievers had said earlier most of the damage was covered by insurance, although some of the equipment was not due to its age. He said most of the C-Wing, where the fire started, classrooms and labs should be ready for use at the beginning of the fall semester, but room 102, where the fire started, would still be closed for awhile. “They are going to have gut the

entire lab; the walls, the doorframes, everything has to been taken out and replaced,” Sievers said. “It may be December before that lab is back in operation.” Means said his college has begun to test all the equipment in the wing where the fire happened to see if any of the research equipment has been damaged by smoke or chemicals. He said the cost to replace it could be more than $500,000, but he was not sure where the money would come from to replace the damaged equipment. “That is the big outstanding question for us at this point,” he said. “We’re kinda caught in the middle here, because the equipment manufacturers of these expensive pieces of equipment will charge upwards of 20 to 30 percent of the original cost every year for insurance. There’s no real way to insure them.” Administrators initially estimated the damage to be more than $1 million, for cleanup and equipment replacement, but Sievers said it could be a little bit more since outside contractors were needed to remove asbestos in the wing. He deferred questions about costs to Phil Gatton, director of the Physical Plant. Gatton is out of town until later this week, according to his secretary,

and could not be reached for comment. Means said since it is the summer, no classes were interrupted by the cleanup, and everything is coming closer to normalcy in regard to classrooms. However, the college is still waiting for more information about how much money will be needed to replace equipment. “Right now, we’re getting close to what we expect in regards to usable spaces,” he said. “But we’re still waiting for equipment people to come in and inspect and figure out if we can still use our equipment. We’re just beginning with that.”

Ryan Voyles can be reached at rvoyles@dailyegyptian.com or 536-3311 ext. 254.

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JESS VERMEULEN | DAILY EGYPTIAN

Damages, which have left Neckers building Room 102 vacant after a fire broke out June 2 because of a chemical combustion, are expected to cost the university more than $1 million. Although most of the C-wing has reopened, Jay Means, dean of the College of Science said the room may not be reopened until December.


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Enrollment sees changes under Nicklow

RYAN VOYLES Daily Egyptian

John Nicklow said he is just like the professor who allows his students to come up with their own research projects — only the project for his employees is to turn around SIUC’s sliding enrollment numbers. Nicklow, who was named the assistant provost for enrollment management June 15, said he has begun to settle into his role as head of enrollment and see what needs to be done to increase enrollment and retention. “I saw some opportunities to make some changes, but to build off of current strengths and to do things, not in all cases, but to do things differently,” Nicklow said. “We can improve as a unit and as an institution.”  SIUC enrollment has dropped every year since 2005, including a drop of 1,849 students from fall 2007 to spring 2010. But Angie Royal, director of New Student Programs, said Nicklow has provided a change of direction. “He’s very goal-oriented and outcome-driven and he’s really challenged us to establish our own goals,” Royal said. “He wants us to set-up our own goals and he will hold us accountable for those. Those can only help us grow as a unit and ultimately increase our enrollment and retention.” Nicklow said it’s important to allow the different units of enrollment management to let his know what expectations can be for future enrollment. “If you give them the research topic, they’ll do it — but they won’t be passionate about it,” he said. Nicklow, who has served as associate dean of the college of engineering the last three years, said it was especially important for his department to develop communication with the colleges on campus. “This is truly a collaborative effort, if any one of

us tried to do it ourselves; we wouldn’t be as effective as we could if we stand together,” he said. Royal said the connection to the colleges is something that has not been a focus of enrollment before Nicklow. “His experience gives us a much-needed bridge between the colleges and enrollment management,” Royal said. We’ve never had a person from the academic side leading our team, so we have a lot to learn from each other.” Besides reaching out to the different college deans, Nicklow said another major change would be the creation of the “enrollment technology services”, which would use cost-efficient technology to create a closer connection to students. “With the new software we are able communicate with all perspective students and quickly contact any of the students on our list,” he said. “Once they’re here, we have another system we’re we can connect with almost all first-year students. We can track performance, we can intervene and we can send messages and reminders. Nicklow said he will also look to reorganize some staff into a campus relations group, which would handle questions or complaints from students, faculty or parents. Interim Provost Don Rice said there has been no talk of a search for a long-term replacement for head of enrollment. Nicklow said his main focus is to turn the tides on SIUC’s declining enrollment. “I would like to turn the trend around and I’d like to increase the number of students who are enrolled and are graduating from this institution,” he said. “I’d also like to focus more on retention and build collaboration with the other units on campus. There’s the opportunity for significant collaboration, and because of that progress, we will see progress and a turnaround in these trends.


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SIUC faces possible layoffs, furloughs

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e are beginning planning for potential for furloughs, but we will only do that if we absolutely have to.

RYAN VOYLES Daily Egyptian SIUC could face possible layoffs and furloughs in its future if the state’s financial situation does not improve, administrators said July 8. During the SIU Board of Trustees meeting July 8 in Springfield, SIU President Glenn Poshard said the state still owes SIU more than $82 million in appropriations for the Fiscal Year 2010, which ended June 30. He said via telephone it is a possibility the university would not receive all of the $82 million. If that were to happen, both the Carbondale and Edwardsville campuses were to prepare plans for layoffs and furloughs, he said. “We have told the chancellors to have a furlough or layoff plan in place to meet with our situation during the fall, if it comes to that,” Poshard said. SIUC Chancellor Rita Cheng, who has already told all university units to prepare for

— Rita Cheng SIUC Chancellor a 4 percent cut, said it was becoming hard to determine where to make more cuts. However, she said layoffs and furloughs remain the last resort. “We are beginning planning for potential for furloughs, but we will only do that if we absolutely have to,” Cheng said. The board also authorized the university to establish a line of credit in case it needs to borrow money in place of what the state owes SIU. The state passed a bill in June that allows state universities to borrow money to pay their bills. The bill allows universities up to 75 percent of what it owed to them in state appropriations. Poshard said the university would decide soon on whether it needs to borrow money to make payroll after mid-October.

Ryan Voyles can be reach at rvoyles@dailyegyptian.com or 536-3311 ext. 254.


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Sievers: SIU, Toyota relationship remains strong Administrators support Gilbert, research while Toyota reveals own findings RYAN VOYLES Daily Egyptian Administrators stand behind Dan Gilbert’s Toyota research, even as the world’s largest automotive company says human error, not electronics, have caused sudden unintended acceleration, a problem that has forced the recall of millions of vehicles. Gilbert, a professor in automotive technology, testified at a congressional hearing in February that he might have identified a glitch that would cause Toyota vehicle’s computer systems to prevent diagnosis of SUA. Toyota has said oversized floor mats and sticky accelerator pedals are the causes of SUA in its recalled models. Toyota has taken more than eight million vehicles off the road in two separate recalls since October because 11 different models have experienced the problem. Gilbert could not be reached for comments July 14, but told the Associated Press he never wanted to go after Toyota. “I didn’t really set out to take on Toyota. I set out to tell the truth, and I felt very strongly about that,” Gilbert said. But Toyota, who held its own investigation into the accidents, said Wednesday its investigation revealed the true problem to be

human. A Toyota representative told BusinessWeek July 14 the company’s investigation of accidents revealed the drivers — not the car’s electronics — caused “virtually all” accidents. “There are a variety of causes — pedal entrapment, sticky pedal, other foreign objects in the car,” said Mike Michels, a spokesman at the Toyota U.S. sales unit in Torrance, Calif., in an interview with BusinessWeek. A spokesperson from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration told BusinessWeek its own investigation on SUA in the vehicles is ongoing. Electronic messages obtained by The Associated Press July 11 showed some Toyota employees were frustrated by Gilbert’s research. One message, from a SIU alum and Toyota Motors employee, asked then-chancellor Sam Goldman whether it was smart to keep Gilbert on staff at the university. “I ask you why your organization allows such activities to be performed by one of your professors and most importantly allowed to be reported to the media in a false manner,” Thompson wrote. “I believe he should not be an employee of our fine university.” Sievers said the university had

little reaction to this and other messages. “We just read it,” Sievers said. “There were people who did take issue with Gilbert’s research. We took that under advisement, but his research stood for itself. Research is really nothing more than one long argument.” Toyota’s initial reaction to Gilbert’s research included the resignation of two Toyota employees from an advisory board of SIU’s automotive technology program, and the company withdrew offers to fund two spring-break internships. Toyota representatives told The Associated Press the two resignations were only to avoid the appearance of influence over Gilbert’s testimony. SIUC Interim Provost Don Rice said there was some communication from people who expressed issue with Gilbert’s research, but Gilbert’s job was never in jeopardy. “There’s been absolutely no discussion about removing Dr. Gilbert from this university because of research,” Rice said. “That would be a very poor thing to do, and a conflict of academic freedom among other things.” He said there is a committee set aside to investigate claims of research misconduct, but Gilbert’s research was “not one of these

Professor of automotive technologies Dr. David Gilbert poses for a portrait at the school of automotive technology in Carterville. Gilbert recently testified in front of the Subcommittee of Oversight and Investigations in Washington D.C., about the Toyota recall under investigation. Gilbert began teaching at SIUC’s school of automotive technology in 1996. FILE PHOTO

cases.” “The case of the Toyota research was a difference of technique, outcome and opinion,” Rice said. “There’s been no charge of any research misconduct. The university supports all of its research… as long as they are ethically doing what they’re suppose to be doing.” Toyota spokeswoman Celeste Migliore told The Associated Press the relationship between SIU and her company remains strong. “We have absolutely no issues with SIU and retain an excellent

relationship. That won’t change,” Migliore said. Sievers said he shared Migliore’s sentiment. “Our relationship still remains strong. They didn’t pull back any of our funding,” Sievers said. “I really don’t think there is an issue anymore. Our partnership continues with them and we’re happy about that, and I believe they feel the same way too. It’s benefitted both sides.”

Ryan Voyles can be reached at rvoyles@dailyegyptian.com or at 536-3311 ext. 254.


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Federal law lessens textbook burden Publishers must provide retail costs, cheaper options to professors LAUREN LEONE Daily Egyptian A new federal law will require textbook publishers to disclose more information to professors, such as the retail price of textbooks and alternative, cheaper options. Senator Dick Durbin, the original sponsor of provisions of College Textbook Affordability Act, said students should see three major changes starting this semester. As a part of the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008, this new law will require publishers to provide the textbook’s retail price, cheaper methods and a history of revisions, Durbin said in a phone conference with reporters July 21. “Professors don’t know the prices of textbooks, which is hard to believe, but it’s true,” he said. “Now, there is no excuse.” The average cost for books and supplies for fall 2010 is $900 for

SIUC students, according to College Board, a non-for-profit association. The national average at four-year public colleges in 200910 is $1,122, according to College Board’s website. Larry Dietz, vice chancellor for student affairs, said the issue of textbook prices and affordability overall has been on everyone’s minds. To help battle textbook prices, SIUC launched its’ new textbook rental system website July 23. “Students should see their textbook costs alleviated with the help of this federal law and SIU’s rental program,” he said. Although the rental system will not have all textbooks available immediately, introductory courses — which are the most common — will be available to rent, Dietz said. Lori Stettler, director of the Student Center, said the new fed-

eral law is designed to provide faculty with more options, but it’s ultimately the student’s decision to buy new, used or older editions. Durbin said he hopes universities and students will take this law seriously and understand their rights under it. “Students are emerging with more and more debt and lowering the cost of textbooks is a sensible way to try to reduce that debt,” he said. Books sold only in bundles provide supplemental, extra material students and professors are sometimes unaware of, or do not use, Durbin said. Under the new law, textbooks and supplemental materials usually sold as a bundle must also be sold individually. “CDs, workbooks and website access now can be sold in pieces instead of as a package, which should bring the overall cost down,” he said.

Colleges will be required to include the list of assigned textbooks during course registration, according to Durbin’s website. Durbin said students will know what they are in for if they have the information ahead of time. Other steps in the process to lower the cost of textbooks include the Open College Textbook Act, passed by Congress last year. The act allows the Secretary of Education to award one-year grants to institutions of higher education, higher education professors and producers of open textbooks to create or update open textbooks — electronic college textbooks or course materials the public has the right to access, customize and distribute — or adapt textbooks into open formats, for postsecondary coursework, according to the Library of Congress’s website. “(With this bill), we’re trying to provide a short-term federal in-

vestment in developing open college textbooks,” Durbin said. “With the internet, a professor can create a lecture, a lesson, a book or entire curriculum and share it online. A teacher across the country can access that educational material, adapt it for their own uses and put it in the classroom.” Under this bill, the Secretary of Education would award grants to colleges to create introductory level college textbooks, Durbin said. He said the text would be available online to anyone for free. “If there is a way to find an approach that is more economical and gives students an opportunity to learn at a lower cost, it means less cost to the government and ultimately less student debt,” he said.

Lauren Leone can be reached at lleone@dailyegyptian.com or 618-536-3311 ext. 255.


August 2010

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Student Services Center constructs parking questions RYAN VOYLES Daily Egyptian

Plans for the construction of a new student service building have taken a turn, which could turn people to scramble for fewer parking spaces. Kevin Bame, vice chancellor for administration and finance, presented plans for a new service student center to the Board of Trustees on July 8, which would be built at the site of the two-story parking garage on Lincoln Drive, next to the Student Center. SIU President Glenn Poshard said construction of the building, which would house departments such as Undergraduate Admissions and Financial Aid, is vital to appealing to prospective students — as well as making life easier for current students. “There’s no question of how great a need this is,” he said. He said the “the Woody Hall Shuffle” process where students go around the former dormitory looking for different departments, has been an annoyance since he was at SIU in the 1960s. “That building is so inadequate to meet the needs for our students that it’s not even funny,” Poshard said. The building, which still needs the approval of the BOT before construction starts, will cover 75,000 square feet and cost about $32 million, said university spokesman Rod Sievers. He said it would be paid for through student fees already in place and issue revenue bonds. Despite the close proximity of departments within the planned building, getting to it may be a whole different problem.

SIUC Chancellor Rita Cheng said she estimated a loss of “a couple hundred” parking spots when construction starts. She said administrators are looking into the expansion or creation of temporary lots in the short-term to replace the spots lost from the parking garage. She said future spots could be created when McAndrew Stadium is replaced with administration buildings. “We’re looking at options of expanding other lots and/or creating a new lot temporarily to replace the amounts lost,” Cheng said. “Long-term, we feel administrator buildings and other buildings may provide more parking opportunities.” Cheng said administrators always look for “tasteful” ways to add more parking when new building is constructed. The parking garage has 240 parking spots, Bame said. The new service building would hold about 50 spots, with an additional 80 spots coming from expanding other lots in the area. Ed Hightower, vice chair of the BOT, said it would continue to evaluate the project in regard to parking and student worth, but it was vital to keep attracting students to the university with projects like this. “Even during these difficult financial times ... We cannot stop planning for the future,” he said. “We have to do the kind of things that will let the university attract new students. “They have a choice ... if you are running all around the campus, and you don’t have a onestop shop and it’s not up to par — why in the world would someone we’re trying to recruit come to SIU?”

Ryan Voyles can be reached at rvoyles@dailyegyptian.com or 536-3311 ext. 254.

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Students eye city’s comprehensive plan

MICHARA CANTY Daily Egyptian

Mallory Lindberg, 22, born and raised in Carbondale, said while Mayor Cole has done a great job creating more businesses, there is still a need for store options and store proximity. Carbondale is set to prepare a Comprehensive Plan to address the development of the community, and Carbondale residents and SIUC students said they are keeping an eye on the plan to see how it will affect them. The Comprehensive Plan is comprised of six chapters, which address several points of the community’s development, according to a city’s public document. The Comprehensive Plan was drawn by a review committee, which monitored the planning process. Lindberg said her parents attended SIUC and they found the then-communal atmosphere attractive. She noticed an exchange between traditional “mom and pop” stores with new major corporations like Wal-Mart. City councilman Chris Wissmann said Carbondale has been considered a college town since 1992, but has been steadily falling financially due to its economy, which partially relies on the university’s enrollment. “The Comprehensive Plan is a fascinating policy ... how to bring students into that is a tough thing,” he said. “The plan aims to make the community more attractive.” The chapters of the plan include community overview, land use character and community growth, community mobility, housing and neighborhoods, economic development and implementation. The plan also includes a future land use plan and a thoroughfare plan, according

to the document. Greg Nofsinger, 24, alumni student and member of Students for Peace and Democracy, said there are too many bars in town, which push students to drink rather than build community. “There should be more safe zones for people to build community and urbanization,” he said. “There has been a business shrinkage on the Strip; now it’s a place for the homeless.” The Comprehensive Plan Review Committee held a community symposium March 26 where key stakeholders were interviewed, in efforts to gain as much community input. Although local businesses such as QQ Bubble Tea, Harbaugh’s Café, and Pagliai’s Pizza have maintained the character and sense of community for Carbondale in the past, the city does not reflect the diversity of the community, said Phil Hocher, a senior from St. Louis studying philosophy and history. “It used to be where you could just find something to fit into,” he said. “I can not see how there couldn’t be money in making diverse businesses.” Poor sidewalk construction and zoning of housing has made living conditions difficult for individuals, said Jonquil Curry, a junior from Chicago studying radio and television. Lindberg said students lose the sense of community and fun that comes with the disappearing businesses. “It’s a disappointment watching the Strip dwindle and tons of business shutting down ... businesses that built community,” Lindberg said. Wissmann said the city has to remember to accommodate all of its residents. “We have different lifestyles that we have to consider,” he said. “Carbondale is better off as an intermingling community.”


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oot Beer served in frosted mugs — the home of Mr. Frosty — in a place that has an ambiance unlike any other. The decor includes more than 175 sets of antlers — elk, caribou, deer, and moose — many taxidermy mounts of gamefish; more than 150 mounted ducks, geese

and birds; beasts large and small; a giant statue of King Tut; a wooden cigar store Indian; antique guns, snow shoes, decoys, fishing plugs; even a Michael Garman diorama a replica of a New York tenement from the 1930s and so much more that it boggles the eye and mind.

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erving southern Illinois and the surrounding states, Shawnee Trails has been the gear shop of choice for outdoor enthusiasts since 1979. Located in downtown Carbondale next to Quatro’s Pizza, Shawnee Trails stocks gear, accessories and clothing for anyone venturing into the great outdoors. You’ll find everything you could possibly need to make for a safe and enjoyable experience whether you are car camping, backpacking, climbing, rappelling, canoeing/ kayaking, working outdoors or traveling and trekking around the world. Shawnee Trails stocks the finest backpacks, tents, sleeping bags, boots, outerwear, compasses, hiking poles, H2O filters, stoves and cookware, as well as headlamps and all accessories needed for camping. If rock climbing or rappelling are your sport of choice or if you work in high places, Shawnee Trails stocks climbing and rappelling ropes, harnesses, carabiners, figure 8s, guide books, climbing shoes, cams, quickdraws, bolting gear and all related hardware needed to be a safe climber. Everyone loves a good paddle and Shawnee Trails carries canoes from Wenonah; kayaks from Current Designs, Wilderness Systems, Perception and Dagger; as well as dry bags

and boxes, paddles, H2O shoes and roof racks. When it comes to comfort or rugged footwear Shawnee Trails stocks hiking boots, shoes and sandals from Birkenstock, Dansko, Keen, Chaco, Merrell, La Sportiva, Scarpa, The North Face and Vasque, as well as a complete line of Nikwax boot wax and conditioners. Whether you are walking to class, scaling a mountain, walking the dog or traveling in foreign lands, Shawnee Trails stocks clothing and outerwear to keep you comfortable, dry, warm and simply looking good from The North Face, Patagonia, Mountain Hardwear and Smartwool. No matter what you are doing, you will find the correct socks for that activity at Shawnee Trails. Stocking Smartwool, Thorlo and Patagonia socks, you will find the very best Merino wool or synthetic blend socks for running, hiking, fishing/hunting, work, sleeping or sitting around a cold house watching a movie. Shawnee Trails also price matches, so please shop and support your locally owned business! Whatever your outdoor needs be, stop by Shawnee Trails. You won’t be sorry to buy the best, and we would appreciate your business and support.

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ou’ll find more board, card, miniature and role playing games at Castle Perilous Games & Books than at any other store in the tri-state region, with more than 950 different games in stock. Only eight blocks from campus, the Saluki Express stops a block from our front door. You’ll find a complete selection of Dungeons & Dragons books, Warhammer 40,000 and Fantasy Battle miniatures, Magic the Gathering packs and single cards, as well as board games ranging from Monopoly Special Edition to HeroScape to Settlers of Catan to Panzer Command.

Interested in comics? You’ll find 20 feet of comics and graphic novels, including a large section of used graphic novels, manga and anime. Need new stuff or some cash? We trade for and buy games — both board and video —and graphic novels every day. With 10 gaming tables, you’ll find something going on every day of the week. Want more? Look for Little Egypt Wars — the fall game day — Sept. 25 at the Carbondale Civic Center. Visit us at www.castleperilous.com or Friend us on Facebook for more information.


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August 2010

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ome visit Yesteryear Tobacconists’ cedar-paneled, walk-in humidor with more than 300 varieties of cigars in stock. We also have a fine selection of cigar cases, humidors, cutters and ashtrays. We offer imported cigarettes along with American Spirit and Nat Sherman from the U.S. We carry custom-blended cigarette tobaccos plus hand-rolling accessories for the person who wants to roll his/her own.

For the pipe smoker, we have a wide range of hand-blended pipe tobaccos along with briar pipes from around the world and pipe racks, pouches, tampers and pipe lighters such as Zippo. We offer an assortment of flasks, Swiss Army knives, Zippo lighters and soaps from Juniper Ridge. Yesteryear Tobacconists was established in 1991 and is your full-service tobacco shop.

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ew World strives to be a socially conscious business. We recognize and accept our responsibility for the common good, by understanding the interconnectedness of all life, and by serving humanity and the planet. Our major focus is addressing concerns of women in our

community through empowerment. New World sells good quality new and used furniture at good prices. Look at our website and order our furniture online. We will meet you by appointment at the store for pickup. Then sell the furniture back to us when you are finished with it!

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octors Brian and Julie Bird, D.C. at Allied Physicians and Rehab of Southern Illinois are committed to better health and wellness for each patient. Having been trained on the most up-to-date chiropractic procedures and techniques, you can be assured that your health is in good hands. The entire staff at Allied Physicians and Rehab is dedicated to your wellness objectives and overall health. This is what drives them to deliver the friendliest and most professional service the chiropractic field has to offer in and around Carbondale. Besides chiropractic care, massage therapy and physical therapy, Allied Physicians and Rehab also provides free workshops, wellness days and lectures as part of their volunteer work through The Foundation for Wellness Professionals. One of these workshops offered every other Tuesday teaches Trigger Point Therapy. If you’re like 75 percent of the general population, you probably experience at

least some “stress” every day. Too much stress can cause physical problems that can lead to more serious complications. Taking prescription or over-the-counter drugs that may numb your symptoms also have a menu of negative side effects, and the physical reaction to stress can continue to come back and possibly get worse. Trigger Point Therapy offers a safe and natural solution to reliving stress-related problems. If you suffer from headaches, pain, fatigue, insomnia, digestive problems or any other health problems caused or aggravated by stress, you should not miss this program. You will learn how to use Trigger Point Therapy on yourself and a guess from Allied Physicians and Rehab as a representative for The Foundation of Wellness Professionals. Trigger Point Therapy Workshops are offered 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. every other Tuesday. Food and drinks will be served. Call 529-0921 to reserve your seat!

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arbondale Main Street is proud to help improve and promote the downtown district of Carbondale. We are a resource for the businesses in our district; we offer design assistance grants and promotional tools for all of our retail and service locations, restaurants and other establishments. We also plan and help to coordinate all of the special events in downtown, including the Downtown Art & Wine Fairs and The Lights Fantastic Parade! Our next special event is Meet Me On Main! Meet Me On Main is an event that will be held 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Aug. 24. Meet Me On Main will be located on the Student Recreation Center lawn, right across the street from Brush Towers. Meet Me

On Main helps familiarize incoming freshmen with the businesses on Main Street, and it’s a fun time! Meet Me On Main will have demonstrations, games, information pamphlets and often free samples will be handed out during the evening. Meet Me on Main will have a scavenger hunt that takes you by tram around to all businesses and restaurants so you can actually see where they are located and how to get there. During the scavenger hunt you will receive a card that you can get stamped from all the places you visited. You have a whole week to get this card stamped. If you hand it into Carbondale Main Street you can get a prize! So come and see what Meet Me On Main has to offer!

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he Practice Pad offers a fun and unique environment for making, practicing and learning music. We offer percussion, guitar and harmonica lessons. The soundproof rehearsal/recording room is a perfect space to rehearse or record music at very reasonable rates. Whether you are a solo artist or a full band, we have

what you need to satisfy your musical needs! You will find custom wrapped drum sets, vintage snares and hand crafted guitars in our retail room along with a great selection of new and used instruments and gear. Special orders can be here the following business day so you get exactly what you need. We are located on the Strip in Carbondale!

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utlawz Dance Barn is conveniently located behind SI Bowl in Carterville. It’s a fun, country atmosphere with amazing drink specials, theme nights and bartenders who dance on the bar! Some of the top-notch performers in the area — such as Lee Brice, Thomas Tillman and Deanna Freeman — have all shared a night with us! Also, Outlawz features

Mud Bogs the third Saturday of every month! Family during the day and the fun begins at night! You must be 21 to enter. If you need a ride home, no problem! Just let the bartenders know and we’ll get ya home for FREE! We want you to have a good time, but more importantly, we want you to be safe. When the spotlight is on, we’re OPEN! Come check us out!


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Band diversity keeps sunsets colorful Marquee band “unlikely” to ever play at Sunset LAUREN LEONE Daily Egyptian Don Castle said the summer concert series would be about two things — free, diverse music. Choosing with diversity in mind allows the series to reach out to a larger audience, said Castle, Student Programming Council adviser and assistant director of the Student Center. John Masear, concert director for the Student Programming Council and a junior from Carbondale majoring in meteorology and photography, said the search for band diversity starts early. “Early in the year, we (SPC) look at live videos of performances, their studio albums — we try to narrow it down,” he said. “This year, the committee had to listen to hundreds of bands that showed interest in us, before narrowing it down to just seven.” The concert committee includes the series’ four sponsors: the city

DIANA SOLIWON | DAILY EGYPTIAN

Teddy Jones rips on the saxophone while Colby Miller plays guitar during Shaggy Wonda’s performance at Shryock July 15. The band of Carbondale, Carbondale Park District, SPC and the Student Center, Castle said. He said the committee tries to sign all contracts with the bands by April 1. Castle said it is SPC’s role to be experts on what bands are available and to stay in contact with agents throughout the year. “It’s like a two-way street. We either contact them or they

formed in Bloomington, Ind., and inspired the crowd to dance before rain and thunder overtook the sunset concert.

contact us,” he said. The Sunset Concert Series costs roughly $40,000 each year, divided equally between the four sponsors, Castle said. He said each band receives on average $1,750 for their performance, not including a free hotel room. Masear said each night’s $1,000 production budget is used mainly for supplying sound, which they

do through SoundCore Music and Video, located in Carbondale. He said SoundCore comes out a few hours early to set up the stage each night and production cost doesn’t change much year to year. Priciliano Fabian, executive director of SPC, said the committee wants the community to get a different flavor of music week to week.

“You get the stereotype of having just country bands in the southern Illinois area,” he said. “But with sunset concerts, we want to keep the music diverse.” Castle said SPC has never discussed bringing in a big-name band that would require a cover charge to cover expenses. He said even if the idea was brought to the table, the venues wouldn’t be able to handle such a large-scale production. “When you start selling tickets, there’s other costs that go with that,” Castle said. “The actual tickets, the ticket-takers, the ushers, security and the fences.” He said having a big-name band is outside anything that could even be considered within the series’ price range. The series would probably never have a big-name band perform because it would not be practical, Castle said. He said one aspect the community loves about the sunset series is they know what to expect each year. “It’s tradition for the sunset concerts to be free,” Castle said. “It’s always been free.”

Lauren Leone can be reached at lleone@dailyegyptian.com or 536-3311 ext. 255.


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Parking proposal draws fire MICHARA CANTY Daily Egyptian

The location of the new public safety center has raised concerns about parking from residents and tenants on East College Street. According to a proposal sent to the city council, the center will require access to East College Street and would be better served by having two-way traffic to allow police vehicles in and out in case of an emergency. Therefore, reconstruction of the street will widen it 28 inches and remove public parking, according to the request. City council members approved the construction of a new public safety facility June 22, in efforts to improve the working environment of police staff. City Councilman Chris Wissmann said there should be public parking alternatives created for residents before this proposal is finalized. “We cannot have a police station on a oneway street especially when immediate action is needed,” he said. “There are six or more houses without driveways ... where will the residents park?” The director of Public Works sent 16 letters to property owners on East College Street on June 25 to notify them of the city’s recommendations and possible changes. Carbondale resident Greg Szubartowski said he owns various properties located on East College Street and the removal of parking will be of great expense to property owners that may not have the funds to create parking lots for their tenants. “This brings safety issues for students crossing and for the handicap traveling in their wheelchairs that do not have safe sidewalks,” Szubartowski said. The center, expected to be completed by March 25, will be a 32,000 square foot; two-story brick structure located on South

Washington Street. The completion date led councilman Steven Haynes to ask about the urgency of the council’s immediate decision and if there were other alternatives considered. Allen Gill, Carbondale city manager, said the best time to make changes on the street would be before school begins. Nancy Cunningham, an East College property owner, said while she is pleased with the new center, she was also poorly notified of this issue. Cunningham said consideration for a two-way street should have been considered long before the location of the safety center was decided. Council members aired complaints that they were not notified of this proposal beforehand. City council decided to postpone its decision on the East College Street construction proposal until further deliberation and consideration of all affected parties. In lieu of city developments, the council approved the Patterson Industries LLC request to rezone 5.29 acres located at 1209 East Walnut Street in order to donate 3.2 acres of land to the Hindu Temple and Cultural Society of Southern Illinois. The non-profit corporation plans to construct a temple on the site with the donated land. The Planning Commission held a public hearing July 7, where the committee unanimously voted (6-yes, 0-no) on a motion to recommend approval of the rezoning request, according to the request form of the city council agenda. The construction of the Hindu temple will increase diversity throughout Carbondale and create a community for people of similar interest, said Wissmann.

Michara Canty can be reached at mcanty@dailyegyptian.com or 536-3311 ext. 263.


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Drivers who crowd bikers could see jail time

LAUREN LEONE Daily Egyptian

The state recently followed suit in a matter that SIUC has already learned the hard way. Gov. Pat Quinn signed a bicycle safety bill July 5 to increase penalties for drivers who overcrowd bicyclists, but Todd Sigler, director of the SIUC department of public safety, said the university has already made strides to insure bike safety. “We don’t want to see any injuries,” Sigler said. “With our population trying to travel on campus, you’ve got a lot of things coming together in just about any form of transportation.” The bill, which will take effect Jan. 1, will make it illegal for drivers to crowd or threaten bicyclists by unnecessarily driving too close to a cyclist, according to the Illinois state website. Depending on whether serious injuries occur, it is either a Class A misdemeanor or a Class 4 felony. The misdemeanor is punishable up to one year in prison or a $2,500 fine, putting it on the same scale as a firsttime DUI, Sigler said. In 2001, Anne Coleman, a student in the Dental Hygiene Program, was killed in a crosswalk when a vehicle struck her bicycle on SIUC’s campus. Following the death, the campus speed limit dropped from 25 mph to 20 mph, Sigler said. Police issued 414 more warnings and tickets to motorists caught speeding in spring 2002 — the spring following Coleman’s death— as compared to spring 2001, according to a Daily Egyptian report. Fines for speeding increased from $15 to $50 in 2002 but have not increased since, Sigler said. Sigler said if a driver had intentionally tried to run into a bicyclist with their car, it was only classified as reckless conduct before. The new law is an addition to the Illinois Vehicle Code, which allows for penalties for violating the law to be attached to one’s drivers license, he said.

SIU has had one car-bike collision this year, with injuries to the cyclist’s hand, knee and elbow. The cyclist declined an ambulance, Sigler said. The consequences of overcrowding bicycles were hit or miss before the bill was signed, said Anne Johnson, vice president of the Carbondale Bicycle Club and board member for the League of Illinois Bicyclists. Although the law increases penalties for drivers, Johnson said bicyclists should ride responsibly, too. “You need to ride as if you were a car,” she said. “If you’re coming to a sidewalk to cross the street, stop.” The biggest distinction between campus and city regulations is bicyclists are required to walk through the crosswalk on campus, Sigler said. Phillip Kaufman, a senior from Carbondale studying criminal justice, said he didn’t know he had to walk through the crosswalk, but does stop before he rides through it. “I don’t think the rule is really enforced,” he said. Sigler said department records show three violations were given out to bicyclists who did not walk their bikes through the crosswalk in 2009. One was given in 2008, but Sigler said most of the time, bicyclists are given a written warning. “You can look at these numbers and think ‘this isn’t too bad,’” he said, “but the department has no way of knowing the near misses that are out there.” The law will take effect Jan. 1, but Sigler hopes it won’t have to be enforced too often as he would rather see people try to accommodate one another on the road. Kaufman said no one should be held more responsible than the other. “You’re up against a couple-thousand pound vehicle, so bicyclists need to pay attention too,” he said.

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Cleanliness is next to ‘Garden of the God’liness MICHARA CANTY Daily Egyptian

Officials from Garden of the Gods forest have been upkeeping the 3,300 acres of forest well for future campers and tourists with technician and volunteer cleansing services. Ruth Manyara, a senior from Chicago studying psychology, said southern Illinois hiking grounds have given her the best summer yet. “The forest is well kept which makes it a very beautiful place to be and interact with nature compared to others places I have been in the Midwest,” she said. “Being here has changed my summer experience for the better.” Jim Smith, recreation technician for Shawnee National Forest, said camping and hiking traffic increase during the summer and fall, which increases the need for volunteers and cleaning technicians for the campgrounds. After considerable observation, Smith said he altered the sanitation structure of the forest from excessive trashcans to importing a few Dumpster sites. Cleaning technicians oversee the restroom and picnic ground cleanliness by physically picking up trash along observation trails and public sites. “Our new system increases sanitation, eases the physical man power of our staff and increases the safety of campers from wildlife threatening their campsites due to excessive lingering waste in trashcans,” Smith said. As an incentive for people to gain a better camping experience, campers are advised to collect their trash and dispose it in Dumpster locations throughout the campsites, said Smith. Other means of sanitation support have

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he forest is well kept which makes it a very beautiful place to be and interact with nature compared to others places I have been in the Midwest. — Ruth Manyara senior from Chicago studying psychology

kept the Garden of the Gods in a delicate state. National grassroots environmental organizations such as the Sierra Club and Back Country Horsemen of America, a non-profit organization, provide invaluable service to the forest, said Becky Banker, public affairs spokeswoman for the national forest. “We offer several volunteer service programs to the public and local and national organizations to sustain the structures of our paths and cleanliness of our campsites,” Banker said. “Without these organizations, our resources would suffer damage.” Last year, the national forest offered more than 14,000 hours of volunteer service to the public, she said. Trash Bash, an annual sanitation event, is held every October by the national forest to encourage organizations and others to help preserve the land. “One of the best things about this park is (its) cleanliness and the scenery,” said Pilar Shearry, a Carbondale resident. “They do a great job of maintaining here.”

Michara Canty can be reached at mcanty@dailyegyptian.com or 618-536-3311 ext. 263.


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Simon ‘honored’ to represent southern Illinois

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am spending less time with my family, but this campaign takes a lot of dedication and traveling.

MICHARA CANTY Daily Egyptian Shelia Simon is used to following in her father’s footsteps and has been working hard to take her biggest step yet.  Shelia Simon, former Carbondale city councilwoman from 2003 to 2007, has spent the past few months away from home while campaigning as lieutenant governor for Gov. Pat Quinn to address issues regarding the state’s budget and engage with the public. Simon served on the Carbondale City Council from 2003 to 2007, when she lost to Brad Cole in the bid for city mayor. Paul Simon, Sheila’s father, served as lieutenant governor from 1969 to 1973, as a U.S. representative from 1975 to 1985 and as a U.S. senator from 1985 to 1997. The Carbondale Federal Building and SIUC’s Public Policy Institute are both named after him. “I am spending less time with my family, but this campaign takes a lot of dedication and traveling,” Shelia Simon said. “I am honored to represent Jackson (County) and make connections with people from the state.” The campaign’s communication committee said Simon could increase women involvement as a female political representative throughout the election process. According to “Women’s Voices. Women

— Shelia Simon lieutenant governor elect Vote,” single women are one of the largest demographic of voting drop offs. From 2008 to 2010, single women involvement decreased by 33 percent. “She is finding ways to engage with all demographic spectrums,” said Justin Stofferahn, a member of Simon’s campaign communication committee. Simon has met with the Illinois Education Association, environmental leaders and religious groups to address and unveil these areas to state view. The campaign hopes to help shape the topics the people are most concerned with, she said. Quinn has concentrated on raising political focus toward job development for residents and safety issues, Simon said. With Democratic incumbents struggling to keep their seats, Simon hopes to surpass the public scrutiny and skepticism of Democratic politicians and election members. “Folks are just turned off by politics in general,” Simon said. In spite of political agendas, Simon said she enjoys the state tour and meeting new people.

Michara Canty can be reached at mcanty@dailyegyptian.com or 536-3311 ext. 263.

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DIANA SOLIWON | DAILY EGYPTIAN

BUBBLY TRADITIONS BubbHsein-Tang Kuo of Taiwan prepares a strawberry banana fruit slush with juice and a Jell-O-like substance at QQ Bubble Tea Tuesday. The teas and flavoring shaken together produce air bubbles in the

drink, while tapioca can add texture. Drawings line every wall and the ceiling in the decorated shop on 701 S. Illinois Ave, which has been selling the distinct beverages in Carbondale for the last seven years, Kuo said. NO A/C HELPS WITH THE HEAT? Pam Hickam of County Line Landscaping said as she watered annuals June 16 the trick to coping with the hot weather is to embrace it — she keeps her air conditioning off in her home to acclimate her body to the heat. “If you go from sitting in the A/C to out here, it’s hard on you,” she said. Hickam and her husband have worked together full-time in the outdoors for the last 15 years and are both SIUC alumni. DIANA SOLIWON DAILY EGYPTIAN

August 2010


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JESS VERMEULEN | DAILY EGYPTIAN

A/C TAKES FLIGHT Jim Robinson, president of St. Louis Helicopter, explains how to secure and fasten a hook used to lift heavy equipment via helicopter to Dennis Hamburger, of DuQuoin, Thursday outside Neckers Building. St. Louis Helicopter airlifted a motor for

an air conditioner to the rooftop of Neckers Building after performing the same task at Schneider Hall. Brad Dillard, associate director of facilities, said the use of the helicopter cost $750, but the move would have cost SIU around $6,000 to lift it by crane.


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Lease agreements lost in translation Security deposit state law is on students’ side LAUREN LEONE Daily Egyptian Elaine Conrad said miscommunication between the tenant and the resident is one of the main factors that lead to unreturned or delayed security deposits. Conrad, community programs coordinator, works specifically with international students who have difficulty getting their security deposits back. Conrad also helps students understand their rights and responsibilities before signing a lease. “Leases can be difficult to understand, even when English is someone’s first language,” she said. Conrad said leasing policies differ from one apartment complex to another. She said some complexes have security deposits, which are to be paid beforehand, and some deposits are attached to the monthly rent. Conrad said a verbal agreement is not enough. “You can avoid any misunderstanding in the lease by asking

FAQ: Security Deposits Q: How much security deposit can a landlord charge? A: All states allow landlords to collect a security deposit when the tenant moves in; the general purpose is to assure that the tenant pays rent when due and keeps the rental unit in good condition. Half the states limit the amount landlords can charge, usually not more than a month or two worth of rent -- the exact amount depends on the state. Many states require landlords to put deposits in a separate account and some require landlords to pay tenants the interest on deposits.

questions, and getting anything agreed upon that’s not in the original release, in writing,” she said. Richard Hall, a lecturer in the finance department, said security deposits are a hot issue in Carbondale, but there is an Illinois state law that can help residents in the event a tenant holds a security deposit for an extended period of time. The Security Deposit Return Act explains what a landlord has to do when returning a security deposit, he said. The law applies to tenants of residential real property containing five or more units. This would

Q: What can a landlord deduct from a scurity deposit? A:Landlords may normally make certain deductions from a tenant’s security deposit, provided they do it correctly and for an allowable reason. Many states require landlords to provide a written itemized accounting of deductions for unpaid rent and for repairs for damages that go beyond normal wear and tear, together with payment for any deposit balance.

include the larger apartment complexes in Carbondale such as Home Rentals, Lewis Park, and Saluki Apartments, Hall said. The law states the lessor, or landlord, has 30 days from the date the resident vacates the premises to supply an itemized statement of all damages and the estimated cost for repair. “That is from the date the premises is vacated, not the date of the end of the lease,” Hall said. He said if the landlords do not supply a statement within 30 days, they are obligated by law to return the security deposit in its

By Move.com

Q: Is the landlord required to return the security deposit? A:A tenant may sue a landlord who fails to return his or her deposit when and how required, or who violates other provisions of security deposit laws such as interest requirements; often these lawsuits may be brought in small claims court. If the landlord has intentionally and flagrantly violated the law, in some states, a tenant may recover the entire deposit -- sometimes even two or three times this amount--plus attorney fees and other damages.

entirety within 45 days. The law states if management is aware of some damages but is unsure of the exact cost, they still have to tell the tenant how much it will cost after 30 days of sending the original statement out. This could lead to some tenants not seeing their deposits for nearly two months. Hall said if the time frame in the leases differs from state law, and the complex has five or more units, state law prevails. Conrad said she stresses for students, national or international, to read every point of the lease

and to find out if the security deposit is refundable or not beforehand. She said there could also be a cleaning deposit as opposed to a security deposit. Students need to take photos or have written record of any damages in the living space, she said. “If you can get them to sign off on that, or be present while you are taking pictures, that’s the smartest thing to do,” she said. Richa Asarawala, a graduate student studying electrical and computer engineering from India, lives in Campus Habitat and hasn’t had any issues with her tenants. “Before signing a lease, they need to read the whole lease papers carefully,” she said. “Not each and every lease is the same.” Conrad said the Students’ Legal Assistance Office, located on the 3rd floor of the Student Center, has representatives available when students need advice concerning legal issues with understanding apartment leases. Asarawala said students should be cautious when searching for apartments and not to rush into anything. “Before you sign the lease, they are very good with you, but after you sign the lease, they sometimes don’t care for you at all,” she said.

Lauren Leone can be reached at lleone@dailyegyptian.com or 536-3311 ext. 255.


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Greek Row construction to start before demolition

LAUREN LEONE Daily Egyptian

Although Greek Row’s demolition date had been set for May 2012, three years ago, Julie Payne-Kirchmeier said construction would begin before demolition. Kirchmeier, director of university housing, said there is a three-step phase in the process of renovating Greek Row. Phase one would begin by constructing three to five buildings to house the three sororities of Greek Row in unused space west of the campus lake.

The demolition of Greek Row started in 2004 when former Gov. Rod Blagojevich signed the Fire Sprinkler Dormitory Act requiring dormitories at all Illinois colleges and universities to have fire sprinkler systems installed by Jan. 1, 2013. Buildings on Greek Row being used as administrative buildings could still be used after the date, Kirchmeier said. She said they are not affected by the act because they are not residential buildings. The buildings on Greek Row are more than 50 years old and have out-

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anuary 2013 is not that far away. To me, it’s absolutely ashamed that the university is just slowly, slowly going through this thing.

lived their usefulness so installing fire sprinkler systems in the existing building is not viable, Kirchmeier said. She said it would be easier to replace the buildings completely. Norman Lach, assistant professor and architectural studies program di-

DIANA SOLIWON | DAILY EGYPTIAN

Several architecture students have constructed design proposals for new Greek housing as part of a class project for Norman Lach, architectural studies program director. Greek Row will be

demolished by May 2012 because of the Fire Sprinkler Dormitory Act, which requires that all university dormitories have fire sprinkler systems installed by Jan. 1, 2013.

— Norman Lach assistant professor and architectural studies program director rector, has partnered with University Housing for the last year, and asked students to design phase one of Greek Row as a class project. Although it is unlikely the final design for the housing units will replicate a student’s idea, Lach’s class project has kept discussion rolling, said Larry Dietz, vice chancellor for student affairs. From an architect’s viewpoint, Lach has expected a three-phase project as big as Greek Row to progress more quickly. “January 2013 is not that far away,” Lach said. “To me, it’s absolutely ashamed that the university is just slowly, slowly going through this thing.” Lach said he’s suggested using precast concrete, a building material that will speed up the construction process. He said precast concrete components could begin to be erected shortly after foundations are ready and can be installed quickly, often cutting weeks or months from the schedule. “(Precast concrete) would definitely speed up the construction process, but we have to follow all the state procurement laws before we can do anything else,” Kirchmeier said. “We have to decide the best long-term master plan for the university.” Kirchmeier said the smallgroup housing project is beyond

preliminary discussion. “We’ve worked over the past two or three years with the Greek community to assess what their needs and wants are,” she said. In addition to working with the Greek community, Dietz and Kevin Bame, vice chancellor for administration and finance, briefed SIUC’s chancellor Rita Cheng about the smallgroup housing project. The choice between financing this project with public/private funding and self-funding is still up in the air — a decision has to be made before the university can do anything else. Dietz said the university has a request for proposal, but only in draft form. “(The final proposal) will all depend on whether or not we’re going to do a public/private party or bond it ourselves,” he said. Although a preliminary budget has not been set for either phase one or the project as a whole, Kirchmeier said the university might be able to build the small-group housing for less than $27 million, the same cost for Wall and Grand apartments. “It’s a long-term domino effect,” she said.

Lauren Leone can be reached at lleone@dailyegyptian.com or 536-3311 ext. 256


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Protect Your Security Deposit MOVE.COM

During the exhausting process of moving into a new apartment, the last thing on your mind is moving-out day. But since your landlord is probably holding a sizable chunk of your money in the form of a security deposit, it’s risky not to prepare for the end of your tenancy right from the beginning. Before you start unpacking dishes and hanging prints on the walls, take a few simple steps to avoid the misunderstandings and disagreements that have made disputes over security deposits legendary. Look under the hood Give your unit a thorough inspection before you move in. (Better yet, do it before you sign the lease!) It’s

best to inspect the premises before you move in; it will be easier to spot problems while the place is bare. Don’t neglect to check out things that might not be readily apparent, such as water pressure and sink drainage in the kitchen and bathrooms, the operation of appliances, the appearance of floors and walls, and the condition of the pads under the carpet. Use a move-in checklist Make a detailed inventory of what you find. The best way to do this is with a good checklist. The more you record about the unit when you move in, the better position you’ll be in when moving out to show that certain problems already existed before you moved into the unit. In some states, landlords are re-

quired to give new tenants a written statement on the condition of the unit at move-in time, including a comprehensive list of existing damage. In other states, many landlords provide a checklist to new tenants, but some do not. You can write up a checklist yourself. Ideally, you and your landlord should fill out the checklist together to prevent any disputes or disagreements. Otherwise, it’s smart to bring along a roommate or a friend so that there’s at least one other witness to the condition of the unit at move-in time. If you spot problems, describe specifically what is wrong. Rather than simply noting “damage to carpet,” for example, state “cigarette burns, frayed edges in carpet next to picture win-

dow.” The more detailed you are, the clearer it is that you’re not responsible for those damages. You and your landlord should both sign the checklist after completing it. Make a copy so that each of you has one. At the end of your tenancy, you’ll make another inspection of the same items, noting their condition at move-out time. If items that were okay at move-in are now damaged, your landlord may hold you responsible for fixing them. But you’ll be protected from being billed for damage that existed before you moved in. Take pictures Besides completing a checklist, you may also want to document the condition of your unit with photographs or video. If you take photos,

have doubles of them developed immediately (or print your digitals), write the date they were taken on the backs, and send your landlord a set as soon as you get them back. That way your landlord won’t be able to claim that the photos were taken later than they actually were. If you can, use a camera that automatically date-stamps each photo. If you videotape the premises, clearly state the date and time while you are taping, make a copy and send it to your landlord right away. Repeat this process when moving out. Getting Your Security Deposit Back If, despite your efforts, your landlord tries to hold on to some or all of your security deposit when you move, read Get Back Your Security Deposit.

Your First Apartment: What you need for your first place MOVE.COM Whether you plan on living alone or with roommates, be prepared -your first apartment will most likely be a small one. That’s why it pays to plan ahead. Figure out in advance which things you just can’t do without. This includes essential furniture, cookware and other basics. Furniture Face facts — your first apartment is never going to be featured in Architectural Digest. Think bare essentials.

A good comfortable chair for study, perhaps a couch or beanbag, a small sturdy desk for homework or a computer, a dresser, a bed of course or perhaps a futon. Baskets and trunks too are a nifty idea...both as decoration and to store extra clothes or other items. If you need to actually buy furniture, there are many places — like Stacks & Stacks — that sell fine inexpensive furniture and accessories. Also consider flea markets, yard sales or even the Salvation Army or Good-

will. And don’t forget such essential things as CD-holders, milk crate bookshelves, hooks to hang your bike or speakers. For sleeping, think about a bedframe with drawers or raising your bed on concrete blocks for extra storage space. Screens also add a decorative touch to a room ... as well as providing an area to “hide” storable items. Another good storage idea— consider stashing the out-of-season stuff in empty suitcases. Finally, put a key hook by the door so you’ll always

take along your keys. Cookware Yes, you’re going to have to eat in too. Maybe even learn how to cook. But first, get the basics — a good cast iron skillet, large covered pots, pans for roasting, service for four, silverware. Don’t forget glasses, coffee and tea mugs, a teapot, perhaps even a microwave. And we’re not talking sterling silver or fine china here — inexpensive cookware is just fine to start out with. Decorating

Think plants and posters, colorful rugs and wall coverings. Also consider haunting flea markets and moving sales for those inexpensive funky items that’ll add character to your place. Another idea: check out the local record stores for posters. And think about covering your sofa or easy chairs with print sheets — it adds a bit of welcome color to the room. Finding and fixing up your first apartment can be both fun and a personal statement.


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:KDW\RXQHHGIRU \RXUÀUVWSODFH MOVE.COM Whether you plan on living alone or with roommates, be prepared — your first apartment will most likely be a small one. That’s why it pays to plan ahead. Figure out in advance which things you just can’t do without. This includes essential furniture, cookware and other basics. Furniture Face facts — your first apartment is never going to be featured in Architectural Digest. Think bare essentials. A good comfortable chair for study, perhaps a couch or beanbag, a small sturdy desk for homework or a computer, a dresser, a bed of course or perhaps a futon. Baskets and trunks too are a nifty idea ... both as decoration and to store extra clothes or other items. If you need to actually buy furniture, there are many places — like Stacks & Stacks — that sell fine inexpensive furniture and accessories. Also consider flea markets, yard sales or even the Salvation Army or Goodwill. And don’t forget such essential things as CD-holders, milk crate bookshelves, hooks to hang your bike or speakers. For sleeping, think about a bed-frame with drawers or raising your bed on concrete

blocks for extra storage space. Screens also add a decorative touch to a room ... as well as providing an area to “hide” storable items. Another good storage idea—consider stashing the out-of-season stuff in empty suitcases. Finally, put a key hook by the door so you’ll always take along your keys. Cookware Yes, you’re going to have to eat in too. Maybe even learn how to cook. But first, get the basics — a good cast iron skillet, large covered pots, pans for roasting, service for four, silverware. Don’t forget glasses, coffee and tea mugs, a teapot, perhaps even a microwave. And we’re not talking sterling silver or fine china here — inexpensive cookware is just fine to start out with. Decorating Think plants and posters, colorful rugs and wall coverings. Also consider haunting flea markets and moving sales for those inexpensive funky items that’ll add character to your place. Another idea: check out the local record stores for posters. And think about covering your sofa or easy chairs with print sheets — it adds a bit of welcome color to the room. Finding and fixing up your first apartment can be both fun and a personal statement.

WLSVHYHU\WHQDQW QHHGVWRNQRZ MOVE.COM

Here are 10 tips to help you be prepared in case disputes occur with a landlord: 1. The best way to win over a prospective landlord is to be prepared. Bringing the following information when you meet prospective landlords will give you a competitive edge over other applicants: a completed rental application; written references from landlords and employers; friends and colleagues, and a current copy of your credit report. 2. Carefully review all the important conditions of the tenancy before you sign on the dotted line. Your lease or rental agreement may contain a provision that you find unacceptable — for example, restrictions on guests or pets, design alterations or running a home business. 3. To avoid disputes or misunderstandings with your landlord, get it in writing. Keep copies of any correspondence and follow up an oral agreement with a letter, setting out your understanding. For example, if you ask your landlord to make repairs, put your request in writing and keep a copy for yourself. If he agrees orally, send a letter confirming this fact. 4. Protect your privacy rights. Next to disputes over rent or security deposits, one of the most common and emotionfilled misunderstandings arises over a landlord’s right to enter a rental unit and a tenant’s right to be left alone. If you understand your privacy rights, for example, the amount of notice your landlord must provide before entering — it will be easier to protect them. 5. Know your rights to live in a habitable rental unit — and don’t give them up. Landlords are required to offer their tenants livable premises including adequate weatherproofing; heat, water and electricity; and clean, sanitary and structurally safe premises. If your rental unit is not kept in good repair, you have a number of options ranging from

withholding a portion of the rent to pay for repairs to calling the building inspector (who can usually order the landlord to make repairs) to moving out without liability for your future rent. 6. Keep communication open with your landlord. If there’s a problem — for example, if the landlord is slow to make repairs — talk with the landlord to see if the issue can be resolved short of a nasty legal battle. 7. Purchase renters’ insurance to cover your valuables. Your landlord’s insurance policy will not cover your losses. Renters’ insurance typically costs $350 a year for a $50,000 policy that covers loss due to theft or damage caused by other people or natural disasters. 8. Make sure the security deposit refund procedures are spelled out in your lease or rental agreement. To protect yourself and avoid any misunderstandings, make sure your lease or rental agreement is clear on the use and refund of security deposits, including allowable deductions. 9. Learn whether your building and neighborhood are safe, and what you can expect your landlord to do about it if they aren’t. Get copies of any state or local laws that require safety devices such as deadbolts and window locks, check out the property’s vulnerability to intrusion by a criminal, and learn whether criminal incidents have already occurred. If a crime is highly likely, your landlord may be obligated to take some steps to protect you. 10. Know when to fight an eviction notice — and when to move. Unless you have the law and provable facts on your side, fighting an eviction notice is usually short-sighted. If you lose an eviction lawsuit, you may end up hundreds (even thousands) of dollars in debt and face a negative credit rating.


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Important Tips for Finding an Apartment MOVE.COM Be prepared. You’ll be making dozens of phone calls a day as you search for your apartment. Photo by Jason Stitt You need an apartment and you need it now. But how do you find the right one, the apartment with your name on it? We’ve got tips for you to be successful on the hunt. Get yourself in a gung-ho apartment search frame of mind. You will be making dozens of phone

calls and leaving many messages. If your messages aren’t returned the next day, you should call again, of course doing so with the utmost tact. If you don’t have a local phone number, get one. Apartments Unlimited rents out very inexpensive voice mail boxes. Keep your checkbook with you. When you see an apartment which looks good to you, you are going to have to decide and act upon it quickly. Good places do not stay on the market long! People constantly

lose good places due to indecision. Collect all of your rental information before you visit your first vacancy. You may want to fill out an Apartments Unlimited application form. These forms are comprehensive and accepted by most landlords. Have a credit report with you and give yourself an edge over the next guy. Landlords will be impressed by your organization and preparedness. As well, you’ll save money by not having to shell out

for each and every landlord that requires one. Dress and groom as though you are going to a job interview. In many respects it is the same. Landlords of really good units usually have their pick of several applicants. They are looking for: • Someone both able and responsible enough to pay rent on time. • People who will treat them and their property with care and respect.

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• Quiet tenants who will not be disturbing to other tenant or neighbors. Always keep your appointments and always show up on time. Noshows are a major source of frustration for building managers and landlords. Don’t get discouraged. Finding a great place is not easy, but it is well worth the effort. Keep your chin up, get back on the phone and remember to always sound cheerful!

12 Things to Pack Last by: Move.com Things you will want to have around for the move...

1. Extension cords, batteries. Everything’s electric these days it seems. Computers, CD-players, your Walkman, all those little gizmos you just can’t seem to live without. So it just makes sense to keep that extension cord or pack of new batteries right on top and within easy reach.

4. Snack, pizza or fast food coupons. You’re going to work up a hunger so think about treating yourself to a quick bite or a night out at Mickey D’s.

2. Tools. We’re talking hammers and screwdrivers, nails and screws, scotch tape, duct tape and especially, a tape measure.

6. Cell phone or regular telephone with plug -put these within easy reach. There’s always potential for an emergency.

3. A bottle opener and glasses. Thirst always seems to come first -particularly if you have to lug that stuff by yourself. Dehydration is a sneaky beast, so be prepared.

7. Sufficient cash. Duh ... but if you’re opening a new bank account you may have to wait for your first check to clear. Traveler’s checks wouldn’t hurt either.

5. Address book or PDA. Keep those important telephone numbers handy.

8. A copy of your lease and personal ID such as a driver’s license. And speaking of banking, if you’re starting a new checking account (or applying for utilities service) you’ll need proof of your new address too. 9. Cleaning materials. Especially paper towels, accidents do happen. 10. Light bulbs, a small lamp (perhaps a flashlight). It may be dark when you finally move in. 11. Alarm clock. You don’t want to miss your first day at school, right? 12. Box cutter. Don’t pack this puppy at all! It’s the first thing you’ll need to open your packages.


36 Daily Egyptian JOHN O. ANDERSEN Move.com My spouse and I are both middleaged. We have been married for eleven years. We have two children ages 10 and 8. We have zero personal debt. We have a spotless credit history. We have been profitably self-employed for seven years. We have put away a substantial sum of money for retirement. And we are renters by choice. We are renters because renting meets our needs better than owning a home. Situations change, however, so we will stay open-minded to the home ownership option. But at least in the next 5 years, we will not be in the housing market. Nor will we save specifically for a down payment. In a culture in which home ownership is supposedly the ticket to middle class respectability, we often feel constrained to defend our choice to rent. Yes, we confess our deviance from conventional wisdom on this issue. Yet with each passing year and steady accumulation of financial assets, we feel more comfortable with our questioning of the accepted notion that home ownership is the only way to go. Why rent? We like the flexibility of renting. In 1997, we moved from Indiana to Oregon. We were grateful to be free to move when we wanted without the burden of selling a home before we left. Granted, in some markets selling a home is not much of a fuss because it can be done quickly and profitably. Many markets, however, are less favorable. With relatively limited leisure time,

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The Case for Renting we enjoy the lesser maintenance and repair demands of renting as compared with owning. When we do have time together, we like to play, not work on the house. Some people have time for both. In an ideal situation we would have time for both, but when forced to make a choice, we always opt for non-homeowner related activities such as travel, reading together, and visiting museums. Renting relieves the pressure to earn a large income or pursue dual careers. We have made a commitment to never get a mortgage that is more than double our annual income. This is to avoid becoming “house poor” (in our opinion, not having enough left over to invest in savings and for fun activities right now). Currently we live in a three bedroom “starter” non-fixer-upper home that likely sells for a minimum of $160,000. If we were to put 20 percent down on a $160,000 home, we would have a mortgage of $128,000. Considering the no-more-than-double our income rule, this would require an annual household income of $64,000 or greater. We do not earn that much yet because some time ago we made the two decisions. We want to homeschool our children. Thus, one spouse will be out of the work force; in this case, Mandy. And we want our business to remain a solo business. This is because I have a strong preference to work alone, and avoid the stress of employing someone else. We are content with the reality that our income is necessarily limited by the hours I can work. Because of our desire for simplicity, and, to the greatest extent

possible, hassle-free days, we favor this less remunerative option. We believe that changing this in order to “qualify” for a mortgage wwould be a bad move. Our rent is less than the monthly expenses of owning the home in which we live. The upshot of this is that lower cost renting enables us to invest those savings and other funds in a big way. Here’s where we funnel those savings: • Family travel: Each year, along with around five local 1-3 day camping trips, we like to take a 2-3 week vacation. We’ve been to England to visit Mandy’s family. Another year it was San Francisco and LA (by train). Then it was a long distance car trip to Madison, Wisc. and back. Next year it will be another train ride down the coast (this time riding in first class--the sleeper car). And beyon that, we think it will be time to “cross the pond” again and reacquaint ourselves with England. • Short-term savings: We try to set money aside for big-ticket items in the future, like replacing our 11-yearold car. We intend to pay cash for the replacement. • Medical fund: We have a major medical policy with a $5,000 deductible. We are working to build up a separate account earmarked solely for doctor bills. Once we reach $5,000 in that account, we will let it sit and accumulate interest. Right now, if we were buying the home in which we live, we wouldn’t have money for those three priorities. So when people go on about how renting is “money down the drain,” we silently disagree. As demonstrated

above, renting enables us to accumulate more than sufficient “equity” to help us reach our financial goals. We have always had good landlords. Horror stories about landlords abound, but having been a renter now for over 15 years and Mandy, for her entire life, we do not have any horror stories to report. On the contrary, we have many good memories. Once after a heavy downpour in Indiana, we noticed a few small water spots on our bedroom ceilings. We notified the landlord. After looking at the situation (which was not dire and repairs could have waited for a year with no further damage), he promptly contracted to have the entire roof replaced. This landlord also trusted us to call plumbers and electricians (he gave us his approved list) and just send him the bill or deduct it from our rent. When we first signed the lease, he told me that he saw himself as the best landlord a person could ever have, and in the four years we lived there, he proved it. Our experience leads us to conclude that if you choose landlords wisely, keep their property clean, and pay your rent promptly, the chances of having a positive experience are very good. Renting a small place makes it difficult to accumulate things. Basically, we do not have anywhere to put the stuff. We suspect that if we owned a home with more space, we would buy more stuff to fill it. We’ve observed that the psychology of home ownership frequently induces people to accumulate more things than if they were renters. We fear we might fall into the same trap.

To be fair, we know of homeowners who are as frugal or even more so than we are. And, we acknowledge that out-of-control spending and home ownership are not necessarily linked. Nevertheless, renters in our particular community have a built-in excuse for not accumulating stuff (we are supposed to be “poor”), hence, nobody applies pressure. We like that a lot. Renting is simply a better choice for us. It’s not my intention to persuade homeowners to sell their homes and become renters again. Many homeowners could show me how their financial situation is better as a result of owning a home. I do not question their claims. And I freely admit that in many cases, if you can afford to, it makes more sense to buy than to rent. Nevertheless, our lifestyle preferences and finances decidedly favor renting. Others who are in major transition periods (changing careers, going back to school, building a business, downshifting, etc.), or have timeconsuming hobbies, or major interests unrelated to home projects, may also find that renting is a good interim, if not permanent option. We like renting. It simplifies our lives, preserves our time and energy for the things we are passionate about, and makes it possible for us to build a solid financial future. We cannot ask for much more than that.

John O. Andersen is the author of Uncoventional Ideas: A Collection of Short Essays Which Question Mainstream Thinking.


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Checklists to simplify your moving day Move.com Planning the move has been difficult enoughdon’t get bogged down with the final details. Print this handy Moving Day Checklist to ease the stress of moving day. Checklist for moving day • Finish last-minute cleaning. • Take the garbage out. • Turn off the water heater and set the thermostat to 55 degrees. • Plan ahead for what you’ll need the first day after your move. Packing a separate bag with your toiletries, a change of clothes, etc. will avoid unnecessary scrambling or a run to the local store. • Finish all last-minute packing. • Notify a close friend or relative of your itinerary in case of emergency. • Meet with the apartment manager or landlord and do a final walk-through of the apartment. • Get a copy of the apartment inspection and damage report for your records. • Keep a flashlight handy in case you arrive at your new place after dark. Checklist for moving yourself • Get contact information for the rental business-you never know what might happen during your move. • Pick up the truck bright and early (or even the day before). • Make sure it has a full tank of gas. • Do an inspection of the vehicle in order to note any body damage before your rental. • Buy any last minute furniture covers, pads, boxes, bubble wrap, etc. • Buy a padlock to secure the door of the truck (if it does not have another lock). • Buy a map or get directions to your new home.

• Make an inventory list of what items are in which boxes. This is accomplished by numbering the boxes and labeling which room the items belong in. • When packing the truck, make sure the items you’ll need first are loaded in last (ie. kids toys, kitchen items, telephone and radio) to make access easier. • Use common sense when loading your truck by keeping in mind the size, sturdiness, and weight of your boxes. • Return the truck with the same amount of gas as it had when you rented it. • Do another inspection to insure you will not be charged for any damage that you did not cause. Checklist for moving with professional movers • Check the mover’s inventory to be sure that you agree with the mover’s judgment on the condition of your household goods. Take photographs if there is a dispute. • Make sure you get a copy of the inventory. • Load items you are taking with you on the trip, including luggage. • Search every room before the van leaves. • Check the Bill of Lading for completeness before you sign it. Retain a copy for your records. • Record the van driver’s name and give him contact numbers at the destination. Confirm directions to the new residence with your driver. • Check the condition of each carton and household item as it is unloaded. List all missing or damaged items on the inventory form. • Since you will probably do some unpacking after the movers leave, make a note on the inventory form “subject to inspection for loss or concealed damage”. • Get to your new home before the movers. There could be a waiting charge if you are late.


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When a roommate wants to break the lease Move.com What to do if a roommate wants to move out and you want to stay Remaining roommates need to cover their legal flanks with respect to the departed tenant as well as the landlord. If your housemate has left during the middle of a lease or without proper notice in a month-to-month tenancy, leaving you responsible for all the rent, your personal relations will be rocky at best. Probably the last thing you want is to have your errant roommate reappear expecting to move back in. A co-tenant who wants to leave in the middle of a tenancy is legally responsible, if she is a monthto-month tenant, for giving the landlord proper written notice and paying rent through the end of the notice period. If there’s a lease, the tenant should either get permission from the landlord to leave early or, if this is impossible, find a new tenant who is acceptable to the landlord. If a co-tenant simply leaves, the fallout can be serious. What to do if you want to stay The unauthorized departure of a co-tenant gives the landlord the option of evicting the rest of you, even if you are able to pay the full rent. The landlord has this option because breaking the

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f your housemate has left during the middle of a lease or without proper notice in a monthto-month tenancy, leaving you responsible for all the rent, your personal relations will be rocky at best. lease or rental agreement by even one tenant is a violation of a key lease term (the length of stay), for which all tenants are liable. In practice, however, your landlord will probably let you stay if it will keep a steady stream of rent money coming in and keep the place occupied by stable, non-destructive tenants. So if you pay the rent after a co-tenant has broken the lease and left, the landlord will probably not evict you and other tenants unless: • You are a troublesome tenant, and this is a golden opportunity to be rid of you • Your income doesn’t appear sufficient to cover the rent in the future. In this case, if you can assure the landlord that you can promptly bring in a good, law- and lease-abiding new co-tenant, you might be able to salvage your tenancy. In the meantime, you may need to ask permission to pay the rent late or in installments. Or, ask the landlord to use the departed tenant’s share of the security deposit to help pay the rent until you find an acceptable replacement. Always get your landlord’s approval before moving in with a

new roommate If a co-tenant takes off and leaves you facing the entire rent, you may be tempted to simply move in another roommate, bypassing the landlord’s application process. Don’t! Your lease or rental agreement probably prohibits unauthorized sublets. If it does, bringing in a new tenant — even a great one — without your landlord’s okay violates your agreement and gives your landlord a watertight reason to evict you. Instead, keep your relationship on an honest footing and get your landlord’s approval for a replacement tenant. How to deal with a departing roommate To avoid such surprises, try to get your former roommate to sign an agreement, making it clear that the departing tenant: • Will pay a stated amount of rent and utilities. If you rent under a written rental agreement, this will normally be rent and utilities for 30 days from the date the departing tenant gave written notice (or left without notice) unless a new roommate comes in earlier and covers these costs. If you rent

under a lease, the amount owed will depend on when a new cotenant, acceptable to the landlord, is ready to take over. If, despite your best efforts, you cannot find an acceptable replacement, the departing tenant will be liable for the rent for the balance of the lease. • Will pay for any damage she caused to the rental unit. • Will pay for rent and damage no later than a stated date. • Has moved out for good and gives up any claim to be a tenant. But what if you and the departing roommate can’t work things out, and the departed cotenant shows no signs of paying? If your roommate is long gone or out-of-state, you may want to grit your teeth, pay his share and forget it, since trying to find him, sue him and then collect the judgment is likely to be more trouble than it’s worth. On the other hand, if your exroommate is still in town and has a source of income, consider taking the time to sue him in small claims court for unpaid rent, damage to the rental unit, unpaid utilities and your costs to find a replacement co-tenant, such as advertising.

Then, if your ex-roommate still doesn’t pay up, you can collect what you won in court from his bank account or wages. What to do if you want to move out, too If your co-tenant skips out, leaving you in the lurch, you may decide that it’s not worth the hassle of trying to stay and rustle up another roommate. To ease your departure and forestall the landlord from keeping your security deposit to make up for unpaid rent, or listing you as a deadbeat at the credit bureau, follow these steps: If you are a month-to-month tenant, give the required amount of written notice (usually 30 days) immediately. Don’t wait until you can’t pay the next month’s rent and receive a termination notice. If you have a lease, let the landlord know in writing that you plan to move because you cannot afford the rent without your cotenant. Before you move, be extra accommodating when it comes to showing the unit to prospective renters. Facilitating a quick rerental is not just a courtesy to your landlord, but to your advantage as well, since the sooner a new tenant takes over, the sooner your liability for the balance of the rent due under the lease ends. In addition, do your best to find an acceptable replacement tenant yourself.


August 2010

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Transfers are new trend BRANDON LACHANCE Daily Egyptian

Professional athletes are not the only ones switching area codes as transfer rates have increased in collegiate athletics. John Shafer, director of athletics at Southeast Missouri State University, said transferring is at the highest rate it has ever been in his 40 years of experience in intercollegiate athletics. Shafer’s resume includes 37 years with four different teams in the Southeastern Conference. He said losing a student athlete is a wash when it comes to finances, but costs institutions when it comes to education and time coaches spend finding players and teaching them once they have committed. “The only money lost would be money on recruiting,” Shafer said. “If a scholarship player is lost, we use it on someone else. The major loss is in time academically. It’s not like we will lose $100,000 on a kid.” Transfers have been more common at SIU recently as well with athletes such as Kevin Dillard, Anthony Booker, Nick Evans, Dana Olsen, Ellen Young, Eric West and Chase Miller — among many others — all departing their respective programs within the last four years. SIU Athletic Director Mario Moccia said transfer student-athletes affect SIU in three different areas: team aspect, finances and possibility of penalties authorized by the NCAA. Moccia said a dollar amount can’t be put on a student’s education but a transfer student is an investment containing funds on education, housing and meals. Mark Scally, SIU associate athletic director, also said a dollar figure cannot be assigned to losing or gaining a transfer athlete. He said a checkbook could not be figured out when it comes to recruiting cost either. “When our coaches travel, they go all over the country,” Scally said. “So, I don’t know if you can put a dollar figure on, hey, it cost $23 to go see some-

body play at SWIC (Southwestern Illinois College) or $5,000 to go see someone play in Orlando.” Moccia said no one could predict if a student would leave early after coaches has heavily recruited him or her. He said it doesn’t matter which issue sends a student packing — it always affects the team. “When someone leaves your team, a lot of things can happen you can’t foresee when you recruit someone,” Moccia said. “Either they get homesick, there is a coaching change, they don’t like the direction of the team or they have a family member that’s ill. “ He said college athletic programs also have to be weary of the NCAA’s academic progress rate. Moccia said the rule puts a point value on students’ academics and whether a school can retain them. Shafer said one point is given to an athlete for being eligible to participate in sports and another is given if the athlete comes back instead of transferring. He added the standard point score for every individual sports team is 925. If a team drops below 925, the NCAA can endorse penalties such as taking scholarships away. Shafer said post-season appearances could be erased as well if failing to meet the score becomes routine. Moccia said he likes that the rule has been attached to every sport and program in every university or college because of what it prevents. “They enforced the rule because they don’t want people running kids out of programs or limit the amount of kids transferring,” Moccia said. He said the positives of transfers leaving or coming is a unique balancing act. Moccia said it might be the best idea for student-athletes to leave because they don’t fit in a program, but it might be sad to see other students leave. “You might take a transfer that is a bad fit for the team or you might work out great like a Brandon Jacobs or Deji Karim,” Moccia said.

Brandon LaChance can be reached at blachance@dailyegyptian.com or 536-3311 ext. 282.


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Karim runs up the ranks with Jaguars BRANDON LACHANCE Daily Egyptian Brandon Jacobs and Bart Scott are no longer the only players in the NFL representing SIU — Deji Karim has arrived.  The Jacksonville Jaguars and Karim, who ran a 4.37 forty and had a 43 inch vertical on his pro day, have agreed to a four-year contract. The team drafted him with the 180th pick in the sixth round of the 2010 draft. The deal is worth $1.9 million with a $110,000 signing bonus, according to Rotoworld.com, an MSN affiliate. There are three running backs in Jacksonville’s camp besides Karim and starter Maurice Jones-Drew: Rashard Jennings, Chad Kackert and Allen Patrick. Jennings was the primary backup last year. Karim has gotten the attention of his coaches and team scouts, according to a report on Rotoworld.com. “After showing homerun-hitting ability and video-game moves ... he’s expected to battle Jennings for the primary backup job,” Rotoworld.com stated. When the season starts each NFL team can only have three running backs on their active roster. “It’s a fun competitive environment. At the end of the day we know it’s a business and cuts will be made,” Karim said. “We know the deal.” Karim said Jones-Drew has been his mentor on and off the field. The fiveyear veteran lets him know if he is doing something wrong on the field and helps him go over the playbook, Karim said. He said learning under Jones-Drew has been a valuable process. “I’ll definitely listen to him; he is a premier

Former SIU running back Deji Karim breaks through a tackle during a Nov. 14 game against Missouri State where the Salukis beat the Bears 44-24 in the last regular season game at McAndrew Stadium. FILE PHOTO

back in the league,” Karim said. “I’m going to continue to grow under him.” Karim said the NFL is different from college football in many ways. He said he had never practiced while wearing a helmet without pads, the playbooks are more complicated and the workouts are more intense. While Karim used the spotlight of being an SIU star player to propel him to the next level, the Salukis have taken advantage of having players of Karim’s caliber compete in their program.

SIU Athletic Director Mario Moccia said having players such as Karim succeed at SIU, and then go to the next level helps SIU in recruiting. He said SIU has established a track record of getting players to the next level in any sport. “Not only are kids saying ‘Hey, this is a great school to attend academically, I get to play in great facilities and by the way you have a lot of players playing at the next level,’” Moccia said. Moccia also said schools such as Texas

and Oklahoma have students selected in the draft every year, which is something programs in the Football Championship Subdivision don’t experience, making SIU a desirable destination for FCS athletes. The Jaguars finished up their off-season training activities in mid-June and began training camp July 30.

Brandon LaChance can be reached at blachance@dailyegyptian.com or 536-3311 ext. 282.


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McCall, Berry compete through cultural barriers

BRANDON LACHANCE Daily Egyptian Two of SIU’s best track and field athletes found there is more to international competitions than just who can put up the best mark. Jeneva McCall and Gwen Berry traveled to Miramar, Fla., to compete against international athletes from July 9-11 in the 2010 North American, Central American and Caribbean Athletic Association Under-23 Track and Field Championships. McCall said the event caused a culture shock as the athletes from the other 31 countries did not talk much to Americans. McCall said the number of participants for the discus and hammer throw events was small, making the miscommunication only a minor barrier. She said the real problem was at the hotel. “We were trying to interact with other countries and learn their cultures; they shut us down,” McCall said. Although McCall and Berry didn’t get to chat with as many people as they wished, they still met a few friendly faces from Mexico and Canada, McCall said. McCall said the 92 athletes representing the USA seemed distant with each other while the other countries’ representatives hung out in groups. She also said the social distance the athletes showed strenghtened her drive to win. Both SIU athletes set personal records in the hammer throw. McCall finished second with a throw of 210 feet, 6 inches while Berry came in third with a toss of 205 feet, 2 inches. Communication wasn’t the only issue McCall wished would have been worked out. She said the officiating could have

JESS VERMEULEN | DAILY EGYPTIAN

Junior thrower Gwen Berry practices the hammer throw April 19 at the throwing field behind McAndrew Stadium. Berry finished third at the 2010 North American, Central American and Caribbean been better as there were two instances of questionable calls. She said her last toss in the hammer throw competition was foul but judges ruled it fair, which gave her an undeserved second place Berry into third. John Smith, SIU assistant track coach, and McCall said the officials incorrectly marked one of her discus

tosses costing her the gold. “They mismarked her throw by two meters,” Smith said. “Jeneva threw it over the spotter’s head. He didn’t see where it landed, so he put the stake where he thought it landed — 15 minutes later I had three calls from coaches who were there telling me my girl got screwed.”

Athletic Association Under 23 Track and Field Championships, which were held in Miramar, Fla., July 9-11. Fellow teammate, Geneva McCall, finished second in both the hammer throw and the discus. Smith said officiating mishaps happen from time to time and he was still proud Berry and McCall only lost to an athlete from Canada who has been hammer throwing for nine years. He said they simply were under-experienced at this meet — both have less than three years of experience. SIU track and field head coach

Connie Price-Smith said they both did well representing SIU on a global stage. “They both (made personal records) down there at the end of a season,” Price-Smith said. “Anytime you can do that, you’re doing a good job.” NACAC was the last track event of the 2009-2010 season. The athletes will resume competition in December.

Athletes relish responsibility as community role models BRANDON LACHANCE Daily Egyptian Stadiums and arenas are not the only places SIU athletes are making a difference. Several SIU athletes have made efforts to give back to the community in different ways. Some have helped strengthen neighborhoods by taking part in church projects while others have guided children in programs such as SIU Head Start and the Boys and Girls Club. Tina Carpenter, program director for Boys and Girls Club, said it puts a smile on her face to see athletes give children the message that life is not all about sports and they have goals beyond athletics. She also said volunteer athletes are doing something special for the children who need it and themselves. “When I see SIU students come in here, I hope what they realize by interacting with these kids, is ‘Wow, I’m important in the lives of these kids. If I mess up, then that could lead them to say it’s OK for me to mess up,’” Carpenter said. Kevin Green, former Saluki offensive tackle who graduated in 2008 with a degree in recreation, said he had positive role models to look up to when he was young, so it is only right for him to give another child the

same opportunity. “The athletes I looked up to, like Warren Sapp and my brother, always did the right thing,” Green said. “I felt if I did the right things, kids would notice that.” Green has worked with the Boys and Girls Club since January. During the afternoon, he leads some of the 75 to 85 kids in routine stretches before they play in athletic activities such as football and basketball. Nina Okafor, junior track athlete from Carbondale, works alongside Green and other volunteers at the club. She said there is pressure to be a strong role model for the children. “Growing up in Carbondale, I feel there is a lot of pressure on me to do the right thing when I’m off the track because I know them,” Okafor said. “These kids need role models who carry themselves in a positive way.” Current and former SIU athletes take part in other programs as well. Teri Oliver, junior women’s basketball guard from Kokomo, Ind., said the team visits the Boys and Girls Club an hour and a half once a week. The team is also avid participants in the Just Read program. The team reads books to children in elementary schools. Oliver said she believes athletes have a responsibility to be role models for kids, but sometimes there is more pressure put on athletes than

DAN DWYER | DAILY EGYPTIAN

Former Saluki offensive tackle Kevin Green leads children during calisthenics Monday at the Boys and Girls Club of Carbondale. Program Director Tina Carpenter estimated somewhere between 7 to 15 SIU student athletes volunteer their time at the club each semester. there should be. “When we (the women’s basketball team) go out, it’s not that we don’t have as much fun as we could, but sometimes we are on our toes a lot because not only are we representing ourselves and our families, but we are representing SIU athletics and our coaches.” Joel Sambursky, former Saluki quarterback who started 49 consecutive games on his way to the SIU record books, has volunteered in the Carbondale area since he arrived in

2002, including building houses with the Habitat of Humanity program. Sambursky, who is a volunteer assistant coach for the Carterville Lions football team, participates in homeless ministries with the Vine Community Church. He said the memories of the glitz and glamour of being an accomplished athlete is something to remember, but those are not the moments he remembers the most. “A lot of people come up and talk to me about games they saw me play, such as Western Illinois when I threw

the touchdown pass on the last play of the game to beat Western for the first time in 18 years,” Sambursky said. “People will recall the memory of them running on the field. That means so much to me, but it doesn’t mean nearly as much as when people say, ‘You patted my kid on the head and told him to keep it up and keep working hard, now he is starting varsity quarterback and he remembers you saying those words.’ That means more than anything else.” Mike McElroy, who is a nominee for the Allstate American Football Coaches Association Good Works team and a pre-season Missouri Valley Conference All-American, volunteers with the Vine Community Church and has worked with SIU Head Start. While helping at Head Start last spring, McElroy found himself watching underprivileged children have fun writing letters in shaving cream all over a table. McElroy, who is also a nominee for the Buck Buchanan award, said he holds football and extra curricular accolades with the same level of honor. “I take a lot of pride in (being named to the Good Works Team),” McElroy said. “This is expected as an athlete. We get so much attention. This is a way to give back to the people in the community who support us.”


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46 Daily Egyptian

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August 2010

Technology boosts Salukis’ performance

RYAN SIMONIN Daily Egyptian One SIUC professor’s research could change the rehabilitation and training of future Saluki athletes. SIUC kinesiology professor Michael Olson said he has used motion capture equipment since 2008 in his research of the spine and lower back. Through his research, Olson said he is able to correct a person’s motions — including athletes’ techniques. With the use of infrared cameras, reflective body markers and computer software, Olson said he is able get a more detailed account of a person’s motion patterns. He said with a few keystrokes on the computer he has the ability to rotate the digital image to get different views of the person performing a task. “Anytime I analyze someone, I look at what is going on with their joints and I can get a rough idea of where that person is at a specific point in time but from that it can lead to provable analysis a few weeks down the line because I see if those changes in the recovery process have gotten better,” Olson said. He said the motion capture technology is great supplement to physical therapy in patients and it helps to determine any correctional measures that can be taken in the patients’ rehabilitation. Olson said the information gathered from this technology doesn’t make somebody a great athlete but it can help a good athlete become better. “Since I can get a good idea of how somebody’s body is moving as they perform an activity, I can then analyze their movements and provide a corrective measure for that task,” he said. While motion-capture technology could be used in the future for SIU athletes, Saluki teams have used other technology to enhance the training of its athletes. Ken Henderson, the associate head coach of

DIANA SOLIWON | DAILY EGYPTIAN

Director James Cameron and Saluki athletics might have something in common — making something good better with motion-capture equipment. In Davies Gymnasium room 121 the SIU baseball team, said he takes video footage of the players’ batting form and is able to analyze it in similar ways Olson uses motion-capture technology. He said after he takes video footage, he downloads it onto a computer, which is programmed with software that can synchronize the hitter’s swing with a professional’s form. He said up to four batters could be synchronized and analyzed at one time. Henderson said the technology is able to show things that cannot be seen by the naked eye. “Hitting is very complex and anytime we can

are eight cameras trained on an area that detect and transmit movements to a computer software program when one wears several small, sticky reflective balls on their body.

get detailed analysis on a player’s swing it is a good thing,” Henderson said. “I can tell our players something that they are not quite doing correctly but when I can show them they are able to understand more clearly.” SIU swimming head coach Rick Walker said technology is important in training swimmers as well because they cannot see what they are doing when they are in the water. He said most of a swimmer’s progress is made underwater. Walker said the swimmers sometimes wear tempo trainers, which beep every time athletes

should take a stroke in the water. He also said swimmers use underwater cameras while divers use video footage to analyze their technique. “It has changed the way we communicate with our athletes because we can give them verbal, audio and video feedback,” Walker said. “Even though technology has changed, it all comes down to how hard the athlete works.”

Ryan Simonin can be reached at rsimonin@dailyegyptian.com or 536-3311 ext. 269.


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Salukis boast 13th ranked recruitment class

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sually it takes freshmen some time, a year or so, to get acclimated to the pace of college tennis, but I really think this class is going to come in and make a statement right away. — Audra Nothwehr head coach

BRANDON LACHANCE Daily Egyptian The SIU women’s tennis team has added its highest-ranked recruiting class in the past decade to the program. The Tennis Recruiting Network ranked the Salukis’ incoming class 13th among mid-major teams. No other Missouri Valley Conference team finished in the top 25. Head coach Audra Nothwehr said she is excited about her three new players: Korey Love, Anita Lee and Aziza Butoyi. “It’s really exciting, because I think the returning players know they’re going to get pushed by these freshmen,” Nothwehr said. “Usually it takes freshmen some time, a year or so, to get acclimated to the pace of college tennis, but I really think this class is going to come in and make a statement right away.” Ame Blacketer, an assistant coach and graduate assistant in sports studies, said players are ranked on a five-star system. Blue chip means the player is one of

the best in their high school class. Five-star is the next best ranking, while one star is the worst. Love, a freshman from Port Orange, Fla., won singles in the Florida high school state championship in 2009, beating opponents ranked higher than her. According to the Tennis Recruiting Network, Love is ranked 96th in the nation and is a fourstar player. She finished 19-12 during her senior year, going 0-6 against blue-chip players, 5-3 against other four stars and 12-0 against players ranked below her. Love, who has played tennis since she was 7 years old, said she talked to a few big schools but liked SIU because of its campus environment. She also said the ability for her to enjoy tennis, instead of playing with the additional pressure big schools could bring, led her to SIU. “I really love Audra and the entire SIU team,” Love said. “The campus was beautiful and the school has a great academic reputation.” Lee, a freshman from Las Ve-

PROVIDED PHOTO

Anita Lee, a freshman from Las Vegas, Nev., is part of the 13th ranked recruiting class for the women’s tennis team. Lee was ranked the No. 1 player in Nevada. gas, Nev., won the Nevada high school state championships in singles and doubles. The network ranked her as the No. 1 high

school player in Nevada. She is ranked 126th nationally and is a three-star player. During her senior year, she was 10-9 against

four-star players. “That’s what is impressive about them,” Nothwehr said. “They already have a good ranking but they should be ranked even higher.” Butoyi, a freshman from Burundi, Africa, trained at the International Tennis Federation academy in South Africa with Saluki Anastacia Simons and 2009 MVC Tennis Player of the Year Fadzai Mawisire. Nothwehr said Simons and Mawisire told her about Butoyi’s talent. Butoyi in ranked No. 1 in Kenya. Nothwehr said she doesn’t know who will play and who will not, but the players from last year’s team are working hard this summer to keep their spot in the rotation. There are eight players on the team, but only six can represent SIU at competitions. “I don’t know who has those six spots,” Nothwehr said. “Usually I know this person will play this, this and this. I really don’t know how they’re going to fall in.” Blacketer said the coaches give the recruits and the returning players time to visit without the presence of coaches, giving them a chance to bond as a team. “We always ask the girls what they think of the recruits,” Blacketer said. “They all said they would fit in great.”

Brandon LaChance can be reached at blachance@dailyegyptian.com or 536-3311 ext. 282.


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Super conferences create concerns for mid-majors BRANDON LACHANCE Daily Egyptian Mid-major conferences could become a little more mid and a little less major. With the addition of the University of Nebraska to the Big Ten and the University of Utah and University of Colorado to the Pac-10, SIU Athletic Director Mario Moccia said there are concerns about negative consequences of the potential “super conferences.” Moccia said schools with larger student enrollment and big bank accounts would make even more money with television deals and media coverage while smaller schools would get pushed away if big schools continued to congregate in larger conferences. “(Four super conferences) would have been a further line of demarcation between the haves and have nots,” Moccia said. The potential for super conferences started to become a reality with the additions to the Pac-10 and Big Ten, and substantial amounts of money being offered for more schools to follow suit, Moccia said. The Atlantic reported the Big Ten Network was a crucial part in Nebraska’s move as the network is expected to pay out more than $7 million to each of the conference’s 11 schools. Nebraska will be the 12th school in the conference when it begins play in 2011. The report also said University of Texas, Oklahoma University, Oklahoma State University and Baylor could leave the Big 12. Other conferences such as the Big East and Atlantic Coastal Conference were in

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think it would give some of the super conferences the invitation to cut us out even further. — Mario Moccia SIU athletic director

the discussion ending as well. Moccia said he is glad there has only been minimal movement between conferences so far. He said schools at the mid-major level such as SIU are getting fewer opportunities to play in the NCAA basketball tournament every year. “It seems like the trend is to keep everything for themselves,” Moccia said. “I think it would give some of the super conferences the invitation to cut us out even further. Us being the ones with modest budgets, like $15 million instead of $50 to $100 million.” Putting the conference’s bank books aside, players recruitment could also be affected. But Justin Bocot, senior Saluki basketball player, said a conference realignment would do little to change the decisions of potential players. “Players are just going to play. They’re looking for a school that plays a similar style as they do,” Bocot said. “In our conference, you have to play defense.” He said the process would be the sawwme as it is now, except teams would face different competition.

Brandon LaChance can be reached at blachance@dailyegyptian.com or 536-3311 ext 282.

August 2010

Daily Egyptian Back to Campus, Fall 2010  

The Daily Egyptian student newspaper, Back to Campus edition, Fall 2010.

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