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Downtown Pittsburgh

Public Realm Action Plan

April 2016


Project Team

Thanks Envision Downtown Technical Committee Jeremy Waldrep and the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership Heinz Foundation

Hillman Foundation Ray Gastil Kristin Saunders Pilot workshop participants

John Bela / Project Director Anna Muessig / Project Manager Celsa Dockstader / Project Designer Tyler Jones / Project Designer

Sean Luther / Executive Director Phoebe Downey / Program Manager Sarah Kontos / Data Fellow

PSPL Volunteers Chuck Alcorn

Ellen Gaus

Anushree Nallapaneni

Molly Wight

Corianne Andrews

Colten Gill

Kara Olson

Natalie Wilk

Matt Barron

Will Gregory

Kathy Pelegrinelli

Dan Yablonsky

Jim Blue

Greggoire

Max Pitulski

Jessica Ziemski

Abhishek Bodkay

Malcolm Hardie

Kate Radkoff

Caitlyn Braun

Duncan Henricks

Anna Salvador

Tracy Brindle

Horace Hou

Anika Shah

Tamara Cartwright

Tracy Hudak

Kelsey Simpson

Smriti Chauhan

Lin Hou

Dave Sobal

Rene Cuneca

Greg Kobulnicky

Martha Solomon

Costas Connors

Sarah Kontos

Michael Studt

Melissa Dougherty

Christina Lauble

Becky Thatcher

John Downey

Keertana Lingama

Jeremy Waldrup

Sabrina Estudillo

Sean Luther

Matthew Weibaum

Akshali Gandhi

Mike McAllister

Katie Wettick


Contents 1 / Why a Public Realm Action Plan? 2 / Build a Vision from Eye Level: Public Space and Public Life in Pittsburgh 3 / Embracing Public Life: a Vision and Strategies for Downtown Pittsburgh 4 / Taking Action: Pilot Projects 5 / Next Steps 6 / Data Appendix


Life

Space

Buildings


“we measure what we care about”- Jan


1

Why a Public Realm Action Plan? An action plan is… •

a framework to guide investment in the public realm.

a plan that tests strategies through pilot projects


Why a Public Realm Action Plan?

Livable cities are in high demand This matters in the 21st century, where cities need to compete for talent. And where livable neighborhoods need to be accessible to all people Pittsburgh was ranked #1 for livability


Why a Public Realm Action Plan?

Investing in Place, APA, 2014


Why a Public Realm Action Plan?

Investing in Place, APA, 2014


Why a Public Realm Action Plan?

Investing in Place, APA, 2014


Why a Public Realm Action Plan?

Investing in Place, APA, 2014


Why a Public Realm Action Plan?

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Downtown PGH hasn’t comprehensively addressed its public realm in years


Why a Public Realm Action Plan?

To reach its goals and stay competitive, Pittsburgh needs a world class public realm.


Project Process

SEPT. 2015

Kick-off Site walks + analysis

OCT. 2015

Discovery Public Space / Public Life Survey

DEC ‘15 FEB ‘16

MARCH 2016

Refine

Deliver

Present hunches and workshop pilots

Present Final Action Plan

Implement!


2

Build a Vision From Eye Level: Public Space and Public Life in Downtown Pittsburgh


Build a Vision from Eye Level Guiding Question:

What are the existing patterns of Life in Downtown Pittsburgh?


Build a Vision from Eye Level Guiding Question:

What type of Life do you want to cultivate in Downtown Pittsburgh?


Build a Vision from Eye Level

Public Space Public Life Survey


Build a Vision from Eye Level

Why Collect Data?

To find human stories To inform strategy and design To provide evidence To make objective choices To benchmark progress To discover new opportunities To create urgency for change

0238


Build a Vision from Eye Level

the PSPL / Methods Wednesday, October 21 7am - 10pm Sunny all day Low - 43 째F High - 70 째F Saturday, October 24 7am - 10pm Light rain after 3pm Low - 48 째F High - 64 째F Amazing volunteers: a community affair! The survey was conducted by ~50 volunteers over two days from Pitt, CMU, Bike PGH, PDP and Envision, DPW, city planning, and other local urbanists

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Build a Vision from Eye Level Survey Locations 6TH ST GATEWAY CENTER

7TH & PENN

PENN AVE

LIBERTY AVE

POINT STATE PARK WOOD ST & 6TH LIBERTY AVE

MARKET SQUARE

MARKET ST

MELLON SQUARE

SMITHFIELD ST

GRANT ST

STEEL PLAZA

PENN STATION


Build a Vision from Eye Level Public Life

# WALKING

# CYCLING


Build a Vision from Eye Level Public Life

STANDING

WAITING FOR TRANSIT

SECONDARY SEATING

BYO SEATING

LYING DOWN

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

CULTURAL ACTIVITY

COMMERCIAL ACTIVITY

CHILDREN PLAYING

AGE + GENDER

BENCH SITTING

CAFE SITTING


Build a Vision from Eye Level Public Life

PAVEMENT QUALITY

TREE CANOPY

PAVEMENT MATERIAL

SEATING

FACADE ACTIVITY

LIGHTING


Build a Vision from Eye Level

Public Life Highlights


Public Life / Highlights

1 Downtown looks like a CBD Not a complete neighborhood

e! k i sp e im t h c n u l Liberty and 8th

g n i rn e o t m no mmu co

Smithfield and 6th

fe i l t h g i n e som

Gateway Center

Weekday data: hourly counts


s i e r ch a u n q u s r t rb e k r o ma spot f % 0 e 5 h t s p o dr d n e k wee

Public Life / Highlights

2 50% less public life on the weekend means people don’t choose to come downtown

Market Square

RAIN!

Weekend

e! k i sp e im t h c n u l

data: hourly counts

Liberty and 8th

g n i rn e o t m no mmu co

Smithfield and 6th

fe i l t h g i n e som

Gateway Center

Weekday data: hourly counts


Public Life / Highlights

3 There is no network that supports everyday cycling Bridges are busy, but where do people cycling go from there?

People cycling / Weekday 4pm Evening Commute


Public Life / Highlights

4 Downtown is full of adults

Typical age mix Downtown

Saturday at Katz + EQT Plaza

Seniors, Kids, and Teens

Seniors, Kids, and Teens

Pedestrians

(Stationary Activity 8am)

With some exceptions. Where are young and old people choosing to go instead? How can we learn from places and times that do have multi-generational public life?


Public Life / Highlights

5 13% standing

Transit Riders Rule!

At key times bus riders account for

71% waiting for transit

30-85%

of stationary activities 5% bench sitting 2% cafe seating 9% secondary seating

Liberty and 7th Weekday average


Lots of activity at Market Square!

Public Life / Highlights

6 Downtown has some open space gems

Healthy mix of activities at Point State Park

But some spaces with comparable qualities aren’t performing as well.

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Stationary Activity Types

Standing

Sitting

Active


Build a Vision from Eye Level

Public Space Highlights


Public Space / Highlights

1 Discontinuous pedestrian network Pavement quality varies in downtown. There is a solid core, but the edges are crumbling and Smithfield is patchy.

Pavement Quality


Public Space / Highlights

Fair

Good

Poor


Public Space / Highlights

2 Uneven Facade Quality Active facades make pedestrians feel safe, and make the walking experience pleasant. There are many active facades downtown. But there are also lots of banks, federal buildings, vacant buildings, and parking garages that make the walking experience uninteresting or unsafe. Facade Quality


Public Space / Highlights

Vibrant

Inactive

Active

Dull

Monument

Parking Lot


Public Space / Highlights

3 Public Space / Public Life Mismatch Spaces with similar public space profiles have very different user profiles.

480

Market Square

cafe seats

200

280

public seats

public seats

Average weekday staying activities

22

Mellon Square

Average weekday staying activities

132 Market Square

Mellon Square


Build a Vision from Eye Level

Key Findings


Build a Vision from Eye Level / Key Findings

1 Downtown is a thriving business district 113,000 people work downtown every day. $438M was invested in Pittsburgh technology companies in 2014

source: 2015 PDP state of the downtown


Build a Vision from Eye Level / Key Findings

2 ‌with major recent investments like PNC place. And more on the way


Build a Vision from Eye Level / Key Findings

3 Downtown is a multi-modal transit hub 54% of commuters in Downtown Pittsburgh ride the bus or T (compared to 19% city-wide and 6% metro-wide)

source: 2015 PDP state of the downtown


Build a Vision from Eye Level / Key Findings

4 Nicely scaled, walkable downtown blocks


Build a Vision from Eye Level / Key Findings

5 Unique historical assets naturally celebrated by view corridors


Build a Vision from Eye Level / Key Findings

6 Plenty of open space and proximity to natural beauty 18% public space + 27% streets + sidewalks = 45% public realm


Build a Vision from Eye Level / Key Findings

7 A great culture of public life Pittsburghers know how to take over public space during sporting events, festivals, red lights and theater events


Build a Vision from Eye Level / Key Findings

8 Downtown is becoming more mixed-use 300 restaurants - spreading out from the Cultural District. Point Park University enrolls 4,000 students. 1,000 undergraduates live on campus


Build a Vision from Eye Level / Key Findings

9 Downtown is a growing residential center 12,000 people choose to live in the greater downtown area - with 4,000 more units of housing on the way

source: 2015 PDP state of the downtown


Build a Vision from Eye Level / Key Findings

10 Growth can be shared by everyone A National Bureau of Economic Research 2014 report named PGH the second best U.S. city for intergenerational economic mobility


Build a Vision from Eye Level / Key Findings

11 Pittsburgh has the world’s best bus stop

Pairing a crowded bus stop with the comfortable amenities of Katz Plaza is a great match: comfortable transit waiting experience and activated plaza.


Build a Vision from Eye Level / Key Findings

12 It also has some poor ones Too many bus stops in Pittsburgh have next to zero amenities for transit riders. Without a dignified waiting experience it’s no surprise stops appear disorganized and cause a conflict with people walking and with shop owners.


Build a Vision from Eye Level / Key Findings

13 Some public spaces are congested - and others empty Many privately owned public spaces are often closed to the public - or difficult to access.


Build a Vision from Eye Level / Key Findings

14 Some streets try to serve too many systems at the same time. Conflicts between pedestrians, cyclists, busses, and private vehicles on Pittsburgh’s narrow streets means pedestrians and cyclists often get the short end of the stick


Build a Vision from Eye Level / Key Findings

Downtown Pittsburgh has incredible assets and spirit of public life, but its public spaces are not serving the people that need it most and not welcoming to the new users and uses that would make it a dynamic neighborhood


3

Embracing Public Life: A Vision and Strategies for Downtown Pittsburgh


2030 Vision

Embracing Public Life in Downtown Pittsburgh

21st Century Transit

Making room for Public Life

People-First Pittsburgh

World Class Waterfront City

Downtown is a Complete Neighborhood

Strategies

Unlock the potential of the public realm to meet the demand for public life Use the public realm to explore the kind of life you want to create downtown

Retail

Love your transit riders

Enhance pedestrian connectivity & expand cycling networks

Prioritize different modes on different streets

Create more invitations for social mixing

Celebrate and enhance Downtown district identities

Pilot Projects

1

2

3

A Great Route

Activate Urban Edges

Streetlife Lab

nt ainme Entert Food

Busines s

1. 2.

Create more reasons to to visit Downtown - and stay longer!

Take your great public spaces to the next level


2030 Vision

21st Century Transit Goal: 80% transit ridership by 2030 Pittsburgh deserves a 21st Century transportation network. Optimizing different modes on different streets and the way transportation serves different users will make riders happier and make more room for public life in Pittsburgh’s public spaces. Match mode to trip-type Ensure short trips are serviced by flexible above-ground shuttles and long trips serviced by more efficient modes. Intersection priority Prioritize busses at intersections: consider level of service based on the number of people transported - not by mode.

Celebrate transit stops Intermodal transit exchanges are opportunities for placemaking and reinforcing a strong civic identity.

Long trips Medium trips Short trips


2030 Vision

Making Room for People Goal: Room for people-first improvements Making a People-First Pittsburgh requires tradeoffs in how the public realm is shared. Some tradeoffs between private vehicles and people-first planning can also mean major strides towards sustainability goals. Traffic Calming Reduce all speeds in Downtown Pittsburgh to 25 mph. Gradually phase out single occupancy vehicles downtown People Streets No private vehicles on People Streets Better Curb Management Increase traffic capacity by restricting long-term parking and reduce conflict with deliveries. Make more space for short term staying - deliveries, taxis, and short term shopping

Paid Parking No free parking in Downtown Pittsburgh. Regulate parking with rates to make sure there is always 5-10% of parking spaces ready for use Park on the Periphery Gradually reducing parking spaces from the center of the city will slowly reduce the traffic load in Downtown Convert high-traffic streets Convert highways to allow pedestrian and cyclist connection to the waterfront

Slow Zone Convert High Traffic Streets Vehicles P

Parking Hub


2030 Vision

World Class Waterfront City Goal: Reconnect Pittsburgh to its waterfronts through a network of green streets Pittsburgh is a world-class waterfront. Embrace this identity by investing in an active waterfront, green streets, unique public spaces, and neighborhood connections Reunite the people with their waterfront Invest in creative solutions to the grade-separation between the street grid and the waterfront on both sides of Downtown Connective Tissue Treat downtown open space as a network, not a series of separate spaces

Neighborhood connections Improve pedestrian and cyclist connections to dramatic views of downtown from the Hill District and South Shore

Active Waterfront Green Streets Open Spaces Incline


2030 Vision

People-first Pittsburgh Goal: “Every route is a great route” Downtown Pittsburgh is graced with walkable blocks and humanscaled architecture. Its public right of way should put people first so walking downtown is comfortable and enjoyable for people of all mobility types. Safe Streets • Adopt a“Vision Zero” goal to work towards zero traffic deaths in downtown - and citywide • Ensure every sidewalk is in good condition and safe to walk down for people of all mobility levels • Prioritize pedestrians at intersections, especially highway overpasses Active Alleyways • Embrace the natural human scale of the alley network by activating alleyways and integrating them into the great walking paths of downtown Pittsburgh

Interesting and Active Streets • Ensure pedestrian corridors have active facades • Encourage outside cafe uses • Expand public seating where there are clear community stewards Bicycle Network • Create a network of protected bike lanes downtown so biking to work door-to-door is the most efficient way to commute • Pair downtown connections with city and suburban trails Complete People Streets • Leverage plans and policies already in motion to work towards a peoplefirst public realm

Pedestrians Cyclists Incline


2030 Vision

World Class Waterfront City Goal: Reconnect Pittsburgh to its waterfronts through a network of green streets Pittsburgh is a world-class waterfront. Embrace this identity by investing in an active waterfront, green streets, unique public spaces, and neighborhood connections Reunite the people with their waterfront Invest in creative solutions to the grade-separation between the street grid and the waterfront on both sides of Downtown Connective Tissue Treat downtown open space as a network, not a series of separate spaces

Neighborhood connections Improve pedestrian and cyclist connections to dramatic views of downtown from the Hill District and South Shore

Active Waterfront Green Streets Open Spaces Incline


2030 Vision

Downtown is a Complete Neighborhood Goal: Downtown has all the neighborhood amenities a resident or employee might need within a 10-minute walk

“All within a 10-minute walk” Develop a local criteria for a complete Pittsburgh neighborhood - then fill in what’s missing Downtown A regional destination Downtown is also a destination for art, sports, and recreation. Enhance art, culture, and recreational opportunities downtown.

Distinct identity Distinct neighborhood identities are created through strong community stewards and signature public spaces (including streets) where community gathering and conviviality can take place. Cultivate this capacity in local institutions and stakeholders. Festival culture Use Pittsburgh’s strong festival culture to pilot new permanent uses and activities downtown

Activity

A diverse mix of uses and users make the golden triangle a complete neighborhood.

Neighborhood Life

CBD

Morning

Afternoon

Evening


Embracing Public Life in Downtown Pittsburgh

Strategies

Love you r transit riders

1. Unlock the potential of the public realm to meet the demand for public life There are many public realm improvements that can have a dramatic improvement on the way people experience downtown Pittsburgh as it is today.

strian e d e p e c Enhan expand & y t i v i t connec orks w t e n g n cycli

Create a contiguous public realm network Treat the public realm as a connective tissue that bridges unique public space assets. Combine Pittsburgh’s great exiting public space assets like Market Square and Point State Park with the underutilized network of Privately Owned Public Spaces (POPS) and smaller, informal gathering spaces.

Take your gr public spa eat ces the next le to vel

Prioritize different modes on different streets

Don’t forget about transit riders while they’re waiting for the bus Pittsburgh has an excellent transit network, and lots of good work is going into supporting transit riders while they are on the bus. Expand this investment to the transit waiting experience. Take advantage of people waiting for the bus as an existing public life engine by stacking functions at transit stops and making them people places with seating, shade, food, and entertainment. Bus riders are customers too!

A beautiful public space isn’t worth much if it is hard to get to Connect Downtown’s public- and privately-operated open spaces and waterfront assets through pedestrian- and cyclist-friendly streets. Pedestrian and cycling paths are networks - they get better the more connected they are. Start by investing in sure-win projects that connect existing pedestrian and cycling infrastructure to itself. Then identify new routes for expansion that connect people to where they want to go.

Think carefully about how to prioritize certain modes on certain streets Key corridors in downtown Pittsburgh are doing too much, and none of it very well - especially for pedestrians and cyclists. Make room for new types of life on specific corridors by ensuring the comfortable and safe flow of pedestrians and cyclists.


Embracing Public Life in Downtown Pittsburgh

Strategies

Elevate public spaces to civic spaces by ensuring they invite people from different walks of life Interactions between people from different backgrounds can foster understanding and tolerance across socioeconomic divides. Create the conditions for this interaction by using the built environment and programming as a catalyst.

ore Create m for s invitation ing x social mi

2. Use the public realm to explore the kind of life you want to create downtown

Invite the type of life you envision in each downtown district Strengthen existing and nascent districts through a mix of hardware and software. Identify natural stewards of each subdistrict and help them build their unique identity.

Pittsburgh is changing. How can the public realm invite the type of life you want to see downtown?

Retail

nt ainme Entert Food

Busines s

Celebrat e an downtow d enhance n district identities

Create more reasons to to visit Downtown - and stay longer!

A complete neighborhood includes a variety of robust invitations to participate in public life - retail, food, entertainment, and business Pittsburghers know how to make their downtown come alive with special events, sports, and festivals. But, it lacks vibrancy in its ‘everyday’ public life, such as a vibrant nightlife, invitations for women, young people, families, and weekend activity. As downtown transforms into a complete neighborhood, it will need to invite new users into its public life.


4

Taking Action: Pilot Projects


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

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Ba rri er of Tra dit ion al Pla nn ing

Current Situation

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Vision •

Why Pilot a Vision?

Test an idea on a 1:1 scale. Engage more people than traditional planning ever can by engaging with people as part of their everyday routine

Shorten the distance between citizen and decision maker, and idea and implementation

Create a feedback loop between community need, intervention, and use

Fail fast. Make adjustments to a long-term vision based on real information

Envision the unimaginable

Manage risk inherent in capital projects by testing ideas in a low-risk environment before full-scale implementation


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Iterative Placemaking

Urban Transformation

Strategic Vision

Pilot

Pilot

Pilot

Pilot

Time


rocess Taking Action / Pilot Projects

, time-frame and typology, e a way to test new solutions scale invites existing and age in the process of changing needs and desires.

me and level of investment for g on the project goals and der to ensure a high level of level of maintenance should t the test period. A pilot niture and worn off paint can e of the intended effect and on.

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1 / Measure Collect baseline public life information International example SĂŁo Paulo Pilot

ven to be strong political ng, as they directly show how realm affect city life.

ere public life has been e information has been e information helps to inform ok like. The test then can be st the baseline public life pact. The findings from this ow the test should be refined or for a more permanent text, data collection should er the pilot implementation.

US example The Porch, Philadelphia

2 / Test Do before and after tests

3 / Refine Re-imagine the design, based on evaluation of tests


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Effective

Prioritizing Pilots

Move the needle on at least one key strategy - ideally more than one!

Tied to Vision

Start with projects that can display long-term visions and show best-practice solutions

Test new stakeholder + implementer relationships

Pilots should test new collaborations across silos between elected officials, city agencies and departments, the public, the nonprofits, the office workers and downtown residents

Feasible & Adaptable

Project can be tested quickly and cheaply - and can iterate in the future.

Leverage community stewards + existing investment Prioritize projects where stakeholders are engaged and/or where they are already working

Visible / iconic

Start with something people can see and experience. Selecting a highly-trafficked/ iconic/strategic location expands the conversation by simply being part of people’s everyday routines


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Test Strategies through Pilots

Streetlife Lab

3

1 A Great Route

2 Activate Urban Edges


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

PILOT ONE

A Great Route


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

A Great Route Goals A Safer Route / A Route for People What if every route downtown was a great route? This pilot tests public realm improvements in one of the busiest pedestrian areas of the city. Improve crosswalks and prioritize pedestrians in places where cars and people share space. An Interesting Route / A Street as a Place This route connects two of Pittsburgh’s most successful public spaces - but the place in between is dull. Make the connective tissue between Point State Park and Market Square just as interesting and engaging as these public space assets.

1 Tests Strategies:

Connecting Public Space Assets Thousands of people walk between Point State Park, Gateway Center, Gateway Station, and Market Square each day. But this is not yet a gateway for people. Test wayfinding and a public realm network that connects quality open spaces with quality streets and sidewalks. Champions of Better Routes Identity natural champions of better routes in Pittsburgh through outreach and events. Build an appetite for more active, high quality streets!

strian e d e p e c n a h n E xpand e & y it iv t c e n n co rks cycling netwo

Prioritize different mod e on different st s reets

Take you r public sp great ace the next s to level


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Uninteresting Walks

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Taking Action / Pilot Projects


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Is this really a gateway? Liberty at Stanwix


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

What if it were safer to cross here? Point State Park at Liberty


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

From Pilot to Permanent

6 months

15 years


Taking Action / Pilot Projects


New Crosswalk

Generous public space at Gateway Station

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Supergraphics Pave the Way

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Pedestrianactivated signal

Public art beacon For bes Ave nue

Paint and bollards curb extensions

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A hub of activity mid-way between public space gems

Fou rth Ave nue

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Seating for Transit Riders

Sta nw ix S tre et

Seating and Wayfinding

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Continue Bike Lane to Point State Park

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Taking Action / Pilot Projects

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Taking Action / Pilot Projects


Taking Action / Pilot Projects


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Elements of a Great Route

Planting Wayfinding

Ped Signal Public Art / Activation

Active Facades

Bringing dignity to the walking experience Walking should be a safe and comfortable experience, free from tripping hazards, conflicts with vehicles, and clear and safe intersection crossings.

Safe Crossing Seating

Walking should also be a fun experience, with interesting things to look at and interact with along the way. Elements of a great route details some of these qualities piloted in A Great Route.

Pedestrian Lighting Improved Paving


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

RESUR FACED louisville, KY

RESUR FACED louisville, KY

Pedestrian Crossings


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

RESUR FACED louisville, KY

RESUR FACED louisville, KY

Public Art & Activation


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

RESUR FACED louisville, KY

RESUR FACED louisville, KY

Pedestrian Lighting


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

RESUR FACED louisville, KY

RESUR FACED louisville, KY

Seating & Planting


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

RESUR FACED louisville, KY

Wayfinding


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Pilots as Outreach/ Software Pilots can be outreach tools in-and-of-themselves. Bringing the community meeting to the street can have a powerful impact on bringing more people into the conversation about urban change Programming, social events, and other public life catalysts, or “software” reinforce the material intervention of pilot projects, and vice-versa. Associations with place are formed because of unique and memorable experiences in these places. Here are some concepts for leveraging this pilot as outreach, and community partners to make the events a success:

Activities / Events •

Walkshop: Your Great Route Ask members of the public to draw their “favorite route downtown.” Gather into 2-5 routes, then walk them with an event at the end.

Gap to the Point Run a series of simultaneous events at Market Square and Point State Park to strengthen the connection between these two public space gems

Light the Way Launch a public art competition for the public art beacons attached to street lights on the way to Market Square. Launch a similar competition or commission for pavement Super-Graphics

Community Partners

• • • • •

Bike PGH Open Streets PGH Department of City Planning Riverlife Pittsburgh Art Commission


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Evaluating Success

GOAL METRIC

A safer route

What to measure: decrease in crashes, decrease in jaywalking

An interesting route

What to measure: increase in retail sales of adjacent businesses, decrease in poor/dull facades, increase in programming along route

A route for people / a street as a place

What to measure: increased pedestrian volumes, increase in diversity and presence of stationary activities, decreased secondary seating, decrease in poor/dull facades

Connected Public Space Assets

What to measure: Better navigation measured through intercept interviews

Champions of better routes

What to measure: increased demand for pedestrian improvements


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Conceptual Cost 6-month pilot

A Great Route

$175,000 - $225,000 Estimate

Supergraphics / Crosswalk Improvements / Ped signal $75,000 Public Art and Activation $8,000 Planting $18,000 Moveable Bleacher $39,000 for seven Wayfinding $27,000 Kiosk $20,000


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

PILOT TWO

Activate Urban Edges


Busi ness

Create more invitations for social mixing

Celebrate and enha downtown dis nce trict identities

Goals Reveal demand for life in this unique district / A strong identity for First Side First Avenue is graced with beautifully scaled architecture, narrow streets, and proximity to cultural anchors like Point Park University, and natural features like the Monongahela River. But there are few reasons to visit. Capitalize on the latent potential of the incredible history and humanscaled blocks of this street and put the surface parking lots on First Avenue to better use! Help identify local champions who will continue to cultivate and steward the district’s identity and public life. Prove the market for a greater variety of programs and amenities downtown Can downtown support a retail economy? Can food activate Firstside into the evening? Will local manufacturers and artisans help jump-start these activities downtown? This pilot tests the market for new uses, new businesses, and new life downtown. A more inviting urban edge Demonstrate a higher value than parked cars. Downtown has too much surface parking. Help the public re-imagine them as places for people through temporary programming and activation.

2

Entertainment Food

Activate Urban Edges

Tests Strategies:

Reta il

Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Create m ore r to visit D easons to ow - and sta ntown y longer!


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

o h o

People leave right after work

Activate Urban Edges

Many dull & inactive facades

Informed by Key Findings: Nearly 60% of Downtown’s key corridors have inactive or dull facades - often due to parking lots. Activate Urban Edges with a combination of commerce and culture to enhance public life, district identity, and economic activity.

! e m

Facade Quality

g s ’ t e

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9am

5pm

9pm

Weekday Peak - for all count locations


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

I could be so much more than a parking lot!

1st Avenue at Market Street


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Hey, where did the building go?

1st Avenue at Market Street


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

From Pilot to Permanent

6 months

15 years


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

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Golden Triangle

Active Laneway New Crossing Intersection Treatment

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Gra nt St

Ch err yW ay

Vill Pa age rk

Sm ith fiel d

Ma rke tS t

Ch anc ery Wa y

Sta nw ix S t

Bo ule var do f th eA llie s

Wo od St

Fir st A ven ue

Public Art / Activation Firs Pa tside rk

Pop-Ups Wayfinding Seating Planting

N


Testing new patterns of life on Firstside Test the market for new activities downtown while distinguishing the identity of Firstside as a place for art, culture, food, and retail. Pop-up hub attracts new activities. The illuminated lantern is a beacon for pedestrians coming from Market Square and fills in the urban edge.

Beer garden and movie theater/performance space Ma rke tS t

Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Fir st A ven ue

Active Laneway

Performing Arts Beer Garden serves as a flexible space for culture, with natural performance space, projection screen, and climbing wall.

Flexible social seating and greening

Pop-up vendors

N

Food trucks and coffee cart


Taking Action / Pilot Projects Activate Urban Edges/


Taking Action / Pilot Projects A Great Route / Pilot Improvements


Taking Action / Pilot Projects


Taking Action / Pilot Projects A Great Route / Pilot Improvements


Taking Action / Pilot Projects


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Elements of Active Urban Edges

Facade-Activation/Public Art

Pop-Ups Active Laneway

Before

After

Wayfinding

Seating

Planting

New Crossing


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

RESUR FACED louisville, KY

RESUR FACED louisville, KY

Vendors


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

RESUR FACED louisville, KY

Public Workshop

Culture + Activation

RESUR FACED louisville, KY

The Great Wall

Outpost


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

RESUR FACED louisville, KY

RESUR FACED louisville, KY

Social Furniture


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Resurfaced Louisville, KY


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Dekalb Market Brooklyn, NY


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

The Yard San Francisco, CA


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Pilots as Outreach/ Software Pilots can be outreach tools in-and-of-themselves. Bringing the community meeting to the street can have a powerful impact on bringing more people into the conversation about urban change Programming, social events, and other public life catalysts, or “software” reinforce the material intervention of pilot projects, and vice-versa. Associations with place are formed because of unique and memorable experiences in these places. Here are some concepts for leveraging this pilot as outreach, and community partners to make the events a success:

Activities / Events •

“1st Side Sundays” A series of events each Sunday (or, every first Sunday) that close the street to cars and celebrate arts, culture, and commerce near the riverfront. Build off events at Market Square and the Cultural District.

Open House History Get to know the companies, artists, and businesses on First Side through a series of open houses. Pair contemporary open houses with tours of the architectural and maritime history of the district.

Bank to Bluff Point Park University Dance Department leads a sitespecific dance and music festival that has its home base on First Avenue, and links the Monongahela and Allegheny waterfronts through culture

Community Partners

• • • • • •

Point Park University Dance Department Local Chefs - e.g. Smallman Galley Local Merchant’s Association Pittsburgh Art Commission Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation Local small manufacturers and artisans


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Evaluating Success

GOAL METRIC

Reveal demand for life in this unique district

What to measure: increase in pedestrian volumes, increase in number and diversity of stationary activities

Prove the market for greater variety of program and amenities downtown What to measure: increase in retail sales, investment in vacant or underutilized buildings on 1st Avenue

A more inviting urban edge

What to measure: decrease in dull facades, improvement in sidewalk quality

A strong identity for first side

What to measure: identify a local champion for 1st Avenue


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Conceptual Cost 6-month pilot

Activate Urban Edges

$500,000 - $1.5M

Super graphics $10,000 Public Art and Activation: movie screen/lantern/mural/lights $12,000 Planting and seating $63,000 Beer garden container $70,000 Retail containers ($75,000 ea) $450,000

Estimate


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

PILOT Streetlife THREE Lab


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Streetlife
 Lab

3

Goals Explore district character through public programming and streetscape standards Downtown Pittsburgh has an incredible range in urban character. Enhance and celebrate district identities by exploring experimental events, activities, and experiences while piloting new streetscape material palettes. A tool for engagement / gather public opinions for a new streetscape palette on Smithfield and in Downtown Test Streetlife Palettes on a 1:1 scale on an area of Smithfield Street to gauge community feedback - they can vote with their feet!

Tests Strategies:


 Evaluate material palette success Test materials on a 1:1 scale to understand how they hold up against the elements Street as a place for people: a safer and more enjoyable staying experience Invite more people to spend time on Smithfield Street A safer and more enjoyable walking experience Improve the walking experience of this street that serves more than 10,000 people walking per day

Love your transit riders

Enhance connect pedestrian ivity & e xpan cycling n etworks d

Celebrate and enhance downtown district identities


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Streetlife
 Lab Informed by Key Findings Streetscape material and quality can be a sign of district identity - or lack of it

Patchy paving types indicate breakdown in district identities

When a district has a strong identity - it is often apparent in a coherent streetscape palette that reinforces identity. If a district lacks a strong identity, this often shows up in the streetscape. Firstside, Smithfield Street, and Gateway each have an extremely varied paving palette. These areas could also have stronger identities. Smithfield Street has 50% fair or poor paving, reinforcing the fact that there are few or disorganized stewards of this corridor.

Brick Brick Terrazzo Terrazzo ExposedAggregate Aggregate Exposed Concrete Concrete SpecialPaving Paving Special Asphalt/ /Other Other Asphalt


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Streetlife
 Lab Informed by Key Findings

Smithfield has 50% poor or fair pavement and many active facades

Streetscape material and quality can be a sign of district identity - or lack of it When a district has a strong identity - it is often apparent in a coherent streetscape palette that reinforces identity. If a district lacks a strong identity, this often shows up in the streetscape. Firstside, Smithfield Street, and Gateway each have an extremely varied paving palette. These areas could also have stronger identities. Smithfield Street has 50% fair or poor paving, reinforcing the fact that there are few or disorganized stewards of this corridor.

Latent Potential: Locations with poor or fair quality pavement and active facades


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Smithfield used to be the center of public life in this city‌ It deserves to be reimagined!

Smithfield at Oliver


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Software: People, events and activities make streets vibrant and memorable Market Street Prototyping Festival


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

PNC Plaza

Hardware: A nice streetscape goes a long way


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

From Pilot to Permanent

6 months

15 years


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

3

Distinguishing District Character and Embracing Public Space Gems

Cultural District

The Nolli Map at right highlights areas in the public realm - streets, sidewalks, and open spaces. Together they comprise 45% of downtown Pittsburgh’s total land area.

4

This public realm is characterized by roughly six different districts. Each district has a distinct public life profile. Different people use the public realm at different times of the day, week, and year for different reasons.

Central Core

These districts can better serve their users by embracing their unique character and programming their public spaces accordingly.

5


 District, corridor, or citywide streetlife palettes can help reinforce these distinct identities and public life profiles.

Civic Corridor

1 Waterfront

2 Gateway

6 Firstside


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Elements of a Streetlife Palette

Greenery Greenery

Artistic Elements Public Art

Programming and Events

Lighting Lighting

Streetlife is both hardware and software A streetlife palette includes traditional elements that are part of a streetscape plan like paving materials and tree standards. It also includes recommendations for how to include public art and creative elements to encourage the public life profile desired.

Paving Paving

Guidelines Street Guidelines

Seating Seating


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Streetlife Software Programming, social events, and other public life catalysts, or “software” reinforce the material intervention of pilot projects, and vice-versa. Associations with place are formed because of unique and memorable experiences in these places. Here are some concepts for leveraging this pilot as outreach, and community partners to make the events a success. Pilots can be outreach tools in-and-of-themselves. Bringing the community meeting to the street can have a powerful impact on bringing more people into the conversation about urban change

Community Partners

• Parks Conservancy • The Port Authority • Department of City Planning • Department of Public Works • Office of Management and Budget • New Smithfield tenants • Community Design/Build groups (like Public Workshop in Philly) • Pittsburgh Art Commission • Open Streets Pittsburgh


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Walk to Work Day Celebrate this national day of pedestrian advocacy by hosting walk to work days along the Smithfield Street Streetlife Lab.

Walk SF San Francisco, CA


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Bench Lab Test different ways to add furnishings, play, and seating to Smithfield Street by hosting a design/build community workshop in Mellon Square. The city learns about preferences for seating on Smithfield, and participants get to take home their benches.

5x5 ArtPlace Washington, DC


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

River to River Open Streets Reinforce Smithfield Street as a North/South connector between the two rivers by holding a regular open streets event that closes the street to vehicular traffic and shows the public the value of this people street. Make sure to include activities that appeal to children and families to test the potential for downtown as a family-friendly place.

Sunday Streets San Francisco


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Walkshop Host an event where members of the public vote with their feet about which streetscape palette they prefer. Have a computer with “StreetMix� on hand so people can draw their ideal streetscape.

Dundas Street Workshop London, ON


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Evaluating Success

GOAL METRIC

A tool for engagement / gather public opinions for a new streetscape palette on Smithfield

What to measure: public sentiments gathered through intercept interviews and workshops, increased demand for public realm improvements

Evaluate material palette success

What to measure: durability of material and other furnishing selections over pilot timescale

Street as a place for people: a safer and more enjoyable staying experience What to measure: increase in number and diversity of stationary activities, decrease in secondary seating

A safer and more enjoyable walking experience What to measure: improved sidewalk quality


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Conceptual Cost 6-month pilot on one side of one block (250 feet long)

Streetlife Lab Paving $142,000 Public Art $2,000 Pedestrian Lights $20,000 Planting $7,000 Seating $4,000 Trash/recycling/bike racks $3,000

$150,000-$300,000 Estimate


5

Next Steps


Taking Action / Pilot Projects

Steps to a strategic vision Next Steps: prioritize investment and build momentum towards a common vision Measure/Test/Refine Continue to measure public space and public life in Downtown Pittsburgh through regular PSPL surveys which track Downtown’s progress towards its public life goals. Bring lessons outside the Golden Triangle Some pilots may have lessons for other parts of Pittsburgh. Where appropriate, re-deploy pilot concepts and processes elsewhere in the city where they can have a catalytic effect.

Commission a Streetlife Plan Take the lessons from PSPL surveys and pilot projects to craft an informed design brief for a Streetlife Plan that includes • “Hardware”: a set of standards, guidelines, and material palettes for street form • “Software”: a plan that choreographs programming and events, activities and experiences in downtown • a plan for streamlining and optimizing stewardship and care of the public realm


Taking Action / Steps to a Strategic Vision

1

21st Century Transit Small Pilot mode prioritization on Liberty Avenue Support the creation and activities of downtown walk/bike advocacy groups Medium Pilot optimized bus routing downtown Large Regional rail connections integrated into downtown

2

Making Room for Public Life

3

People-First Pittsburgh

Small Pilot limited loading times

Small Test new streetscape palettes 1:1

Enforcement of vehicular regulations

Pilot a great route

Review long-term parking strategy

Review financing for for downtown streetscape improvements

Pilot slow zone downtown Medium Encourage development on surface parking lots Large Removal of private vehicles on select streets Transition busways to lightrail Implement highway removal

Connect existing bicycle infrastructure Medium Give special treatment to highway overpasses so they are connections not barriers Create protected North/South bicycle connection(s) Large Initiate a new downtown streetlife masterplan

4

5

World Class Waterfront City

Downtown is a Complete Neighborhood

Small Celebrate access to the Monongahela River

Small Leverage festival culture to pilot new activities downtown

Create downtown public space working group that includes privately owned public space managers (POPS)

Determine what a downtown complete neighborhood means in Pittsburgh

Medium Include POPS in downtown comprehensive planning Connect pedestrian paths to the Duquesne Incline Large Ensure each downtown district has a signature open space that serves a distinct user profile

Initiate a streetlife improvement grant for activation, facade improvements, and other improvements Medium Include principals for a complete neighborhood into downtown comprehensive planning Large Identify new regional destinations that might thrive downtown


6

Data Appendix


Data Appendix: Survey Locations

15 count locations for people moving (walking and cycling) 12 counts of people staying 4 counts of age and gender of people moving 4 counts of age and gender of people staying


Data Appendix

People Walking


People walking / Weekday 8am Morning Commute

Findings: Some people walking to work

data: weekday hourly counts October 21, 2015


People walking / Weekday 12pm Lunch Break

Findings:

data: weekday hourly counts October 21, 2015

Busy for weekday lunch!


People walking / Weekday 4pm Evening Commute

Findings: Upper Smithfield is downtown’s transit hub

data: weekday hourly counts October 21, 2015


People walking / Weekday 7pm Nightlife

Findings: Nightlife is in Market Square and the Cultural District Most nightlife is in the Cultural District Little nightlife on lower Smithfield

data: weekday hourly counts October 21, 2015


People walking / Weekday & Weekend

Liberty and 8th

Smithfield and 6th

Findings:

Market Square

Downtown’s public life looks like a CBD - not a complete neighborhood Weekday: no morning commute lunchtime spike! some nightlife Weekend: market square is the spot for brunch weekend drops 50%

RAIN!

Gateway Center

Weekday data: hourly counts

Weekend


People walking / In Comparison

Findings: Weekday: PGH experiences a dramatic droop when other cities do not Weekend: Low weekend peaks


Data Appendix

Stationary Activity


Stationary Activities / Weekday

Findings: Market Square is popular Nice mix of uses at Point State Park No one at Mellon Square

data: average hourly counts by day October 21, 2015


Stationary Activities / Weekend

Findings: Diversity of uses at Market Square and Point Sate Park

data: average hourly counts by day October 21, 2015

Point Park increases use on the weekend - the only one


Stationary Activities / Weekday

Findings: Bus riders rule - 30% of all people spending time are waiting for transit. At key times on Liberty that figure is 85% data: average hourly counts by day

Market Square attracts lots of activity No one is sitting on Smithfield

October 21, 2015


Stationary Activities / Weekend

Findings: data: average hourly counts by day

Pittsburgh has some gems staying activities are diverse and robust in Point State Park and Market Square

October 21, 2015


Data Appendix

People Cycling


People cycling / Weekday 8am Morning Commute

Findings: Where are the bike commuters? Just as many commuters on the Smithfield Bridge as on Penn Avenue

data: weekday hourly counts October 21, 2015


People cycling / Weekday 12pm Lunch Break

Findings: Cycling picks up in the afternoon Bridges are busy But where are people cycling through downtown?

data: weekday hourly counts October 21, 2015


People cycling / Weekday 4pm Evening Commute

Findings: Smithfield Bridge is a busy bicycle route, as is Penn

data: weekday hourly counts October 21, 2015


People cycling / Weekday 7pm Nightlife

Findings: Not much cycling home in the evening

data: weekday hourly counts October 21, 2015


People cycling / Weekend 8am

Findings: Roberto Clemente Bridge busy in the morning

data: weekend hourly counts October 24, 2015


People cycling / Weekend 12pm

Findings: Bridges are busy - but where are people choosing to bike through the city?

data: weekend hourly counts October 24, 2015


People cycling / Weekend 4pm

Findings: Does cycling normally drop off on weekend evenings?

data: weekend hourly counts October 24, 2015


People cycling / Weekend 7pm

Findings: Not much cycling to weekend evening entertainment

data: weekend hourly counts October 24, 2015


People cycling / Weekday & Weekend

Cyclists

Ft. Duquesne Bridge

Roberto Clemente Bridge

BvA

Pt State Park Penn @ 7th

Smithfield Bridge

RAIN! Findings: Balanced recreational and commuter cycling Weekday: some nightlife Weekend: Is it normally this slow on weekend evenings?

Weekday data: hourly counts

Weekend


People cycling / In Comparison

Findings: Weekday: More AM bike commuting in other cities Weekend: Same weekend peak as other cities


Data Appendix

Age and Gender


Men & Women / Downtown

Findings: There are more men than women moving around downtown - but the farmer’s market flips this ratio by 10% Mellon Square is mostly men Farmer’s market is mostly women


Age Groups / Downtown

Greater Downtown

Pedestrians

Stationary

Seniors, Kids, and Teens

Findings:

Thursday Farmer’s Market Seniors, Kids, and Teens

Greater downtown is a multigenerational community - but its public life often isn’t. Youth and seniors make up 35% of the population in greater downtown, but only 10-20% of its public life - except at key times and locations

Wednesday Liberty @ 8th

Saturday Katz + EQT

(People Walking 3pm)

(Stationary Activity 8am)


Data Appendix

Pavement Quality


Sidewalk Pavement Quality / Downtown

Findings: Solid core But the edges are crumbling!


Sidewalk Pavement Quality / Key Corridors

Findings: Quality varies on key corridors 10,000 people per weekday day walk through Market Square lots of nice pavement! 10,000 people per weekday walk past Smithfield and 5th pavement is mixed 5,000 people per weekday walk down Grant at Liberty - nice pavement!


Sidewalk Pavement Quality / Key Corridors

Findings: In general quality is high, but some corridors bring down the general experience of being downtown


Data Appendix

Facade Quality


Facade Activity / Downtown

Findings: There are many active facades downtown. There are also lots of banks, federal buildings, vacant buildings, and parking garages


Facade Activity / Key Corridors

Findings: Corridors have more active facades than downtown as a whole


Facade Activity / Key Corridors


Latent Potential: Underperforming Pavement on Active Streets / Key Corridors

Findings: Upper Smithfield has lots of potential for a pavement project


Latent Potential: Underperforming Pavement on Active Streets

Findings: ‌so does firstside


Data Appendix

Street Furnishings / Trees and Benches


Tree Condition / Key Corridors

Findings: Tree canopy + quality varies Gateway Center Weekday average number of people spending time: 37 Katz + EQT Plaza Weekday average number of people spending time: 41 Mellon Square Weekday average number of people spending time: 22


Seating / Public Seating (benches & chairs) and Cafe Seating

Findings: If you build it - they might not come - just because a public space has places to sit, doesn’t mean it is inviting. For every one person sitting at Mellon Square, there are 7 people sitting at Market Square 5,000 people per day stand to wait for a bus at Smithfield and 6th Market Square At any given time on a weekday 112 people are sitting Smithfield 7% of all people spending time are “secondary seating” because there isn’t anywhere to sit! Mellon Square At any given time on a weekday 15 people are sitting


Public Space / Key takeaways

1.

Katz Plaza

Market Square

Mellon Square

Steel Plaza

Findings: Discontinuous pedestrian network Market Square, and certain key corridors have a high quality public realm. However, outside certain corridors, discontinuity in quality and character of downtown pavement, tree canopy, and seating result in the feeling of a fragmented public realm.

PPG Place

Where’s the seating on Smithfield + Liberty?


Public Space / Key takeaways

1.

Findings: Discontinuous pedestrian network Market Square, and certain key corridors have a high quality public realm. However, outside certain corridors, discontinuity in quality and character of downtown pavement, tree canopy, and seating result in the feeling of a fragmented public realm.

Where’sare Where thethe seating trees on Smithfield?


Public Space / Key takeaways

2. Findings: Public space / public life mismatch Some first-rate streets have few users, and some not-so-nice streets have tons. 11,000 people per weekday walk past Smithfield and 7th pavement is mixed 10,000 people per weekday day walk through Market Square lots of nice pavement 7,000 people per weekday walk down Grant at Liberty - nice pavement!

Solid core but the edges are crumbling


Data Appendix

One Great Route Public Space analysis


One Great Route Public Space Analysis

Crosswalk Quality

AVE RTY LIBE

PE NN

ST RA WB

IAM

SM

Good

PL

ITH FIE LD

ST

Aque nihil mo blate sit od esti doloratem nos de volecusam.

ER

PEN

Poor

6TH

ST

STA N

RK

ET

5TH

AVE

AN TS T DS T

BE S

AVE

SM IT

HF

IEL

FO R

GR

ST WO OD

Crosswalk Material

AVE

WI XS T

VE TY A IBER

7TH

AVE

MA

MO

NW E

ALT HP

L

L

COM

RY WA Y

E N AV

WI LL

Fair

Aque nihil mo blate sit od esti doloratem nos de volecusam.

Tests Strategies ST LD

PL

FIE

ER

Fair PEN

E N AV

6TH

AVE RTY

LIBE

RY WA Y

NN PE

ST RA WB

IAM

Good

Poor

E Y AV

WI LL

Unsafe Crosswalks

Aque nihil mo blate sit od esti doloratem nos de volecusam.

RT LIBE

ITH

Findings:

Asphalt

Crosswalk Quality

SM

Brick

7T AVE


One Great Route Public Space Analysis

Tests Strategies

Findings: Many sidewalks and crosswalks in poor condition

Fair Poor


One Great Route Public Space Analysis

Trees

AVE RTY LIBE

Proposed Planting

PEN

E N AV

6TH

RT

IX S T

ET ST

STA NW

RK

5TH

AVE TS T AN

SM

Aque nihil mo blate sit od esti doloratem nos de volecusam. Missing / No Ped Lighting

Findings: Tree Canopy Missing

Tests Strategies

GR

FO RB ES

ITH

FIE LD ST

ST WO OD

Lights

PL

7TH

AVE

MA

COM

MO

NW

EAL TH

PL

LIBE

E Y AV

RY WA Y

WI LL

AW BE R

IAM

ST R

PE NN

Existing

SM

ITH F

IEL D

ST

Aque nihil mo blate sit od esti doloratem nos de volecusam.

AVE

AVE


PEN

BE RR YW AY

E N AV

6TH

RK ET ST

5TH

AVE

FO RB

ES

AVE

ITH

FIE

LD ST

WO OD

ST

GR AN

TS T

MA

Lights

SM

AVE RTY E B I L LD ST

Aque nihil mo blate sit od esti doloratem nos de volecusam.

ER RY WA Y

E

Existing

6TH

AVE RTY E B I L

XS T WI

ST

STA N

RK

ET

5TH

AVE ST NT

ST

ES

ITH

FIE

LD

GR A

ST WO OD

FO RB

SM

Tests Strategies

Findings: Dark Streets

Aque nihil mo blate sit od esti doloratem nos de volecusam. Missing / No Ped Lighting

PE

7TH

AVE

MA

COM

MO

NW

EAL TH

PL

Proposed Planting

WI

N AV

LL IAM

AW B

PEN

NN

ITH

ST R

Aque nihil mo blate sit od esti doloratem nos de volecusam.

Lights

PL

FIE

Trees

SM

Missing / No Ped Lighting

AVE

STA NW I

COM MO NW E

ALT HP L

One Great Route Public Space Analysis

7TH

AVE

XS T

AVE RTY LIBE

WI LL

Proposed Planting

AVE

AVE


PEN

RR YW AY

E N AV

6TH

VE TY A IBER

WI L

Poor

7TH

AVE

AVE

L

TS T

NW E

STA N

ALT HP L

WI XS T

One Great Route Public Space Analysis

KE

GR A

BE

HF IEL DS T

WO OD ST

FO R

SA VE

SM IT

AVE RTY LIBE

VE TY A IBER

NN PE

7TH

AVE

PEN

E N AV

VE TY A IBER 5TH

ET

NW

RK

MO

SA VE

SM ITH

ST ET

5TH

RK

AN TS T

MA

AVE

BE

IEL

SA VE

HF

Facade Activity

FO R

DS T

WO OD

Tests Strategies

GR

ST

AVE RTY LIBE

SM IT

DS T

Aque nihil mo blate sit od esti doloratem nos de volecusam.

PE NN P

HF

PEN

E N AV

6TH

A

RY WA Y

IAM

Inactive

AW BE R

LL

ST R

WI

Dull

SM IT

Some uninteresting walks

L

IEL

Findings:

PE IAM

AN TS T ST

BE

FIE

LD

FO R

GR

ST WO OD

WI XS T STA N

L ALT HP NW E MO COM

AV

AVE

MA

COM

7TH

AVE

L ST

EAL TH P

STA NW

L

IX S T

6TH

RY WA Y

WI LL

Poor

AW BE R

SM

ST R

NN

ITH

L

Fair

AVE PL

6TH

AVE RTY LIBE ST

Aque nihil mo blate sit od esti doloratem nos de volecusam.

RY WA Y

LD

PEN

E N AV

FIE

Pavement Quality

AW BE R

LL IAM

Inactive

ST R

WI

Dull

PL

FIE

LD ST

Aque nihil mo blate sit od esti doloratem nos de volecusam.

SM ITH

Facade Activity

AVE NT ST

MA R

MO COM

5TH

7TH

AV

Pittsburgh Public Realm Action Plan  
Pittsburgh Public Realm Action Plan