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Votes for Women: The Story of Suffrage

Votes for Women: The Story of Suffrage

Major exhibit opens to the public in the Richmond Gallery, Sunday, July 28

When the Founders crafted the U.S. Constitution, they gave the authority to decide who could vote to the states. All but one decided it would be men— white, property-owning men, 21 years old and older.

The one exception was New Jersey. For the first few decades of our new nation, propertyowning women in New Jersey could vote. But in 1807, state legislators took a step backwards and rescinded the right. New Jersey women joined their sisters across the country who were shut off from the ballot.

New Jersey native Alice Paul (far right) headed the militant branch of the suffrage movement in the lead-up to the 1920 passage of the 19th Amendment. When others backed off from strident demonstrations after the U.S. entered World War I, Paul and her followers stepped up their efforts. They picketed the White House and confronted Wilson for “making the world safe for democracy” while denying it to half the American population. They faced arrest, refused to eat, endured force-feeding, and ultimately won the day. —Library of Congress

The new exhibit, “Votes for Women: The Story of Suffrage” opening in the Woolley House, Sunday, July 28, tells of the remarkable campaign waged by women across the country to gain (and for New Jersey women, to regain) the vote.

The start of a movement

Most historians mark the start of the American suffrage movement from the 1848 Women’s Convention in Seneca Falls, New York, organized by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott. Both women had discovered their political voice fighting for the abolition of slavery. Both had felt the sting of being shut out by male-dominated leadership. They were outraged, frustrated, and ready to take on the status quo.

The status quo at the time was a sorry mess for women. Not only were they barred from public speaking and leadership positions, but married women could not own property, keep their own wages, or enter into any legal contract. Women were shut out of most professions. Divorce was near impossible, even in cases of abuse. A woman’s place was in the home—often an inherited home whose title had been ceded to her husband.

In 1851, three years after the Seneca Falls conference, Elizabeth Cady Stanton met Susan B. Anthony. Though strikingly unlike in appearance and temperament, they became lifelong friends. Together, they made a formidable team that reigned for more than 50 years as the iconic leaders of the suffrage movement.

Anthony and Stanton travelled the country making speeches and gathering support. When Stanton, mother of seven, cut back on travel, she stayed hard a work—writing Anthony’s speeches, organizing supporters, even rewriting the Bible from a feminist perspective.

Both women were bitterly disappointed when Congress refused, following the Civil War, to expand the language of the 15th Amendment to bar discrimination in voting based on both race and sex. Their outrage generated harsh statements from these former abolitionists that created a lasting racial rift among suffragists.

Anthony and Stanton did not give up. In 1878, they pushed for a 16th Amendment to guarantee women the right to vote. The

“Susan B. Anthony Amendment,” as it became known, failed in this first attempt and was introduced anew to each session of Congress for the next 42 years! The (by then) 19th Amendment, granting women’s suffrage, was finally ratified in 1920.They didn’t live to see it

Elizabeth Cady Stanton (seated) and Susan B. Anthony

Neither Stanton nor Anthony lived to see passage. Their efforts fell short of their goals. But the inroads they gained, the organizations they created, and the national awareness they built set the stage for the next generation—the early 20th century activists who carried the campaign for women’s suffrage to victory.

The second wave

Among this second wave of suffragists were the daughters of Elizabeth Stanton and Lucretia Mott—and newcomers, including Carrie Chapman Catt and New Jersey native Alice Paul. Catt and Paul were rivals. Their strategies and styles were at odds. Catt favored local campaigns to change state voting laws. She thought militant demonstration unpatriotic after the U.S. entered World War I in 1917.

In contrast, Paul took the fight for a U.S. Constitutional amendment to President Wilson’s doorstep. She lead an 18-month long picketing campaign at the gates to the White House. She welcomed arrest and used the mistreatment of imprisioned suffragists to build public sympathy. Faced with a public relations nightmare, Wilson gave in and threw his support in favor of the federal amendment.

Passage of the Anthony Amendment was “the greatest expansion of democracy on a single day the world had ever seen” (Eleanor Clift, Founding Sisters). Join us at the July 28 opening to learn the full story.