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GARDEN TRIPOD

Issue 20 February/March 2014

Horticultural Science Technology & Art


Cover Image Visible Traces (Remnants of Presence) by Kerryn Madsen-Pietsch

Photographic Print & Throw Pillow

All The Materials Contained May Not Be Reproduced, Copied, Edited, Published, Transmitted Or Uploaded In Any Way Without the artist/photographers Permission. These Images/writings Do Not Belong To The Public Domain. All images and information within the Garden Tripod magazine are the responsibility of the owner/artist/writer/photographer & not the Garden Tripod magazine 2012-2014



GARDEN TRIPOD Horticultural Science Technology & Art Issue

22 April/May 2014 Garden Tripod Web Site www.gardentripod.com


About ‌ 7 Office News Hound

8Window to the world challenge 25Feature Hans Bax 40Gardening Tips from Wilkinson sword 44Calendar Feature, Sandra Fortier

& bubblehex08

62Calendar Feature, Morag Anderson

& Mother Nature

80Lancelot (Capability) Brown 82Fine Art America, garden tripod group Exhibition

92William Morris 97RedBubble, country gardens come

grow with us group Exhibition

125In the News


GARDEN TRIPOD Horticultural Science, Technology & Art Welcome to our 22nd edition of the Garden Tripod. Wow our 22nd edition and still looking amazing due to all the fabulous images that are arriving. Thank you everyone for joining in and supporting the Garden Tripod.

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This is a slightly different edition as we have sent all our writers off on a short fact finding break. So am delighted to say the featured writings are all sourced by your editor.

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The Garden Tripod would like to thank Yvonne Weaving from Wilkinson sword allowing us to show their garden advice text and images. Also V&A museum for some text and images connected wit the article on William Morris, and lastly where would we be without wikipedia with useful info on William Morris and Lancelot Brown.

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As always we are including real text, so grammatical errors and spelling mistakes are all included free of charge

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The Garden Tripod is also beginning its search for talented artists and photographers to be included in the Garden Tripod hard cover book. As this is going to be printed we will need high res images (300 dpi) and an artist statement with a short bio.

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So if you would like your images to be looked at for inclusion, please go to the Garden Tripods Web site (Talk to Us page) and fill in the request form or email to gardentripod@yahoo.com. Closing date is the 1st September 2014 Look forward to seeing your applications.

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Charlie


A little word from our

Office News Hound Hi Folks ..

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I am officially the office dog for the Garden Tripod Magazine.

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O wow ~ I just love throw pillows… and now I can get them from some of my favourite artists . RedBubble have just introduced their new range of cushions and they looks great. My personal fav are these from the artist  Kerryn Madsen-Pietsch. We also have a feature about William Morris, and his art on textiles. …. cool Guess I am trying to say .. woof :)

Stay Safe Princess Summer

A Potter's Garden by Kerryn Madsen-Pietsch

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Window to the world Catalogue Garden Tripod Supports Country Gardens come grow with us group challenge


House of Johannes Larsen by hans p olsen Born in Kerteminde on Funen, Larsen studied art at the Free School in Copenhagen under Kristian Zahrtmann in the 1880s. There he met other painters from Funen, notably Fritz Syberg and Peter Hansen, both from the southern port of Faaborg, and the Funish Painters’ group was born. They went on to create an art colony that influenced many Danish and Swedish artists and brought them success. Johannes Larsen’s home, Møllebakken in Kerteminde, became the gathering place in summer months for many painters, particularly younger artists from Zahrtmann’s school.

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Rice Paper Window by Eileen McVey

gecko by metriognome

gecko in silhouette hanging on clear screen


A Pink Outlook by Alexandra Lavizzari The window of an English country cottage with a windowsill full of pink glass and china objects. (Devon)

The dinner table .. .. make mine red! Kilmore East VIC Australia by Margaret Morgan (Watkins)

Looking Out by Fay270 Garden Tripod 22

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Chimneys by ElsT Taken in the Botanic Gardens, Glasgow

My Room...My Winter View... by naturelover


Set In Stone - Mission San Jose - San Antonio Texas USA by TonyCrehan Window in the stone wall of one of the ruined buildings at Mission San José y San Miguel de Aguayo in San Antonio, Texas, USA, looking through to the church.

Founded in 1720, the mission was named for Saint Joseph and the Marqués de San Miguel de Aguayo, the governor of the Province of Coahuila and Texas at the time. It was built on the banks of the San Antonio river several miles to the south of the earlier mission, San Antonio de Valero (the Alamo).

In 1941, Mission San José was declared a State Historic Site, and later that same year, a National Historic Site. When the San Antonio Missions National Historical Park was established in November 1978, the Spanish colonial mission was assured of protection.


A room with a view - Sissinghurst Castle by Mortimer123

A shot of a quintessential English country garden through a window in an outside wall in the grounds of the National Trust property at Sissinghurst, Castle, Kent UK.

Lookin' Out The Window by WildestArt Looking out the window of The Old Mill, in N. Little Rock, Ark USA, at their garden. This building, a mill, was used in the opening credits of the movie Gone Withe The Wind. It was built in the 1930s, and is on the National Historic Register. Its open and free to the public, and one of my favorite places. Taken with a LumixDMCSZ02.


Taken at the Chalice Well, Glastonbury, UK

From My Bedroom Window by Vicki Spindler (VHS Photography)

In church near Exmouth, UK

Church Window by lynn carter Garden Tripod 22

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Looking Inside the Old Potting Shed by SummerJade Try to look through the old windows of the potting shed to see what the family gardener has been doing. The yard foliage casts a pinkish reflection on the cloudy glass, but thanks to the light coming from the windows on the opposite wall some shapes can be seen. There are painted pots on the work bench, and some patio furniture has been stored inside. Geraniums, saved over the winter, are now leggy and in need of care before being planted outside in large urns near the front entrance. The place is both pleasant and mysterious.

Edited in Paint Shop Pro using many blending layers with several textures added. The window layer is from CG Textures
 Canon EOS Digital Rebel XT, Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-55mm.
 Location: New York (USA).


It's Nice Outside. by relayer51 A view through one of the windows at Frensham Heights School.

View on the Muckross gardens

Muckross – Killarney – Ireland


by Arie Koene Garden Tripod 22

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Taken in the grounds of ‘Everglades’ at Leura, in the Blue Mtns, NSW, Australia.

Framing the Blue Mtns by PhotosByG

Huntington Botanical Gardens in San Marino, California.

Chinese Garden view at The Huntington by Celeste Mookherjee


Oko's Open Shutters.......... by WhiteDove Studio kj gordon

Oko opens his shutters and lets the beauty of the world in…………..Kauai Hawaii……..


acrylic on fabric.
 each shutter is hinged and moves independently. This was exhibited at a Gallery last year at Arizona State University…..
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Looking out on an Ullapool Evening by lezvee

Flowers in the Window by krishoupt Old Stone House in Salisbury, NC


Lovely Garden View by hummingbirds North Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada.

A River View by Barbara Brown The Truckee River viewed through the window at River Ranch, a few miles from the point that Lake Tahoe flows into the Truckee river Garden Tripod 22

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Autumn Through the Fence Window by Georgia Mizuleva Autumn colors shine through the fence window in the Old Town in Plovdiv, Bulgaria.


Window to the world

Top Ten Results

7

5

Flowers in the Window by krishoupt

It's Nice Outside. by relayer51

3

3

Looking out on an Ullapool Evening by lezvee

My Room...My Winter View... by naturelover

3

3

2

2

Chinese Garden view at The Huntington by Celeste Mookherjee

View on the Muckross gardens by Arie Koene

Autumn Through the Fence Window by Georgia Mizuleva

A River View by Barbara Brown

2

2

House of Johannes Larsen by hans p olsen

Looking Out by Fay270

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Winning Entry Flowers in the Window by krishoupt


A sideways look at wire Challenge Winner Feature

A little bit hair of a sheep with dew at an early morning at sunrise near Wijk bij Duurstede, Holland

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Autumn in the Country by Hans Bax

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About..

Hi, I’m Hans and I live in the Netherlands in Gouda, near Rotterdam.

Photography is my hobby (hey, hey!), especially close ups, details, nature, old buildings, flowers, funny things and many more. I’m fascinated by lines and colours.

I took pictures to illustrate magazines and I’ve also made bridal photo shoots, but I’m not a professional!

The camera’s I used were a Canon Powershot S3 IS, Canon Powershot SX1 IS and an Olympus Mju 790 SW. The last one especially for underwater-shots. My first digital camera was a Kodak DX 6340 ZDC.

Currently I use a Canon Powershot SX40 HS. For underwater-shots an Olympus Mju Touch 6010 SW. I also took pictures with my I-Phone 4 and nowadays with my I-Phone 5S.


Next generation by Hans Bax lady’s bower (clematis) in Gouda, Holland.


Autumn view by Hans Bax


Sun reflected in Pearls by Hans Bax


Pearls at sunset II

Pearls at sunset by Hans Bax


Paulusbrug - Utrecht by Hans Bax

Nieuwegracht Utrecht by Hans Bax


Broken glass 3


Finally Winter in Holland by Hans Bax

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On Guard! by Hans Bax


Peekaboo!


Just a little pink at sunset by Hans Bax Hydrangea starting to bloom in Gouda, Holland.

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"Oh My.... Kiss me, please!" by Hans Bax

Keys by Hans Bax


Fallen into the Puddle


Gardening Tips đ&#x;‘€

About‌

The Wilkinson Sword gardening tool collection is a totally unique, innovative range of products developed by E. P. Barrus Ltd; a British Company with over 90-years trading experience. Barrus has a strong sales, distribution and engineering focus and is the power behind leading brands in the garden machinery and tools sector, marine, powered products and industrial engine markets. E. P. Barrus Ltd is a family Company co-owned with MTD Products., one of the largest producers of outdoor powered equipment in the world who are committed to producing high quality lawn and garden machinery including the popular brands of Lawnflite, Wolf-Garten and Cub Cadet; distributed in the UK by Barrus.  E. P. Barrus has a trade mark licence agreement with Wilkinson Sword Ltd (a wholly owned subsidiary of Energizer Holdings Inc) to sell and market the Wilkinson Sword range of garden tools in the UK and Eire.  Reflecting 100 years of cutting excellence, the Wilkinson Sword gardening tools collection comprises highly engineered quality products, including pruners, shears, loppers, stainless steel garden tools as well as a range of axes and multi-tools. Every product in the range is put through rigorous quality tests to ensure the high quality design, durability and strength that you would expect from this trusted brand. We are so confident about the quality of our range that every product comes with the reassuring stamp of a 10 year guarantee. Our mission is to provide gardening tools of premium quality and performance that help make gardening easier and more enjoyable!

Reflecting 100 years of cutting excellence


from Wilkinson Sword Choosing Pruners or Loppers Bypass, Precision, Anvil what is the difference and how do I know which pair I should choose? Well it really comes down to what cutting job you need to do in the garden whether it is trimming new stems or tougher, woodier growth.

Bypass or Precision These are essentially the same, just different terminology. They work on a scissor-like cutting action with one blade ‘bypassing’ the other. They are ideal for cutting growth which is around 1 to 2 years old as they provide a very clean cut, essential for maintaining a healthy plant or shrub. For pruning of this nature there is little pressure required and therefore the pruners or loppers tend to be light in weight. A good quality pair of Bypass or Precision pruners or loppers can still handle older cuttings but a little more effort is required. However to avoid unnecessary strain on the hands and wrist it may be wise to consider either Anvil or Ratchet models.

Anvil or Power Again, these are essentially the same. They have a blade that closes against a softer metal anvil on the lower jaw. This action tends to crush the stem being cut so this type of pruner or lopper is particularly suited to older wood where the cleanliness of cut is not as important.

Ratchet Ratchet pruners and loppers have the advantage of being easy to use and take the strain out of cutting woody growth. The ratchet mechanism allows you to cut through a branch in 3 or 4 movements rather than in one action. This means that less effort is required. Ratchet pruners or loppers are beneficial for the mature gardener or gardeners who suffer from arthritic conditions and disabilities.

đ&#x;‘€


Gardening Tips đ&#x;‘€

Cutting It

When it comes to all things wood whether it be tree care, pruning shrubs or hedges, we at Wilkinson Sword are in our element, with over 100 years of cutting excellence. Our cutting products have evolved into a mature range of tools that will cover all of your cutting needs in the garden – whatever the task or diameter of the branch. For any plants to grow to their optimum, it is so important that they are regularly pruned. Wilkinson Sword have developed a premium range of cutting tools for each task. Our range of loppers and pruners are available with both anvil blades – for hard or dead wood and bypass blade – for cutting young green plants.

How to recognise high-quality pruners‌ How do you recognise good quality durable pruners? They need to fit comfortably in your hand, cut sharply and cleanly (even after years of use) and are designed so that the parts, if necessary can be replaced. 

Pruners The Wilkinson Sword Power and Precision pruners bring together all our expertise and quality into one cutting tool: • • • •

•

Unsurpassed in precision, longevity and technology Accurate cut, owing to precision-polished blade. Special screw safety device prevents inadvertent loosening of the spring 30Âş angle of the cutting head will prevent over-stretching of the hand during the cutting process. This takes the strain off the wrist and lower arm The spring is integrated into the pruners. It will not get dirty or be lost and will stay securely in place

Reflecting 100 years of cutting excellence


from Wilkinson Sword Scissors Wilkinson Sword will be launching a brand new range of scissors in 2014.

Loppers For dead wood, you would want to use an anvil lopper. In a good quality hard wearing lopper so you won’t have to replace them so often. Make sure that the tool you choose is the right tool for the job. If using a garden lopper to cut a branch down that really should come down with a saw, you are overworking yourself, the tool and could possibly damage your plants. Be sure that the lopper will be able to make one clean cut when you prune, otherwise you are causing multiple wounds on the shrub and it could attract insects or disease more quickly than just one cut would.  The longer the handle of the garden lopper, the more leverage you will have when cutting, for gaining extra reach try using the Wilkinson Sword General Purpose Telescopic Geared Anvil Loppers (1111136W). This is especially important for individuals who do not have height as an asset when it comes to pruning taller bushes. The long handles give more leverage for the cut, making it easier to make a clean cut.  For closer and less stout jobs, a shorter handled Wilkinson Sword General Purpose Geared Anvil Loppers (1111134W) could be used. The shorter version will give you a powerful cut on a smaller diameter. Find garden loppers that have a good hand grip that will be non-slip. Accidents are avoidable if you practice safety measures and use good equipment. đ&#x;‘€


www.gardentripod.com

April


www.gardentripod.com

May

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Sandra Fortier CHATEAUGUAY, CANADA

Hi! My name is Sandra and I live in Canada. I’ve re c e n t l y d i s c o v e re d there are many photo opportunities where I live and I now take my camera for daily walks. I enjoy photography and writing… I’m editor of 3 newsletters and I often integrate my photos with my written words. This provides an interesting incentive to find the perfect image to convey my message.

April

Sandra Fortier


Malachite by Sandra Fortier

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The World As I See It by Sandra Fortier


Bluebelle by Sandra Fortier

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Sipping Nectar by Sandra Fortier


Ssss-Cobra by Sandra Fortier

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Sandra Fortier


A Spot of Tea? by Sandra Fortier

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bubblehex08

My name is MarieJo.
 I’m living in the heart of Europe and I travel a lot through the world.
 I want to share my photos and in the same time I like to look at the others’ work and learn from them. Therefore Redbubble is perfect!

bubblehex08

May


Valuable by bubblehex08

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In good company by bubblehex08


Hello Spring! Magnolia blooms like butterflies on the bare tree by bubblehex08

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My idea of a romantic garden by bubblehex08


All you need to light up your day! by bubblehex08

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bubblehex08


Thru the clock by bubblehex08

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www.gardentripod.com

April


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www.gardentripod.com

May


Morag Anderson HOBART, AUSTRALIA

I’ve been taking photos for a while. But I continually feel the need to extend myself, sometimes the journey takes you somewhere better than expected‌

Morag Anderson

April


Shady walk amongst the trees by Morag Anderson

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Eucalypt leaves by Morag Anderson


Zouterwoudsesingel, Leiden by Morag Anderson

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Loch Tulla by Morag Anderson


Heartbeat of the city by Morag Anderson

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Morag Anderson


Owl by Morag Anderson

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MotherNature GREEN LANE, UNITED STATES

I love nature, science, poetry, prose, art, music – you name it! Now that I’m retired, time is mine to spend as I wish (pretty much), and I wish to take pictures of our natural world. Bringing the outdoors in for others to see, especially those who may not get the opportunity to wander next to a pond, fish at the beach, or tramp in the woods, is a pleasure. I hope to build a window to the wonders of nature that fill our everyday lives. If you learn something new or see an animal or landscape from a different perspective, I’m delighted. Six years ago I began photographing and worked my through an Olympus FE240, a Sony Cyber Shot DSC H9, and now I use a Canon EOS Rebel T4i. This move to DSLR was a tough one for me because it meant learning about lenses and carrying more equipment. The Tamron lenses and the new DSLR camera took me to another level, and I learn more every day.

May

MotherNature


Sunset on the Outer Banks, NC by MotherNature

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Sunrise Painted In Liquid Gold by MotherNature


Frisco Pier - Outer Banks NC by MotherNature

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Sunrise Surf - Island Beach State Park, NJ by MotherNature


Sunset Behind the Dunes by MotherNature

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MotherNature


Sand Dune and Split Rail Fence by MotherNature

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Lancelot (Capability) Brown Landscape gardens Lancelot Brown (Baptised 30 August 1716 – 6 February 1783),more commonly known as Capability Brown, was an English landscape architect. He is remembered as "the last of the great English eighteenth-century artists to be accorded his due", and "England's greatest gardener". He designed over 170 parks, many of which still endure. His influence was so great that the contributions to the English garden made by his predecessors Charles Bridgeman and William Kent are often overlooked; even Kent's apologist Horace Walpole allowed that Kent had been followed by "a very able master�.

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It is estimated that Brown was responsible for over 170 gardens surrounding the finest country houses and estates in Britain. His work still endures at Croome Court (where he also designed the house), Blenheim Palace, Warwick Castle, Harewood House, Bowood House, Milton Abbey (and nearby Milton Abbas village), in traces at Kew Gardens and many other locations. It has been reported that he refused work in Ireland because he had not finished England & was called "Capability" Brown, because he would characteristically tell his landed clients that their estates had great "capability" for landscape improvement.

Lancelot ('Capability') Brown, by Nathaniel Dance

Badminton House and landscape garden, in Gloucestershire, England from Morris's Country Seats (1880)

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His landscapes were at the forefront of fashion. They were fundamentally different from what they replaced, the well-known formal gardens of England which were criticised by Alexander Pope and others from the 1710s. Starting in 1719, William Kent replaced these with more naturalistic compositions, which reached their greatest refinement in Brown's landscapes. At Hampton Court, Brown encountered Hannah More in 1782 and described his "grammatical" manner in her literary terms: "'Now there' said he, pointing his finger, 'I make a comma, and there' pointing to another spot, 'where a more decided turn is proper, I make a colon; at another part, where an interruption is desirable to break the view, a parenthesis; now a full stop, and then I begin another subject'". Brown's patrons saw the idealised landscapes he was creating for them in terms of the Italian landscape painters they admired and collected, as Kenneth Woodbridge first observed in the landscape at Stourhead, a "Brownian" landscape with an un-Brownian circuit walk in which Brown himself was not involved.

'Now there' said he, pointing his finger, 'I make a comma, and there' pointing to another spot, 'where a more decided turn is proper, I make a colon; at another part, where an interruption is desirable to break the view, a parenthesis; now a full stop’ Badminton House: features of the Brownian landscape at full maturity in the 19th century His style of smooth undulating grass, which would run straight to the house, clumps, belts and scattering of trees and his serpentine lakes formed by invisibly damming small rivers, were a new style within the English landscape, a "gardenless" form of landscape gardening, which swept away almost all the remnants of previous formally patterned styles.


At Blenheim Brown dammed the paltry stream flowing under Vanbrugh's Grand Bridge, drowning half the structure with improved results Russell Page, who began his career in the Brownian landscape of Longleat but whose own designs have formal structure, accused Brown of "encouraging his wealthy clients to tear out their splendid formal gardens and replace them with his facile compositions of grass, tree clumps and rather shapeless pools and lakes”. Richard Owen Cambridge, the English poet and satirical author, declared that he hoped to die before Brown so that he could "see heaven before it was 'improved'". This was a typical statement reflecting the controversy about Brown's work, which has continued over the last 200 years.

Grand Bridge and lake at Blenheim Palace, Oxfordshire. by Boddah

Subsequent reputation Brown's popularity declined rapidly after his death, because his work was seen as a feeble imitation of wild nature. A reaction against the smooth blandness of Brown's landscapes was inevitable; the landscapes lacked the sublime thrill which members of the Romantic generation (like Richard Payne Knight and Uvedale Price) looked for in an ideal landscape, where the painterly inspiration would come from Salvator Rosa rather than Claude Lorrain. During the nineteenth century he was widely criticised, but during the twentieth century his popularity returned. Tom Turner has suggested that the latter resulted from a favourable account of his talent in Marie-Luise Gothein's History of Garden Art which predated Christopher Hussey's positive account of Brown in The Picturesque (1927). Dorothy Stroud wrote the first full monograph on Capability Brown, fleshing out the generic attributions with documentation from country house estate offices. Later landscape architects like William Gilpin would opine that Brown's 'natural curves' were as artificial as the straight lines that were common in French gardens.

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By contrast, a recent historian and author, Richard Bisgrove, described Brown's process as perfecting nature by

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"judicious manipulation of its components, adding a tree here or a concealed head of water there. His art attended to the formal potential of ground, water, trees and so gave to English landscape its ideal forms. The difficulty was that less capable imitators and less sophisticated spectators did not see nature perfected... they saw simply what they took to be nature”.

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This deftness of touch was not unrecognised in his own day; one anonymous obituary writer opined: "Such, however, was the effect of his genius that when he was the happiest man, he will be least remembered; so closely did he copy nature that his works will be mistaken". Sir William Chambers, who considered himself a garden authority as well, complained that Brown's grounds "differ very little from common fields, so closely is nature copied in most of them".

Read the full text at …

Brown died in 1783, in Hertford Street, London, on the doorstep of his daughter Bridget, who had married the architect Henry Holland. Horace Walpole wrote to Lady Ossory: "Your dryads must go into black gloves, Madam, their father-in-law, Lady Nature’s second husband, is dead!”. Brown was buried in the churchyard of St. Peter and St. Paul, the parish church of Brown's small estate at Fenstanton Manor (a fact memorialised on his tombstone).

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Brown's portrait by Nathaniel Dance, c. 1768, is conserved in the National Portrait Gallery, London.

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His work has often been favourably compared and contrasted ("the antithesis") to the œuvre of André Le Nôtre, the French jardin à la française landscape architect. He became both "rich and honoured and had 'improved' a greater acreage of ground than any landscape architect" who preceded him.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capability_Brown Garden Tripod 22

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An exhibition from Fine Art America Group Garden Tripod


Photography

Conservatory In Autumn Sally Weigand Venice, FL - United States

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Photography

Apple Blossoms Rabiah Seminole Chase City, Va - United States


Photography

Wisley Garden Ross Henton Frisco, TX - United States

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Photography

Natural Born Beauty‌ Bob Daalder Den Helder, Noord-Holland - Netherlands


Photography

The Last Wish Stuart Harrison Sea Pines, Fl - United States

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Watercolour Painting

Parsley

Annemeet Van der Leij Tel- Aviv, Israel - Israel


Sculpture

A Circle Of Flowers Esther Newman-Cohen Mevaseret Zion - Israel

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Photography

Spring Blossoms In The City

Miriam Danar New York, NY - United States


Garden Tripod Group Features

Cabbage And Marigolds

Jean Hall

Ferns Ferns Oh My Lucy Threlfall

Norwood, MA - United State

Tonawanda, NY - United States

Good Morning

Dreamy Green Fern

Katerina Kamenetsky

Priya Ghose Bay Area, CA - United States

Adelaide, SA - Australia

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Almost

Secret English Garden

Michael Friedman

Ann Horn

Springfield, MA - United States

Livonia, Mi - United States

Civil War Eastern Sycamore Tree Patti Whitten Sykesville, MD - United States

Tropical Green Curves And Diagonals A Vertical View Georgia Mizuleva Toronto, ON - Canada


William Morris

As an author, illustrator and medievalist, he helped to establish the modern fantasy genre, and was a direct influence on postwar authors such as J. R. R. Tolkien. He was also a major contributor to reviving traditional textile arts and methods of production, and one of the founders of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings, now a statutory element in the preservation of historic buildings in the UK.

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Morris wrote and published poetry, fiction, and translations of ancient and medieval texts throughout his life. His best-known works include The Defence of Guenevere and Other Poems (1858), The Earthly Paradise (1868–1870), A Dream of John Ball (1888), the utopian News from Nowhere (1890), and the fantasy romance The Well at the World's End (1896). He was an important figure in the emergence of socialism in Britain, founding the Socialist League in 1884, but breaking with that organization over goals and methods by the end of the decade. He devoted much of the rest of his life to the Kelmscott Press, which he founded in 1891. Kelmscott was devoted to the publishing of limited-edition, illuminated-style print books. The 1896 Kelmscott edition of the Works of Geoffrey Chaucer is considered a masterpiece of book design.

Textiles Portrait of William Morris, aged 53! First published 1899 (photo c. 1887)! William Morris (24 March 1834 – 3 October 1896) was an English artist, writer, textile designer and socialist associated with the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and English Arts and Crafts Movement.

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Born in Walthamstow, Essex to a wealthy middle-class family, Morris studied Classics at Oxford University, where he came under the influence of medievalism. There he became a close friend of artist Edward Burne-Jones and joined the Birmingham Set. After university he trained as an architect, married Jane Burden, and became close friends with artist Dante Gabriel Rossetti and architect Philip Webb. Webb and Morris designed a family home, Red House in Kent, where the latter lived from 1859 to 1865, before relocating to Bloomsbury, central London. In 1861, Morris founded a decorative arts firm with BurneJones, Rossetti, Webb, and others: the Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Co. The firm profoundly influenced the decoration of churches and houses into the early 20th century.

Furnishing textiles were an important offering of the firm in all its incarnations. By 1883, Morris wrote "Almost all the designs we use for surface decoration, wallpapers, textiles, and the like, I design myself. I have had to learn the theory and to some extent the practice of weaving, dyeing and textile printing: all of which I must admit has given me and still gives me a great deal of enjoyment.”

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Morris's preference for flat use of line and colour and abhorrence of "realistic" three-dimensional shading was marked; in this he followed the propositions of Owen Jones as set out in his 'The Grammar of Ornament' of 1856, a copy of which Morris owned. Writing on tapestry weaving, Morris said:

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As in all wall-decoration, the first thing to be considered in the designing of Tapestry is the force, purity, and elegance of the silhouette of the objects represented, and nothing vague or indeterminate is admissible. But special excellences can be expected from it. Depth of tone, richness of colour, and exquisite gradation of tints are easily to be obtained in Tapestry; and it also demands that crispness and abundance of beautiful detail which was the especial characteristic of fully developed Mediæval Art. Of the Revival of Design and Handicraft

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It is likely that much of Morris's preference for medieval textiles was formed  — or crystallised  — during his brief apprenticeship with G. E. Street. Street had co-written a book on Ecclesiastical Embroidery in 1848, and was a staunch advocate of abandoning faddish woolen work on canvas in favour of more expressive embroidery techniques based on Opus Anglicanum, a surface embroidery technique popular in medieval England.

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He was also fond of hand knotted Persian carpets and advised the South Kensington Museum in the acquisition of fine Kerman carpets.

Detail of Art Needlework embroidery "Artichoke" in wool on linen


Portion of Cabbage and Vine tapestry, William Morris's first tapestry woven at Kelmscott House in the summer of 1879. (Identification from Linda Parry: William Morris Textiles, New York, Viking Press, 1983, ISBN 0-670-77074-4, p. 100-101)

Embroidery

Morris taught himself embroidery, working with wool on a frame custom-built from an old example. Once he had mastered the technique he trained his wife Jane, her sister Bessie Burden and others to execute designs to his specifications. When "embroideries of all kinds" were offered through Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Co. catalogues, church embroidery became and remained an important line of business for its successor companies into the twentieth century. By the 1870s, the firm was offering both embroidery patterns and finished works. Following in Street's footsteps, Morris became active in the growing movement to return originality and mastery of technique to embroidery, and was one of the first designers associated with the Royal School of Art Needlework with its aim to "restore Ornamental Needlework for secular purposes to the high place it once held among decorative arts

Tapestry Morris long dreamed of weaving tapestries in the medieval manner, which he called "the noblest of the weaving arts." In September 1879 he finished his first solo effort, a small piece called "Cabbage and Vine". Shortly thereafter Morris trained his employee John Henry Dearle in the technique, setting up a tapestry loom at Queen Square and later a large tapestry works at Merton Abbey.

Printed and woven textiles

Morris's first repeating pattern for wallpaper is dated 1862, but was not manufactured until 1864. All his wallpaper designs were manufactured for him by Jeffrey & Co, a commercial wallpaper maker. In 1868 he designed his first pattern specifically for fabric printing. As in so many other areas that interested him, Morris chose to work with the ancient technique of hand woodblock printing in preference to the roller printing which had almost completely replaced it for commercial uses.

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Morris took up the practical art of dyeing as a necessary adjunct of his manufacturing business. He spent much of his time at Staffordshire dye works mastering the processes of that art and making experiments in the revival of old or discovery of new methods. One result of these experiments was to reinstate indigo dyeing as a practical industry and generally to renew the use of those vegetable dyes, such as the red derived from madder, which had been driven almost out of use by the anilines. Dyeing of wools, silks, and cottons was the necessary preliminary to what he had much at heart, the production of woven and printed fabrics of the highest excellence; and the period of incessant work at the dye-vat (1875–76) was followed by a period during which he was absorbed in the production of textiles (1877–78), and more especially in the revival of carpet-weaving as a fine art. However, his first carpet designs of 1875, were made for him industrially by commercial firms using machinery.

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Morris's patterns for woven textiles, some of which were also machine made under ordinary commercial conditions, included intricate double-woven furnishing fabrics in which two sets of warps and wefts are interlinked to create complex gradations of colour and texture. His textile designs are still popular today, sometimes recoloured for modern sensibilities, but also in the original and bright colourways.


Drawing for block-printed fabric Tulip and Willow by William Morris. (Identification from Linda Parry, William Morris Textiles, New York, Viking Press, 1983, ISBN 0-670-77074-4, p. 147)!

© Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Acanthus Wallpaper
 Place of origin:
 England, Great Britain (made)
 Date:
 1875 (published)
 Artist/Maker:
 William Morris, born 1834 - died 1896 (designer) 
 Morris & Co. (publisher) 
 Jeffrey (manufacturer)
 Materials and Techniques:
 block-printed in distemper colours, on paper
 Credit Line:
 Given by Morris & Co.
 Museum number:
 E.495-1919
 Gallery location:
 Prints & Drawings Study Room, level C, case MB2A, shelf DR104, box LOANS

Acanthus wallpaper.


Tile panel of 66 tiles, designed by Willaim Morris and made by the firm of William de Morgan, 1876. Museum no. C.36-1972, © Victoria & Albert Museum, London.  Given by Charles and Lavinia Handley-Read

A William Morris and William De Morgan Tile-Panel !

The early commissions of Morris and Company for decorative work at St James Palace (1865-67), the Green Dining-Room in this Museum (1866) and at No. 1 Palace Green (1868) are well documented, as well as being for Morris and his still fairly new firm important milestones towards success. Some light can be thrown on another major commission, not previously discussed, of which almost nothing now remains but some tile-panels. The commission was to decorate Membland Hall, which lay some miles north east of Plymouth. Originally the house was an 18th century one but in 1877 it was remodelled for the Baring family by George Devey. Before discussing the commission some words should be spared for Devey (1820-1886): at the time when this text was written he was  rather forgotten, probably because he played little part (unlike most leading architects of his day) in the governance of the Royal Institute of British Architects or the Architectural Association; but, in his heyday, Devey was a prolific builder and adaptor of country houses, which he often constructed in a pastiche of the Jacobean and Queen Anne styles. His patrons were usually landed gentry, and very often bankers. One such was Edward Charles Baring (1828-1897; created first Baron Revelstoke in 1885), for whom Devey had already worked about 1863 at Coombe Cottage, Surrey. In 1887 Baring bought Membland Hall and got Devey to enlarge it by adding wings and also outbuildings to serve as a laundry, stables, and so on. The work must have gone on speedily for the west wing was dated 1877, and Devey's account book shows that the payment of his fees stop after 1879.

Read more at :

http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/a/a-morris-and-de-morgan-tile-panel/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Morris


An exhibition from RedBubble Group Country Gardens come grow with us Garden Tripod 22

Page 97


coffee-painted back-ground Brown Stabilo Fine point 0.4 pen sketch on a coffee-painted background – DalerRowney 300gsm

Barn Owl hunting 1 by Maree Clarkson


A palette-knife
 painting, oil. Summer in South Africa. 
 ART: Oil
 A paletteknife painting, oil. (on an x-raysheet, can be framed) .
 35 × 43 cm. Original SOLD.

Happiness by Elizabeth Kendall

Garden Tripod 22

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Things enslave us and yet we can’t help but collect them…they will live on long after we’re gone, a testament to how we’ve lived our lives…

Acrylic on Linen Canvas

Things... by © Janis Zroback


Pastel

Daisey Mum by Charlotte Yealey

Garden Tripod 22

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Scannerscanned Photography on Epson Perfection.

Purple and CreamTulip Bouquet by Barbara Wyeth


Photography

Entwined ~ Chain of Hearts by Kerryn Madsen-Pietsch

Garden Tripod 22

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Photography

Spring by jhawa


Photography

Pickwick by Brian Haslam

Garden Tripod 22

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Featured 36 February ~ January ~ December Country Gardens Come Grow with us RedBubble Group


Featured

February

Garden Tripod 22

Page 107


Wherwell by lezvee 
 Garden – Belvidere, NJ – My little cottage by Mike Savad
 Pam’s Garden #5 by Elaine Teague 
 The old Porch by PicsbyJody 
 Adare – Ireland by Arie Koene
 Stone Cottage by phil decocco

Junco in Budding Cherry Tree by hummingbirds
 Titmouse at the Pyracantha by Eileen McVey
 Southern Boobook Owl by BronReid 
 Pelegrine Falcon – bird of prey – Australia by Margaret Morgan (Watkins)
 Kingfisher – I by Peter Wiggerman 
 Lets have a closer look…..by Nicole W.


Wherwell by lezvee

Pam's Garden #5 by Elaine Teague

Adare - Ireland by Arie Koene


The old Porch by PicsbyJody

Stone Cottage by phil decocco

Garden - Belvidere, NJ - My little cottage by Mike Savad


Junco in Budding Cherry Tree by hummingbirds

Southern Boobook Owl by BronReid

Kingfisher - I by Peter Wiggerman


Titmouse at the Pyracantha by Eileen McVey

Pelegrine Falcon - bird of prey - Australia Acrylic on Arches 175 by Margaret Morgan (Watkins)

Lets have a closer look..... by Nicole W.


Featured

January

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Double Stone Garden Arch by phil decocco 
 Marrow Chutney by Clare Colins 
 The View From My Tuscan Bedroom by Fara 
 Blossom of PINK by Joy Watson
 The Huckleberry Trail. by Larry Lingard/Davis 
 Organic lady apples by Celeste Mookherjee

Verdancy by Lynn Gedeon 
 How Green the Leaves of Gardens Grow by paintingsheep 
 New Born – Fern Frond by MotherNature2
 hitting their straps by metriognome
 Drops on a leaf… 2 by Bob Daalder 
 Elephant Ear Leaf by Penny Smith


Double Stone Garden Arch by phil decocco

The Huckleberry Trail.

The View From My Tuscan Bedroom

by cullodenmist

by Fara

Garden Tripod 22

Page 115


Marrow Chutney by Clare Colins

Blossom of PINK by Joy Watson

Organic lady apples by Celeste Mookherjee


Verdancy by Lynn Gedeon

New Born Fern Frond by MotherNature2

Drops on a leaf... *2* by Bob Daalder


How Green the Leaves of Gardens Grow by paintingsheep

hitting their straps by metriognome

Elephant Ear Leaf by Penny Smith


Featured

December

Garden Tripod 22

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Sunset rose by Celeste Mookherjee 
 “Lady in Red” by Rosehaven 
 Deck The Halls by paintingsheep 
 Forest in Miniature by Larry Lingard-Davis
 In the forest by EbyArts 
 funghi by Nicole W.

A place for quiet contemplation between the trees by heidiypi1
 Central Park – Autumn – Literary Walk – New York City by Vivienne Gucwa 
 Earth Grown Cold… by © Janis Zroback 
 Garden Out Building by relayer51 
 Romantic Window by Alexandra Lavizzari 
 Branches And Twigs by Sandra Foster


Sunset rose by Celeste Mookherjee

Deck The Halls by paintingsheep

"Lady in Red" by Rosehaven


Forest in Miniature by cullodenmist

In the forest by EbyArts

funghi by Nicole W.


A place for quiet contemplation between the trees by heidiypi1

Central Park Autumn - Literary Walk - New York City by Vivienne Gucwa

Earth Grown Cold... by © Janis Zroback


Garden Out Building by relayer51

Romantic Window by Alexandra Lavizzari

Branches And Twigs by Sandra Foster


Contributors

RedBubble Group Country Gardens Come Grow With Us Founder & Editor C Mclenahan Treasurer V Gore

! !News Hound

A Potter's Garden by Kerryn Madsen-Pietsch

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Cover image Visible Traces (Remnants of Presence) by Kerryn Madsen-Pietsch

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Written Features by Spotlight features Hans Bax Wilkinson Sword Sandra Fortier bubblehex08 Morag Anderson MotherNature Wikipedia

! ! ! !

Window to the World

House of Johannes Larsen by hans p olsen Rice Paper Window by Eileen McVey gecko by metriognome A Pink Outlook by Alexandra Lavizzari The dinner table .. .. make mine red! Kilmore East VIC Australia by Margaret Morgan (Watkins) Looking Out by Fay270 Chimneys by ElsT My Room...My Winter View… by naturelover Set In Stone - Mission San Jose - San Antonio Texas USA by TonyCrehan A room with a view - Sissinghurst Castle by Mortimer123 Lookin' Out The Window by WildestArt From My Bedroom Window by Vicki Spindler (VHS Photography) Church Window by lynn carter Looking Inside the Old Potting Shed by SummerJade It's Nice Outside. by relayer51 View on the Muckross gardens by Arie Koene Framing the Blue Mtns by PhotosByG Chinese Garden view at The Huntington by Celeste Mookherjee Oko's Open Shutters………. by WhiteDove Studio kj gordon Looking out on an Ullapool Evening by lezvee Flowers in the Window by krishoupt Lovely Garden View by hummingbirds A River View by Barbara Brown Autumn Through the Fence Window by Georgia Mizuleva

Barn Owl hunting 1 by Maree Clarkson Happiness by Elizabeth Kendall Things… by © Janis Zroback Daisey Mum by Charlotte Yealey Purple and CreamTulip Bouquet by Barbara Wyeth Entwined ~ Chain of Hearts by Kerryn Madsen-Pietsch Spring by jhawa Pickwick by Brian Haslam Wherwell by lezvee 
 Garden – Belvidere, NJ – My little cottage by Mike Savad
 Pam’s Garden #5 by Elaine Teague 
 The old Porch by PicsbyJody 
 Adare – Ireland by Arie Koene
 Stone Cottage by phil decocco Junco in Budding Cherry Tree by hummingbirds
 Titmouse at the Pyracantha by Eileen McVey
 Southern Boobook Owl by BronReid 
 Pelegrine Falcon – bird of prey – Australia by Margaret Morgan (Watkins)
 Kingfisher – I by Peter Wiggerman 
 Lets have a closer look…..by Nicole W. Double Stone Garden Arch by phil decocco 
 Marrow Chutney by Clare Colins 
 The View From My Tuscan Bedroom by Fara 
 Blossom of PINK by Joy Watson
 The Huckleberry Trail. by Larry Lingard/Davis 
 Organic lady apples by Celeste Mookherjee Verdancy by Lynn Gedeon 
 How Green the Leaves of Gardens Grow by paintingsheep 
 New Born – Fern Frond by MotherNature2
 hitting their straps by metriognome
 Drops on a leaf… 2 by Bob Daalder 
 Elephant Ear Leaf by Penny Smith Sunset rose by Celeste Mookherjee 
 “Lady in Red” by Rosehaven 
 Deck The Halls by paintingsheep 
 Forest in Miniature by Larry Lingard-Davis
 In the forest by EbyArts 
 funghi by Nicole W A place for quiet contemplation between the trees by heidiypi1
 Central Park – Autumn – Literary Walk – New York City by Vivienne Gucwa 
 Earth Grown Cold… by © Janis Zroback 
 Garden Out Building by relayer51 
 Romantic Window by Alexandra Lavizzari 
 Branches And Twigs by Sandra Foster

Fine Art America Group, Garden Tripod

Conservatory In Autumn by Sally Weigand Apple Blossoms by Rabiah Seminole Wisley Garden by Ross Henton Natural Born Beauty… by Bob Daalder The Last Wish by Stuart Harrison Parsley by Annemeet Van der Leij A Circle Of Flowers by Esther Newman-Cohen Spring Blossoms In The City by Miriam Danar Cabbage And Marigolds by Jean Hall Ferns Ferns Oh My by Lucy Threlfall Good Morning by Katerina Kamenetsky Dreamy Green Fern by Priya Ghose Almost by Michael Friedman Secret English Garden by Ann Horn Civil War Eastern Sycamore Tree by Patti Whitten Tropical Green Curves And Diagonals A Vertical View by Georgia Mizuleva

Catalogues Garden Tripod 21

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Sheep act 'like heroin addicts,' 'commit suicide' after eating poisonous plant !

In The News

Stephen and Louise Knight have lost nearly 800 sheep, who have died after eating a darling pea plant that causes addiction. The animals reportedly become addicted to the plant and exhibit behavior such as ramming their heads against objects until they die. BY DAVID HARDING NEW YORK DAILY NEWS Sunday, May 18, 2014, 4:36 PM

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Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/sheep-heroinaddicts-eating-poisonous-plant-article-1.1797060#ixzz32F9Q9Sqi

DEAGOSTINI/GETTY IMAGES

Hundreds of sheep in Australia have "committed suicide" after eating and becoming addicted to a poisonous plant. Some 800 sheep died after eating the darling pea plant then bashing their heads open "like heroin addicts." The plant is toxic to the animals and if the sheep graze on it for a period of time it causes addiction, a lack of coordination and depression. The Sydney Morning Herald reports that New South Wales farmers Stephen and Louise Knight have lost 800 sheep to the plant. "They just go to a post and bang their head on it till they crack their heads open," Louise said. "It's like dealing with a thousand heroin addicts."


In The News

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MOONLIGHT0551/WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Vet Bob McKinnon, said sheep display erratic behavior "similar to that of a drunk" when they become addicted to the plant. "They lose weight to start with and then get staggery, the progression gets worse, they get uncoordinated and depressed, they don't know where their feet are and they become recumbent and die that way," he said. there appears to be no cure, other than preventing the animals eating the plant in the first place.

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Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/sheep-heroinaddicts-eating-poisonous-plant-article-1.1797060#ixzz32FAu96fm


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Garden Tripod 21

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Visible Traces (Remnants of Presence)

by Kerryn Madsen-Pietsch

Photographic Print & Throw Pillow

All The Materials Contained May Not Be Reproduced, Copied, Edited, Published, Transmitted Or Uploaded In Any Way Without the artist/photographers Permission. These Images/writings Do Not Belong To The Public Domain. All images and information within the Garden Tripod magazine are the responsibility of the owner/artist/writer/photographer & not the Garden Tripod magazine 2012-2014



Garden Tripod 22