Destination Garden Spot Village - Spring/Summer 2022

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MEET GARDEN SPOT'S

SEVEN GREAT TIPS FOR

GREEN THUMBS

DOWNSIZING

SERVING & LEARNING AT

LONGWOOD

DESTINATION

Your Best Story Is Waiting SPRING/SUMMER 2022

for

You

GA R D E N S P OT V I L L AG E

GREYSTONE MANOR GARDENS

A FAMILY AFFAIR

4 GOURMET RECIPES FEATURING

STRAWBERRIES

Greenhouse-to-table sprouts thrive in Garden Spot's state-of-the-art aeroponic greenhouse.


YOUR BEST STORY IS WAITING FOR YOU When will your best story begin? Bob and Rosey Hess started their story when they moved to Sycamore Springs in June 2020. Their new community quickly became a place where their children and grandchildren felt at home too...

Saturday morning breakfasts, walks along the creek and special places to build forts made the Sycamore Springs neighborhood at Garden Spot Village a magical place to write new stories for the Hess family.

START YOUR BEST STORY AT GARDENSPOTVILLAGE.ORG OR CALL SALES AT 717.355.6000



ENCOUNTER


L ANCASTER

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community

Discover a

filled with opportunity and purpose

Explore the abundant opportunities you

have to live with purpose in community at Garden Spot Village.

WAYS TO LEARN MORE: • Take a virtual tour at: gardenspotvillage.org/village-virtual-tour • Attend a Look & Learn: gsvlookandlearn.org • Read Destination Magazine online at: destination.gardenspotvillage.org • Watch videos on our YouTube channel • Like our Facebook page

#gardenspotvillage

GARDENSPOTVILLAGE.ORG | 717.355.6000



EPISODES RELEASED MONTHLY This podcast explores what it means to retire with purpose, live to your full potential and explore abundant opportunities to live with purpose in community.

LISTEN TO OUR PODCAST:

gardenspotcommunities.org/podcast


INTERESTED IN BECOMING A

FUTURE RESIDENT?

At Garden Spot Village, our two-step approach to building community lets you determine how quickly you take your journey.

STEP 1 Submit an application with the $150 application fee in order to become a future resident.

STEP 2 Choose your housing style, make a down payment and join our Radar Screen, a community of people looking forward to calling Garden Spot Village home.

WHAT DO YOU HAVE TO LOSE? GARDENSPOTVILLAGE.ORG 717.355.6000 Read about Tom & Joanne's journey to Garden Spot Village on page 24.


FEATURES SPRING/SUMMER 2022 | ISSUE 26

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SERVING AND LEARNING AT LONGWOOD GARDENS

Alan and Judy Dinning find joy and purpose in volunteering at Longwood Gardens in nearby Kennett Square.

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GARDENING AT GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE

Frequently referred to as the “Garden Spot of America,” New Holland offers rich soil, perfect for growing crops and flowers.

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CREATING LEGACY

A Legacy Project offers an opportunity to ask, “What can I create that will last forever?” Marian Harnish helps people answer these and other inspiring questions.

The labyrinth in the Garden Spot Village Legacy Garden offers a space to reflect and walk in meditation.


DEPARTMENTS SPRING/SUMMER 2022 | ISSUE 26

PEOPLE OF THE COMMUNITY

ON THE MOVE

21

Looking Forward Brett and Robin Buckwalter plan their move.

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Downsizing Tips Plan your move.

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New Possibilities Gary and Alice Cochran grow plants from heirlooom seeds.

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Meet Your Neighbor Joanne and Tom Heiser celebrate life at Garden Spot.

44

Real Estate Update Market remains strong.

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Socially Speaking The Community Gardens offer space to connect and grow.

TIME WITH FAMILY

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30

Volunteer Spotlight Gary Fillippo serves his community outdoors.

32

Giving Generously Ruth Buehler challenges her grandchildren to be generous.

Bring the Family Make memories, locally.

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47

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Staff Spotlight Mark Kauffman appreciates the relationships he cultivates.

Hugo & Val The Garden IN EVERY ISSUE 14 First Word 100 Opportunity Calendar

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THE TABLE—A CELEBRATION OF FOOD 61 Lancaster Tastes of the Season:

Four Delicious Strawberry Recipes

66 Chef’s Delight: Amish BBQ Chicken 68 Restaurant Review with Fay:

John J. Jeffries offers the finest in farm-to-table dining.

70 Recipes

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NEARBY & BEYOND

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Greystone Manor A family-owned and operated garden inspires many.

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On The Road Garden Spot Serves in Kenya.

96

On the Clock Don Aldrich teaches teens.

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Community Spotlight Dr. Laura Harkin


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Purchase discounted tickets at Garden Spot Village Resident Services


FIRST WOR D BRAND EDITOR & CMO Scott Miller EDITOR & STORYTELLER Juanita Fox WRITER Art Petrosemolo VISUAL DIRECTOR & DESIGNER Brandon Adams PHOTOGRAPHY The Premise Studio: Jeremy Hess, The GSC Creative Team: Gavin Sauder, Brandon Adams HUGO & VAL WRITER & ILLUSTRATOR Andrew Lytle PLEASE SEND COMMENTS OR ARTICLE SUGGESTIONS TO: info@gardenspotvillage.org PLEASE SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO: ccreek@gardenspotvillage.org PUBLISHED BY: Garden Spot Communities

DESTINATION REIN VENTED IN TIME FOR A CELEBRATION OF SPRING hank you for reading Destination. We do our best to make it both informative and engaging. One of the things about Garden Spot, is that we consistently try to raise the bar. Invariably, people will email us or tell us directly that our most recent issue of Destination was by far our best. Our creative team appreciates those comments very much. The “behind-the-scenes” response is, how are we going to top this one? I’ve come to believe that the desire to invest our best selves in order to provide you with something useful and meaningful has a lot to do with it.

T

We have tweaked the format, the look and the feel of the magazine, from issue to issue. Our thought being, when the time is right, we’d take those tweaks, add some more enhancements, and upgrade to a substantially more contemporary format. You are holding it in your hands. There are a lot of “subtle” changes with this issue, including the size. If you put another magazine on top of it, you will see the “small” change that seems to make a pretty big difference. Springtime is a time of renewal. We emerge from the quiet, dormant, snowy winter into a lively, vibrant, thriving spring. The trees bloom, flowers spring up, the grass grows thick and green. For gardeners it’s time to get vegetables, corn and flowers into the ground. This issue celebrates the gardens and the gardeners of Garden Spot Village. It seemed appropriate to release our reinvented Destination at the rebirth of spring. We hope you find this issue helpful and engaging as you “leaf ” through the pages to discover a little more about Garden Spot Village: Where Life Blooms! SCOTT MILLER Brand Editor & Chief Marketing Officer

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VIEW ONLINE: destination.gardenspotvillage.org

Sustainably printed to reflect Garden Spot Communities' commitment to environmental stewardship. ISSUE NO. 26 PUBLISHED BIANNUALLY


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PEOPLE OF THE COMMUNITY

THE PEOPLE WHO LIVE & WORK HERE

NEW POSSIBILITIES

GARY & ALICE COCHRAN FINDING COMMUNITY IN THE GARDENS

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PEOPLE OF THE COMMUNIT Y

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hen Gary and Alice Cochran were first married, they believed that “there is no finer thing than the joy of being in the garden.” As a result, they purchased a farm in Collegeville that dated to the 1800s and was in great disrepair. With the help of family and good friends, they lovingly restored the home and barn, one room at a time. The farm’s pasture was quickly filled with sheep, steers, hogs and horses. Alice, a horsewoman from the age of six, began boarding horses, primarily for 4-H students. She was also active in competition, including orienteering, paper chase, fox hunting and paces, until moving to Garden Spot Village. They named the property Heritage Farms, to remind them of Psalm 127:3 which says, “Children are a heritage from the Lord.” Their sons, David and Daniel, were very involved in the farm. Dan, in particular, participated in local 4-H clubs, raising steers, hogs and sheep over the years. Dave pursued interests off the farm, primarily playing baseball, from Little League through college. For three seasons of the year, the family raised vegetables in a large garden. It was during those years that Gary learned the benefits of heirloom seeds and how to prepare seeds for the next spring’s planting.

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Gary says, “The gardens are a neat place Today Gary and Alice grow heirloom to go in the evening. After 6pm, people plants in their plots at Garden Spot will be working at their garden plots and Village’s community gardens at Sycamore visiting. People who don’t have plots also Springs. Their plots teem with Russian stop by, just to see what is growing.” Black Krim, Brandywine, Hawaiian Alice and Gary also volunteer in Pineapple and Amish Paste tomatoes; as Garden Spot’s aeroponic greenhouse well as edamame (soybeans), Yukon Gold each Monday at 8am. They potatoes, sweet potatoes, string harvest lettuce and other beans and cabbage. vegetables. “We always wanted During harvest, Gary a greenhouse,” she says. “Now reserves seeds for the following we have one!” year. He picks the best tomato, Gardens Of volunteering Gary says, for example, scoops out the add years “First Peter 4:10 says, ‘Each seeds and places them in a to your life of you should use whatever container of water and covers and life to gift you have received to serve the container. He allows the seeds to ferment, which causes your years. others as faithful stewards of God’s grace in its various the good seeds to fall to the forms.’ We believe we are called bottom of the container. After to share our gifts at Garden a few days, he separates the Spot Village.” seeds and places them on paper When it was time to downsize, towels to dry for several days. When the Gary and Alice chose Garden Spot seeds are dry, he places them in a marked Village because of the community they envelope and sets them aside until he’s experienced when they visited. They say, ready to plant. “Garden Spot Village appealed to us Tomatoes are the only seeds Gary and because of the many opportunities for Alice plant indoors. Their other fruits and people to be of service to one another vegetables are started in the ground, as and the community. This is a wonderful soon as the weather allows. Gary relies opportunity that benefits everyone who on Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds when he shares this vision.” wants additional heirloom varieties. “One of our neighbors asked, ‘Why do you spend so much time in the gardens?’” READ MORE: rareseeds.com Alice says. “We find purpose there.” “Gardens add years to your life and life Gary and Alice Cochran, Garden Spot to your years. The community gardens Village residents since April 2018, harvest at Garden Spot Village create a smaller vegetables in their garden plots in the community with people who have the same community gardens. kinds of interests,” Gary adds. “There is a real spectrum of people who garden and we are learning to love and appreciate each other while we work together.”

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PEOPLE OF THE COMMUNIT Y

MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR

JOANNE & TOM HEISER

EMBRACING THEIR NEW COMMUNITY

J

oanne and Tom Heiser love their front porch. On warm mornings the porch overflows as neighbors connect over cups of coffee to start the day. “We ran out of chairs the other morning,” Joanne laughs. Joanne and Tom’s journey to Garden Spot Village began in 2018. They put a pre-construction down payment on a home in Sycamore Springs in 2020. Their downsizing plans involved moving Tom’s adult daughter into a condominium co-op. Because the COVID outbreak halted real estate sales for a period of time, they withdrew their names, realizing it might be several years until they were able to move. As they waited, they regularly drove an hour from their separate homes in Bucks County just to walk the paths at Garden Spot Village. “We walked for miles,” Tom says. “The people were so friendly, so helpful. We would ask questions and they would graciously answer.” After Tom’s daughter settled into her new home, Tom and Joanne called Sales Director Kelly Sweigart just to see what might be available. Although they realized they might have to wait several years, they made a deposit on a home at Sycamore Springs and joined the Radar Screen, hopeful that something would become available.

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In June 2021, during a trip to the Outer Banks in North Carolina, they learned that a home would be available in August. They listed their homes and began to prepare to combine their households. Tom’s home sold in a weekend. Joanne’s didn’t even make it to market. A friend’s sister who lived on the West Coast toured the home and said, “I want it.” The move was meant to be. A SECOND CHANCE AT LOVE Tom and Joanne each lost their spouse to cancer in 2013 and 2015, respectively. The couples had been friends through the years and Joanne and Tom connected through their shared grief. They began walking together regularly. Their friendship grew and they soon began to plan new adventures together. Recognizing that neither of them was ready for a second marriage, they held a commitment ceremony with their combined children in 2016. Over the next few years they traveled around the country. Trips to Alaska, Yellowstone, Mackinac Island and more, cemented their friendship and fostered a deeper relationship. A NEW START They soon realized that they wanted to move to a new home together. They visited Garden Spot Village while the first phase of Sycamore Springs was still under construction. The neighborhood appealed to them because the community offered a no-maintenance lifestyle in a small town. “The first time we drove here, we loved it,” Joanne says. Plus, the community walking paths offered them the opportunity to continue to prioritize exercise and time together. Joanne adds, “Garden Spot Village is centrally located for our grandchildren' s music, cheer and sports activities. We love going to as many as we can around the beautiful countryside.” They moved into their new home in the middle of a hurricane in late August 2021. Their next-door neighbors welcomed them with hugs as well as a basket full of muffins, fruit and candy. “Ever since we moved in, our friends and family have wanted to visit,” Tom says. “Everybody who visits likes Garden Spot Village very much,” Joanne echoes. “I took a friend through the Wood Shop and couldn’t get him out,” Tom laughs. As they settle into their new community, Tom and Joanne appreciate the Wellness Center, including the pool and the balance classes. They also appreciate the social opportunities to connect with their neighbors. Shortly after moving in, Tom popped the big question: “Joanne, would you marry me?” She tearfully accepted and they celebrated their fresh start with a private family gathering in late November 2021.

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Clockwise from top left: Joanne's grandsons walk with her to the wedding ceremony; Tom and Joanne enjoy their first married kiss; standing in front of their home in Sycamore Springs; walking home after the ceremony; posing with their family at the Hemlock Commons Common Building. Opposite: Tom and Joanne enjoy long walks on the paths near their home at Sycamore Springs.


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PEOPLE OF THE COMMUNIT Y

SOCIALLY SPEAKING

THE COMMUNITY GARDENS GROWING COMMUNITY & VEGETABLES

ell over 100 gardeners tend the 66 garden plots at Garden Spot Village. They fill their gardens with vegetables such as tomatoes, cucumbers, sweet potatoes, lettuce, peppers, as well as wildflowers and perennials. In the process, they create community. Doug and Pegge Moister, Garden Spot Village residents since December 2016, serve as co-presidents of the Garden Spot Gardeners Club. Doug says, “It’s so much fun to watch people reconnect with gardening, work the ground and grow things. Community happens as people gather to work together and share experiences and the abundance of their produce.” Doug and Pegge say Garden Spot Village’s Campus Services team makes gardening easy. Each spring they turn over the soil, add lime, rototill and measure the plots. In addition, throughout the summer, Campus Services provides a common wheelbarrow and picks up weeds that gardeners pull each day. Doug says, “Mark Kauffman and his crew do so much to help us. We simply facilitate the relationship between Campus Services and the gardeners.”

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Throughout the growing season, the gardeners enjoy daily interaction with fellow gardening enthusiasts at the garden plots. “People always have little nuances that they do to help them get a better crop,” Doug says. He believes that sharing these nuances and lessons helps all of the gardeners to be more successful. In addition to being generous with advice, Doug and his neighbors also generously share their harvest with those around them. “We got a knock on the door yesterday, and one of the residents who has a garden brought us a bag of sweet potatoes and just said thanks for what you do here,” Doug says. A table by the gardens is often overflowing with the bounty of harvest. These vegetables are shared freely with anyone who can use the produce.

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Clockwise from left: The Community Gardens in full bloom; Campus Services plows the gardens after a successful harvest; grape tomatoes; the Community Gardens at Sycamore Springs; heirloom tomatoes


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It’s so much fun to watch people reconnect with gardening, work the ground and grow things.

Each fall, Campus Services uses a chisel plow to plow the garden and covers the fresh ground with leaves, which compost into the soil and provide rich nutrients for the next year’s growing season. Since March 2020, the community gardens have offered a bit of normalcy in a world that has felt like it was turned upside down by the effects of COVID-19. This is the one place where people can focus their conversations on something other than the events of the world around them. Doug says, “When things are out of control, you need something that you can control. When I go to the garden I can work that dirt up, I can plant what I want, I can take care of it.” The order of the garden has offered hope to Doug and his neighbors in a time when life has been uncertain. Gary and Alice Cochran, Garden Spot Village residents since April 2018, appreciate the opportunity they have through the community gardens to continue their interest in gardening. Gary says, “The gardens offer a unique reason for people to gather. Often, when we are working in the garden, people will be sitting on the bench at one end of the garden, just enjoying the camaraderie and community that the garden provides.” (Read Gary and Alice’s story on page 21.)


PEOPLE OF THE COMMUNIT Y VOLUNTEER SPOTLIGHT

GARY FILLIPPO SERVING OUTDOORS

“I

love the outdoors and want to be outside as much as I can while I am blessed with good health,” says Gary Fillippo, a Garden Spot Village resident since March 2021. Gary’s volunteer assignment with Campus Services affords him many hours outside each week. On various days he spends two to three hours per day clearing fallen branches, twigs and other debris from sidewalks, parking lots and courtyards. He works around the perimeter of the apartments and health care areas. Gary enjoys planting annuals in the “After living at Garden Spot for about beds adjacent to his apartment patio, a month, I noticed a need for someone which faces a beautifully landscaped to pick up sticks and other debris after courtyard. He chose shade-tolerant storms. I connected with Scott Ruth, the impatiens and begonias. “The plants did director of campus services, and he was very well last summer,” he says. thrilled for the extra help,” explains Gary. He continues, “Campus Services does a In addition to volunteering with great job, but they are as shorthanded as Campus Services, Gary and Lois have everyone else. I simply wanted to help.” also helped to hand out meals at CrossNet Gary, a former accountant and Ministries through Garden Spot’s Swipe financial manager Out Hunger program. from West Chester, As a young boy, Opposite: Gary rakes branches that fell during a recent storm enjoyed landscaping Gary took piano in the courtyard near his garden and vegetable lessons but stopped apartment. gardening at his home when school and piano for many years. became too much. After retiring, Gary and his wife, Lois, “It was the biggest mistake I ever made,” moved to Garden Spot Village. Although Gary reflects. Since retiring, he has taught his wife, Lois, researched a number of himself to play the piano again. He enjoys communities, Garden Spot Village offered easy listening and popular songs from the best value for the money. Also, Gary the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s and plays piano explains, “My mother-in-law lived at as a volunteer in Adult Day Services. He Garden Spot Village for 15 years. We hopes to play for skilled care residents visited her often and the community when the COVID situation allows. became like a second home to us.” Gary also occasionally plays the baby Gary and Lois joined the Radar Screen grand piano adjacent to the Village by placing a deposit on an apartment in Park. “People will stop and listen while 2018. Although it took three years for I play,” Gary says. “If I bring a smile to them to move, Gary says, “It was well someone’s face, I’ve accomplished my worth the wait. We are so thankful to be mission for the day.” here. Our apartment in Gardens West is connected to everything.”

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Volunteer Services encourages residents to engage with their community through volunteering. “The best way to build relationships is by working toward a common goal,” says Daryl Groff, director of Volunteer Services. “We want to give people opportunities for meaningful volunteer assignments. If you see something you want to do, let us know. We will connect you with the appropriate department and encourage you to pursue volunteer opportunities that provide meaning and purpose for you.”


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PEOPLE OF THE COMMUNIT Y midst of a remodeling project. Last, the Humane Society offers vet services for reduced prices to local families. Tommy, who was 13, chose Reading Musical Foundation (RMF). Tommy chose RMF because, as a musician, he believes in the power of music to enrich lives. Tommy says, “Some people want to play an instrument, but do not have the money to afford it. RMF takes used instruments and repairs them to make them more affordable.” Tommy also had a personal connection to RMF. The organization offers competitions for local students. Tommy won one of the competitions, which included a monetary award that he applied to lessons. In addition, Tommy performed in the Berks Jazz Fest, which RMF supports. Katie, who was 10, chose Berks Encore’s Meals on Wheels program as her nonprofit organization. Katie told Ruth, “I chose this charity because everybody should have food. I want to end the story of hunger.” Katie also supported Berks Encore because of their good work in supporting older adults. After hearing the proposals, Ruth generously wrote checks for each of the nonprofits. Her grandchildren mailed letters to the organizations that explained their support and the enclosed check. Mick, Tommy and Katie each received a personal letter from the organization they chose, thanking them for their thoughtfulness and generosity. Lori Gerhart, Berks Encore’s director of marketing and GIVING GENEROUSLY communications, wrote an article about Katie in the March 2020 issue of Berks Encore’s monthly newspaper. Lori says, “At Berks PASSING ON THE LESSON OF GENEROSITY Encore, we were surprised when we got a letter from a 10-yearold with a very generous donation from her grandmother. Katie’s kindness in choosing Berks Encore made me want to find out hortly before Christmas 2019, Ruth Buehler, a more about this little girl’s hope to end the story of hunger— Garden Spot Village resident since October 2008, especially for seniors in Berks County.” reached out to her son, Tony Cox, with an idea After learning more about Katie and her family’s involvement for teaching her grandchildren in Meals on Wheels through Cub Scouts and to be generous. other community connections, Lori says, “We are Above: Ruth poses with her Inspired by a financial grateful Katie chose Berks Encore.” grandchildren Tommy, Katie presentation she had attended Ruth says of the challenge, “If nothing else, and Mick. in late 2019, hosted by Rick Rodgers of Rodgers I hope I have instilled a strong work ethic & Associates, Ruth decided to challenge her and giving spirit in my family, so they can be three grandchildren, then ages 10, 13 and 15, to research a local contributing members of society.” nonprofit and present a case as to why a donation should be made Mick says, “It was very fulfilling to be able to impact others to the organization. through my grandmother's generosity.” Her son reinforced the challenge. Before Ruth knew it, her “I never expected the incredible response,” Ruth adds. “I just grandchildren were busy researching and writing presentations wanted to inspire my family and others to be generous.” to support their nonprofits of choice. Their choices reflected their personal interests and experiences. READ MORE: rodgers-associates.com Mick, who was 15 at the time, chose the Humane Society of Berks County in Reading. He made his choice for several reasons. humanepa.org First, it is a no-kill shelter. Second, the organization was in the readingmusicalfoundation.org berksencore.org

RUTH BUEHLER

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Allen Wessel, CFP® Financial Advisor 201 East Main St New Holland, PA 17557 717-354-4879


PEOPLE OF THE COMMUNIT Y STAFF SPOTLIGHT

MARK KAUFFMAN

GROWING RELATIONSHIPS IN THE GARDEN For the past nine years Mark Kauffman has been driving against the early-morning Philadelphia-bound traffic, as he heads west on Route 23 to New Holland from Pottstown. He enjoys his commute saying, “It’s a beautiful drive and it beats driving east toward Philadelphia, like I used to, with the rest of the commuters.” In late 2012, Janine Ziegler, Garden Spot’s administrative assistant and the wife of one of Mark’s friends in high school, told Mark about a job opportunity at Garden Spot Village. At the time, Mark, who had many years of experience in landscaping, was in the midst of his annual winter layoff. Village residents since December 2016, and co-presidents of the For Mark, spring, summer and fall were busy seasons with long Garden Spot Gardeners. Each spring his team uses the chisel hours. He worked hard, knowing that inevitably, he would be plow and tiller on the gardens before measuring and staking the facing a layoff each winter. individual plots. After many years of this difficult cycle of unbalanced workload, Through the planting and growing seasons, Mark ensures Mark learned from Janine that Garden Spot Village was hiring. that residents have the gardening tools they need as well as He was very thankful for the opportunity. He says. “Having work any fencing and tomato cages that Campus Services stored the year round is a blessing. I am thankful I was able previous fall. Many residents also rely on the Above: Mark works with the to get out of the unhealthy landscaping cycle and common wheelbarrow, where they place weeds gardeners to prepare the be able to rely on steady work.” and clippings for Mark and his team to remove community plots. As the grounds supervisor for Campus for composting. Services, Mark says, “I take care of everything In the fall, when the growing season is over, outside the buildings.” He enjoys the job because “the work is Mark coordinates putting the community gardens to rest for the never the same; I am always doing something different. The days winter. Mark or a member of his team once again chisel plows fly by because there is so much work to do. It is such a blessing to the ground, preparing it to lie dormant for the winter before the serve the residents.” cycle begins again in the spring. His day-to-day tasks can include picking up sticks and debris In addition to caring for the gardens, Mark and his team help after storms, removing trash, trimming bushes and trees— to remove annual and perennial clippings from residents’ flower essentially anything that needs to be done to keep Garden Spot beds around their homes. He drives Garden Spot’s Ford F250 Village beautiful. Mark appreciates his position within the with a trailer throughout the campus and collects the clippings and management team that Campus Services Director Scott Ruth has plants, which are composted near the Campus Services nursery. been building over the last few years. “We keep pushing forward,” When Mark’s not at work, he’s busy in his community, Mark says. “We are constantly looking forward, planning ahead volunteering his time. His wife, Laura, is the children’s librarian and being proactive as we look toward future growth at Garden at the Exeter Community Library. She coordinated a Storywalk® Spot Village.” on the library grounds in early 2021. A Storywalk is a fun, In addition to being grateful for the steady year-round work, literacy-based installation, designed to encourage families to read Mark also says, “working at Garden Spot Village is the best together while enjoying the outdoors. Mark shared his expertise by decision I ever made. I appreciate the relationships I’ve been able to landscaping the area along the trail. build with residents. It’s a blessing to be able to help them achieve Mark also enjoys collecting vintage stereo equipment and vinyl the goals they have with their flower beds and gardens.” records. His collection includes albums from local bands as well as Mark serves an essential role with the Community Gardens. classic rock. His music therapy helps him unwind and relax at the He works closely with Doug and Pegge Moister, Garden Spot end of a busy day at Garden Spot Village.

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TA K I N G T H E N E X T S T E P S

ON THE MOVE

LOOKING FORWARD

BRETT & ROBIN BUCKWALTER PREPARING TO RETIRE

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ON THE MOVE

rett Buckwalter remembers sitting at his family’s kitchen table in Churchtown while his dad, Weldon, talked with Dale Weaver about the vision for a retirement community in New Holland. Weldon, a local businessman, supported the vision. Brett remembers his mother, Dorothy, saying to Dale, “There are going to be a lot of people who won’t like this idea.” Dale responded by nodding his head. Dorothy, a registered nurse who worked at the New Holland Family Health Center, realized the value of the community and moved to Garden Spot Village in August 2003.

B

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Nearly 20 years later, Brett and his wife, Robin, are future residents of Garden Spot Village. They joined the Radar Screen in November 2021 when they placed a deposit on their future home at Sycamore Springs. “We really like the concept of Sycamore Springs,” Robin says. “The style of homes, with the houses facing the commons, is a great concept.” DEDICATED TO THE ARTS Brett was born and raised in eastern Lancaster County. In contrast, Robin’s dad was in the Air Force. “As I was growing up, we moved about every 18 months,” Robin says. “We lived all over the U.S., as well as in England and Germany.” The two met at North Carolina School of the Arts and have spent their lives supporting the arts. After Brett graduated from college in May 1985 (Robin graduated in 1984), they moved to New York City, where Brett worked in production lighting, primarily for TV. Self-employed, he served as a consultant for a variety of shows including Late Night with Conan O’Brien, Guiding

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Above: Brett and Robin Buckwalter choose flavors of Fox Meadows ice cream at Linden | Gifts & Essentials; they enjoy a break at a Common Building at Sycamore Springs.


Light, Sesame Street and the original episodes of The All New Mickey Mouse Club. Robin worked for Tiffany & Co., designing and opening stores around the world. After their children were born, the expense of living and commuting in New York City simply became too much. They returned home to Lancaster County in 2005. After about 18 months of freelancing, Brett started working at Miller Center for the Arts at Reading Area Community College (RACC) as technical and operations coordinator. Robin focused most of her energy on caring for their children—Colin, Bryan and Carrie. In addition to caregiving, Robin also dabbled in the arts as a costume designer and, most recently, directing RACC’s evening program at Wilson Middle School. DEDICATED TO THEIR COMMUNITY Robin recently completed her “swan song,” serving as costume designer for the show Proof, which ran at Penn State Berks for four shows in December 2021. “It’s ironic that this is my last show,” Robin says. “Mary Louise

Parker, who was one of our classmates in college, performed in this show when it debuted on Broadway. She received a best actress Tony Award for her performance.” Brett serves as an unofficial sound and lighting consultant for a number of community organizations. “We have a lot of arts groups in Berks County,” Brett says. “I’ve worked with Yocum Institute for the Arts, BCTV, and some smaller churches in Reading. My work is unpaid; it’s just something I like to do. I like to find reasonable ways for organizations to accomplish their goals with sound and lighting.” Brett also recently started his second elected term as a member of the board of directors for Cocalico School District.

Above: Martie Borts, Robin's mom, lives in Rose Court, just a short walk from Colin's home. Robin's dad, Bob Borts, lives in Mountain View.

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ON THE MOVE

DEDICATED TO THEIR FAMILY The Sycamore Springs neighborhood at Garden Spot Village offers the perfect location for the Buckwalters. Robin’s parents, Bob and Martie Borts, moved to Garden Spot Village in April 2019. In addition, Robin and Brett recently purchased a house on Valley View Drive (adjacent to Garden Spot Village), which they are renovating to make a handicapped accessible home for their oldest son Colin, who has cerebral palsy. “We’ve been working toward this goal of retirement for a long time,” Robin says. “Colin will be able to look out his back window and see his grandma’s house on Rose Court,” Robin explains. “Plus, when we move to Sycamore Springs, we can walk to his home in just a few minutes.” As Colin’s advocate, Robin is working to secure a team of caregivers so he will have round-the-clock care. After getting Colin settled, Robin aims to help other families navigate the journey of advocating for their adult children who have physical disabilities, helping them find independence.

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Brett and Robin look forward to moving to Sycamore Springs and to traveling the world. “One of the things that appealed to us about Garden Spot Village is that everything is taken care of. We can live in Barcelona for four to six weeks, or travel to Greece, and not worry about anything,” Robin says. Brett adds, “I’ve had a long history with Garden Spot Village with my mother, and before her, my uncle. I know what my future looks like if something should happen, and that makes me feel really comfortable. Most people don’t want to move to a retirement community. My mother was a really good role model and made all of these decisions so that as children we did not have to. I’m going to be 60 and I’m thinking about my next steps. You never know what might happen.” Clockwise from top: Robin, Brett and Martie enjoy the short walk from Colin's backyard to Martie's home; Colin looks out at his backyard; the family takes a break and dreams about a future when they will all live in New Holland.

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16 GRAYBILL RD | LEOLA, PA 17540 5 MILES WEST OF GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE; OFF ROUTE 23

717.656.2181 | WWW.HFCI.US

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ON THE MOVE

DOWNSIZING TIPS

PLAN YOUR MOVE BEFORE YOU NEED TO hen you have lived in a home for 20 or more years, it is easy to accumulate stuff. Just thinking about moving can be a daunting experience. Finding freedom from your stuff, however, can bring life and new opportunities. Consider the following tips as you work toward downsizing: START EARLY. Do not wait until you are ready to list your home to begin downsizing. Include decluttering and downsizing in your spring housecleaning. STOP ACCUMULATING. Invite family and friends to give you gifts of experiences or make donations in your name instead of giving physical gifts. Tickets to the theater, a local amusement park or even a gift to your favorite nonprofit can be even more meaningful than a costly collectible that will just collect dust. WORK SLOW. It has taken many years to fill your home—do not try to downsize in a weekend! Recognize that you will have seasons when you feel inspired to work through your possessions and other seasons when the process is more difficult. Give yourself space and time to do the project well.

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GIFT HEIRLOOMS EARLY. Many times people will gift family heirlooms in their will. Consider gifting the heirlooms early, such as for momentous occasions like graduations and weddings, so you can share your children’s and grandchildren’s joy in receiving the gift. SET ACHIEVABLE GOALS. Again, it has taken many years to accumulate all of your stuff. Set achievable goals so you can see your progress and stay motivated to keep working. HIRE A CONSULTANT. Although hiring a moving or downsizing consultant may feel like a frivolous expense, investing in their expertise and assistance is money well spent. They can quickly help you assess the value of your items and provide resources for auctions, recycling and more. INVITE YOUR FAMILY TO HELP. Engaging your children and grandchildren in the downsizing process can create special family memories. Don’t expect too much from them and invite them to participate at their convenience. Remember, this is your project and you are simply inviting them to join you on the journey. READ MORE: wayforth.com

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ON THE MOVE

REAL ESTATE UPDATE MARKET REMAINS INCREDIBLY STRONG

or the last few years, the real estate market has been incredibly strong in Lancaster County and its surrounding communities. A number of factors have contributed to the booming real estate market. LOW INTEREST RATES. Historically low interest rates for mortgages means that people can afford to pay more for a new home. This results in a seller’s market where homes are commanding record high prices. LIMITED INVENTORY. Basic economics apply to the real estate market too. Supply and demand set the price. When limited inventory meets a community with high demand, prices soar. Lancaster County has recently been recognized as one of the best places to live and work in the United States. This recognition has resulted in people moving into the community from out of state. They find the lower cost of living and slower pace of life appealing. This added demand drives up the price of homes. INCREASED LABOR RATES AND SUPPLY CHAIN DISRUPTION. Increased labor rates and supply chain disruption means that new home construction is more expensive and time-consuming for buyers than it has been in the past. New

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buyers are looking at established homes and communities where they can move in quickly. DEMOGRAPHICS. The millennial cohort, which is currently between the ages of 25 and 40, numbers 72 million compared to Generation X, which numbers 65 million. Although the baby boomers are retiring, they are not selling their homes at a rate that meets the increased demand. Local Realtor Carol Lehman says, “The real estate market in Lancaster County remains incredibly strong. Because of the historically low inventory, I regularly see homes going for thousands above the asking price.” This demand benefits sellers in time and price. “Many buyers continue to forego home inspections and place cash offers, which helps sellers move through settlement quickly,” Carol explains. Carol anticipates a strong market through 2022 and into 2023. “People who are looking to move to Garden Spot Village in the next two years will continue to be in fantastic shape as they list their homes for sale.” READ MORE: hostetterrealty.com

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ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS

Andy Sieger, D.M.D., Melissa Della Croce, D.M.D.

Proudly Serving the New Holland Community

Compassion, Experience, Integrity 119 West Main Street, New Holland

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BUYING GOLD LOCALLY OWNED • HIGHEST PRICES

WE MAKE HOUSE C ALLS 46

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TIME WITH

FAMILY MEMORIES IN THE MAKING

BRING THE FAMILY YOU’RE ALWAYS THE PERFECT AGE TO ENJOY LANCASTER.

ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL THINGS about Lancaster County is its bustling small business and arts community, which gives locals and visitors alike an endless number of places to cross off their Lancaster bucket list. With so much to see and do, it’s time to gather your family and friends of all ages to discover some must-visit spots. The following pages will include spring activities around Lancaster that everyone will enjoy. Bring the Family is a special section sponsored by our long-time partners and friends at Fig Lancaster. Fig celebrates independent businesses in the City of Lancaster. They love supporting local businesses and use their talents and creativity to change a community… for good.

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TIME WITH FA MILY

SPRING HAS ARRIVED, and Lancaster is ready to help you and your family create new memories this season. TINA PARKS, A FUTURE RESIDENT OF GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE, and her granddaughter Gwen went on a tour of five spots that are sure to be fun for the whole family. We hope you’ll wake up on a sunny Saturday morning when that spring feeling is in the air and use this guide to plan a day of adventures.

This article is presented in cooperation with

1. G allery Grow

Find out who has the greenest thumb by building one-of-a-kind terrariums at Gallery Grow. With step-by-step instructions from their knowledgeable staff, everyone can create something special to take home. 150 North Prince Street | 717.869.6547 | gallerygrow.com

2. N ook Books

You don’t have to be a kid to dive into one of the books at Nook Books. A children’s picture book store, they have just the story to warm your heart, make you think and spark your imagination.

50 North Queen Street | hello@nookbooks.shop | nookbooks.shop


3. Lancaster Cupcake Take a dessert break with a tasty treat from Lancaster Cupcake. With their large selection of cupcake flavors, everyone can try a little something different. 24 West Orange Street 260 Granite Run Drive lancastercupcake.com

4. The PotteryWorks

With hundreds of pieces to choose from, The PotteryWorks is a paint-yourown-pottery studio right in the heart of Downtown Lancaster. Everyone’s inner artist can come to life creating masterpieces that will be fired and ready to take home in just one week.

16 West Orange Street 717.299.9963 thepotteryworks.com

5. K itchen Kettle Village

A treasured attraction of Lancaster County, Kitchen Kettle Village is a timeless place for family time, exploration and laughter. Grab a treat to eat or sip on while the whole family finds something that piques their interest in one of their unique shops.

3529 Old Philadelphia Pike 800.732.3538 kitchenkettle.com

For more ways to enjoy Lancaster City and beyond, go to figlancaster.com. D E S T I N AT I O N G A R D E N S P O T V I L L A G E | S P R I N G / S U M M E R 2 0 2 2

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When It’s Time to Begin the Next Chapter of Your Life… We will be there for you!

IN EDITORIAL ADVERTISER SPOT

Call Carol Lehman or Greg Hostetter today to schedule your free consultation.

717.354.6416 | 717.354.HOME (4663) carol@hostetterrealty.com

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321 East Main Street, New Holland, PA

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GARDEN SPOT TH E AM A Z I N G A D V E NTHE T U RGARDEN E S O F H U GPART O6 COMMUNITIES A N D VA L

PRESENTS

The Amazing Adventures of

Hugo & Val

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The Amazing Adventures of

GRANDPARENTS GUIDE Reading The Amazing Adventures of Hugo & Val with the children in your life offers an opportunity for purposeful conversation.

INTERNATIONAL GARDENING QUICK FACTS • Traditional English Country Gardens are characterized by neatly clipped hedges, clearly defined edges and manicured walking paths. • The Taj Mahal is in a very famous Mughal garden. Mughal gardens typically include a mausoleum or palace and geometric shapes. • Japanese gardens are designed to inspire peaceful contemplation. They often combine plants, water, and rocks with simple, clean lines to create a tranquil retreat. • Chinese gardens are enclosed by walls and include ponds, rocks, trees and flowers. Chinese gardens also include an assortment of halls and pavilions within the garden, which are connected by winding paths and zigzag galleries. • French gardens are highly symmetrical and include neat and defined spaces. They may incorporate reflecting pools and gravel paths, but are best known for their order and control over nature.

Here are a few

QUESTIONS

to get the conversation started! TAKE TURNS ANSWERING THE QUESTIONS WITH THE CHILDREN. 1. Have you ever worked on a project that just didn’t work out? 2. Do you ever feel like Faline did at the beginning of this story? 3. Sometimes failure can teach us more than success. Is there a time when you failed that you learned an important lesson? 4. When things are not going your way, how do you stay positive? 5. John Maxwell has said, “There is no success without failure and losses.” What do you think he means by that?

CREATE YOUR OWN MINIATURE GARDEN Create your own miniature garden and share your love of growing with the next generation.

• FOR INSPIRATION ON HOW TO CREATE A SODA BOTTLE TERRARIUM: GSC. GL/8I7Z X B

• FOR INSPIRATION ON HOW TO CREATE A CONTAINER GARDEN: GSC. GL/P 7YMFXCRV

CHECK OUT HUGO AND VAL'S WEBSITE A fun place where kids and adults can go to view all of Hugo and Val's adventures, see Hugo and Val's family tree, and learn more about each member of their family!

H U G OAN DVAL . C OM 58

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Whoopie, It's A

Kids Fun Run For Kindergarten-8th graders at Garden SPot Village

March 25, 2022 Starting at 6pm Join us for this fun run for our youngest runners. Kids will run a one-mile loop on our campus. Each runner gets a t-shirt, finisher’s medal, a whoopie pie and ice cream. Mr. Whoop E. Pie from Shady Maple will join us to cheer for the kids and be available for pictures. Cost: $20 per runner / Register before 3/14/22

LEARN MORE & REGISTER ONLINE AT: GARDENSPOTVILLAGE.RUN/KIDS

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BUEHLER FAMILY DENTAL Our goal is to improve your oral health, provide a comfortable office environment, and, of course, to make you smile!

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912 W Main St. Suite 404 New Holland, PA

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717.656.0005

BuehlerFamilyDental.com | info@buehlerfamilydental.com

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THE

TABLE A C E L E B R AT I O N O F F O O D

LANCASTER TASTES OF THE SEASON

STRAWBERRIES FEATURING FOUR DELICIOUS STRAWBERRY RECIPES D E S T I N AT I O N G A R D E N S P O T V I L L A G E | S P R I N G / S U M M E R 2 0 2 2

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THE TA BLE

Fried Goat Cheese Crostini with Candied Walnuts and Macerated Strawberries

Fresh strawberries add a taste of the season to a delicious appetizer featuring fried goat cheese.

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Chocolate Covered Strawberry Salad

Sweet strawberries offer the crowning touch to a seasonal salad topped with a fresh-made chocolate vinaigrette.

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THE TA BLE

Strawberry Pork Tenderloin A delicious strawberry sauce makes grilled pork tenderloin a seasonal favorite. Garnished with fresh strawberries.

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Strawberry Turnovers Puff pastries and fresh strawberries make a quick-and-easy dessert to complement any entree.

Recipes on page 70.

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THE TA BLE

CHEF'S DELIGHT Amish BBQ Chicken Spring Pea, Asparagus and Parmesan Pasta

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On any given summer Saturday, you can pick up fresh chicken BBQ at a community fire company. Chef Mat Plank offers his take on the popular summer staple. Recipe on page 71.

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THE TA BLE RESTAURANT REVIEW

JOHN J. JEFFRIES WITH FAY STRICKLER

Located in the Lancaster Arts Hotel at 300 Harrisburg Avenue in downtown Lancaster, John J. Jeffries offers an authentic farm-to-table dining experience.

Photo provided by John J. Jeffries.

T

he restaurant is located in an old tobacco warehouse and is named after John J. Jeffries, a tobacco inspector whose stamp, dated November 5, 1890, was found in the rafters of the building during renovations. Chefs Sean Cavanaugh and Michael Carson opened the restaurant in 2006 with the vision of not only what a restaurant should be, but also what a restaurant can do for its local community. Chefs Sean and Michael, in partnering with local organic farms, offer an opportunity for small farmers to engage in sustainable farming practices and receive fair prices for their harvest. A friend and I enjoyed a delightful dinner in the restaurant’s absolutely beautiful outdoor courtyard. We dined under a mature tree, facing the courtyard, so we could enjoy the incredible ambiance. The weather was just perfect, which added to our dining pleasure. A local artisan cheese tray with fresh fruit, toasted nuts and toasted crostini served as a delicious starter. We enjoyed fresh-caught trout and beef liver with caramelized onions in a red wine reduction sauce. The entrees were paired with the freshest salad I’ve ever tasted. The fresh vegetables in the salad were delightful. We finished the evening with pumpkin apple cake and vanilla crème brûlée. The crème brûlée’s crispy torched sugar top perfectly complemented the creamy custard underneath.

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Menus change frequently, “in harmony with the harvest of our partnering small family farms,” the restaurant’s website says. The frequent changes offer a unique dining experience each time you visit. Plus, because the food is fresh, you receive the full benefits of the nutrientrich entrees and salads. We are so blessed to live in Lancaster County and have year-round access to delicious, fresh produce. John J. Jeffries is open for dinner Monday through Saturday, from 5-9pm. This popular Lancaster restaurant does accept reservations and I would strongly recommend calling ahead to reserve your table. The evening we dined there, every table was full. READ MORE: johnjjeffries.com

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Fay Strickler holds a Master of Science degree in Agriculture and Extension Education from Penn State University. Through the course of her career she was very involved in training restaurant staff on food safety as well as serving as a food judge in fairs across Pennsylvania. She offers recommendations for local Lancaster County restaurants on the Garden Spot Village website. CHECK OUT FAY'S RESTAURANT REVIEWS: gsc.gl/s3e2rfcw4j


Petal Perfect Flowers

NEW: SHOP ONLINE with curbside pick up

F lower s • S p e ci a l O cc a s ion s C ele br at ion of L i fe • G i f t B a s ket s Wa l k- I n s Welcome

NEW: Restaurant Orders are available with curbside pickup! To order from our Supermarket or Restaurant, visit

yoderscountrymarket.com

We Deliver Locally

YODER’S COUNTRY MARKET IS YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE GROCERY STORE, PHARMACY, DRY-CLEANING, DIGITAL PHOTO LAB, H2O TO GO, GIFT SHOP SUPERMARKET HOURS

Monday-Saturday: 7am–9pm, Sunday: 8am-5pm

LOCATED IN YODER’S MALL 12 South Tower Road | New Holland, PA

717.354.2430

petalperfectflowershop.com

YODER’S FUEL ISLAND & CAR WASH Save 10¢ to 30¢ per Gallon of Gas when you use your Gold Card at Yoder’s Country Market.

RESTAURANT HOURS

Monday-Thursday: 6am–7pm, Friday-Saturday: 6am-8pm, Sunday: 10am-2pm

14 SOUTH TOWER ROAD | NEW HOLLAND, PA

717.354.4748

PLAN YOUR FUNERAL

YOUR WAY

Join us for a complimentary meal and learn about the many options and the benefits of pre-planning.

Register today! 717.560.5100 Scan this code & choose a date & time.

Serving families from 5, soon to be 6 locations!

Manheim Township // 717.560.5100 Millersville // 717.872.5041 Lancaster City // 717.393.9661

Heritage

MONUMENTS

A S N Y D E R FA M I LY CO M PA N Y

• Design • Memorial Benches • Bronze Markers and Plaques

Lititz - Spacht-Snyder // 717.626.2317 Strasburg - Bachman Snyder // 717.687.7644

Willow Street // 717-464-4600 Summer 2022

Heritage Monuments, A Snyder Family Tradition Each monument and memorial that we create receives the same attention as if it were being built for a member of our own family. • Engraving, Laser Etching • Restoration, Cleaning and Repair

CALL Kathy Snyder Guidos

717.872.1750

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4. Using ¼ cup of the

safflower oil, brush both sides of each baguette round until all 8 have been brushed.

5. Bake rounds in a 350-

degree oven until toasted (about 5 minutes, but check often). Once toasted, remove to cool.

6. Heat remaining oil in a pan

RECIPES FRIED GOAT CHEESE CROSTINI (with Candied Walnuts and Macerated Strawberries) Makes 4 servings 8 oz. goat cheese log, sliced into 1 oz. slices

1/2 cup all-purpose flour

over medium-high heat and fry the breaded goat cheese until golden brown on each side, about 2 minutes. 7. To assemble, place the

fried goat cheese slices on the baguette rounds. Divide the macerated strawberries between all the rounds, then divide the chopped candied walnuts over top of the strawberries.

12 oz. strawberries, hulled and quartered 1/2 cup red onion, julienned

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

1/2 cup sliced almonds, toasted

1 lb. pork tenderloin, cleaned

1/2 cup bleu cheese crumbles

salt and pepper to taste

1. In a mixing bowl, whisk

together vinegar, orange juice, oil, sugar, mustard and cocoa powder until thoroughly emulsified to make the Chocolate Vinaigrette. 2. In another bowl, mix

together the arugula, quinoa, and mint.

3. Divide the arugula/quinoa

mixture among four bowls (or eight if you are making smaller salads).

4. Evenly divide the

1/2 cup panko bread crumbs

strawberries, onions, almonds, and bleu cheese crumbles between all the greens.

1/2 cup safflower oil, divided

5. Drizzle 2 tablespoons

2 eggs, cracked and beaten 2 tablespoons whole milk

(or 1 tablespoon if making eight smaller salads) of the Chocolate Vinaigrette over each salad.

8 oz. strawberries, hulled, quartered 2 tablespoons granulated sugar 1/2 cup candied walnuts, chopped

1. Set up a breading station with 3 containers. In the first container place the flour, mix the eggs and milk in the second container, and put the panko in the third.

CHOCOLATE COVERED STRAWBERRY SALAD Makes 4 servings

cheese in the flour (shake off the excess), dredge it in the egg wash, and finally into the panko to bread it. Repeat until all the goat cheese is breaded. Set aside to allow the crust to set.

2 teaspoons olive oil

3. While the goat cheese sets,

combine the strawberries and sugar. Allow to macerate for 30 minutes at room temperature while you finish the rest of the recipe.

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1. Heat butter in a sauté pan over medium-high heat. 2. After butter melts, add

onion, garlic, and thyme. Sauté until onions are tender, about 5 minutes. The onions should be soft, not colored, so turn down the heat if needed.

3. Add strawberries and

honey. Continue to cook for about another 5 minutes or until strawberries are soft.

4. Deglaze pan and continue

to simmer until sauce starts to thicken.

5. Transfer sauce to a blender

and blend until smooth. Taste and season with salt and pepper as needed. If sauce isn't thick enough for your liking, return to the pan and allow to cook over low heat until reduced slightly.

6. Preheat grill at medium heat. 7. Season the outside of the pork loin with salt and pepper.

1 baguette, sliced into 8 rounds

2. Dredge each slice of goat

1 tablespoon honey

8. Cook tenderloin on the grill

until it reaches 135 degrees.

9. At this point, baste the

1/4 cup plus 1/8 cup balsamic vinegar

tenderloin with half of the strawberry sauce to allow it to get a crust. Continue to cook until pork reaches 145 degrees.

2 tablespoons orange juice, fresh-squeezed 2 teaspoons granulated sugar 3/4 teaspoon Dijon mustard 2 tablespoons cocoa powder 12 oz. arugula 12 oz. cooked red quinoa, cooled 1 tablespoon fresh mint, chiffonade

STRAWBERRY PORK TENDERLOIN Makes 4 servings

10. Remove from grill, tent

with aluminum foil, and allow to rest for 5 minutes.

1 tablespoon butter

11. Slice the pork thin and divide

2 tablespoons sweet onion, minced fine

12. Drizzle pork with

1 clove garlic, minced fine 1 teaspoon fresh thyme, chopped fine 2 cups strawberries, hulled and quartered

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between 4 plates.

remaining strawberry sauce.

13. Serve with sides like

wild rice pilaf and sautéed asparagus.


8. For the glaze, combine the

powdered sugar and milk. Using a spoon, drizzle glaze over turnovers in a back-andforth motion. SPRING PEA, ASPARAGUS AND PARMESAN PASTA Makes 4 servings

8 oz. penne

STRAWBERRY TURNOVERS Makes 4 servings

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 3 cloves of garlic, minced

1 3/4 cups strawberries, hulled and diced

16 oz. thick, fresh asparagus, cut into ½-inch lengths

1 tablespoon water

2 cups chicken stock

2 tablespoons granulated sugar

2 cups sweet peas

1 tablespoon corn starch 1 sheet puff pastry, thawed 1 egg, beaten 3/4 cup powdered sugar 2 tablespoons milk 1. In a saucepan on medium-

low heat, add the strawberries, water, granulated sugar, and corn starch. Cook for 5 minutes, then smash strawberries with a potato masher. Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly. 2. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. 3. Lay out the sheet of puff pastry

and cut into 4 even squares.

4. Place 2 tablespoons of

the strawberry filling in the middle of each square.

5. Brush the edge of each

square with the beaten egg, then fold the square over to form a triangle. Crimp all the edges with a fork to seal. Repeat with the remaining squares.

6. Move turnovers to a baking sheet and brush with the remaining egg wash. 7. Bake for 15 minutes. Remove from oven and allow to cool while making the glaze.

1/4 cup heavy cream 2 tablespoons butter

AMISH BBQ CHICKEN Makes 6 servings

1 tablespoon chopped fresh sage 1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese Salt and pepper to taste 1. To prepare pasta: Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add the penne and cook for about 7 minutes, stirring occasionally, until al dente. Drain, cool and set aside. 2. To prepare vegetables: In

a large skillet, heat olive oil. Add the garlic and asparagus and cook over medium heat, stirring often until garlic is fragrant, about 3 minutes. Add stock and boil on high heat until liquid is reduced by half and asparagus is tender. Add spring peas and cream to skillet and reduce till sauce has thickened. Stir in the penne and cook until heated through. Remove from heat and stir in butter, sage and parmesan cheese. Season with salt and pepper. Garnish with additional parmesan cheese when serving.

3 whole chickens, cut in half with back bones removed (leaving wing, breast, thigh and leg connected) CHICKEN BRINE 2.5 gallons water 2 cups salt 3/4 cup sugar 4 cloves garlic 3 bay leaves 5 sprigs rosemary 1/2 bunch parsley 1/4 bunch thyme

1. To prepare brine: Place all

ingredients together in a large kettle. Bring to a boil; reduce to a simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. 2. Remove from heat and cool

AMISH CHICKEN BBQ RUB 1/2 cup brown sugar 2 tablespoons salt 2 tablespoons chili powder 2 tablespoons smoked paprika 4 teaspoons garlic powder 4 teaspoons onion powder 1. To prepare the BBQ rub and chicken: Mix all ingredients together in a small bowl. Coat chicken evenly. Allow chicken to sit and rest for one hour before cooking over open charcoal pit. 2. Roast chicken on both sides

evenly, about 45 minutes total.

3. Serve with your favorite

Lancaster County sides as well as Spring Pea Asparagus and Parmesan Pasta.

completely. Pour over chicken and let set in refrigerator for two days. Drain liquid and pat dry.

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FAITHFULLY SERVING 20+ YEARS!


DESTINATION PRESENTS

Gardens The

Serving and Learning at Longwood Gardens

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Gardening at Garden Spot Village

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Creating Legacy

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SERVING & LEARNING AT

LONGWOOD GARDENS: Alan & Judy Dinning Longwood Gardens, located just 26 miles from Garden Spot Village, is one of the world’s great display gardens. Sprawling across 1,100 acres, Longwood offers themed, manicured gardens and welcomes more than 1.5 million guests each year.

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Alan and Judy Dinning, Garden Spot Village residents since November 2018, volunteer regularly at Longwood Gardens. Before moving to their carriage home at Garden Spot Village, Judy and Alan lived in Kennett Square, a five-minute drive from Longwood Gardens. Many of their neighbors and acquaintances volunteered at Longwood, so Alan and Judy got involved too! Judy began volunteering in the five-acre Idea Garden. Dedicated to local gardeners, the Idea Garden offers plants that thrive in southeastern Pennsylvania’s climate and soil. It offers tangible ideas for home gardeners to use to create gardens that thrive throughout the year. Alan and When she started volunteering, Judy walked through the Idea Dinning Garden with a cart, showing visitors herbs and ideas for container Judy find meaning planting. and purpose volunteering at “I love flowers,” Judy explains. “When I got there, I was Longwood Gardens hooked. The space is beautiful, the people are wonderful and the in Kennett Square, visitors are great.” Pennsylvania. One spring, during the height of Longwood’s tulip display featuring more than 200,000 blooms from bulbs imported from Holland, Judy casually began interacting with some of the guests. Through the course of her conversations, she discovered that


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she was speaking with one of the Dutch farmers who had grown the bulbs that were planted that spring. Today Judy volunteers two times a month in the eastern part of the gardens, which includes Peirce’s Woods and the Open Air Theatre. She walks that area and interacts with people who come from Opposite, all around the world to experience the clockwise from top historic gardens. left: Alan prepares for guests at the “I look for children. I get them Peirce-du Pont interested in the bees and the House; yellow hummingbirds and soon they are Brugmansia (Angel Trumpet); engaged,” Judy says. Judy admires the Alan began volunteering at Longwood gardens; orange in 2007. He says, “I began volunteering cosmos. in the Idea Garden, which features vegetables, fruits, herbs and flowers. It was manual work but I loved it because I was learning so much.” In 2013 Longwood expanded the Meadow Garden and restored a historic house built at the edge of the Meadow in 1734. Fascinated by the history surrounding the house, Alan soon found himself immersed in a research project on the house and its occupants, the Webb family. Alan says, “In the midst of the research, I retired from the Idea Garden and focused on the Webb Farmhouse and the Peirce-du Pont House, the original home on the property purchased by Pierre du Pont in 1906.” Alan’s research ultimately was used to develop a historic record for Longwood. That record tracks the history of the property Above, left to right: Alan stands in front of the Peirce-du Pont House where he interacts with guests; Judy rests in the East Garden.

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from William Penn through the Revolutionary War. “I’ve really appreciated that opportunity,” Alan says. One of the reasons Alan and Judy appreciate being able to volunteer at Longwood is the organization’s deep commitment to continuing education. They recently completed a six-week online horticulture course in which they learned, among other things, how to identify plants. Additional two-week courses on Longwood and their assigned areas have also helped Alan and Judy to feel confident in their roles as volunteers. “The volunteer training is very important,” Alan says. “They do a really good job of equipping us to interact with guests. Other organizations visit Longwood to learn how to engage volunteers.” Longwood is committed to educating people about the value of horticulture and conservation. They offer K-12 programs, as well as online classes, domestic and international internships and continuing education classes for the community. In addition, Longwood offers a two-year undergraduate program for those interested in pursuing a career in horticulture. Students from around the world live and work at Longwood. In 2024, Longwood hopes to unveil Longwood Reimagined. The project includes the re-imagination of 17 acres of the gardens, and will include new buildings, indoor and outdoor gardens and new guest experiences, as well as state-of-the-art classrooms and a library with virtual learning studios, creating even more opportunities for students. “I love volunteering at Longwood,” Judy says. “I’m out in the fresh air, the flowers are beautiful and the guests are friendly. It’s a very interesting place to be.” LEARN MORE: longwoodgardens.org VOLUNTEER: longwoodgardens.org/volunteering/apply-now

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“THE SPACE IS BEAUTIFUL, THE PEOPLE ARE WONDERFUL AND THE VISITORS ARE GREAT.” - JUDY DINNING


Gardening AT GARDEN SPOT VILLAGE

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Frequently referred to as the “Garden Spot of America,” New Holland offers rich soil, perfect for growing crops and flowers. When the first European settlers arrived in the early 1700s, the area that would eventually become New Holland was full of virgin forests of ash, oak, walnut and chestnut trees. John Diffenderfer was the first German farmer to settle in the area in 1727. Other German farmers dotted the landscape in the years following. The soil in the valley between the Welsh and Ephrata Mountains was fertile and crops thrived. The area was named New Holland in 1802, in memory of the benevolence of the people of Holland, who helped the Germans as they emigrated west to the New World. In 2022, New Holland is still known for its German farmers and the rich farmland that sustains crops throughout the year. At Garden Spot Village, cultivating the land is a natural extension of living with purpose. Many residents care for plots in the community gardens while others find great delight in planting flowers and vegetables around their cottages and carriage homes. Through the following pages, you are invited to encounter the beauty and purpose that people at Garden Spot experience through gardening.

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THE LOVE OF GARDENING IS A SEED ONCE SOWN THAT NEVER DIES. GERTRUDE JEKYLL, BRITISH HORTICULTURIST

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The community gardens include space for vegetables and annuals as well as perennials.

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NANCY ELLSWORTH

Nancy Ellsworth’s plot in the community garden is full of zinnias. Early in the summer she purchases zinnia plants from a local greenhouse and transplants them, hoping for a variety of colors, heights and bloom sizes. Knowing that zinnias will bloom more readily when their flowers are cut, Nancy, a Garden Spot Village resident since August 2017, clips the blooms frequently and shares them with her friends and neighbors. Her mini bouquets bring a smile to faces and encouragement to hearts throughout Garden Spot Village.

A GARDEN REQUIRES PATIENT LABOR AND ATTENTION. PLANTS DO NOT GROW MERELY TO SATISFY AMBITIONS OR TO FULFILL GOOD INTENTIONS. THEY THRIVE BECAUSE SOMEONE EXPENDED EFFORT ON THEM. LIBERTY HYDE BAILEY, AMERICAN HORTICULTURIST

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Clockwise from top left: Nancy Ellsworth plants an abundance of zinnias to share with friends and family; Ruth Anne Starnes uses flowers to create a living sculpture in her driveway; Esther Rittenhouse creates beautiful bouquets from flower and shrub clippings she gathers around her house.

RUTH ANNE STARNES

Dave and Ruth Anne Starnes, Garden Spot Village residents since March 2018 and artists who find beauty in the world around them, transform the flower beds around their home and their driveway into works of art each summer. Each spring offers a fresh canvas as Ruth Anne carefully chooses flowers that will do well in her whimsical containers.

ESTHER RITTENHOUSE

Throughout the spring and summer, Esther Rittenhouse gathers blooms and greens from around her home to create beautiful floral bouquets for the Resident Services desk located in the Village Square at Garden Spot Village. A seasoned gardener and bouquet artist, she naturally knows which clippings will create stunning arrangements for her neighbors to enjoy. Esther also tends the bird and butterfly garden located on the path directly behind her home. Birdhouses and perennials with bright blooms attract birds and butterflies. D E S T I N AT I O N G A R D E N S P O T V I L L A G E | S P R I N G / S U M M E R 2 0 2 2

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Inheritance Endowment • Bequest • Birthright

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CREATING LEGACY A LEGACY PROJECT OFFERS AN OPPORTUNITY TO ASK,

WHAT CAN I CREATE THAT WILL

LAST FOREVER? Marian Harnish shares the analogy of an oak tree to inspire clients to think about their legacy.


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Marian Harnish

recently semi-retired from Garden Spot Village, where she served as associate chaplain for 11 years. In 2020, she began to serve Garden Spot Village residents differently, focusing her calling on helping residents and loved ones to create a legacy, with the desire to help people end well.

Many of the people Marian works with are older, but do not necessarily have a terminal diagnosis. Instead, they desire to spend time reflecting on their lives and finding ways to create tangible memories for their families to cherish when they are no longer here. Marian says, “We know that, as humans, we will not last forever. A legacy project offers an opportunity to ask, ‘What can I create that will last?’” “As we walk through the legacy exploration, I ask questions like ‘Who were you? Who are you? Who do you want to be?’ Remembering seasons and telling the story allows for meaning to emerge. These questions help to generate ideas, as I offer an invitation for residents and their families to create something that lasts,” Marian explains. Seamstresses may create teddy bears from Grandpa’s shirts, musicians may record music, husbands may arrange for their wives to receive flowers on future wedding anniversaries. Some may want to video a life interview, record poetry or create artwork. “The seasons of life and death in which we are walking are not a medical experience, but a human one. When we take time to turn around and reflect on our life story, we can experience the beauty and purpose in our lives,” Marian says. For many people, stopping to reflect can bring healing, forgiveness and reconciliation with family members. It also provides an opportunity to find ways to live more fully in the present. For

example, one of Marian’s clients was seeking purpose for this season of his life. After being encouraged to explore the intentional ways that he regularly connects with his grandsons, he realized that he was mentoring them. They sought his advice, specifically around their desire to find jobs. He offered wisdom and guidance through the job search process and celebrated their success with them. His presence in their lives made a difference at a time when they needed him. Supporting Marian’s work is a natural next step for Garden Spot Village, which is committed to person-centered care. Residents may choose to work with Marian when the time is right for them and their family. “I encourage people to connect with me sooner rather than later. It’s fulfilling to begin a legacy journey and to tell the story, when you have more energy and memories. It gives us time to establish a relationship,” she says. She adds, “Each life is a word from God, spoken to the world. I invite people to think about what that word might be. What have you been given to share during your lifetime? As we explore that word, they find their life’s purpose throughout the seasons.”

THE STORY OF THE OAK TREE “When the oak is felled, the whole forest echoes with its fall, but a hundred acorns are sown in silence by an unnoticed breeze.” —Thomas Carlyle Marian uses this quote to help people see the meaning and purpose their life holds. “I pull symbols from their present life season,” she explains. “I share the idea that the falling acorns represent our personality characteristics, as well as lessons learned and taught from life experiences. Leaves can symbolize disappointment and heartaches or spiritual values. Leaves that fall represent who you are and what matters to you. The leaves become a nurturing layer that covers the soil in winter. The purpose of your life unfolds as a new generation of shoots emerges.” “I remind people that the next generation is watching and listening to their story. They watch how you offer forgiveness and kindness, as well as how you handle finances and life’s disappointments. The way you face and respond to aging is a powerful part of telling your story. People find affirmation and realize that ‘Yes, I do have purpose.’”

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NEARBY & BEYOND E XPLO RIN G O U R CO M M U N IT Y AND OUR WORLD

Photo captured by Laura Briggs and provided by Greystone Manor Gardens, Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

GREYSTONE MANOR GARDENS A FAMILY AFFAIR Story and Photos by Art Petrosemolo

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N E A RBY & BE YO N D

“ ”

God Almighty f irst planted a garden. And indeed, it is the purest of human pleasures.

Francis Bacon, Former Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, 1561-1626

escribing Greystone Manor Gardens as a small operation is really a bit of an understatement. The Gardens’ manager, Katie Byler, is partnered with her mom, Bonnie Ranck, and sisters, Michelle Kunjappu and Jen Zwaska, as well as their 13 children. It’s a family grown, field fresh operation. They all work together on a one-acre plot of gorgeous annuals tucked in next to the barn on the Ranck family’s 124-acre, 18th-century farm off of Oregon Pike in Lancaster. The Gardens bloom from June through early fall, and their wholesale business has a growing customer base of florists and event planners throughout southeastern Pennsylvania. Although the Gardens is home to a variety of colorful flowers, Katie, a mother of four, has a fondness for the dahlias, tuberous plants native to Mexico and Central America. “They bloom from mid-summer through autumn,” Katie says, “and I’ve always loved them. They come in a wide

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variety of sizes and colors, and my husband, Chase, and I chose them for our 2007 wedding.” A Lancaster County native, Katie lives in Lititz. She taught second grade for five years in the Warwick School District but never gave up her home flower garden, a beloved hobby. “I stopped teaching in 2010 and have been managing the Byler household and our active children, including twin pre-teen girls,” she says, “and it actually gave me more time to indulge my love of gardening, which has turned into a wonderful family business.” Family is Katie’s life and first career, she explains, but flowers have always been her passion. She credits her mother for instilling in her daughters, now all business partners, the love of the beauty of flowers and their cultivation. Katie’s favorite flower—the dahlia—is treated as an annual at Greystone Manor Gardens because of the cold winter months, she explains. The plants are removed from the ground and wintered out of the weather before being replanted in late spring. “Dahlias grown here can range in diameter from just over an inch to 14-inch dinner plate size,” says Katie, “and have become increasingly popular with florists for bouquets, arrangements and decorative vases.” Katie may be a little biased, but she even

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From top: Bonnie and Ron Ranck, with their daughters, sons-in-law and grandchildren on the farm; Katie Byler holding freshly picked dahlias.


thinks that dahlias are giving traditional roses and calla lilies a run for their money at weddings. The Greystone Manor growing space includes fifteen 130-foot rows, nearly half of which are dedicated to 2,600 dahlia plants in 160 varieties. The remainder of the garden is filled with 40 other colorful flowers and select greens. The Ranck sisters and their mom work together in planning what will be included in the growing space each year. The entire family works in the fields, including the children (ages 5 to 18), who help with everything from planting in the spring to harvesting during the busy seasons. Last year, besides providing a variety of flowers for the wholesale market, Greystone Manor Gardens’ CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) program allowed retail customers to purchase flowers in season. Katie and her mom also started an outreach program

where they bring flowers and vases to some of the many retirement communities in Lancaster County. Through this program residents can build their own flower vase and hear about the flower business and flower arranging. The COVID pandemic put a kink in many businesses but had minimal effect on the Greystone Manor operation. According to Katie, “As a wholesale operation we do not have the public on-site, and our children were able to hang out at the farm with their grandmother while we worked in the garden. They also had a safe place to be with their siblings and cousins and do their school work.” In early fall 2020 Greystone Manor Gardens hosted its first evening retreat for flower lovers. Says Katie, “We worked with Krista Jones of Heritage Gatherings in Paoli, Pennsylvania, and

Above: Picking dahlias is a family affair! Katie's nieces and nephews help with everthing from planting in the spring to harvesting during the busy seasons.

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N E A RBY & BE YO N D color from reds and pinks to yellow Kate Kiehl of Lancaster’s Forte Florals to plan and deep purple. The hellebore,” she a unique flower event that allowed our guests says, “is called the Lenten rose for its to hear Kiehl, who has a gift for flower design, rose-like flowers that appear around give tips about flower arranging. “Then guests,” the Christian observance of Lent. They continues Katie, “using a flower recipe/plan they come in a variety of colors including created from the talk, wandered through our black and many variations of pink and growing space and picked botanicals—greens, purple.” Although flowers are available focus flowers, airy and spikey flowers—to create at the Gardens all summer, Katie a personal arrangement.” There was even a explains that spring and fall are the big professional photographer on-site to take guests’ growing seasons, with dahlias taking photos with their creations as a one-of-a-kind over in late summer and early fall. memory. The retreat has become a yearly event. Greystone Manor Gardens is an “Florists are visual people,” Katie explains, and in-field operation and does not use she helps them place weekly orders by sending greenhouses or hoop house buildings out an electronic “availability” list of her flowers, for growing flowers. “We plant accompanied by photos showing colors currently Ford Byler inspects the dahlias. outside after the last frost in the spring,” available. Greystone Manor Gardens delivers orders Katie says, “and with good weather our first crop of cut flowers is directly to customers weekly. Florists are also hosted at an open house at the site in late summer to view the gardens and learn more available starting in late April.” Looking ahead to future offerings, the family is thinking about adding hydrangeas to their garden about the operation and future plans. space to provide even more variety for florists. Greystone Manor Gardens’ seasons start in the spring with peonies and hellebores that are ready for cutting in May. Says Katie, “These are large-flowered plants that run the gamut in READ MORE: greystonemanor-gardens.com

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Impacting Our

COM M U N I T Y

2021 AT A GLANCE Over the past year Garden Spot Village has worked to help our community rebuild and reconnect. Monthly community meals, while served in a to-go format, provided opportunities for neighbors to connect. Deeper relationships with CrossNet and other local businesses resulted in increased collaboration as we worked together to meet the needs of our neighbors. www.gardenspotvillage.org

$31,700+ 4,336 Items

FOR LOCAL NON-PROFITS

$1.627M

PER YEAR IN LOCAL TAXES

$20,000

GARDEN SPOT FIRE RESCUE

$43,266

CASH CONTRIBUTIONS TO OTHER NON-PROFITS

*

Including toothbrushes, diapers, clothing, winter coats, hats, scarves, backpacks, school supplies and food through our monthly collection to benefit local nonprofits like Lighthouse Vocational Services, Clare House, Water Street Ministries, New Holland Food Bank and more.

The largest taxpayer in ELANCO School District.

Including CrossNet Ministries, ELANCO Public Library, Servant Stage and Cavod. * Estimates based on charitable gift contribution recommended amounts

3,256 FREE MEALS Shared at Garden Spot’s monthly community event at CrossNet Youth Ministries.

100 Lbs. FRESH PRODUCE Donated to local food pantries from our aeroponic greenhouse.

551 STAFF MEMBERS Live and serve in our broader community, impacting the lives of people around them.


N E A RBY & BE YO ND ON THE ROAD

MISSIONS OF HOPE INTERNATIONAL

GROWING CROSS-CULTURAL RELATIONSHIPS

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hen Brandon Adams traveled to Nairobi, Kenya, in 2008 he didn’t realize the foundation that trip would create for the future. Subsequent trips and a two-month apprenticeship with Missions of Hope International (MOHI) exposed him to the variety of ways the organization helps people in the Mathare Valley of Kenya. Brandon, who serves as the graphic designer at Garden Spot Village, has continued to support MOHI over the years since then. Watching the organization deal with the COVID pandemic inspired him to share MOHI’s mission with Garden Spot Village. With the encouragement and partnership of the Garden Spot pastoral team, Brandon hosted an event in early December 2020 that invited residents and team members to invest in the lives of children in Kenya through monthly sponsorship. To create deeper relationships among sponsors at Garden Spot Village, Brandon and Chaplain Karyn Nancarvis began bimonthly meetings where sponsors learn more about MOHI and how to connect with their sponsored children. “MOHI sent us a video thanking us for our sponsorships. In that video, the founders of MOHI, Wallace and Mary Kamau, extended an invitation for Garden Spot Village to come visit their sponsored children in person,” Brandon explains. Brandon and Karyn began to explore what would be involved in taking a team to Nairobi. Brandon says, “We sensed God prompting us, through Mary and Wallace Kamau’s challenge for Garden Spot Village, to send a small team of residents and team members to experience MOHI firsthand and meet all of our sponsored children.”

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As they invited others to join them, Brandon and Karyn shared the following: There are three simple but compelling reasons we want to do this. First, we envision serving the poor in the slums of Nairobi in the name of Jesus because doing so is the best way to share the love of Christ. Second, we want to encourage and assist the team at MOHI. Our presence shows our support in a way that cannot be captured through email, video chats and letters. Third, we want to strengthen the bond between Garden Spot Village and MOHI. There is nothing like a cross-cultural mission trip when it comes to fostering deeper relationships. The travel, work, fatigue, joy, challenge and worship we share will tie us together in very meaningful ways. In May 2021, Garden Spot Village residents and team members were invited to participate in a Travel with Purpose Trip to Nairobi in late February 2022. Through discernment and a process of intentional conversations, 12 people chose to participate in the trip, including residents, team members and family members. Over the next nine months the team prepared with a series of ten team meetings as well as a public educational event focused on world hunger. The meetings included informational sessions,


working through the curriculum of “Helping Without Hurting in Short-Term Missions,” and a 40-day devotional, “Before You Go,” to prepare their hearts and minds for the challenges of international travel and service through ministry. Karyn says, “Our focus as we prepared was on learning and engagement. Rather than checking off a task list, we prepared ourselves to simply be with the MOHI students and staff.” “We invited them to be our teachers. We learned alongside them how best to support, engage and interact to show God’s love in the best ways the children and families were are able to absorb it,” Karyn continues. “Building on relationships with one another allowed for a safe space for us to grow together, enriching their lives as well as our own, to be active participants in God’s work in the world.” “This trip was an incredible opportunity to partner with MOHI in a tangible way,” Brandon adds. “I am so thankful that I was able to lead this amazing group of residents and team members. Our team worked really hard to honor each other and to bless and work alongside MOHI’s ministry.” LEARN MORE: mohiafrica.org

THIS PAGE: From top: 2022 Travel with Purpose Team, left to right: Jeannine Perry, Vanessa Moore, Robin Heinrich, Nancy Heckman, Brandon Adams, Judy Rettew, Karyn Nancarvis, Edna Jean Homsher, Tony der Kinderen, Evie Hershey, Arlene der Kinderen, Jodi Lefever; the MOHI Pangani Center, happy MOHI school children; an aerial view of the Mathare slums. OPPOSITE PAGE: From Top: Brandon Adams hanging out with Onesmus, his small group's sponsored child, from a missions trip in 2011; MOHI students walk home after school; MOHI students having fun during their lunch break.


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A CALCULATION FOR THE NEXT GENERATION WITH DON ALDRICH

hen Don and Lois Aldrich moved to Garden Spot Village in August 2016, Don knew that he wanted to become involved in his new community. The couple helped to start Garden Spot’s Swipe Out Hunger program in early 2017. Through CrossNet Ministries, Don also connected with Garden Spot Middle School, where he served as a math tutor. When his grandson began to struggle with Algebra 1, Don offered to tutor him. “What a gift from God, that we live close enough that I could tutor my grandson once a week,” Don says. “Little did I know, people were watching,” Don adds. “My grandson quickly improved. His teacher and others at the school he attended, Anchor

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Christian Academy, noticed.” “The following summer I received an email from the head of school asking me if I wanted to be a high school math teacher. I laughed so hard I almost deleted the email,” Don explains. “The more I thought about the opportunity, though, the more I realized I could teach. What an opportunity to impact young people! I will never get the opportunity again if I don’t take it now,” Don continues. In the fall of 2019 Don began his teaching career. He taught one class of Algebra 2. “They did well, in spite of me,” Don says with a laugh. “I had to learn a great deal of things as a teacher. I had to reteach myself Algebra 2 and pre-calculus, as well as learn how to teach it to students in different ways so they could learn it in a way that makes sense to them.” Don, who does not have any formal


YOUR TRUSTED HOMETOWN PHARMACY teacher training, brings a career’s worth of experience training adults. A chemical engineer, Don worked for DuPont in various businesses in technical and managerial roles, including traveling the world providing safety and environmental services training to professionals who worked for all kinds of businesses. This training experience laid the foundation for his teaching approach. Now in his third year of teaching, Don has two Algebra 2 classes. Last year he also taught a pre-calculus (trigonometry) class. Anchor’s university model means that Don teaches Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays and then for the rest of the week provides oversight to his students who work independently at home under their parents’ supervision. As a private school, Anchor pivoted quickly when COVID shutdowns in March 2020 affected students’ education. Within a weekend, Anchor’s staff transitioned to online teaching so that the students did not miss a day of learning. As more students transfer to Anchor, Don is seeing COVID learning loss. “We are finding ways to rebuild confidence and accelerate learning for students.” Don employs a student-focused approach and relies on the experience of the faculty in finding ways to teach the children well. “Each child is an individual whom God has created,” Don says. “I begin my classes with prayer and remind the students they are made in God’s image. Some of the students will be called into professions where they will need math daily; others will not. In the end, I want to instill a mindset of selflearning, where they can apply logic and find self-confidence, which they can apply anywhere.” READ MORE:

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COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT

DR. LAURA HARKIN

THIRD GENERATION TO SERVE HER COMMUNITY hen Dr. John Sheaffer opened his dental practice after graduating from Temple Dental School in June 1940, little did he know he was laying the groundwork for a generational commitment to the New Holland community. Committed to his country, Dr. Sheaffer took a break from dental practice during World War II, serving with the Army Dental Corp in Hempstead, New York. He returned to his practice following the war. Dr. Sheaffer’s middle son, John Sheaffer, Jr., graduated from University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine in 1969. He followed his father’s lead, taking a two-year detour to serve in the Vietnam War. The father

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and son duo served the New Holland community together until Dr. Sheaffer, Sr., retired in 1980. In 2008, Dr. Laura Sheaffer Harkin joined her father in his practice, marking the third generation to serve the New Holland community. Dr. Sheaffer, Jr., retired in 2011. He and his wife, Sharon, moved to Garden Spot Village in September 2020. Dr. Harkin is committed to serving the New Holland community to the best of her ability. She says, “We love what we do! My team and I are dedicated to understanding the needs of our patients, and we deliver the dentistry that is most appropriate for each patient based on their dental needs, overall health and circumstance. We offer an individualized experience that reflects the way my grandpa and dad practiced dentistry.” Dr. Harkin also continues her family’s commitment to continuous learning.

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She’s earned advanced status as a Master with the Academy of General Dentistry and serves as an instructor at the Pankey Institute in Florida. The experience she has through her education at the Pankey Institute allows her to treat a mouth comprehensively. Dr Harkin explains, “With a thorough knowledge of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and musculature of the face and neck, I am able to treat the mouth and individual teeth as part of a larger system. For example, determining the cause of a single tooth fracture allows me to offer longer-lasting restorative options for our patients. Dentistry and oral health is easily described as a gateway to systemic health.” “There is something special about my patients and the fact that many have known me since I was little,” Laura continues. “Those relationships have continued and grown and are a gift to me daily in practice. We do celebrate our third-generation patients. But, new or old, I always feel a sense of gratitude for the care that my team provides. Just as I hope my patients can sense my heartfelt care, I feel that same warmth in return. They also care for me.” She also follows the lead of her father and grandfather, serving her local community. She’s a member of the New Holland Business Association and serves on the board of directors at the Lancaster Country Day School. She and her team offer dental services at Water Street Mission. She also serves patients through Dental Access of Lancaster County and MOM-N-PA Dental Mission. Dr. Harkin and her family live in Lancaster. In their spare time they enjoy outdoor activities and cooking together as a family. Her husband, Sean, is a selfemployed carpenter and restores old homes in Lancaster City. Her son, Denis, attends Ohio Wesleyan University; her daughter, Lianne, attends the Lancaster Country Day School. READ MORE: drharkin.com


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OPPORTUNIT Y CA LENDA R

THANK YOU BUSINESS CIRCLE

The below schedule is subject to change. For current listings, visit gardenspotvillage.org/events or contact Resident Services at 717.355.6000.

MARCH 25 Kids Fun Run Join the cheering crowd as children ages 6-12 compete in a Fun Run. For residents, guests and the public.

26 Garden Spot Village 1/2 Marathon & 10K Join us as we host nearly 1,000 runners from around the world. Visit gsv.run for more information. For residents and the public.

28 Community Meal A free community meal at CrossNet Youth Center. Prepared by Garden Spot Village staff and residents. For the public.

APRIL

25 Community Meal A free community meal at CrossNet Youth Center. Prepared by Garden Spot Village staff and residents. For the public. 27 Plain Living A three-part series in partnership with Mennonite Life, exploring Amish and Mennonite traditions. Also held May 4 & 11. For residents and the public.

MAY

12 Look & Learn A luncheon to learn more about life at Garden Spot Village. Visit gsvlookandlearn.org to find out more and register. For the public 55+.

To learn how your business can help enrich the lives of older adults through sponsorship and giving, contact Wendy Nagle, Director of Development, at wnagle@gardenspotvillage.org.

23 Community Meal A free community meal at CrossNet Youth Center. Prepared by Garden Spot Village staff and residents. For the public.

JUNE 18 Garden Spot Village Yard Sale Annual community-wide yard sale offers bargains on household items, crafts, books and more. For residents and the public.

27 Community Meal A free community meal at CrossNet Youth Center. Prepared by Garden Spot Village staff and residents. For the public.

JULY

23 Airing of the Quilts Walk, ride or drive through Garden Spot Village to view the beautiful quilts displayed around the campus. For residents and the public.

25 Community Meal A free community meal at CrossNet Youth Center. Prepared by Garden Spot Village staff and residents. For the public.

28 Look & Learn A luncheon to learn more about life at Garden Spot Village. Visit gsvlookandlearn.org to find out more and register. For the public 55+.

AUGUST

22 Community Meal A free community meal at CrossNet Youth Center. Prepared by Garden Spot Village staff and residents. For the public.

SEPTEMBER 17 Celebration Gala A fundraising event for the Benevolent Care Fund. For residents, family and public by invitation.

21 Look & Learn A luncheon to learn more about life at Garden Spot Village. Visit gsvlookandlearn.org to find out more and register. For the public 55+.


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