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Feb-Mar ’12

Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

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E d i t o r i a l

Publisher cum Editor Rajneesh Sharma rajneeshhammer@gmail.com

Associate Editor Swarnendu Biswas Resident Editor Sharmila Chand (Delhi) Ashok Malkani (Mumbai) Sub-Editor Tapapriya Lahiri Layout & Design Hari Kumar. V Narender Kumar Photographer Mahendra Singh Mehta Production Controller Vinay Goel Production Assistant Mamta Sharma Advertising Sales Delhi: Neeraj Diwan Mumbai: Rajesh Tupsakhre Subscription sales Dattaram Gangurde Director Sales Sanjay Anand Director Operations & Finance Rajat Taneja Editorial & Advertising Offices: Delhi: Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd. 1202, Pragati Tower, 26, Rajindra Place, New Delhi-110008 Phone: 45084903, 25854103 Telefax: 25854105 Mumbai: Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd. 105, 1st Floor, Aarpee Centre, Gufic Compound, 11th Road, MIDC, Near Tunga Paradise, Andheri (E), Mumbai-400093 Ph.: 022-28395833 Telefax: 022-28388947

Website: www.fbrmag.com E-mail: hammerpublishers@vsnl.net © 2012 Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd. No article can be reproduced in part or as whole without prior permission of the Publisher. Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review is a bi-monthly magazine, printed, owned and published by Rajneesh Sharma from 302, Himgiri Apartments, J-Block, Vikaspuri, New Delhi. Printed at Age of Enlightenment Publications, Green Fields Colony, Faridabad, Haryana. Annual Subscription rate within India is Rs. 450 and overseas US $110, for surface mail. Single issue is available for Rs. 90 in India and US $25 overseas. Cheques are payable to Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd.

The quick service restaurant chains are quickly gaining popularity across urban India. The popularity of QSRs can be accounted by the rising demand for fast foods, which in turn can be accounted by the increase in the disposable incomes and changing lifestyles among middle and upper middle class metropolitan India. In fact, the demand for QSRs in India began in the nascent days of liberalisation, way back in the early 90s. Then there were very few domestic QSRs in India, catering to a fast food culture. Nirula’s was one of them. But soon, sensing the huge business opportunity in the Indian market for QSRs, many multinational fast food chains came and set up a number of outlets in India. Though their coming and revolutionising the fast food industry of India perhaps required lofty enterprise and vision, but they had to rely on pragmatic business policies to attain and sustain their success in the Indian market. To put it simply, they had to intelligently tailor their products according to the Indian tastes and religious sentiments to gain acceptance and popularity in the Indian society, which is modern and traditional, rigid and cosmopolitan at the same time. Today, many of the offerings in the Indian menu of McDonald’s, KFC, Pizza Hut, and Domino’s are vegetarian and very Indian. Burgers, pizzas, and sandwiches are getting Indianised in a big way, and our youngsters and the not so young too are lapping up these foreign food products with their familiar Indian ingredients and toppings. In fact, the popularity of multinational QSRs in the recent years, and their growing popularity in the very recent years reflect the pluralistic trait of Indian society, which effectively manages to assimilate foreign influences and tune them perfectly according to our cultural resonance. In the Cover Story, we discuss the spearheading of QSR revolution in India, and trace the reasons behind the success of multinational QSR chains in our country, with interesting detail. Another important trend prevailing in the Indian food & beverage industry is the growing popularity of food courts. Nowadays, food courts have great potential for revenue generation in malls. In fact, restaurants stationed in food courts found in malls, airports and highways can be attractive business prospects. However, before venturing to own or open a restaurant in a food court you need to know the intricacies and nuances of running a restaurant business in food courts. We discuss the business potential of food courts and restaurants in food courts in our Business Story in an exhaustive manner, which we think would interest our readers. Besides these invigorating topics, we have covered a gamut of issues germane to the Indian food & beverage industry between the covers, through our regular sections, along with the coverage of Aahar 2012, which is touted as the biggest food & beverage and hospitality fair in India. We hope that like Aahar 2012, this forthcoming financial year for the industry too would end up as a success story.

Editorial Policy: Editorial emphasis in Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review magazine is on educational & informational material specifically designed to assist those responsible for managing institutional food & beverage business. Articles are welcome and will be published on the sole discretion of the editor.

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Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

Feb-Mar ’12


CONTENTS

Cover Story

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QSRs Catering to Indian Tastes

Business

40

Courting the Tastes

Focus

48

The Food Festival of Sailana at the Capital

Agri

50

Fennel as a Crucial Ingredient

Dairy

52

Sweet and Flavoured Growth

Cover Pix: Fine Dine Lobster Broth with Shimeiji Mushroom

Feb-Mar ’12

Theme Cuisine Delightful Singaporean Hawker Food

Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

Departments Event

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News

16

Report

31

Pub

56

Bartender Watch

60

Restaurant Review

64

Chef Voice

66

Operations

68

Product Preview

70

Business Opportunity

72

Interview

76

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EVENT

Aahar 2012: Facilitating Progress and Growth

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ahar 2012, the 27th international exhibition for food, food processing, hotel and restaurant equipment & supplies attracted a plethora of visitors and exhibitors from India and abroad. The mega event took place at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi, during 12th-16th March 2012. Aahar 2012 took place in halls 7, 8,9,10,11,12,12A, 14, 15 & 18, spread over a gross area of 38,214 sq.m. The show expected impressive visitor participation from both India and overseas. The comprehensive show had something to offer for everybody in the food & beverage and hospitality business. Top decision makers and buyers visited this significant event for the food & beverage and hospitality industry. The fair was being organised by the India Trade Promotion Organisation (ITPO), with the support of the Ministry of Food Processing Industries, Government of India, and Agricultural and Processed Food Products Export Development Authority (APEDA). The other organisations supporting the show were Association of Resource Companies for the Hospitality Industry of India (ARCHII), All India Food Processors’ Association, and Hotel and Restaurant Equipment Manufacturers’ Association of India (HOTREMAI). The premier exhibition

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was divided into two independent shows viz. ‘Food India,’ which covered food and processed foods sector, and Hospitality India, which represented hotel & restaurant, bakery & confectionery equipment and supplies. Anand Sharma, the Union Minister of Commerce, Industry & Textiles inaugurated the 27th edition of AAHAR. Speaking on the occasion Sharma said, “India’s food market is estimated at over $182 billion USD, accounting for about two third of the total retail market. The per capita packaged snack food consumption may be low in India presently but is growing, hence there is a huge market waiting to be tapped. I am sure that AHHAR will be the driving engine of economic growth.” Rita Menon, CMD, ITPO, while addressing the gathering said, “Aahar has emerged as

Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

India’s premier annual international exposition on food, food processing, hotel and restaurant equipment and supplies. It is heartening that over 550 exhibitors from various foreign counties, including; Argentina, Australia, Canada, China, Denmark, Germany, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Pakistan, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Taiwan, Turkey, UAE., USA. and Vietnam are showcasing their products. Sharma stressed on creating an integrated value chain in the food processing and hospitality sectors for increasing India’s shares in global exports and to face future challenges. He said that extensive efforts must be directed to save agricultural produce through creation of integrated value chains, food processing parks and institutions for maintaining global standards for processed food. The Aahar 2012 featured 565 exhibitors, including 72 foreign exhibitors from 19 countries. The foreign countries from where companies displayed at the AAHAR 2012 are Argentina, Australia, Canada, China, Denmark, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Pakistan, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Taiwan, Turkey, UAE., USA, and Vietnam. The range of products on display included food products and processed food including beverages; mill machinery and equipments; machinery related to food processing and packaging of food products; poultry, farm equipments and supplies; dairy and confectionery equipments; air-conditioning, refrigeration and cold storage systems; air and water-pollution control equipment and accessories; hotel and kitchen equipment

Feb-Mar ’12


EVENT

and tableware; laundry and interiors and housekeeping; health fitness equipment; consultancy services and miscellaneous products related to food industry and hospitality supplies. AAHAR 2012 emerged as a popular event with business visitors that included foreign buyers, importers and wholesalers, overseas trade delegations, policy makers, media persons, equipment and machinery suppliers, marketing and direct selling companies, government agencies, etc. Here it deserves a mention that over the years, Aahar has been recognised as one of the leading events of its kind in Asia. The

history of this annual trade show dates back to 1981. During the 2011 edition, Aahar attracted 514 exhibitors, which included the overseas participation from 12 countries. 217 overseas delegations from 29 countries visited this event in its 2011 edition. During these three decades of its successful journey through aroma and flavours, services and smiles, Aahar has emerged as a perfect one-stop destination to showcase the growth and development of the food & beverage and the hospitality industry and as a great opportunity for both potential suppliers and buyers of these industries to interact and benefit from each other. Aahar has been offering a reliable and time-tested forum for B2B transactions, exploration of joint ventures and technological up-gradation and sourcing opportunities. However, Aahar is much more than a huge industrial fair. Over the decades, Aahar has been playing a very important role not only in bringing together the potential business partners from India and abroad in the realm of food & beverage

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and hospitality industry but also in providing a platform for implementing government schemes for infrastructural development like establishing food parks, packaging and value-added centres, integrated cold-chain facility, irradiates and modernised abattoir, etc. Several seminars are being organised by Hotel & Restaurant Equipment Manufacturers’ Association of India (HOTREMAI) and All India Food Processors’ Association (AIFPA) at Aahar 2012. One of the amazing shows at the Aahar 2012 was the Bartending Show, organised at the stall of Ocean Professional. The ‘Dazzling Mix’ show was seen from 13-15 March, twice a day at 14.00 and 16.00 hrs. “The show could be demarcated into three highlights which were Dazzling Flair, Dazzling Waterfall, and Dazzling Domino,” informed Satish Arora,

The Excellence of Venus

During AAHAR 2012, Venus Industries won the Gold Award for the best product display and stall at AAHAR 2012. Venus won this award among more than 550 participants in the India’s biggest food and beverage fair. Here it deserves a mention that Venus Industries is a Delhi-based company engaged in the manufacturing and exporting of stainless steel cutlery, tableware, hotel ware, barware and lifestyle products.

Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

Director – Sales, KI Glassware India Pvt. Ltd. “The dazzling series of activities was organised to present something new at the fair. The intention was to attract a larger number of people at the stand and to create a long-lasting impression on the people visiting the fair towards the Ocean Professional brand name,” he elaborated. KI Glassware India Pvt. Ltd. is the authorised importer and distributor of Ocean’s glassware products. “This year we introduced the long awaited Cuba Hurricane Glass under the Ocean Professional range. It is a very cost-effective solution available for serving cocktails for

the hospitality industry,” informed Sharma. Overall, it is hoped that Aahar 2012, with its impressive participation and display of varied range of innovative products, has become a great knowledge and business sharing platform for our food & beverage and hospitality industry. Moreover, with the promising growth potential for both the food & beverage and hospitality sectors, and with interesting and happening trends developing in both these sectors, not only the present but also the future of Aahar seems to be bright. As we prepare for Aahar 2013, we should be optimistic without being complacent. All the participating parties and stakeholders should attempt to explore beyond the obvious and apparent potential benefits accruing to them from this mega fair, and strive towards making the event an even bigger success story than its previous editions. We need to remind ourselves to think beyond the profits, in order to truly profit from this fair with unlimited possibilities on a global ■ scale.

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Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

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BioFach and Vivaness 2012 — Showcasing Organic Growth

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he demand for organic products continues at a high level. Whether for food, cosmetics or clothing, more and more customers across the world are reaching for goods involving ecological production process. This demand for organic products is also spreading to the wine segment. The independent quality verdict of wine experts is also becoming more and more important for both producers and consumers of wines. The BioFach and Vivaness 2012, which was held at Exhibition Centre Nuremberg, Germany, during 15th-18th February 2012, was a great platform to showcase and recognise organic wines and other organic food & beverage products. 2,420 exhibitors from 83 countries presented their products to some 40,313 trade visitors from 130 countries at the BioFach and Vivaness 2012. Vivaness attracted 206 of these 40,313 exhibitors, who came from 26 countries to showcase their products at this trade fair for natural personal care and wellness. Overall, the assembled organic players at BioFach — the World Organic Trade Fair— and at the parallel Vivaness trade fair for natural personal care and wellness, were nothing short of impressive. Over 100,000 organic products were showcased at the event, which is equivalent to the products of more than 20 organic supermarkets. The exhibition was spread across a net space of just under 45,000 sq m. Besides Germany with 732 exhibitors, the other top five exhibiting countries include Italy (380), France

(184), Spain (137) and Austria (98). The focus of the 2012 edition of the event was on India as the Country of the Year. 51 Indian exhibitors at the fare showcased their products across 1000 sq.m of space, which included products like tea, rice, spices and textiles among others. Together, the Indian exhibitors took the visitors to an inspiring culinary journey. In 2012, the exhibition highlights from the organic food segment again included organic wine, with the Mundus Vini BioFach International Organic Wine Award, and organic olive oil with the Olive Oil Bar and Award. 197 producers of organic wines from 22 countries announced their participation at the Mundus Vini BioFach International Organic Wine Award, a globally renowned exhibition of organic wines. “The Mundus Vini BioFach Organic Wine Award is, as it were, a seismograph for the quality level of organic wines,” explained Christoph Meininger, the Chief Executive Officer of Mundus Vini GmbH. 219 wines were awarded at the third Mundus Vini BioFach International Organic Wine Award, which included eight Special Golds, 101 Golds and 110 Silvers. “The tasting session in Neustadt an der Weinstraße at the end of last year again showed what top products organic winegrowers from all over the world can

produce with their wine know-how. The best of these outstanding wines are now presented with awards by the jury experts in the third competition for the Mundus Vini BioFach International Organic Wine Award,” elaborated Alexander Stein, who was responsible in the BioFach and Vivaness team for the wine and olive oil highlights. The Spanish bodegas were particularly successful by international comparison. They won a medal for each of the altogether 50 organic wines, with one Special Gold, 22 Gold and 27 Silver medals. The organic wine producers from Germany also had a respectable result to show, with 26 Gold and 21 Silver medals. They were followed in the medals table by the major winegrowing nations like France (39 medals, including 2 Special Gold), Italy (38 medals, including 2 Special Gold) and Austria (15 medals). The jury also awarded Special Gold to two organic wines from Australia and one wine from Chile. For the third Mundus Vini BioFach International Organic Wine Award, producers and importers had entered some 600 organic wines. The samples were tasted in a two-day blind tasting session by a jury of international wine experts and assessed according to the rules of the International Organisation of Vine and Wine (OIV) and the standards of the national and international associations of oenologists. In line with the OIV rules, the number of awards is limited to maximum 30 percent of the samples entered.

PIFBEX 2012: Focussing on F&B and Hospitality Trade

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even countries from hotel & food industries were present in the 5th edition of Philippine International Food & Beverage Expo (PIFBEX 2012), Philippine’s most anticipated and most successful international food show that took place at the Philippine International Convention Center (PICC), from 1 st-4 th March 2012. Since its debut in 2008, PIFBEX 2012 has always been one of the sourcing platforms for the food and hospitality trade buyers in South-east Asia. The event attracted more than 250 exhibiting companies and seven of

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these came from Vietnam, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, China, USA and India. This year PIFBEX 2012 widened its market with the launch of Hotel Restaurant Caterers Expo (HORECA Philippines). At the event, hotel and restaurant, café and caterers industry, together with the food and beverage industry players from the Philippines and around the globe

Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

showcased their new offerings and services to explore possible business opportunities. Food & beverage industry decision makers from the around the globe got involved in this annual trade expo that presented a wide range of innovative food & beverage trends combined with quality business opportunities. Besides providing an excellent platform for the buyers and sellers, PIFBEX & HORECA also offered a rich program of industry-related products, demos and competitions from different well-known hospitality schools in the Philippines.

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EVENT

SIAL China 2012 is Destined to be a Success Story SIAL China, whose forthcoming edition will be held from 9th- - 11th May 2012, in Shanghai, at the Shanghai New International Expo Center, is forging ahead every year. It is regarded as the number one wine show in China, besides being the largest meeting point in China for the food and beverage industry. In 2011, the SIAL show was a great success with 320 wine and spirits exhibitors spread across seven international pavilions — the pavilions of France, Spain, Portugal, Greece, Italy, Australia and Germany. 6200 members of the trade showed interest in the wines (which included importers, distributors, wine boutiques, and restaurateurs), which represented 21 percent of the visitors to the fare. All total, the mega event attracted 1520 exhibitors and 33,000 visitors. In this 13th edition of SIAL, wine will be at the forefront of Sial China more than ever before; an entire hall will be dedicated to the wines and spirits. 10,000 members of the wine trade are expected to attend the event as well as 400 exhibitors. For the first time this year, Bettane & Dessauve will be sharing their ‘Shanghai Experience’ in the shape of a Master class, including a selection of about 20 of the greatest names in wine. To date, seven international pavilions have confirmed their participation, which include the pavilions of France South Africa, Germany, Australia, Spain, Greece, Hungary, Italy and Portugal. Among these wine producing countries, France will be particularly well-presented with about 30 producers having confirmed their presence in a space of 450 sq.m, representing wines across France such as the Bordeaux region, Languedoc, Roussillon, etc. One of the highlights of the event will be the Wine Innovation Forum, where you can meet professionals and improve your wine knowledge and experience. It is a programme comprising conferences on wine education, where you can find a tasting area of the international noble grape varietals. The event will bring together 20 of the top French producers for the first time, selected by the Bettane & Dessauve wine guide. These producers will run Master classes, gourmet workshops and wine education seminars. They will be the highlight of a prestigious gala evening where some of China’s finest palates and tasters will be present. The third edition of the China Wine Challenge, with Steven Spurrier as the President, will be held at the SIAL for the very first time. This competition is organised by the top European sommeliers in conjunction with the Institute of Masters of Wine and affords the show a high quality platform among professionals in the wine industry and Chinese buyers in order to facilitate the wine producers to understand the Chinese market better. At SIAL China 2012, The BEST BUY awards will be given to exhibitors’ wines based on their value for money and quality, after having been judged by a panel comprised of sommeliers, importers, wine journalists and consultants. One can say that SIAL is positioning itself at the centre of the Chinese wine market, while taking into account of the demands and expectations of the end consumers. Besides these, the SIAL organisers have set up specifically targeted meetings between exhibitors and Chinese buyers through the Wine Business Meetings, at SIAL China 2012. The Chinese market is worthy of such detailed planning and investment. Currently China is the eighth largest consumer of wines in the world, in value, and is the driving force of the international wine market. In 2012, apart from SIAL China, the main movers of the food and beverage industry across the globe are also expected to attend SIAL Canada (9th–11th May in Montreal), the first ever SIAL Brazil (25th -28th June in Sao Paolo), SIAL Paris (21st-25th October), and the third SIAL Middle East (26th -28th November in Abu Dhabi). The SIAL offers the international wine trade a global vision, access to the most important markets and also targets multi-product buyers who wouldn’t normally attend traditional wine shows.

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Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

E V E N T S’ C A L E N D E R Alimentaria 2012 26-29 March 2012 Fira de Barcelona’s Gran Vía venue., Barcelona Spain www.alimentaria-bcn.com Ethnic Foods Europe 2011 27-29 March 2012 Brussels Exhibitions and Conference Centre, Brussels www.ethnicfoodseurope.com HOTELEX 2012 9-12 April 2012 Shanghai New International Exhibition Center, Shanghai,China www.hotelex.cn FHA 2012 17-20 April 2012 Singapore Expo, Singapore www.foodnhotelasia.com SIAL China 2012 9-11 May 2012 Shanghai New International Exhibition Center www.sialchina.com NRA Show 2012 5-8 May 2012 McCormick Place, Chicago, US www.restaurant.org Espana Original 2012 8-10 May 2012 Ciudad real, Spain www.espanaoriginal.com Vinexpo Asia Pacific 29-31 May 2012 Hongkong www.vinexpo.com Thaifex- world of food ASIA 12 23-27 May 2012 Impact challenger, Thailand www.worldoffoodasia.com MIFB 2012 12-14 July 2012 PWTC, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia www.mifb.com.my International Hospitality Fair 2012 by CII 20-22 Sep 2012 Pragati Maidan, New Delhi www.internationalhospitalityfair.in SIAL Paris 21-25 October 2012 Paris Nord Villepinte, Paris, France www.sial.fr Hotel Expo 2012 10-12 October 2012 The Venetian Macau, www.hotel-exhibition.com Equip Hotel 11-15 Nov 2012 Paris Expo Porte de Versailles, Paris www.equiphotel.com

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EVENT

An Effective Platform for the Industry Food&HotelAsia (FHA) has its humble beginnings in 1978, consisting initially of FoodAsia and HotelAsia. Much anticipated both locally and internationally, the biennial FHA brings to market a myriad food and hospitality products from around the globe. The 8th edition of FHA will be held in Singapore Expo, during 17 th -20 th April 2012. FHA2012 will witness an expansion of its exhibition area to 85,000 sq. m and is expected to attract 2600 exhibitors from over 65 countries/regions and an expected number of 40,000 trade visitors from over 90 countries/regions, thereby presenting a formidable purchasing platform to them to boost their food and hospitality businesses for the robust Asian market. With a focus on promoting the Asian food and hospitality industry, FHA has grown tremendously over the years as the premier trade event synonymous with the food and hospitality industry in Asia and beyond. The exhibition, organised by Singapore Exhibition Services (SES), consists of five specialised shows, namely FoodAsia, HotelAsia, Bakery&Pastry, HospitalityStyleAsia and HospitalityTechnology. Besides these, there is also an up-and-coming segment named Tea&Coffee. At FHA2012, the attendees can not only find it easier to meet their buying needs but also get to indulge in game-changing interaction with business contacts, decision makers and influencers. An impressive 46 group pavilions are also expected at FHA2012. Co-located with FHA2012, the 12th edition of Wine&SpiritsAsia 2012 will boast of a stronger presentation of international wines and spirits than its earlier editions, with a projected exhibition area of 7000 sq. m and estimated participation of 165 exhibitors from 25 countries. Eight group pavilions from Australia, Austria, Chile, France, Germany, India, Italy and Singapore are also expected to showcase a wide array of products and a host of new labels. Succinctly, FHA2012, along with Wine&SpiritsAsia2012 is expected to provide excellent business platforms for

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catering to the requirements of Indian buyers eyeing the international quality products and services, trade partners, and competitive international suppliers. To offer a true allrounded food and hospitality experience, FHA2012 will also have a series of eventful activities including culinary competitions and insightful conferences, which will complement the showfloor buzz for all exhibitors and attendees alike. Stephen Tan, the Chief Executive of

Singapore Exhibition Services (SES), and the organiser of the show affirmed, “These five specialised shows are firmly entrenched as a timely, all-inclusive must-attend trading platform for the industry professionals to establish new alliances with relevant business partners and key decision makers in the food and hospitality trade, and to acquire intelligence on the latest industry trends and issues. India, a rapidly growing economy, will truly benefit from the congregation of remarkable contingent of top quality industry players coming from across the globe.”

The Specialised Events FoodAsia2012 FoodAsia2012—the 18th international exhibition of food and drinks will be held from 17th –20th April 2012, at the Singapore Expo, as one of the five specialised events of Food&HotelAsia2012 (FHA2012). FoodAsia2012 is a dedicated platform catering to the sourcing needs of Asian buyers in the food and drinks sector. From raw ingredients to ready-to-eat products, the exhibition features a smorgasbord of products and supplies from international manufacturers and suppliers. Attracting tens of thousands of highly relevant buyers from Asia and beyond, FoodAsia2012 is a must attend trade event for everyone in the food and hospitality industry. HotelAsia2012 At FHA2012, HotelAsia2012 will return for its 18th edition. The event can be construed as the unrivalled marketing platform for food service equipment and supplies. HotelAsia2012 will feature a comprehensive exhibit of innovative products and services ranging from food preparation and processing to housekeeping products. Here it deserves a mention that HotelAsia is the preferred event for foodservice and hospitality industry professionals to source, network and communicate for better ideas and opportunities in enhancing and leveraging their businesses in the Asian market. HospitalityStyleAsia2012 HospitalityStyleAsia2012 will return for its 7th edition at the Singapore Expo from 17th -20th April 2012. The event will feature a comprehensive range of exhibits from bathroom fittings and kitchen accessories to lightings and tablewares. The show has grown in tandem with the thriving food and

Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

hospitality industry, with greater appreciation for style and luxury, and with the increasing pursuit of new and unique concepts in the Asian market. With thousands of potential buyers and exhibitors from across the globe, it is wise to come to HospitalityStyleAsia2012 and partake the business of style and luxury. Bakery&Pastry2012 Bakery&Pastry2012, which will be the 10th international exhibition of equipment, ingredients and supplies for the bakery and pastry industry, is returning to the Singapore Expo from 17 th - 20 th April 2012. Bakery&Pastry2012 will provide the premier marketplace with a wide array of the latest bakery equipment and ingredients. This onestop business platform will connect international suppliers with Asian buyers and decision makers, will facilitate business networking opportunities, and will generate an abundance of knowledge sharing to meet the growing potential and expectation of the Asian market. HospitalityTechnology2012 HospitalityTechnology2012 will be the eighth edition of this event, which is an unparalleled platform for the future of hospitality technology. Hospitality Technology2012 will feature a comprehensive selection of leading-edge products, ranging from in-room technologies and entertainment to security systems and database management. The tremendous growth spurt of hospitality technology has affirmed HospitalityTechnology2012 as the must-attend event with the potential for vast networking opportunity. The event can also be the platform to source for high-quality hospitality technology products.

Feb-Mar ’12


Your Creativity, Our Passion. Figaro Olives

Pasta, Olive Oil, Tomato Products, Balsamic Vinegar & Couscous, Italian Flours, Rice

Mexican Foods Jalapenos, Harina, Cactus & Other Specialities Ingredients

Chinese Cooking Sauces, Chilli Sauces, Soya Sauce, Seasome Oil

Specialities Italian Preserved Vegetables, Sauces, Place Packed Jars, Kalamata & Linguerian Olives

Italian Condiments

Wine Vinegar & Balsamic

Olive oil

Savoiadri, Amaretti & Puff Pastry

Exclusively Brought in India by :

Corn & Baby Corn

Rodaa Ji Company

A to Z in Italian Food

Ready-to-Cook Pastes & Sauces

Contact : Lalit Asrani GI-30, Main G.T. Karnal Road, Industrial Area, Delhi-110033 (India) Ph. : 91-11-46988888, 91-98-100-16425 Fax : 91-11-27111906 E-mail : rodaajicompany@yahoo.co.in

Bar Syrups, Coffee Syrups, Smoothie Base, Sauces

Pommery Mustard & Vinegars

Hot & Jalapeno Sauces

Innovation in Chocolate

MUSHROOMS Stuffed Exotic Vegetables & Fruits

Guchhi, Truffles, Porcini, Girolles, Golden Nameko, Black Trumpet, Chanter Lee, Shitake, Cepes & White Jelly Funges

Recipient of “Ambassador of the Italian food & drink 2005” award.


Mount Gay Rum Arrives in India Remy Cointreau, the world-renowned liquor brand that has been creating unique joy of headiness among the souls of liquor lovers across the globe for generations, has announced the launch of Mount Gay Rum — the oldest brand of rum in existence— in India. The French-based Rémy Cointreau Group is one of the leading manufacturers of ultra premium spirits and champagnes in the globe, with a presence in more than 150 countries around the world. Mount Gay Rum is a smooth, elegant, medium light tasting rum. Its unique style combines delicate notes of ripe banana, sweet almond, vanilla and moka. This premium brand has been produced in Barbados with passion and unparalleled excellence, since 1703. Expertly fashioned from rich sugarcane and with the pristine, coral- filtered water native to the island, Mount Gay Rum is the sumptuous, inimitable expression of Barbadian art of living. Elegant and complex, each rum in the Mount Gay range presents a unique sensorial profile that is ideal for creating delectable premium cocktails. Mount Gay Rum is a popular ingredient for interesting cocktails out of which Mount Gay Mojito is a preferred choice (which also includes Cointreau).

Danone Comes With a Lassi for India Danone, the French food products multinational corporation has introduced a lassi in India. The product is tailored for the Indian tastes, and its price too is affordable. The lassi comes at Rs.15 for a 165 ml pack, and in sweet, mango and masala variants. Presently, the product has been introduced across Bangalore, Hyderabad, Mumbai and Pune. This lassi will be available across retail and modern trade outlets across these four cities. This packaged lassi is fortified with four nutrients. Earlier, the company launched dahi, flavoured yogurt, creamy yogurt Cremix, and Danette smoothies in India since 2010. Danone India will get this healthy drink exclusively produced at Dynamix, based in Baramati, Maharashtra to cater to the demands. The company has its own factory in Haryana, which was made operational in November 2011, and it produces yoghurt and chocolate milk cereal snack.

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Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

The Sweetness of the SOUL SOUL has brought lip smacking Kesar Mango Pulp, which can make your summers sweet and succulent. These mango pulps are made from high quality Kesari mangoes, which were handpicked for the potential consumers of this product. This perfect treat for mango lovers is priced at Rs.150/- for an 850 gm canister but SOUL is presently offers it at an introductory price of Rs.130/- Now you can treat your taste buds to SOUL’s fresh and delicious Kesar Mango Pulp whenever your heart desires so. However, if you live in Maharashtra and Gujarat, getting access to SOUL’s mango pulp would be easier. Here it deserves a mention that SOUL is the Indian brand of ADF Foods Ltd., which was launched last year, with the introduction of pickles made in olive oil. SOUL’s products are presently available in Mumbai, Pune, Ahmedabad, Baroda, Bharuch, Surat, Rajkot, Anand, Gwalior, Bhopal, and Indore. Apart from marketing and distributing its own Brands, ADF Foods Ltd., which started in 1932, also contracts manufacturers for leading multinationals and mainstream retailers worldwide.

Feb-Mar ’12


NEWS SCAN

KWB to Come Up With Wine Park

Milk with a Long Shelf Life

The Karnataka Wine Board (KWB) is planning an integrated wine park, in an endeavour to give a boost to the production of wine and encourage wineries in the state. This proposed wine park would be unique to South India. The Karnataka government has recently allotted 141.28 acres of land at Toravi village, located 8 km from Bijapur, to the KWB for developing the proposed park Bijapur district of Karnataka, which is known for its seedless grapes, has been selected for the proposed wine park. This wine park is expected to encourage entrepreneurs to invest in wineries in Karnataka and provide a better market for wine grape growers in and around the Bijapur district. The proposed wine park will have a gamut of activities which include manufacture of wine, research and development, and training. The proposed wine park will also have laboratory to test the quality of grapes, and a centre of excellence among other facilities, which would facilitate the farmers as well as the entrepreneurs. According to Vandita Sharma, the Principal Secretary, Department of Horticulture, Karnataka, the department would very soon introduce tenders where the private sector would be invited to invest in the proposed wine park. According to Suresh Chandran, the Managing Director, KWB, since the introduction of the wine policy in 2007, the number of wineries in the state of Karnataka has increased to 14, with an annual production of about 2.5 million litres.

FMCG major CavinKare has come up with ultra high temperature (UHT)-treated milk named Cavin’s Pure+. This milk can last for 120 days without the support of refrigerator. According to CK Ranganathan, CMD, CavinKare Pvt.Ltd., this product was a step towards consolidating the position of the company in the dairy sector. The launch of Cavin’s Pure+ follows the introduction of Cavin’s Ghee and Cavin’s Flavoured Milk in the recent past. The processing technology for this wonder milk was sourced from the Netherlands, and the packaging of the product was developed in association with a Mumbai-based packaging company. The Cavin’s Pure+ milk will be produced by the company from its facility at Bhavani, Tamil Nadu, where its production capacity is up to 100,000 litres. Initially, the company will introduce this ultra high temperature (UHT)treated milk in Tamil Nadu only. Based on the success of this milk in Tamil Nadu, the company would explore the option of launching it in other parts of the country as well. In the first year of its launch, the company is envisaging a revenue of Rs.60-65 crore from this product. . The procurement of quality milk is however, remains a challenge. The company has joined hands with 11,000 farmers living in the 50 km radius from the plant, so as to enable the milk to reach the plant in less than 3-4 hours.

Yzury Comes With an e-Boutique Yzury International Trade, the retail branch of Luxe Corp Group, has opened in India the first e-boutique dedicated to gourmet products, which is named Yzury.com. With more than 300 different references, Yzury e-boutique will not only offer its customers a delightful shopping experience but also a new way to discover and consume international cuisines at rock-bottom prices. The premier online gourmet boutique does have potential to attract foodies in India who have a fascination for gourmet foods. With an objective to make gourmet products affordable to consumers in India, Yzury.com sent its team all over the world with a first stop in the gastronomy capital Paris, to offer a range of gourmet products with rich flavours and vivid colours. Yzury.com has selected an impressive range of gourmet products such as truffles, flavoured vinegars, olive oils, chocolates, pate, mustard, terrines, cooked dishes, sweet and savoury biscuits, wines…and the company continues to increase its range with quality products. The carefully selected ingredients and the traditional production processes make them exceptional products, many of which are not available in the traditional supermarkets or specialty stores.

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Aspri Spirits Brings Raventós i Blanc Wines to India The exquisite range of Raventós i Blanc wines from Spain is now available in India. These wines have been brought to the country by Aspri Spirits Pvt. Ltd. The winery, which produces this heady panacea, was founded by Josep Maria Raventós. The Raventós i Blanc estate, spread across 90 hectares of woodland and vineyards in Sant Sadurní d’Anoia, Spain has belonged to the Raventós family since 1497, and been passed on intact from generation to generation up to the present day. Today, the estate comprises 44 plots which produce a range of distinctive cavas. Francesc Escala, the Export Director, Raventós i Blanc expressed that Raventós i Blanc was pleased to “associate with Aspri Spirits Pvt. Ltd. who have an understanding of the Indian wine market.” He also opined that “the Raventós i Blanc style reflects depth, sparkle and expressiveness.” Jackie Matai, Director, Aspri Spirit Pvt Ltd., reciprocated the sentiment. “We are delighted with our association with Raventós i Blanc. We have always endeavoured to bring in the finest of products for the discerning Indian consumer and are confident that Raventós i Blanc range of wines will find its pride of place in the Indian market,” he affirmed.

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Del Monte Introduces INQBake Contest to Recognise Baking Talent Del Monte, one of the largest and best known international food brands brought to India by FieldFresh Foods Pvt. Ltd., had instituted a unique engagement contest named ‘INQBake’ for bakers and confectioners across Delhi-NCR. The initiative followed the launch of high quality fruit fillings of Del Monte in India, last year. The contest entailed creation of innovative confectionery and bakery products using Del Monte’s range of fruit filling and packaged fruits. It provided a platform for bakers to showcase the versatility and usage of the product range in varied recipes. The contestants were adjudged by the prestigious panel of judges, which included Deeba Rajpal, an avid food blogger with a passion for baking and Del Monte’s Corporate Chef. Entries were received across Delhi-NCR region. The participants showcased their baking skills by creating scrumptious recipes such as pineapple cheese cake, blueberry tarts, raspberry pastries, eclair beauties with dark cherry filling, custards made from fruit cocktail. Judged on three parameters — innovation, taste and appearance, the contest was won by Theos, Noida. Angels in my Kitchen, Defence Colony stood at first runner up position and Perfect Bake, Faridabad, won the second runner up position. Speaking about the contest, Yogesh Bellani, the Business Head, Del Monte Foods, FieldFresh Pvt. Ltd. said, “Bakeries and confectionaries constitute an important part of our B2B clientele. The idea was to create a platform to engage with them and enable them to showcase their creativity using Del Monte’s fruit fillings and packaged fruits. The INQ-Bake contest is a small step taken in this direction. Based on the encouraging response received from the Delhi-NCR region, we would like to extend this further with more engagement programmes for the bakery community across India in the future.” Here it deserves a mention that Del Monte sources high quality packaged fruits and fruit fillings from various parts of the world and has a long heritage and supply side strength in processed fruit and vegetable products. Del Monte provides international quality inputs in the form of packaged fruits and fruit fillings to the bakers and confectioners for both smallmedium businesses as well as large and industrial players. Del Monte was brought to India in 2007 by a joint venture between Bharti Enterprises and Del Monte Pacific Ltd. The joint venture is called FieldFresh Foods Pvt. Ltd.

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Aditya Birla Retail to Get a Financial Boost Kumar Mangalam Birla, the Chairman of the Aditya Birla Group, has decided to invest Rs.400 crore over the next two years, to boost the operations of his retail business. The sum will be invested primarily for the purpose of setting up hypermarkets which would sell a gamut of food & beverage products along with other FMCG items. The group ventured into food and grocery retail sector in 2007 with the acquisition of a southbased supermarket chain. The retail arm of the group is named Aditya Birla Retail Limited. Subsequently, Aditya Birla Retail Ltd. expanded its presence across the country under the brand ‘more,’ with two formats — supermarket and hypermarket. The growth of ‘more’ is reflected in small supermarket stores across the country. The company invested approximately Rs.2000 crore, but had to close 100-odd stores in the aftermath of the recession, in 2008. Presently, the company runs 550 supermarkets and 12 hypermarkets under its ambit. Now Aditya Birla Retail Ltd. will set up 15-18 hypermarkets in the near future, which can hope to match the frantic expansion spearheaded by its competitors like Future Group and Reliance Retail.

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The Beer Lovers’ Haven at Gurgaon In the recent past, The Beer Café was opened at Ambience Mall, Gurgaon, NCR., with a wide variety of the most refreshing and popular alcoholic beverages across the globe. The beer café is a singular concept in the Indian food & beverages industry. The Beer Café at Gurgaon is set to offer the ultimate beer drinking experience to the beer lovers. According to its Founder and MD, Rahul Gupta, this beer café is India’s first PYOB (Pour Your Own Beer) chain offering consumers a wide variety of beers along with a unique beer drinking experience, where consumers can pour ice cold beer directly from taps. “We have a huge stock of imported beers and as well Indian beers in our outlet. You can pay a fixed amount and buy a beer card at The Beer Café, and you can pour your own beer at our café, as long as the money in the beer card lasts,” informed Rahul. From hanging out at beer stations where you can pour-your-own ice cold chilled beers directly from taps using your own RFID activated beer card, to chilling out on comfortable lounges with bright cushions along with great snacks, here the experience and brews are bound to delight you. Besides top quality Belgian beers like Stella Artois and Hoegaarden, you can experience and enjoy a variety of European beers, Asian lagers, Australia’s Victoria Bitter or Mexico’s range of Corona beers at The Beer Café, at Gurgaon. “The technology employed at our outlet enables the beers to be always served at 5 degree centigrade,” pointed out Rahul. Of course, though according to Rahul “beer is the hero of the café,” The Beer Café does house a plethora of other spirits as well. The Beer Café will be bringing in a plethora of novelties for beer connoisseurs ranging from brands to flavours and beermasters to even owning your no expiry own beer card valid across India, as more thirst-inducing or thirst quenching – whichever way you want to look at it — Beer Cafes dot the country. The initial investment for this beer café was between Rs.60-70 lakh. Rahul has the ambitious vision of opening 10 such beer cafes across Delhi-NCR, within this year only. A beer card of The Beer Cafe will be valid across all these future outlets.

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Winterhalter Wins an Award in Warewashing Technology Warewashing specialist Winterhalter Gastronom GmbH won the Readers’ Choice Award BEST of Market 2012, in the category of warewashing technology, which was presented at the Internorga trade fair, in Hamburg, Germany. The award is based on the market research conducted by the three German specialist journals, FirstClass, 24 Stunden Gastlichkeit and GVmanager on the market and buying behaviour in the out-of-home market in 2012. “We are very proud to be have been selected for the award BEST of Market in 2012 by our readers”, said a delighted Ralph Winterhalter, the Managing Partner at Winterhalter Gastronom GmbH. In a survey carried out at the end of 2011, around 2,400 decision-makers from the hotel, the gastronomy and the commercial catering industry were asked to assess 400 manufacturers of the gastronomy supply industry regarding price/performance ratio, quality and service. The awards went to the three best in categories including cooking technology, warewashing technology and coffee machines (amongst others). “This year’s results show once again that the market leaders have retained their position within the industry for a reason,”

asserted Annemarie Heinrichsdobler, the Publisher and Editor-in-Chief at B&LMedienGesellschaft, while summarising the results. “The award serves as endorsement for us and motivates us to continue on our successful path and to improve it, especially with regard to price/ performance ratio, quality and service, always for the benefit of our customers,” elaborated Ralph Winterhalter.

Hilton Worldwide Plans 500 New Restaurants Globally in Three Years Hilton Worldwide has announced the ambitious plan to have 500 new restaurants across the globe in three years. In support of this goal, and after the successful launch of Hilton Worldwide’s internal website, hiltonrestaurantconcepts.com, an external version of the site is available now, under the same domain name, with the objective to help partner with approved restaurateurs in bringing their concepts into Hilton Worldwide hotels. Since its launch internally, the website has secured nearly 900 registered hotel owners, interested in identifying new hotel restaurant concepts, resulting in more than 700 visits from 44 countries. “Our goal is to provide our hotels with great concepts that are unique to their regions and offer menu options that will appeal to their repeat customer base,” said Beth Scott, Vice- President, Food and Beverage Concepts, Hilton Worldwide. “It is also a great opportunity for restaurateurs interested in growing their brand,” Beth added. Restaurateurs who visit www.hiltonrestaurantconcepts.com will be asked to input concept details - menu offerings, design elements and price points - to be considered for inclusion in the website. Upon acceptance, the concept will be loaded for hotel owners’ review and potential hotel match opportunities. The site currently offers original F&B concepts created by Hilton Worldwide and existing concepts such as BGR — The Burger Joint, based in Bethesda, Md; The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf® and Ruth’s Chris Steak House to name a few. Additionally, there are more than 80 deals at various stages of a partnership. The website is expected to have 50 additional concepts available for hoteliers to choose from by year-end.

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Jubliant FoodWorks to Introduce Di Bella Aroma Spreads Through Mumbai Dunkin Donuts in India Recently, the Australia-based Di Bella Coffee has opened its third

Jubiliant FoodWorks Ltd. is expected to open the first store of the US-based chain Dunkin’ Donuts in India, by June. Dunkin’ Donuts’ would enter India through a franchise agreement between Dunkin’ Brands Group Inc. and New Delhi-based Jubilant FoodWorks. According to Ajay Kaul, the Chief Executive of Jubilant FoodWorks, the stores of Dunkin’ Donuts in India are under construction and the menu development is also at its final stages. The maiden Dunkin’ Donuts store in India will come up in New Delhi, which will be followed up by 80-100 more Dunkin’ Donuts outlets across the country during the next five years. Kaul informed that along with the ’core’ Dunkin’ Donuts menu, the Indian outlets of Dunkin Donuts will also serve items which attract the Indian palate. It is expected that the competition between Dunkin Donuts and the soon to arrive Starbucks Corp. would heat up the corporate climate in the coming months and years. However, a mushrooming cafe market in India that is estimated to attract an annual sales of $680 million by March 2016, holds out great business potential for these new entrants. Here it deserves a mention that Jubilant FoodWorks also exclusively operates the Domino’s Pizza chain in India.

outlet in Bandra, Mumbai. According to Sachin Sabharwal, Managing Director, Di Bella Coffee India, Di Bella Coffee would give the people of India “a distinct and unique coffee experience at their doorstep.” At the coffee stores of Di Bella Coffee you will

find a digital menu, endowed with state-of-the-art facilities like web access and Tablet technology. Of course, the quality of the product offered complements the quality of technology. At the Di Bella Coffee stores you would get the taste and aroma of premium blended and roasted coffee beans. The signature blends of Di Bella Coffee’s coffees are sourced from different origins around the world to achieve a distinct taste profile on each blend. Ali Reserve, a complex offering; Felici, a spicy and rich black coffee with distinct dark chocolate, and Premium are some of the Di Bella Coffee blends sought from different origins around the globe. Here it deserves a mention that after Costa Coffee, and Coffee Bean, Di Bella Coffee is the latest entrant in the premium coffee segment in India. It is offering coffees from different regions of the globe, and the coffee prices of Di Bella Coffee in India range between Rs.90 to Rs.170. Besides the existing players, it would also have to compete with soon to be launched, Starbucks Coffee.

FCI on Hiring Spree Food Corporation of India (FCI) has plans to go on a massive hiring spree. According to the Minister of State (Independent Charge), Ministry of Consumer Affairs, Food and Public Distribution, Prof. KV Thomas, over the next six months, the organisation has plans to employ 6000 more people to handle the increase in procurement in food grains. This employment generation would be in addition to the 4000 people that FCI is already recruiting, for which Staff Selection Commission has conducted written tests recently. These 6000 people are to be hired in the C category. “We will request the SSC to undertake the additional recruitment,” stated Shiraj Hussain, Chairman, Food Corporation of India. Currently, FCI has 30,000 employees on its rolls. FCI expects the rice procurement for the 2011-12 fiscal to be 35 million tonnes, which a is a slight increase from 34 million tonnes in the previous fiscal. Overall, the food grains production in India is geared for a record harvest of 250.42 million tonnes in the current year, based on record output in rice and wheat.

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Polo Lounge at Hyatt Regency Delhi Honoured Polo Lounge at Hyatt Regency Delhi has been honoured with the recognition of being one of the three ‘Highly Commended Bars in India’ at the recently held Icons of Whisky Awards 2012. These awards are based on the extensive range of whiskies available at the bar, choice of glassware, service level and knowledge of the team, that are audited by mystery visitors. On the occasion Kumar Shobhan, Director of Food and Beverage, Hyatt Regency Delhi said, “The award has served as a great motivation for the team.” He added, “We have presence in the city for 30 years and have an exhaustive and extensive beverage collection.” Polo Lounge offers the finest and rarest collection of whiskeys, cognacs, single malts and handcrafted beers, complimented with live musical jazz performances six days a week. The extensive beverage menu includes a collection of vintage single malts, aged up to 46 years, ranging from Glenfiddich Vintage 1961 and Glenfiddich 40 year-old to Glenfarclas 46 year-old. In addition to the single malts, the bar also has the legendary cognac, Remy Martin Louis XIII from the house of Remy Martin, rare collection of bourbon, Irish and Japanese whiskeys, vintage champagne and wine, and up-market spirits and liqueurs, which makes it a popular bar amongst connoisseurs of alcoholic beverage. The recently renovated Polo Lounge has kept its traditional colonial look of classic wood paneling, coffered ceilings and leather Chesterfield chairs. At the same time, the bar has had a stylish facelift with chic transparent steel finishing in-line with today’s design.

Starbucks to Come and Quickly Expand in India Starbucks Corporation, an US-based international coffee company, has joined hands with India’s Tata Global Beverages Limited through a 50-50 joint venture to open 50 Starbucks cafés across India within the current year. The venture of Starbucks Corporation and Tata Global Beverages Limited is known as Tata Starbucks Ltd. The Indian operations of Starbucks will begin in Delhi and Mumbai. The first outlet is expected to be opened in either of these cities, in September of this year. The company has also envisaged to open outlets at select hospitality properties within the ambit of the Indian Hotels Company Limited (IHCL), which is under the Tata Group. These stores within IHCL properties will be co-branded as ‘Starbucks Coffee: A Tata Alliance.’ According to John Culver, the President of Starbucks China and Asia-Pacific, the company would also look at opening outlets in shopping malls, office parks, universities, airports and train stations. The growing coffee café culture in metropolitan India, induced by lifestyle changes, can give an impetus to the business of Tata Starbucks Ltd. in the country. Tata Starbucks Ltd. expects to capitalise on the increasing aspirations and affluence of many Indians, who are eager to partake of the aroma of international quality coffee. The partnership with Tata Global Beverages Ltd. will enable Starbucks to source and roast their coffee beans in India. This may improve the bottomlines of its business operations as importing coffee beans in India attracts high taxation. Here it deserves a mention that in January 2011, Starbucks had entered upon an agreement with Tata Coffee — a unit of Tata Global Beverages— to source and roast coffee beans in India. The companies will also introduce a tea for the Indian market, under the Tata Tazo brand.

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Enoteca Wine Bar Wins the ‘Times Nightlife Award’ 2012 Enoteca Wine Bar at Jaypee Greens Golf & Spa Resort, located at Greater Noida, won the prestigious ‘Times Nightlife Award’ 2012, which was held in New Delhi recently. Enoteca Wine Bar was recognised under the category of ‘Bar with Best Ambience’ in NCR. Showcasing fine and authentic Italian flavours, La Brezza with its Enoteca Wine Bar is conceptualised as a traditional yet modern styled Italian restaurant at Jaypee Greens Golf and Spa Resort. Enoteca, the artistically designed Italian wine bar, is spread over an area of 2514 sq. ft. on the ground floor and serves 40 covers, while La Brezza, the fine dinning Italian restaurant on the first floor is spread across an area of 2768 sq. ft. La Breeza also does cater to 40 guests at a given point of time. The restaurant has a direct view of the show kitchen and also affords a picturesque view of the Golf Course in the vicinity. Manju Sharma, the Director, Jaypee Hotels expressed her elation over the honour and promised on her company’s behalf “to keep the momentum alive while maintaining high standards of service.”

World Spice Congress Initiates Empowering Spice Farmers The Indian spice industry will take up a quality capacity building exercise jointly with USFDA (United States Food Drug Administration), thereby enabling every segment of the Indian spice industry to face the challenges of international trade and commerce in spices. This will start right from the spice growers across the country. The declaration to this effect came from Dr.A. Jayathilak, the Chairman of the Spices Board India, at the concluding session of the 11th World Spice Congress, held in Pune during 9th-11th February 2012. Bruce Ross, India Country Director of the USFDA, who was present at the Congress, had suggested that initiatives on such a massive scale will be supported by USFDA since such initiatives on aquaculture in Bangladesh has yielded promising results. The Spices Board India has been undertaking programmes throughout the country especially in the states of Gujarat, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, and Andhra Pradesh to effectively link the spices farmers of these states to the supply chain linked to exports. The board has also proposed plans for programmes in the next plan period to focus attention on export-oriented production of ten spices like nutmeg, chillies, mint, cumin, fennel, coriander, fenugreek, black pepper, turmeric, and ginger. Cardamom is already a focus commodity. All the quality labs of the Spices Board will soon be accredited for the very latest certifications for international acceptability. The Spices Board will also set up task forces for various spices to address all the issues of quality, linkages and sourcing, Dr Jayathilak informed.

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Appointment Chia Kok Sing Westin Hotels & Resorts has appointed Chia Kok Sing as Chef de Cuisine of EEST (an authentic Asian F&B destination) at The Westin Gurgaon, New Delhi. Prior to joining The Westin Gurgaon, New Delhi, Chia Kok Sing was associated with the Hilton Janakpuri. Hailing from China, he began his career by working with his father who was in the culinary business. Subsequently, Chia Kok Sing took formal training in a Chinese restaurant and went on to become an Executive Chef at the age of 30. Since then he has worked in Malaysia and Burma before coming to India. Speaking on the appointment of Chia Kok Sing, Sanjay Sharma, Complex General Manager of The Westin Gurgaon, New Delhi and The Westin Sohna Resort & Spa, said, “We are pleased to welcome Chia Kok Sing as a part of our winning team. He brings a wealth of experience in Chinese cuisine from around the world. He has travelled globally and has honed his culinary skills, and we are certain he will further delight the palate of Asian gourmet lovers.” Chia Kok Sing, on being part of The Westin Gurgaon, New Delhi said, “I am very excited to be taking on this role as EEST is already a popular gourmet destination at The Westin Gurgaon, New Delhi. I look forward to creating a culinary journey for our guests through which it will be possible for them to enjoy each dish with its unique highlights, resulting in exciting dining experiences.”

Valentine Gets Acquired by Naturex Naturex has announced the acquisition of Valentine, an Indian company which specialises in the production of fruit and vegetable powders and natural colours for the food and beverage industry. Based in Avignon, France, Naturex is a global player in the manufacture of natural speciality ingredients for the food & beverage, nutrition & health and personal care industries. Naturex employs more than 1200 people and has 14 production units located in Europe (France, Italy, Spain, Switzerland and England), the United States (New Jersey and California), Brazil, Australia and Morocco. In addition, the group has several sales offices worldwide. Valentine has two production sites located near Mumbai. Thanks to its expertise in formulation and spray drying processes, Valentine has been able to garner a high-quality clientele within the Indian food industry, comprised of local companies as well as subsidiaries of multinationals. The acquisition of Valentine by Naturex will enable Naturex to gain a firmer foothold in the Indian market. "This acquisition provides us not only with a dynamic commercial presence in India but also allows us to become a producer in this country in order to best respond to the local issues that our clients face", declared Jacques Dikansky, the President, CEO and the Founder of Naturex. "The tremendous growth potential of Valentine in a market enjoying high growth, combined with Naturex's technical and scientific expertise will open great opportunities for us,” he added. This acquisition makes Naturex become a local producer in India and being local is an important factor of success in Naturex's business. This first industrial setup in Asia will supplement the Naturex group's regional production centres in Europe and in the Americas, in particular for natural colours. Furthermore, this acquisition will facilitate to ensure promotion for all of the group's product ranges while benefiting from the existing commercial structure, and will help Naturex to develop close relations with the Indian food industry.

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Barry Callebaut’s Drive Towards Sustainable Cocoa Barry Callebaut, the world’s leading manufacturer of high-quality cocoa and chocolate, has launched a CHF 40 million cocoa sustainability initiative to boost farm productivity, increase quality and improve family livelihoods in key cocoa producing countries in West and Central Africa and Indonesia, over 10 years. Here it deserves a mention that with annual sales of about CHF 4.6 billion (EUR 3.6 billion/USD 5.0 billion) for the fiscal year 2010-11, Zurich-based Barry Callebaut is the world’s leading manufacturer of high-quality cocoa and chocolate – from the cocoa bean to the finished chocolate product. In the fiscal year 2011-2012, the company will invest CHF 5 million in farmer training, infrastructure and community education and health programs. The activities will be undertaken in cooperation with agricultural and development experts and government institutions. Barry Callebaut will focus first on large producer countries including Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Indonesia, Cameroon and Brazil, and aims to expand the initiative, called Cocoa Horizons, to other cocoa producing countries with high development potential, over the coming years. “The scarcity of quality cocoa is a serious concern that touches the heart of our business – because without more cocoa, we can’t produce more chocolate. Innovative and comprehensive solutions are urgently needed to reverse the overall decline in global cocoa production. We have therefore made sustainable cocoa a pillar of our company’s ambitious growth strategy, and accelerated our longtime efforts to ensure sustainable cocoa production. Our newest initiative, ‘Cocoa Horizons,’ is the most ambitious and far reaching sustainability program in Barry Callebaut’s history,” said CEO, Barry Callebaut AG, Juergen B. Steinemann. The initiative builds on Barry Callebaut’s proven Quality Partner Program (QPP) for cocoa farmer cooperatives. Launched in 2005, and currently engaging more than 40,000 farmers in Côte d’Ivoire and Cameroon, QPP was the first program of its kind to emphasise quality improvement goals for cocoa as well as farming practices. Barry Callebaut’s Cocoa Horizons initiative comprises three edifices. They are: Farmer Practices – Enabling farmers to boost farm productivity and cocoa quality through Barry Callebaut’s training programs in yield enhancement techniques and sustainable cocoa production, and to be eligible for independent certification according to multiple cocoa sustainability standards. Farmer Education – Improving access to education in cocoa farming communities and promoting a cocoa curriculum and other actions to develop the next generation of young cocoa farmers. Farmer Health – Improving access to basic healthcare and clean water in cocoa farming communities to contribute to the well-being of farming families. Barry Callebaut estimates that by 2020 the global cocoa and chocolate industry will need an additional 1 million metric tonnes of cocoa to meet the rising demand for chocolate, driven by markets in Asia, Eastern Europe and the Americas.

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COVER STORY

QSRs Catering to

Indian Tastes India is in the grips of a QSR revolution of sorts, which is being fostered by multinational food chain players like McDonald’s, KFC, Domino’s Pizza and Pizza Hut among others. Over the last decade, many of these players have acquired a good understanding of the Indian market and the complex and multilayered Indian consumer behaviour. They have Indianised their offerings to suit the Indian tastes. Not only they have come up with Indianised menus, but also have breakfast menus and sit-and-eat formats in their marketing arsenal. Furthermore, they have positioned their outlets as destinations for family outings. Ashok Malkani takes a look at some of these players and how they repositioned their menu to meet the Indian tastes. Their experience, in fact, can be a guide for the new players seeking to enter India.

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W

ith changing lifestyles and increased disposable incomes, the demand for fast foods has increased in urban India. In fact, this demand is increasing with each passing day. Nowadays, we are seeing a large section of Indian consumers increasingly spending tidy sums of money in eating out options at QSRs and casual dinning restaurants, whether they are with family and friends or alone, whether it is a weekend or a holiday, or for that matter a working day. This trend towards consumption of fast foods began in the nascent days of liberalised India, say some two decades ago. But there were not many quality QSRs and casual dining restaurants to cater to that nascent demand in those days. Cashing on this trend and endeavouring to direct it to their profits, many multinational fast food chains did set up a plethora of shops in India, in a big way, some fifteen years ago. However, they soon realised that to grow in the Indian market, they have to produce what India prefers to eat. What may be popular in the US, may not be find favour among the Indians. Thus for quite some years, say for a decade or so, we are witnessing that most of the multinational fast food giants are fast ‘Indianising’ their menus, to woo the Indian customers. Today, McDonald’s McAloo Tikki Burger, Pizza Hut’s Tandoori Paneer Paneer Makhani and Kadai Chicken pizza offerings and Nirula’s Subz Burger are not exceptions but reflect a growing trend towards Indianisation of the multinational QSRs and well as of the Indian QSRs like Nirula’s.

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Today, with an increasing number of young Indians opting to eat out at least once a week more and more international fast food chains are eyeing India, thereby churning up a huge appetite for the global quick service restaurant (QSR) and casual dining restaurant (CDR) business. However, customisation is essential for multinational food joints entering India. In fact, customisation and localisation should be integral characteristics of any global brand’s marketing strategy, which helps it to adopt easily to different countries, cultures and languages. A reflection of the customisation of Indian tastes can be evident from the fact that red dried chillies, mint chutneys and imli sondh are finding their distinctive niches at most fast food joints in India.

Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

In the case of India, where a significant proportion of population is vegetarian for religious reasons, McDonald’s made a wise decision in 1990, when it began establishing local supplier partners, six years before it came up with its first restaurant in India. The company began working on its first no-beef, no-pork menu for the Indian consumers, and ensured that its suppliers respected the beliefs of its future customers.

The Indian Story of McDonald’s McDonald’s opened its doors in India in 1996 and India was the first country where McDonald’s served no beef and no pork items. McDonald’s invested more than five years (from 1990 onwards) on developing the first beefless and pork-less menu in McDonald’s history. Of course, it still continues to refrain from using beef and pork in their menus in India. In fact, India is the only country in the world where McDonald’s restaurants do not offer any beef products. It doesn’t reflect business sense to sell beef products in a country where more than 80 percent of the population do not consume it, and where a restaurant serving beef is likely to be shunned by the majority of the Hindu community. On the other hand, Muslims, a significant section of Indian population, abhor pork and therefore selling pork also doesn’t make good business for a QSR aiming for a national presence. Thus the non-vegetarian section in

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COVER STORY cold chains across India which facilitate to maintain freshness and nutrition in its every product. It is interesting to note that McDonald’s sales in India became the saviour for McDonald’s business during the recessionary period. When McDonald’s restaurants in the US faced losses due to the perilous economic situation, their Indian operations continued to grow.

Lessons Learnt

McDonald’s menu in India is confined to lamb, chicken and fish products. Furthermore, the vegetarian products at McDonald’s are prepared with dedicated equipment and utensils and, in some cases, by a separate workforce, so as to eliminate the possibility of mingling of vegetarian and nonvegetarian products; another pet peeve among many vegetarians. To cater to Indian tastes and sentiments, McDonald’s practices vegetarian and non-vegetarian segregation right from processing to serving stage and uses 100 percent vegetable cooking oil in their food preparations. To make their Indian operations to cater to the Indian tastes may have required great time and effort but the result was worth it. Today, McDonald’s has 235 restaurants operating in India serving over 5,00,000 customers’ everyday. However, tailoring its offerings to cater to the tastes and preferences of local cultures where it operates is nothing new for this global QSR chain. When it opened its first outlet in 1996, at Basant Lok, New Delhi, the restaurant chain with international presence had only one vegetarian product, but now there is a galore of options for the vegetarians to savour at McDonald’s outlets. Yes, over the years, McDonald’s has also introduced a gamut of vegetarian products as a large section population in north India is vegetarian. The global fast food conglomerate has also infused spices for

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the Indian market, which add Indian flavour to the McDonald’s burgers. The fast food chain even opted for localisation in terms of supply chain management. The Indian burgers of McDonald’s are prepared exclusively from ingredients produced in India. This factor has contributed to the reduction in the manufacturing cost of McDonald’s in India, and has helped the global fast food conglomerate to serve burgers at a very affordable price, which again is a huge favourable point in a price conscious market like India. In fact, the growth of McDonald’s in India can be attributed to its ability to effectively cater to the very Indian tastes at very Indian prices. In the initial days of its presence in India, McDonald’s had to go for extensive search of good suppliers. McDonald’s too faced impediments during the early days of its Indian launch, in the early 1990s. For example, then India didn’t possess the technical know-how and expertise to grow lettuce and McDonald’s wanted a crunchy lettuce. It took six years for the fast food giant to get its lettuce right for the Indian market, along with other important food components. Eventually, the fast food giant decided on farming lettuce in Ooty, and taught the vendors advanced drip irrigation methods. McDonald’s has invested a lot in India, not only in terms of time and research but also in terms of infrastructure. It has also established

Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

However, some of the international fast food chains who came to India were not as business savvy as McDonald’s was, in the initial stages of their operations in India. When Yum! Restaurants India opened the first Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC) outlet in Bangalore in the mid-1990s, it attracted protests from the locals about the brand’s foreign origins. It was supplemented by protests from animal rights activists. The later months proved that the chicken wings and wraps of KFC were also not friendly to the Indian tastes. Within a few years of its operations Yum! had to shut down its KFC restaurants across India. The globally renowned brand was relaunched in India only in 2004, where its offerings were now more market savvy. In its second innings, KFC introduced a vegetarian menu that included rice meals, wraps and side dishes. It was the most extensive menu devoid of meat across the chain’s global operations. Like McDonald’s, KFC also opted for eggless mayonise and sauces. Even the trademark chicken dishes of KFC were now endowed with Indian flavour with the influence of Indian spices and cooking techniques. Today in India, KFC is growing rapidly and has presence in 21 cities with close to 107 restaurants within its Indian operations. Taking account of the fact that India has a large vegetarian population, KFC has repositioned itself as a fast-food chain serving tasty food, instead of focussing only on chicken. Like McDonald’s, KFC too has come up with a number of vegetarian offerings to attract a sizeable section of vegetarian Indian consumers. For the vegetarians in India, KFC has great tasting vegetarian offerings that include the Veg Zinger and Veggie Snacker.

Feb-Mar ’12


COVER STORY Pizzas and Sandwiches for India However, Pizza Hut, the other brand of Yum! Brands Inc., was a winner from the initial days of its entry into the Indian market. Within three years of its entry into India in 1996, Pizza Hut had its first vegetarian outlet in India, in Ahmedabad. The given outlet not only served no meat but also served Jain toppings. It is also the first vegetarian pizza outlet of the food giant in the world. In fact, by Oct 2011, only three of the five Pizza Hut outlets in Gujarat offered non-vegetarian options. Today Pizza Hut has a number of vegetarian and non-vegetarian offerings which can attract the Indian tastes. Chicken Tikka Makhani, Paneer Tikka Masala and Spicy Veggie are just some of the many pizza offerings of Pizza Hut suiting the Indian tastes. It is better to wash them with Masala Lemonade; another western drink with Indian flavours. But according to Sandeep Kataria, the Chief Marketing Officer of Yum! Restaurants India, now KFC is growing faster than Pizza Hut. KFC has overtaken Pizza Hut as the largestselling fast food chain of Yum! Restaurants, which perhaps reflects the growing popularity of chicken in the country. This may also indicate that not only Indian tastes have influenced the fast food chains to tweak their offerings, but in turn the fast food chains have also influenced in changing the tastes of India, especially urban India. However, burgers and pizzas are not the only fast foods willing to get Indianised. The sandwich is equally capable to be Indianised. In the realm of popularising sandwich in India, Subway takes the cake. Subway emerged on Indian QSR scene in December 2001, with the opening of its first outlet at Saket, New Delhi. From there onwards it spread wings to both big and small cities like Mumbai, Pune, Bangalore, Chennai, Hyderabad, Ranchi, Baroda, etc. Presently, its network in India spans across 256 operating outlets in 30 cities across the country. Subway envisages to have more than 500 restaurants in India by 2015. There is an advantage of late entry. Subway had the benefit of learning from the experiences of other fast food multinationals and started offering

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Indianised fare from its early days only. Subway restaurants in India serve no beef or pork products and have an expanded selection of vegetarian choices. Popular sandwiches, both local and international favourites, include Veggie Patty, Paneer Tikka, Aloo Patty, Veg. Shammi Chicken Meatball Marinara, Roasted Chicken, Chicken Teriyaki, Turkey, and Tuna. The Chicken Tikka sandwich and Chicken Seekh sandwich of Subway are all time favourites among non-vegetarian crowd in the country. In India, Subway has positioned itself as offering healthy version of conventional fast food. Subway’s fresh foot long sandwiches, which were earlier perceived as alien to Indian taste, is now garnering mass appeal among the health conscious population of India.

Domino’s Pizza too has tweaked its menu and supply chain in India to get on the growth path and is looking at a significant expansion of its outlets. Its Peppy Paneer pizza and Keema do Pyaaza pizza are much more Indian than American in their offerings. By December 2011, there was a network of 439 Domino’s Pizza stores in India. Domino’s Pizza is the market leader in the organised pizza market with a 54 percent market share (Euromonitor Report 2010) and with 70 percent share in the pizza home delivery segment in India.

Brisk Business Overall, by catering to the Indian tastes and flavours, these fast food multinationals are geared for huge growth. Domino’s had envisaged to open 60-65 outlets in India every year, during 2010-2012, while Yum! Brands Inc. which has brands like KFC, Pizza

Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

Hut and Taco Bell under its ambit, has plans for huge expansion in India, with the aim to have 1000 fast food outlets by 2015. The multinational company also plans its Indian operations to touch a turnover of Rs.4600 crore by 2015. KFC, which initially faced problems to function in India, has grown by an astonishing 70 percent in India, in terms of sales, during 201011. Taco Bell too has arrived in India with its first restaurant in Bangalore, in 2010. Yum! Restaurants announced a couple of years back that it had plans to open up to 100 Taco Bell outlets in India, by 2015. The Mexican fast food chain has also gone for an Indianised menu, and has products with paneer, and with almost half of its offerings in India catering to the vegetarians. McDonald’s India is also envisaging to more than double its number of restaurants in the west and south India, within the next three years. Presently, the burger chain has approximately 120 restaurants in the region, a number which the company aims to enhance to 250. McDonald’s India opened 33 outlets in India, in 2010 and has plans to substantially increase the number of its existing outlets in India by 2015, by taking the figure to 410. And in the Indian context, this taste for fast foods like burgers and pizzas is not only spreading through metropolitan India. There is an impressive potential of growth of the fast food industry in the untapped tierII and tier-III cities of India, because of which, according to RNCOS, major fast food retailers have already started introducing various marketing strategies towards popularising their respective brands in these cities. However, in order to make McDonald’s burgers, KFC’s chicken, and Domino’s pizzas appeal to small town India on a long-run, they probably would be needing more Indianisation, or rather more in-depth localisation of their flavours and aromas. Overall, we can say that globalisation of food & beverage brands can only be achieved with localisation of flavours and aromas, and India is a shinning example of this brand logic that is manifested in its ■ ongoing QSR revolution.

Feb-Mar ’12


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BUSINESS

Food, clothing and housing are the three basic necessities of man and food takes precedence over everything else. There is no business like food business. And the latest trend in the Indian food & beverage scenario, which is spreading like wildfire among the foodies, is the food court. Whether you want to have a wide choice of snacks or a full-fledged meal, food courts are the answer to your taste and appetites. While shopping in the malls, driving down highways and expressways or hopping between the airports, food courts are there to satisfy your hunger as well as craving for your favourite dish. Thus having an outlet in the food courts is definitely becoming a potentially profitable option for the enterprising entrepreneurs. Ashok Malkani finds that food courts are claiming higher footfalls in the malls than in individual retail outlets. They are equally popular among inter-city tourists on the highways, as well as among the busy executives managing their schedules between flights.

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t is Saturday afternoon, and time for lunch; but you have been busy since morning shopping in a mall. So what do you do? Head for the food court, of course! But there is no guarantee that a seat is lying vacant there to welcome you. Take the case of Mumbai. Whether it is in Inorbit, or Infiniti Mall at the western suburbs or CR2 Mall at Nariman Point, the foods courts are inevitably always crowded. In fact, Inorbit Malls India Pvt. Ltd plans to nearly double the size of food courts

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in the next few malls it is making, from the current share of 6 percent for mall space. Food courts have become one of the major sources of revenue for the shopping malls. In fact, the supply of the area of the food court often doesn’t able to match its demand. Some years back, Inorbit Malad asked retailers near its food court to move to corner shops for expansion of the area. Many other malls in Mumbai and other cities of India are also giving adequate emphasis

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towards food courts.

Food Courts at Malls No wonder, food courts are emerging as one of the anchor tenants in most of the malls coming up throughout India. In retail industry parlance, anchor tenants comprise those stores which have the largest space, and attract the maximum visitors and revenues in the mall. Many visitors are perceiving malls primarily as a haven for cost-effective multi-cuisine food and entertainment options and to

Feb-Mar ’12


BUSINESS them food courts are one of the chief attractions for visiting a mall. According to the estimates by the Retailers Association of India, as many as 80 percent visitors to a mall may visit a food court compared with about 65 percent who visit a hypermarket and 5055 percent who visit a department store. Food courts can be construed as one of the largest syndicated spaces managed by mall developers in India. Developing food courts in the right way can be therefore very crucial to the mall developers and owners because people who come to malls for their food courts may go to other stores as well and this may eventually increase mall revenues. Food courts can increase visitors’ time spend at the mall and this may encourage business to other stores in the mall as well. The ambit and area of food courts cover a wide range of eating out options, from small joints to restaurant chains. At food courts in glitzy malls you are likely to find south Indian and north Indian snacks, Mughlai cuisine, rolls and wraps, Chinese and Continental delicacies, and also delectable desserts. Whether you want to have a snacking option or want to feast

Feb-Mar ’12

on a sumptuous meal in between or after your shopping spree at malls, food courts are the ideal option. Food courts can also be the right destinations after a good movie where you can animatedly discuss the finer nuances of cinema while satiating your palate. The owners of the small joints in food courts which have area varying from 550 to 1,500 sq. ft., are referred to as vanilla retailers. These vanilla retailers are very important to a mall’s business as they tend to generate between 60-70 percent of the overall rentals and between 30-40 percent of the developer’s overall revenue.

On Highways and at Airports Of course, a shopping mall is not the only place having food courts. They can be found at airports and also on the highways, catering to the visitors and motorists. Incidentally, in India, a food court is generally an indoor plaza or common area within a facility that is contiguous with the counters of multiple food vendors and provides a common area for self-serve dining. In some places of learning such as high schools and universities, food courts have either

Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

replaced or have supplemented the traditional cafeterias. Food courts on highways and expressways are becoming popular. 7, a hot and happening hospitality brand in Hyderabad, promoted by the educational conglomerate People Combine, is currently building a slew of food courts and restaurants in Andhra Pradesh. The jewel in 7’s crown being its first hi-end ‘Highway Food Court 7 at Suryapet’, located mid-way between Hyderabad and Vijayawada. The 40,000 sq.ft. food court, spread across a hectare of land, caters to the health and hygiene conscious sophisticated high-end highway travellers. You can also find several food courts along the Mumbai-Pune expressway. As far as airports are concerned, for those who love the taste of the roadside food in Mumbai but cannot leave the airport — due to transfer rules or lacking the time between changes of flights — can enjoy the savoury aroma of Mumbai style food at the airport itself. There are food courts inside and as well as outside the domestic terminal in Mumbai where one can get a wide range of snacking as well as dining options.

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BUSINESS

Viability of a Restaurant in a Food Court According to a report by FICCITechnopak, the Indian food industry which was estimated at 200 billion USD in the year 2006-07, is slated to reach 300 billion USD by 2015. This sounds too good an opportunity for the food & beverage players, which include restaurant owners in food courts also. Especially, with increasing disposable incomes and lifestyle changes because of globalisation, the demand for food courts is on the rise, in India. It is a wise decision to open a restaurant in a food court in these exciting times for the Indian food & beverage industry. If one wants to open a restaurant in a food court, and if one has no experience regarding that, then it is highly advisable to work in a restaurant of similar nature for the next six months or so and doing everything possible to get some relevant work experience that one will need for gaining an insight into the intricacies of understanding and running a food court restaurant profitably. The location of the restaurant is important but simply location doesn’t make it successful. This is very easy to discern. Just walk down a food court where there are several restaurants and chances are that you will find one or two that are empty while the others are busy, with one or two teeming with crowd. Menu, ambience, quality of staff and your reputation over a period of time all contribute to the success of a restaurant in a food court. The recipe of success for a restaurant in a food court is not much different from that of a casual eating out outlet in a busy area of a city. One has to remember that profitability in food courts demands more than good food, good location and sound marketing. The range of food options should also be fairly impressive. They should be backed up by good customer service, sound hygiene, and competitive prices. A

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restaurant in a food court serving a wide range of affordable delicacies with smiling and competent staff and sound hygienic standards is expected to do really well, provided it markets itself well and controls its costs well too. This is true especially in the backdrop of the mall culture gaining momentum in India. But how to achieve these objectives is a question that doesn’t yield easy answers. For an aspiring restaurateur willing to find a place for his prospective outlet in a food court it is essential to ensure that he has enough funds at his disposal to sustain the costs for two years at least, even if the expected profits are not forthcoming. Buying the franchise of a successful fast food restaurant chain may give an impetus to your business or may make it easy for you to finance your project. However, buying a franchise of a reputed brand is

not that cheap in the first place. In case you want to start your own restaurant without any branding support, it is always better to make your restaurant stand out from the crowd in terms of food, décor and concept. Of course, your menu should be easily understandable to the average food connoisseur (food courts seldom have exclusive fine dining outlets) and your prices should be competitive. And employees with prior experience of working in restaurants inside food courts are always advantageous in terms of productivity and cost savings.

Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

Cost control is a very crucial element in any business operation, and the restaurant business in food court is also no different. Food cost within a given quality is one of the chief factors which can make or mar a restaurant. Restaurant manager of your restaurant and you the owner should ensure that the food costs are calculated correctly. If they are high, they should be brought in check without compromising the quality of food. Similarly, labour costs and other operational costs should also be carefully calculated and kept in control, without compromising the efficiency. It is advisable to set up a regular timeframe for analysing food costs at your outlet. This you can do on your own or in tandem with your accountants and manager/s. Similarly, allotting a regular time-frame (say once in every month) for analysing food sales would do your outlet good. Ideally, food costs should not be more than 30 percent of the total food sales in a restaurant. Besides these, attracting repeat guests and promoting the most profitable items on your menu can increase the profitability quotient of your restaurant. Customers also love to feel like they are getting a great deal. One excellent way to increase your restaurant’s profit margin is to offer bundled meals. McDonald’s is doing a great job in this respect. Bundled meals can offer the customer more value for his money and you a higher restaurant profit margin. Succinctly, with food courts registering higher footfalls by the day, having an eating out outlet in a food court – franchise or otherwise – is definitely a good business proposition, especially in today’s metropolitan India. But a word of advice; manage your finances and budget in a prudent way while running the show, and also weigh your financial muscle before venturing into this business, which entails daily running costs, often running ■ into huge amounts.

Feb-Mar ’12


PROFILE

Spreading the Taste of

Cookie Man By Sharmila Chand

Pattabhi Rama Rao, the President of Australian Foods India Pvt. Ltd. has been associated with the company since 2002 as the Chief Operating Officer. He took over as the President of the company in April 2005. Since joining the company, he has implemented a series of measures to align the company’s operations with a strategic focus to leverage market opportunities. He also played a crucial role in building the ‘Cookie Man’ brand in India. His efforts have helped the company to post a sustained growth in key markets across India and now Pattabhi leads the aggressive growth strategy drawn up by the company, for the Indian market. Prior to joining Australian Foods, Pattabhi headed the operations for Sathyam Cinemas in Chennai. Between 1996 and 2000, he worked in the hospitality industry with senior management assignments at Tulip Star Hotels and The Indian Hotels Company. Pattabhi lives in Chennai and travels extensively, both on work and for leisure. The excerpts of an interview follow:

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Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

Feb-Mar ’12


PROFILE selection of flavours ranging from chocolate and butter scotch to exciting flavours like Irish cream & praline, scorched peanut butter, and tender coconut. We also have fruity flavours like custard apple, chikoo and banana fudge. We plan to stock ice creams in most of the Cookie Man stores across the country.

Kindly succinctly describe the USP of Cookie Man cookies

Cookie Man launched its premium range of fresh- baked cookies in India, over twelve years ago. Since then the company has been growing steadily and is India’s number one brand of premium freshbaked cookies. The brand’s USP is its consistent, premium quality and taste, made from unique recipes refined over 50 years in Australia. The cookies are made from the finest ingredients, and are available in an extensive range of flavours. They are an ideal snack, a wonderful treat, and a perfect gift.

How do you combat competition?

In the premium biscuit & cookies segment in India, we are the largest freshbaked premium cookie player. In addition to a fairly aggressive expansion plan we ensure that our team and franchisees maintain the company’s focus on the customers and the quality of our products. That is how we outpace the competition.

How are your products different from the products of other bakery outlets?

The Cookie Man product line is unique as it exemplifies a youthful international palate. We have over 50 varieties of scrumptious flavours in cookies ranging from crispy crunchy cookies, to cream filled cookies and chocolate dipped indulgences. This variety ensures that our cookies appeal to everyone irrespective of age or region. In addition to this, we have expanded our product range to include

Feb-Mar ’12

muffins, brownies and ice creams. You also have introduced ice creams. So how is this product range faring?

Our ice creams are doing well; we have received a very positive response from customers. We have introduced a wide

Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

How do you ensure the quality of ingredients?

All our raw materials have very stringent specifications and they are tested before they go into the cookies. Most of our baking is centralised to achieve consistency and quality control. We also use the finest ingredients to ensure that we maintain a premium quality and taste.

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PROFILE Magical Ice Creams from Cookie Man Cookie Man offers a wide selection of delicious flavours in ice cream, which include age-old favourites like vanilla, chocolate, butterscotch, honey & almond or new-age sinful indulgences like Irish cream & pralines, triple chocolate, white choc fudg, and cookies & cream. Banana fudge, cappuccino, scorched peanut butter, and white coconut caramel are other selective choices on offer. There are fruity flavours too like chikoo, custard apple, tender coconut and even jackfruit. We invest a huge amount of time and effort in training our staff and franchisees across the country to help maintain this standard. Furthermore, we have a stringent selection process for our franchisees and only partner with those who understand and share the same level of commitment that we have. What kind of growth do you foresee in the near future?

We plan to achieve a target of 100

The Recipes of Universal Appeal Australian Foods (I) Pvt. Ltd. is an Indo-Australian joint venture. The company commenced business operations in India with the launch of the first Cookie Man outlet in Chennai, in January 2000. Today, Cookie Man works on a franchisee model and is a highly reputed brand of fresh-baked cookies in the country. Cookie Man was founded by Kevin Hicks, who started out by selling his grandmother’s fresh-baked cookies from door-to-door. The overwhelming response he received encouraged him to open his first store in Melbourne, in the year 1958. Over the decades, Cookie Man has built a successful retail formula that has seen it become the cookie of choice across Australia and enabled the brand to go for global expansion. At the heart of the Cookie Man retail outlet is the proprietary oven technology and the secret recipes, perfected in Australia over the last 50 years.

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stores by March 2013. We are expanding our presence across the country and are entering the tier-II cities. Cookie Man will also add new offerings to its existing product range. Do you regularly research for new products and flavours?

Yes we do. We started off in India with a product range consisting of only fresh baked premium cookies. Today we have ice creams, muffins, puffs and pastries. We do invest a lot of time in the research and development of new products and flavours. We continually add new flavours and products in line with customer feedback and preferences. What is the secret recipe of the growth of Cookie Man?

Our commitment towards ensuring Cookie Man’s premium taste and quality across products and our strong focus on people who are our customers , employees and franchisees, have helped us to grow steadily over the last 12 years. We have also been quick to adapt our operations and strategy in line with the market trends/needs whenever required. We ensure that we continually create new categories and offer the most delectable range of fresh-baked foods that we can to our customers. We are constantly interacting with our customers in the hope that we learn about their changing preferences. What are the types of challenges you faced while promoting the growth of your company in India?

Cookie Man entered the Indian biscuits

Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

market at a time when organised retail was at a very nascent stage in India, without the adequate logistic and infrastructure to support it. Today, we have crossed several of these hurdles to create a brand that people are excited about. What means do you employ in the image building of your brand?

We do not advertise or engage in any other above the line marketing activities. Our products have always done the talking for us. We have run several store promotions and sampling programs to market our products. Our focus on maintaining Cookie Man’s premium quality and taste has played a key role in building of the brand. What would you like to say about the Indian bakery market? How is it progressing?

Indians love fresh-baked products and India would be the largest market for cookies in the next two decades. The market is growing at a rapid pace; it is experiencing a double digit growth for the last five years. What do you enjoy the most about being in this business? What is your greatest motivating factor?

The joy of creating a huge chain of fresh-baked products from scratch, leading to satisfied customers across the country is the greatest motivating factor. In professional terms, the sense of achievement that comes from satisfied customers and franchisees across the country is what I treasure the most. I

Feb-Mar ’12


FOCUS

The Food Festival of Sailana at the Capital By Sharmila Chand

It is a well-known fact that many Maharajas of yesteryears were great connoisseurs of food. But not many know that the Maharaja Sir Dilip Singhji K.C.I.E of Sailana, besides excelling in the culinary arts, also collected recipes from the bygone era. He also took great efforts to execute these recipes from Kashmir, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Hyderabad, Bengal and Madhya Pradesh to perfection. Besides that, he took pains to translate ancient recipe books in Sanskrit, Urdu and Persian to ensure that these timeless recipes were preserved for posterity. His son, the late Maharaja Digvijay Singhji of Sailana, also carried forward the culinary heritage. Digvijay Singhji has written a book, which contains these forgotten but timeless recipes from royal kitchens, titled ‘Cooking Delights of the Maharajahs’, which was published in 1982, and is now running in its 15th edition. The present Maharaja Vikram Singhji of Sailana is the third generation to carry forward the legacy, started by his grandfather. He wants to keep the dying art of traditional cooking alive through food festivals in India and abroad. It is not surprising that his son, the young prince Divyraj Singhji of Sailana, too inherits the family passion for culinary excellence and wants to carry forward the gastronomic legacy. Here it deserves a mention that Sailana is 25 km from Ratlam, located in the Malwa region of Madhya Pradesh. It is only 50 km away from the Banswara district of the neighboring state of Rajasthan. Sailana is part of the Ratlam district. In the colonial era, Sailana, located in Madhya Pradesh, was famous for its hospitality, cuisine, wine and the cactus gardens. The present Maharaja Vikram Singhji and his family still maintain the old standards of hospitality. The royal family of Sailana is a branch of the great Rathore house; cadets of the Royal House of Jodhpur. Sailana’s magnificent gastronomic offerings was showcased at Fire, The Park, New Delhi, recently. It was a rare occasion to see how the team of Chefs led by Chef Sharad Dewan of The Park Hotels put together a royal fiesta under the guidance of none other than Maharaja Vikram Singhji of Sailana himself. Here follows the excerpts of the interview with Maharaja Vikram Singhji: What is the rationale behind organising this food festival? I am trying to take forward the legacy of the culinary culture of Sailana that dates back to three generations, reflecting finesse and excellence in the art of cooking.

Kindly tell us about the menu which has been showcased at Fire? At Fire, we have created a menu which reflects the style of cooking from a treasure-trove of secret recipes laced with exotic spices, rose petals and

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sandalwood powder, some of which are over 100 years old.

Also throw some light on the cuisine of Sailana Our cuisine reflects inspiration from varied cultures and is an amalgamation of exotic ingredients. With Sailana Food Festival, we aim to revive these recipes and commemorate a cultural voyage that would embrace food lovers with the art of fine cooking. It gives me immense pleasure to partner with Priya Paul as she brings with her rich cultural encounters from different

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parts of India.

Do you plan to organise such food festivals in the future? Yes, certainly. I am very keen to revive the recipes that the Sailana house is known for and were collected by my grandfather, who liked food as much as he enjoyed travelling. He would go to far-flung places, eat something nice, and get the recipe back home with him. And then his bawarchis would try them out once he returned. I will continue to showcase these recipes through various food fiestas across the country.

Feb-Mar ’12


FOCUS

Special Sailana Menu at Fire, The Park, New Delhi Starters I. Non-vegetarian Shikhampuri Kebab Golden fried minced meat kebabs pounded with whole spices and lentils. Goolar Kebab Minced meat kebabs stuffed with mint, onions and green chillies, resembling goolar or ‘wild figs.’ Murgh ka Soola Cloves smoked chicken skewers with chillies and almonds. Machi kebab Sailana Pan-fried fish kebabs; a hidden recipe from the royal kitchens. II. Vegetarian Goolar Kebab The traditional recipe of flavourful kebabs of wild figs. Shalgam ke Kebab The shallow-fried turnip kebabs with a hint of cardamom. Main Course I. Non-Vegetarian Shafak Sheer Rich preparation of mutton cooked with almonds and milk. Mutton Dahibara Unique preparation of mutton cutlets soaked in mint flavoured sweetened curd. Korma Ahmadshahi Dum cooked mutton, a specialty of the famous cook Ahmad Shah. Sasranga Rich mince mutton pie with almonds and raisins. Seekh kebab korma Mouth-watering mutton delicacy, cooked on skewers. Murgh Mumtaj Mahal Slow cooked farm chicken with onions and saffron. Murgh Mussallam do Rukha Minced meat stuffed chicken cooked on dum with two textures and taste — do rukha. Murg Irani

Feb-Mar ’12

Dum cooked farm chicken with select spices in its own juice. Dahi Machi Spicy fish and yogurt curry with a tinge of mustard. II. Vegetarian Kathal Shahi Royal preparation of raw jack fruit; cooked with cardamom and cumin. Petha ke kebab Spicy ash gourd cooked with sesame oil. Makki ke Dane Fresh corn kernels cooked with chillies, coriander and curd. Paneer Shafak Sheer Royal preparation of cottage cheese with almonds and milk, flavoured with cloves. Khatte Moong Sabut A unique recipe of stir-fried green beans, tempered with mustard. Aloo ka Rajai Salan Tangy potato curry with yogurt and onions. Dal Sailana Yellow lentils tempered with green chillies and coriander. Staples Biryani Rashmi Unique rice preparation of mutton and spicy lentil dumplings cooked on dum. Mutanjan Pulao Mutton pulao with sweet, sour and spicy taste. Kabuli Lentil pulao with the scent of mint. Desserts Gulab ki Kheer Fresh rose petal dessert with nuts and condensed milk. Hare Chane ka Halwa Warm pudding of young green chickpeas. Murrakat Baked rice galletes with sugar and almonds.

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Recipe by Maharaja Vikram Singhji of Sailana Goolar Kebab Preparation Time: 2 Hours Cooking Time: 2 Hours To Serve: 10-12 Persons Ingredients: • 1 kg Wild figs (goolar) big and raw • 115 gm Split grams or chana dal • 15 gm Salt • 12 gm Red chilly powder • 6 gm Cumin seeds • 3 gm Turmeric powder • 25 gm Garlic ground • 3 gm Garam masala powder • 115 gm Finely chopped onions • 15 ml Vinegar • Ghee for frying the kebabs Method: 1. Wash and cut each goolar into four pieces. Soak them in deep water for two hours, stirring occasionally. By this process, small insects, if present, will come out and float on the surface of the water, and can easily be drained off. 2. In a separate pan, add fresh water and add goolar pieces along with split grams, salt, red chillies, cumin seeds, turmeric and garlic. When goolar and split grams are cooked, dry the liquid completely. Then add garam masala powder. Grind it to fine paste, and then divide the paste into 24 equal parts. 3. Add vinegar into the chopped onions and divide into 24 equal parts. 4. Flatten each part of the goolar paste, put in its centre one part of the chopped onions and shape into a ball. Flatten, wetting the hands with a little water to give kebabs a smooth and even shape. With a very little ghee fry on low heat till the kebabs attain a dark brown shade.

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AGRI

Fennel as a Crucial Ingredient By Sharmila Chand

F

ennel is an herb emitting great flavour. Fennel is a plant of Mediterranean origin, which was known to the ancient Greeks. Its usage spread across Europe during the imperial rule of the Roman civilisation. Fennel is also grown in India, the Orient, Australia, and South America, and has become naturalised in the US. Interestingly fennel has applications as herb as well as spice. All parts of the fennel part are edible; the roots, stalks and leaves, with the spice coming from the dried seeds. Known as the “meeting’ seed” by the Puritans who would chew it during their long church services, the name funnel derives from the Latin word foeniculum, meaning “little hay.”

Spices and of some other curry powders. Besides having wide usage in fish dishes, fennel is also being extensively used in cheese spreads, and vegetable dishes. When rubbed between fingers, fennel seeds emit a sweet fruity-aroma similar to anise. Fennel seeds have wide culinary applications as a savoury spice. It is primarily used in cooking as a condiment and flavouring base. For keeping the fragrance

Fennel in Culinary Fares Fennel plays a significant role in a wide variety of cuisines. As an herb, fennel leaves are used in French and Italian cuisines, in sauces for fish and in mayonnaise. Fennel is also used for seasoning of pork roasts and spicy sausages in Italy, especially the Florentine salami finocchiona. Overall, fennel plays a prominent role in Mediterranean cuisine, where bulbs and fronds are used, both raw and cooked, in side dishes, salads, pastas, vegetable dishes and risottos. In many culinary traditions, fennel is regarded as an ideal herb for fish dishes. The British apply fennel seeds in almost all fish dishes, especially as a court bouillon for poaching fish and seafood. Fennel is also an important element of Chinese Five

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Feb-Mar ’12


AGRI and flavour of fennel intact, fennel seeds are along with onions and flour, which is known as generally ground just before preparing dishes or ijjeh. whole seeds are lightly roasted before using them Fennel has applications in not only food but in a recipe. also in alcoholic beverages. Several liquors such Fennel seeds are also being used in India as as fennouillette, akvavit, gin are flavoured with part of curry powder. Fennel is an essential fennel. Fennel is one of the chief ingredients in ingredient of the Assamese, Bengali and Oriya an alcoholic beverage named absinthe. spice mixture named panch phoran, which is an important element of the culinary traditions of Healthy Fennel these three states. Moreover, the sugarcoated Besides its culinary properties, fennel has some fennel seeds are used as a chewing condiment to health benefits as well, which should make the improve digestion after a meal, in India, Pakistan F&B industry treat it as a healthy condiment. and Bangladesh. In bakery also fennel seeds Fennel has a long history of being used as a have wide usage; they are used to flavour breads, remedy for indigestion in traditional medicines. dough, cakes, biscuits, and cheese. Fennel seed decoction or added as spice in Abhishek Gupta In some parts of India, fennel leaves are seen food has been found to increase breast milk as leafy green vegetables either by themselves or when they are secretion among nursing mothers. That is not all. For mixed with other vegetables, which are cooked to be served newborn babies, fennel gripe water can remove colic pain and and consumed as part of a meal. Fennel is also an important facilitate in digestion. Fennel seed oil can give one relief from spice in Kashmir’s and Gujarat’s cooking traditions. In coughs and bronchitis and is also used as a massage oil to Lebanon, fennel is used to make a special kind of egg omelette, alleviate joint pains.

Recipes By Abhishek Gupta, Sous Chef, Marriot Hotel Jaipur

Fennel, orange and green apple salad with arugula, BBQ marinated prawns. Serves 4 12 Green king prawns, peeled with tails left intact 1 Lemon zest finely grated ½ Tsp. chilli, finely diced 2 Tbs. olive oil For the Vinaigrette 1 Tbs. Dijon mustard 1/3rd Cup olive oil 2 Tbs. honey 1 Tbs. red wine vinegar 2 Tbs. lemon juice ½ Lemon zest finely grated For the Salad 4 Baby arugula lettuce leaves 2 Celery hearts, finely sliced 1 Baby fennel bulb, very finely sliced, fronds reserved 3 Oranges, peeled and segmented 2 Granny Smith apples, peeled and cut into matchsticks ½ Bunch flat leaf parsley, roughly chopped

lemon, chilli, olive oil, sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Set aside for 15 minutes to marinate. 2. Meanwhile, whisk all of the vinaigrette ingredients together with a pinch of sea salt and pepper, and then set aside. Toss the salad together. 3. Toss all of the salad ingredients together in a large bowl. 4. Heat a large non-stick frying pan over high heat and cook the prawns for 2-3 minutes each side or until they are just cooked through. 5. Add 1/3rd cup of the dressing to the salad and toss to coat. 6. Take a salad bowl or a salad plate, place tossed salad on the bowl giving some

Method 1. First place the prawns in a large bowl and combine them with

Feb-Mar ’12

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height, place cooked prawns around the salad. Take green apple matchsticks and place on the salad. Drizzle each plate with a little extra dressing and scatter over fennel fronds. By Ramit Wason, Executive Chef — Crowne Plaza Today New Delhi Okhla Recipe of ‘Saunf Badam ki Thandai’ Ingredients 30 Nos. almonds 3 Tsp. fennel seeds 1 Tsp. Peppercorn 4 - 6 Tbsp. honey 5 Cups of milk Malai is optional Method: Soak almonds or badam overnight and peel them before blending. Grind almonds, pepper corn and fennel seeds first in a grinder with just few ice cubes and milk, till it becomes smooth. Then add everything else and blend them till the mixture is rich and frothy. Keep it in the refrigerator for at least 2-3 hours for the flavours and aromas of all the condiments to heighten and lend their sharp taste. Garnish it with some malai at the time of serving.

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DAIRY

Sweet and Flavoured Growth By Ashok Malkani

I

ce creams are a perennial delight for children and also the not so young across all geographies of this planet, and they are also sweet routes to impressive revenues. Ice cream gained popularity across the world in the second half of the 20th century when refrigeration became affordable. Prior to the development of modern refrigeration, ice cream was regarded as a luxury item and was reserved for special occasions. Then making of ice creams was quite laborious and time consuming, and naturally this reflected in their lack of affordability. The ice needed for ice creams were cut from lakes and ponds during the winters and stored in holes in the ground, or in wood-frame or brick ice houses; insulated by straw. However, since the development of modern refrigeration, there has been a plethora of brands, colours, flavours, types and outlets of ice creams spreading their tastes across the global marketplace.

the establishment of chains of soft-serve ice cream outlets. Soft serve ice creams are generally lower in milk-fat content than general ice creams and they are produced at a temperature of about 4 degree centigrade, whereas general ice creams are stored at -15 degree centigrade. Soft service creams also contains air, which are introduced at the time of freezing. A chemical research team in Britain made an important innovation; they developed a method of doubling the amount of air in ice creams. This enabled the ice cream manufacturers to use less of the existing ingredients, which resulted in reduction in the cost of production of the ice creams. The airy sweetness contributed towards making ice creams a business with huge profit potential. Soon a soft ice cream machine in which a cone is filled beneath a spigot on order became a reality. Another important invention in the ice cream business is the ice cream cone, which

Innovation and Competition Like other industries, the growth of the ice cream industry is also propelled by innovations. One important development pertaining to the ice cream industry in the 20th century was the introduction of soft ice cream. In the United States, Dairy Queen, Carvel, and Tastee-Freez heralded

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had completed at least 100 years of its growth. Many believe that the ice cream cone was invented at the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis. However, there are authoritative evidences to prove that ice cream cones were served in the 19th century, in Europe. However, their popularity was greatly enhanced during the St Louis World’s Fair in 1904. Now cones are an integral part of ice cream consumption. Strangely their shape has not changed much over the past century. However, there is no need to change the packaging of cone either, since it is an environmentally friendly option, involving no wastage. Along with technological innovations, competition encouraged the manufacturers to add various food additives into ice creams. As the decades rolled by, ice cream became an important player in the food & beverage industry in general, and bakery industry in particular. Today sundaes, which are believed to have made their first appearance in the late nineteenth century, and ice cream sandwiches are a craze with the younger generation.

Growing Despite Bottlenecks Today, ice cream has become such a favourite with the young and the old alike all over the world that the third Sunday of July is observed as National Ice Cream Day

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DAIRY in the USA. The popularity of this dessert can be gauged from the fact that 90 per cent of America’s population consumes ice cream. Ice cream has emerged as the fastest growing dairy product in the Asia-Pacific region, and it is becoming the flavour of all seasons in urban India. The Indian ice cream industry has been traditionally growing at a healthy rate of 12 per cent year-on-year. The value of the ice cream market in India is to the tune of Rs.4300 crore per annum, of which the organised segment is valued at Rs.1700 crore. The unorganised segment of the Indian ice cream industry accounts for approximately 60 percent of the total Indian ice cream market. In India too the growth of the ice cream industry is quite evident. In metropolitan India, ice creams are fast graduating from luxuries usually indulged by the younger generation to desserts meant for family consumption on a fairly regular basis. Ice creams are now no longer perceived as products of seasonal consumption, though in the summer months obviously the consumption of ice creams in India does climb the charts. Increase in disposable

Feb-Mar ’12

incomes, strengthening of the distribution network, development of cold chain infrastructure and introduction of a variety of flavours have all contributed to the growth of the ice cream industry in India. The Indian ice cream industry, despite the mushrooming of ice cream parlours in the branded segment and the explosion of flavours in the marketplace, is bogged down with poor per capita ice cream consumption levels. It is a dismal 300 ml per annum, compared to 22 liters in the US, 18 liters in Australia, 14 liters in Sweden. In terms of world’s average per capita ice cream consumption also India fares poorly. Even Pakistan and China are ahead of us in terms of per capita annual ice cream consumption. It is 700 ml per person in Pakistan and 3 liters per person in China, annually. One of the reasons which inhibit the ice cream consumption and hence the growth of the ice cream industry in India is the cost of ice creams, which sadly are still out of reach of majority of Indians. India is perhaps the only country in the world that imposes a luxury tax on ice cream. Though ice cream is a food item, it attracts a VAT that varies from 2-15 per cent across the country. In Gujarat there is a 15 per cent

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VAT on ice cream. Moreover, ice creams in India are taxed not only at the point of sale but also at the point of production. There is also an additional 1 percent excise tax on ice cream manufacturers, over and above the VAT, which is highly unreasonable. The steep taxations result in making ice creams in India unaffordable to many. However, despite the consumption bottlenecks the potential for the Indian ice cream industry is quite good indeed. Research reveals that the trend of eating ice cream throughout the year among Indian consumers is expected to increase in the medium term. At the same time, greater consumer awareness and higher disposable incomes are expected to usher in an increasing number of ice cream flavours in the market. According to Euromonitor International, this may include limited editions of exotic fruit combinations which would target the premium end of the market. With growing health awareness, the cholesterol free and low calorie and probiotic ice creams would also gain popularity in the market. Though the branded segment of the ice cream is comparatively small then the unbranded segment, it is showing 15

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DAIRY

The Historical Inspirations By Swarnendu Biswas

T

he ice cream as we know today, may have come of age only in the later half of the twentieth century, but its origins or rather inspirations dates long back into the tunnels of history. As far back as 400 BC, the royal Persians used to have a special chilled pudding-like dish during summers, where ice was mixed with fruits, saffron and assorted flavours. It had influence of rose water and vermicelli, and was served to royalty. This dish was probably the precursor to faluda; which is still a popular dish in Iran. In ancient China also, some 3000 years ago, the cooks in royal kitchens were mixing snow and ice from the mountains with fruits, wine and honey, to create wonderful desserts for their rulers to savour. We also know that Alexander the Great (356-323 BC) used to enjoy snow and ice, flavoured with honey and nectar. The notorious Roman Emperor Nero (37–68AD) had his runners sent to the mountains for

percent annual rate of growth, on an average. The major players in the branded segment of the Indian ice cream industry are Amul, Mother Dairy, Kwality Walls, Vadilal, Baskin Robbins, Dinshaw and Arun. On the other hand, the unorganised segment of the ice cream market in India is shrinking considerably in metropolitan cities and other big cities. However, in small towns and rural areas, kulfis and ice creams made by cottage ice cream industries are still holding popularity. The market for the organised ice cream industry is still largely confined to the large cities. Eight cities of India are accounting for 60 percent of India’s total ice cream consumption, which as is evident, is lopsided in favour of the cities.

Healthy and Premium Ice creams are also becoming healthy, without ceasing to be tasty; another sign of maturity in the market. Aficionados of health conscious ice creams in India now have various options, which include probiotic ice creams or fat and sugar free ice creams among others. Nowadays, one can find an array of frozen desserts tailored to various dietary regimes. We are now having reduced fat, fat-free, low-carb, no sugar added or lactose-free ice creams in India, with sizeable presence in the market.

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collecting snow, which was then mixed with honey and nuts to create a delicacy that may not have tasted much different from our modern day ice creams, except perhaps for the absence of milk. Probably, all of those ancient inspirations snowballed into the culmination of modern day ice cream. However, as discussed, they were all primarily snow ice creams, without the presence of milk. Arabs were probably the first to infuse milk and ice to create ice cream like desserts of par excellence. They used to sweeten the concoction with sugar instead of fruits or fruit juices, and also probably were the first to go in for commercial production of that dessert, which for simplicity ’s sake, let us label as ice cream. By the 10th century, those ‘ice creams’ were widely produced and consumed in Baghdad, Damascus, Cairo and other important cities spread through the ancient Arab civilisation. The modern age of ice cream began some

three hundred years ago. Though ice cream recipes were appearing in the eighteenth century England and the US, its popularity gained momentum in the west only during the 19th century. In the 1830s, an AfricanAmerican confectioner named Augustus Jackson is credited with creating multiple ice cream recipes, and also of developing a comparatively superior technique of manufacturing ice cream. He was also responsible for creating a superior technique to manufacture ice cream. In 1843, Nancy Johnson of Philadelphia, USA, was issued the first US patent for a small-scale handcranked ice cream freezer. Soon, the commercial production of ice cream began in full gusto in the western world. However, even then, the popularity of ice cream was confined among the elites only. It was only in the middle of the 20th century that ice cream attracted mass popularity, with the advent of affordable means of refrigeration.

In January 2007, Amul introduced sugar free & pro-biotic wellness ice creams, which was a first in India. These ice creams were and are not only targeted at the health conscious, but also the diabetics. Now several ice cream manufacturers are providing ‘healthy’ ice creams. Various innovative brands of ice creams, involving highly sophisticated equipment and technologies and catering to varied market segments, are also seen invading the market space. Recently, Vadilal has also come up with three new brands in the premium segment – Badabite, Flingo and Gourmet. Out of these three new products ‘Badabite’ is based on extrusion-based technology and the company has taken the risk of introducing this product at premium prices. -With the latest extrusion-based technology, Vadilal has launched the

‘Badabite’ brand in the high-end candies segment. Badabite’ candies is a creamy delight, characterised by fewer over-runs (air insertion), and great texture, whereas according to Rajesh Gandhi, Managing Director, Vadilal Industries Ltd., “Flingo is a product with different types of center insertions.” Flingo has different types of insertions in the centre such as chocolate fudge, raspberry ripple and strawberry ripple. Gourmet is a super premium ice cream, coming with a high-end packaging named as ‘in mould labeling’ technology. According to Rajesh Gandhi, “In next two-three years, we expect our premium products such as Badabite, Flingo and Gourmet to contribute 10 percent to our total sales.” “In the Gourmet category, we are offering two flavours initially and three more will follow soon. Our aim is to launch international quality products at pocketfriendly prices. Badabite and Flingo have a very youth oriented brand personality whereas Gourmet is targeted more towards the young family segment. We are also very aggressively targeting the youth with a number of new TV commercials. Our focus will be on increasing sales to the impulse category,” informed Devanshu Gandhi, MD of Vadilal Industries Ltd.

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DAIRY Vadilal has also installed India’s fastest cone-making machine. As against the current machines which make 6000 cones per hour, Vadilal has put in place a machine which will make 18,000 cones per hour. According to a press release, Vadilal happens to be the first ice cream producer in India to have such a machine. In fact, Vadilal Industries Ltd. has undertaken an aggressive campaign on all fronts to increase its over-all market share as well as capture a larger pie of the premium ice cream market. Its recent exercise in this direction is characterised by introduction of new mega brands, installation of latest state-of-the-art machines, aggressive advertising and significant expansion in production facilities. Vadilal is already the second largest ice cream maker in the country, with only Amul ahead of it.

Explosion of Flavours In India too, where the ice cream market is still nascent as compared to the global standards, the numbers of ice cream flavours are increasing by the day. The

Feb-Mar ’12

overall trend is that the ice cream manufacturers in India are looking towards presenting novel flavours in the marketplace, without comprising on the health quotient. Perhaps intense competition and the arrival of foreign players have induced them to undertake these experimentations, or perhaps it could be attributed to the changing consumer mindsets due to increased global awareness about food & beverage trends, or perhaps all these three factors have contributed to the emergence of a plethora of wonderful ice cream flavours in the marketplace. Whatever may be the case, but the gain is to the consumers. They are arriving at exotic flavours with the help of fresh fruits and dry fruits, and even experimentation with vegetables is not being ruled out. Watermelon, guava, and black berry flavours are no longer unheard of in the Indian ice cream industry. For example, leading ice cream manufacturer Havemor had recently come out with ‘paan’ ice-cream for Shilpa Shetty’s wedding. The company’s pine nut ice cream made from the sancha is also an

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exercise in novelty. Ahmedabad-based Havmor Ice Cream has also introduced some novel ice creams in the recent past, which include the nonalcoholic whisky-flavoured ice cream, targeted at the premium clientele for parties and weddings. The company is also experimenting on diet ice creams. Succinctly, providing customised flavours to the consumers are already gaining currency. And not only famous brands are doing this experimentation. For example, cinnamon, green tea, mausambibadam, coffee-and-orange, and variyali ice-creams of Ahmedabad-based Jaysingh’s Ice-cream are extremely popular with the local populace. One can say that despite the bottlenecks, the Indian ice cream industry has a promising future along with a huge reservoir of flavours. However, unless the cost factor of ice creams and its unfavourable taxation are being addressed urgently, the consumption of ice creams in India would not enhance substantially, and neither would it become rampant in non metropolitan India. And that is not good for the Indian ice cream industry. I

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PUB

By Swarnendu Biswas

A

ccording to ASSOCHAM, India’s consumption of alcohol will cross a figure of 19,000 million litres by 2015, which is a marked increase from the current consumption level of alcohol in the country of 6700 million litres. According to the industry body, India’s alcoholic beverage market comprising beer, wine and spirits will reach over Rs 1.4 lakh crore mark in 2015 from its current size of about Rs.50,700 crore. Along with alcohol consumption, the beer consumption is also appreciably increasing in the country, but more importantly, with per capita beer consumption in India at 1.6 litres, compared to 35.5 litres in China, 75.6 litres in the US, and 105.6 litres in Germany (according to the estimates of Euromonitor), the opportunity of growth

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for beer market in India, in the backdrop of rising disposable incomes and changing lifestyles, is huge. These days, we are not only finding that more and more people in India are developing a love for the beer, but they are also becoming more discerning about their beer choices. This perhaps explains the sudden introduction of microbreweries in India’s alcohol beverages industry. Located at Star Mall, NH-8, Gurgaon, Lemp Brewpub and Kitchen does have the potential to attract such quality beer lovers within the Delhi-NCR region or the tourists coming into this region for business and/or leisure. This commodious and comfortable pub-cum-microbrewery, spread across 11,000 sq.ft., is not your average outlet to have a drink or two. It is the franchise

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property of Lemp Brewing Co., the first lager beer brewers of the US. Lemp Brewing Co. has a 173-year-old rich history behind the peerless aromas and tastes of its over 200 recipes of beers. The master brewery has given for the very first time in its history a sole franchise to Kaviar Hospitality Pvt. Ltd, who translated the mammoth project into Lemp Brewpub and Kitchen, in January 2012. The legendary company’s perfection in the art of crafting traditional boutique beers is also reflected in the beer offerings at Lemp Brewpub and Kitchen.

Beers and the Brand “The opening of Lemp Brewpub and Kitchen in Gurgaon will give the craft beer enthusiasts here a taste of the much loved American flavours.” affirmed

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PUB Akshay Luthria, the Director of Kaviar Hospitality. “The customers here have mature palates and are ready now for an enhanced experience. We welcomed the opportunity to expand the brand in this cosmopolitan part of India where its products will be appreciated for their quality and historic value,” he further explained. Both Akshay and his business partner Shashank Sangall were nursing the desire to open a microbrewery and provide authentic and quality craft beers to the people, which should be vastly different from the regular bottled beer options that you can find in the market. They were fascinated by the history of Lemp and wanted to run a franchise operations of the company in India. Lemp too was exploring the option of developing a market in India. Both their interests merged to create this first of its kind business tie-up, where the people of Delhi-NCR have got a new haven for quality lager and ale beers. The friendly and warm décor of the pub-cum-microbrewery is a unique blend of trendy, and raw rustic interiors, which

Feb-Mar ’12

sets the mood for warm, casual and inviting conversation, and rendezvous. With its high open ceilings and exposed beams, the place embodies a trendy warehouse like setting. Out of 200 beer recipes of Lemp Brewing Co. six are being introduced at this property. All the six in-house beers, which include five ale beers and one lager beer, tasted great, but I found the Belgian style wheat beer or rather ‘Wit Beer’, served with orange garnishings simply ethereal in terms of flavour and taste. The

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light bodied beer which is slightly spicy in taste has a 150-year-old recipe that is still very much in tune with today’s global trends. The Ultra Pale Ale, which tastes like grapefruit with lots of hops in it, with subtle notes of malt in the background, also filled my being with freshness. In this beer, the tropical citrus notes of grapefruit and tangerine capture the palate with a slightly tart but crisp finish. After this fruity, crispy and hoppy beer, I went on to taste Cherokee Red, where the slightly sweet caramel notes from the malt nicely balanced the soft spiciness of the hops. This American style ale is a tribute to the native Americans. Standard Lager, Jurassic Dark, and Lavender Lady are the other refreshing beer options provided at the property. All the craft beers presented at the Gurgaon property have the same water profile as that of St.Louis in the USA and of course it goes without saying that they contain no preservatives and glycerin unlike many bottled beer options. Mayank Shekhar, the Head of Operations at Lemp Brewpub and Kitchen, informed

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PUB me that the entire preparation and the maturation process of the beers served at Lemp Brewpub and Kitchen takes place at its microbrewery only and besides these six freshly brewed craft beers, they do not house any other bottled beer brands.

Lemp’s branding seem to be the USPs of this pub-cum-microbrewery, but at the same time Lemp Brewpub and Kitchen showcases a comprehensive range of other spirits which are sure to keep your spirits high.

Brewing Refreshing Quality

A State of Sumptuous Headiness

Ishan Grover, the Brew Master at the property, painstakingly helped me to get a feel of the exhaustive brewing process followed at the property. “At Lemp Brewpub and Kitchen, we are passionate about the quality of our beers, and this starts with our ingredients. We hand-pick the world’s best Two Row imported malts and the finest and freshest hops, all from the Netherlands and import them directly; here in Gurgaon. We brew according to the international standards of Lemp so we use no additives, colouring, sugar, chemical preservatives or artificial stabilisers in our beers. We have only the four pure ingredients of water, malt, hops and yeast in our beer offerings,” he explained. I asked him to explore a bit about the unique recipes of beers at the property. He seemed to be quite enthusiastic to complement his knowledge with my ignorance. “Each of our beer recipes is carefully designed to extract the character, complexity and goodness from our natural ingredients, in order to produce the rich variety of tastes and flavours found in the Lemp family of beers. Our beer recipes entail individual blends of malts and hops that we then gently mix with RO filtered water in the brewing process to produce the template of flavours and aromas which, with a little patience, become beers,” elaborated Grover. The huge silver vessels on the upper floor of the property embody the exhaustive brewing process of the beers. “To give our beers a polish, we filter out yeast and protein haze via our natural filtration process. This ensures clarity and stability in our beers. However, we are careful not to over-filter the flavours from our finished beers, which we have worked so hard to produce,” asserted Grover, while pointing out, “Once our beers are ready, we serve it directly through our tapping unit.” The tapping unit is located at the separate bar counter, reserved exclusively for dispensing beers. The other bar is used to serve other alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages on offer. The craft beers with the backing of

Besides an impressive range of single malts (The Glenlivet 21 Years, Glenfiddich Ancient 18 Years, Isle of Jura 10 Years, Laphroaig 10 Years are only some of the many renowned brands on offer) and scotch whiskies (Royal Salute 21 Years, Chivas Regal 18 Years, JW Black Label, Teacher 50 are some of the gems from the impressive scotch collection), the pubcum-microbrewery has a diverse array of sparkling cocktails, rums, gins , tequilas, vodkas, cognacs, mocktails and soft beverages on offer to entice and sway the discerning drinker.

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That is not all. You can also be drowned by Shots and Shooters, Bourbon whiskies, Irish whiskies, a range of liquers like Absinthe, Cointreau, Bailey’s Irish Cream among many others, and sparkling cocktails. To top it all, there are special concoctions made in-house at the pub, and of course, these special in-house concoctions include Margaritas and Martinis. In keeping with the wonderful taste of these craft beers so original and true to their essential spirit, the menu at Lemp Brewpub and Kitchen has been creatively conceived, featuring over a hundred delectable dishes. The menu boasts of American classics, with a few authentic recipes especially from Lemp, USA along with some select Indian dishes. This makes for a holistic dining experience that is geared to suit a wide variety of tastes. “The menu has American, Mexican, Italian and a bit of Indian gastronomic elements,” informed Shekhar. For example, here you can get diverse options like pastas, burgers and sandwiches, seafood sizzler, BBQ Tiger Prawns, and

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completely Indian dishes like Paneer Makhan Wala, Murgh Punjabi, and Laal Maas, etc. all under one roof. Whether you want to have snacks with your evening drinks or choose a full-fledged dining option at Lemp Brewpub and Kitchen with your friends and/or family, you are likely to feel satiated.

Footfalls and Revenues Involving an investment of Rs.7.5 crore, the newly opened property is already attracting a crowd of corporates and upwardly mobile youngsters. “We are getting 75 footfalls per day on an average in the weekdays, and 200 footfalls per day, on an average, on the weekends,” informed Shekhar. He believes that, “As the market for beer in India is opening up, and people are beginning to appreciate the finer nuances of craft beers and discern their difference from the regular bottled beers, now is the ideal time to invest on a pub-cum-microbrewery.” Going by the brisk sales that the pub is generating, he is confident that the 130cover property can garner a revenue to the tune of Rs. 2-2.5 lakh per day within a month from now, which can increase to a revenue of Rs.3 lakh per day, within three months from now. Shekhar also expects to generate 5000 footfalls per month, on an average, within a month from now. “To pull in more crowds, we are thinking of hosting rock bands in a big way on Wednesdays, which will also help to promote various talented but relatively lesser known or unknown rock bands,” concurred Shekhar, as I discussed the future plans of the property with him. The live stage near the bar counter is the right platform for such musical occasions or rather celebrations. Not surprisingly, Lemp Brewpub and Kitchen does not dish out Bollywood music, where retro and rock, commercial bilboards seem to rule the evening. “It simply doesn’t gel with the ambience of the bar,” said Shekhar as the sporting action continued on the three live screens. There was no conceit in his voice; there was only a candid frankness. The pub is open from 12 pm to 12 am on weekdays, and 12 pm to 2 am on weekends, but its ambience, décor, spirits, food and music may keep on rocking your soul for 24/7, once you have visited the place. That may tempt you to visit this happening hang-out ■ place again…and again.

Feb-Mar ’12


B A R T E N D E R W ATC H How do you define yourself as a bartender?

Mixing it Just Right Here follows the excerpts of the interview with Hema Kumar K., the Bar Manager at Hotel GRT Grand Chennai, with our Resident Editor, Sharmila Chand. Hema, a passionate bartender, describes himself as a “mixologist with friendliness and dedication.” He thinks that bartending is an art which cannot be acquired only by reading books. By Sharmila Chand

I am a bartender with lots of passion, pride and experience. Everyone can mix drinks, but fixing a drink while entertaining the guests is the trademark of an excellent bartender.

What is your working philosophy as a bartender? People patronise bars for various reasons and not only to get high on spirits. Often their satisfaction lies more in the hands of the bartender than in the drink/s. A bartender should be able to understand the mind of the customer through casual conversation and then mix his/her drink to suit his/her need. I would like the guest to experience more variety while retaining the basic flavours of their favourite drinks. I would always say rather than giving a straight drink or fixing a regular Mojito, offer fusion drinks like Winter Mojito with presentation and showmanship. Also it is my responsibility to ensure the safety of the establishment’s patrons, which generally means recognising when a customer has become intoxicated.

Why did you decide to get into bartending? When I was at school, I was impressed by the hospitality extended to me by a fivestar hotel. This encouraged me to join the hospitality industry. During my college days, I used to do part-time jobs in restaurants and bars. There I got impressed with a bartender and his works, which inspired me further to enter this field.

What are your strengths that make you a good bartender? I am a person who gets along well with every one. Bars are places where guests arrive and leave often in totally different moods. Understanding how far to go and where to stop is the ethical and moral responsibility of a bartender’s character, and I am mature enough to be in control of such situations. I am a quick learner, I have great problem solving skills, and a willingness to learn new things. I always like to do things differently and love entertaining people. I think these personal traits are my strengths.

What are the challenges a bartender face? As mentioned above, handling different types of guests without upsetting the

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B A R T E N D E R W ATC H atmosphere of the bar is a challenge. At the same time, keeping abreast of the latest food & beverage trends, and spirits while staying ahead of the competition is the greatest challenge a bartender faces.

What are the qualities a bartender must have? Of course, he needs to have knowledge of liquors, cocktails, wines and beers, for a bartender needs to know what he is selling. But besides that he should have a great personality, and be an easy going person; a people’s person at the same time. Bartenders need to interact with many people everyday. Therefore he should have the knack to get into meaningful conversations with his customers, while understanding their profile and likes and dislikes. The bartender should also be a team player. Many bars have more than one bartender behind the bar, and in such cases, bartenders have to work together as a team. Furthermore, bartenders must have a good memory for they have to remember all the mixed drinks that a customer orders. He should be organised too. The bartender should organise the bar in such a way that

Feb-Mar ’12

enables him to reach for the mixes without searching for them. Bartenders must also have the ability to work under pressure for many times bartenders get a lot of people coming to the bar at once. In such cases, they have to be able to work under great pressure. Good grooming is also important for the bartender. Bartenders need to look presentable when they tend to the bar.

good fun to serve them.

What is your favourite drink to make?

What is the best line somebody has used to get a ‘free’ drink from you?

It is Raspberry Mojito.

If you have to make a drink for your girlfriend, which one will you prefer to make for her? I would like to make her a Frozen Strawberry Margarita.

Which kind of guest you would like to serve? The person with substance is always interesting to interact and it gives great pleasure in serving such guests. While at leisure, people have more time to spend and are inclined to have lots of fun. They tend to try different drinks and it is

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What is your pet peeve as a bartender? When a customer asks for an exact repeat of his cocktail, drains the last drop and then say something on the lines of: “I think something was not right about that drink, I wanted to tell you at the first instance, but did not.”

I am open to listen to customers’ opinion, but do not let them con me for free drinks.

Tell us one thing about tending the bar that people might not know It is as complicated as putting a car together, and also as exciting as speeding in one.

What are you passionate about? I am passionate about interacting with the leading bartenders. I love to be part of a team that assesses budding bartenders and is able to exchange their passion and ideas in bartending.

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THEME CUISINE

Delightful Singaporean

Hawker Food By Sharmila Chand

I

prawn, fish and crabs. “Madam consider it your Indian chaat stall and choose what you want,” came the suggestion from one of the boys who had his origin in South India and was serving at the stall. I was delighted to hear that and started exploring the famous ‘Hawkers style cuisine’ of this region. Let me begin by saying that Singapore is indeed a foodie’s paradise. The rich multi-culturalism of local

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Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

was at a popular ‘zi char’ in Singapore, trying to figure out what to eat. Zi char is a stall that serves a variety of ala carte dishes at affordable prices. Here different restaurants have their own unique signature dishes, but a typical zi char place usually has meat items like pork ribs and har cheong gai, vegetables like sambal kangkong and kailan, side dishes comprising bean curd, noodles, and rice, and seafood comprising

food, along with the ready availability of international cuisines and styles, with a wide range of prices to fit all budgets at all times of the day and year, helps create this ‘food paradise.’ In Singapore, food is regarded as crucial to national identity and is being treated a unifying cultural thread. It is not dramatic to say that eating is an essential part of the Singaporean spirit. Hawker’s style of feasting further adds to that spirit.

Feb-Mar ’12


THEME CUISINE A Reflection of Ethnic Diversity The cuisine of Singapore embodies ethnic diversity as the beautiful island nation is a melting pot of myriad cultural influences. The composite culinary influences comes from the native Malay, the Chinese, Indonesian, Indian, Peranakan and western traditions (particularly English and some Portuguese-influenced Eurasian, known as Kristang). Influences from other areas such as Sri Lanka, Thailand, the Philippines, and the Middle-East too have left their aromas in Singapore’s culinary culture. The composite culinary culture of Singapore can be evident from the fact that in Singaporean hawker stalls, you can see Chinese Chefs influenced by Indian culture, experimenting with condiments and ingredients such as tamarind, turmeric and ghee, while you might be pleasantly surprised to find an Indian Chef serving a fried noodle dish. All these diversity makes the cuisine of Singapore a cultural attraction of this tourism paradise. In Singapore, most eating out options are focussed at hawker centres or food courts, such as Lau Pa Sat and Newton Food Centre. In fact, it would not be far-fetched to say that the affordable and abundant hawker centres are more popular in Singapore than the regular restaurants.

The Concept of Hawker Stalls The concept is interesting and simple. A zi char or hawker stall entails a group of different food stalls under one roof with a common seating area. This works out fine for a group, as each one can fetch his individual food preferences from a different stall and share it with the others. And you don’t have to worry about cleanliness at hawker centres. Hawker Centres are reasonably well maintained and clean, and they are often visited by health inspectors, so when in Singapore, eating out there should not pose a health problem as such. The added advantage of eating out at hawker stalls is that you do have a chance here to mix with some locals, who can also give you some interesting advice about local food & beverages.

Feb-Mar ’12

Must-eats in Singapore

Singapore Hawkers Food Festival at Eros Hotel Back home, Singapore Hawkers Food Festival was recently organised at Eros — Managed by Hilton New Delhi Nehru Place. The exact venue of the festival was at the restaurant named Blooms. The food festival offered some of the best signature dishes like the Classic Chilli Crab, Oyster Omelette with Charcoal Grilled Seafood, and Chicken Rice. Chef Kelvin and Chef Azmi were flown in from Hilton Singapore to create an array of authentic gastronomy. Said the duo, “The idea behind the promotion was to bring the hawker food concept of Singapore to New Delhi. We have not diverted from authentic preparations, nor have we diluted any flavours for the purpose of the

Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

• Chicken Rice — certainly the most popular dish of the enchanting island nation. • Chilli Crab —seems to be the face of Singapore cuisine, the musttry food for tourists to Singapore. In fact, if you are a non-vegetarian, your visit to Singapore must have a delectable date with Chili Crab. • Laksa — the dish has a rich coconut-based curry soup with rice noodles alongside ingredients like cockles, shrimp, tau pok and fish cake. • Satay. • Oyster Omelette and Carrot Cake. • Hainanese Chicken Rice. • Ikan Bakar (seafood grills). • Cha Kuah Tiew (stir-fried flat rice noodles). promotion. The taste of some of the food preparations is close to Indian tastes because of cultural influences and has been liked by the guests in its originality.” “Hawker centres are one of the best things Singapore has to offer to its visitors in terms of culinary offerings, whether they are the shoe-string travellers or the high budget tourists. Visiting Singapore without eating at one of them doesn’t give your Singapore experience a ring of completeness. In fact, doing so is as unthinkable as visiting Istanbul without having a döner kebab in a small bazaar stall,” they further added. ■

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RESTAURANT

An Exotic Culinary Experience at

Shiro By Sharmila Chand

S

hiro, the fine dining restaurant located in Hotel Samrat, New Delhi, that has attracted the appetite of the gourmets with its sumptuous Pan Asian offerings and signature cocktails, has come out with a new menu. With the launch of its new menu, the restaurant promises to take the food connoisseurs on an exciting gastronomic trip. The spread of tastes, aromas and flavours, which has been envisaged while taking into account of the refined and varied tastes of the guests of Shiro, has brought together sushi, sashimi, Cantonese dim sum, teppanyaki, Korean Vietnamese and Thai cuisines. Besides such awesome variety of Oriental flavours, the new menu has maintained the delicate balance of vegetarian and non-vegetarian delicacies in order to ensure that guests of both varieties would have enough options to savour on their plates and palates. Jay Singh, the Co-Founder and Executive Director, JSM Corporation, the company behind the exotic restaurant named Shiro, explained, “The idea was to elaborate on the existing gastronomic offerings and give something more and new to our guests. A lot of thought went behind planning the menu and the end result was not only

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interesting, but also innovative and creative. We aim to bring all the flavours of Asia under one roof and with this new spread we have taken another significant step towards that goal.”

Soul Uplifting Decor The décor of Shiro, to put it simply, is

“Shiro presents a stupendous larger than life ambience and churns out distinctive flavours in its cuisines, which include flamboyant live teppanyaki, intricate sushi and dimsums, and rustic flavours of Asian influences, among many other oriental exotic delicacies.” - Chef Rahul Hajarnavis — Executive Brand Chef, Shiro.

Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

Signature Beverages at Shiro Oriental Spice – a mix of vodka, guava juice, tobasco, pea & lerrins sauce. Demerara Fig Mojito — fig infused dark rum with lime & mint. Velvet Kimono — vodka, lime & fresh watermelon juice.

innovative. The restaurant is demarcated into earth, sky, fire and heaven at different levels, which leaves you with the interesting option of exploring and deciding where you intend to seat. For animated spirits who simply love spirits, the action or revelry is at the large bar. Together with its killer combo of eclectic décor, top-notch cuisine and intoxicating music, Shiro is just ideal for nightlife lovers and food aficionados alike. The water bodies and soft muted lighting takes care of the peaceful elements. Besides many attractive statues, the highlight of the décor is the teppanyaki counters. Here the Chefs rustle up some food while keeping the guests thoroughly entertained. . The effect of castle like interiors, done up in stone, are accentuated with warm

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R E S TA U R A N T colour palette in sensuous materials such as plush velvets and shimmering copper metallic sheers. “Shiro was created to give guests the opportunity to indulge in a dining experience that is pleasing to the mind, body and soul,” affirmed the noted restaurateurs and promoters, Jay Singh and Sanjay Mahtani. “The huge space with high ceilings, stone carvings and statues, make up for a charming ambience which is ideal for any occasion; be it casual or business lunch or an evening function comprising 800 plus guests.”

A Spring Of Flavours! The menu at Shiro presents itself as a kaleidoscopic range of Japanese delicacies, the nomadic traditions of Korean cuisine, the multi-ethnic cuisines from Malaysia, Thailand, Hong Kong and Singapore,

Recipe Yaki Udon Noodles Preparation Time: 15minutes Cooking Time: 10 minutes Serves: 1-2 Ingredients: Udon Noodles (Brand — Nama): 300gm, blanched Onion: 25gm, Julienne Mixed Bell Pepper: 30gm, Julienne Teriyaki Sauce: 25-30gm Oyster Sauce: 5gm Blended Fresh Chili Paste: 5gm Garlic: 10gm Oil: 15ml Spring Onion: 5gm Prawns (Grade B): 5 pieces Method: 1. Heat wok, add oil & sauté garlic until it is golden brown. Now add prawns and sauté for a while and add the remaining vegetables. Toss on high flame until onion gets translucent. 2. Reduce flame; add blanched noodles, teriyaki sauce, oyster sauce and fresh chili paste. Toss on high flame until sauce gets coated on noodles (avoid tossing with ladle or else noodle will break & look muddled). 3. Transfer noodles in serving bowl & garnish with chopped spring onion.

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About JSM A partnership between noted restaurateurs Jay Singh and Sanjay Mahtani, the portfolio of JSM Corporation Pvt. Ltd. includes a repertoire of some of India’s most successful and well- known independent restaurants. From the super premium luxury lounge Shiro, with its signature high ceilings, grand statues and award winning Oriental cuisine to the world- renowned Hard Rock Café and California Pizza Kitchen, JSM restaurants are known for their unique designs and uncompromising standards. JSM, through its subsidiaries, is the exclusive master franchisee for Hard Rock Café, California Pizza Kitchen and Trader Vic’s across India, and remains committed to its vision – Let Us Entertain You! and the herb-infused fragrances of Vietnamese dishes. The menu at Shiro changes seasonally according to the availability of ingredients, placing emphasis on procuring fresh elements. There is something special every day of the week but what really tops the list is the ‘Sunday Brunch’. What better way to spend a sultry Sunday afternoon than having delicious dimsums, sushi platter, maki roll and a glass of fine wine. You could also get your favourite dishes made at the live counter as you sip one of their many delightful cocktails or mocktails. Do not miss the famous Shiro drink ‘Demerara Fig Mojito’ which is a fig infused dark rum with lime & mint. Or have leisurely sips of ‘Rude Cosmopolitan’ with tequila, triple sec and cranberry juice. While the Chef insists that patrons at

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the restaurant must make it a point to savour the Fish with Chili Mustard Sauce, Hung Shao Green Beans, and Kaprowkai with Garlic Rice, the other innovative dishes such as Tofu with Spicy Korean Bean Paste, Tenderloin Asparagus with Ginger Lemon Sauce, Tofu Kimchichigae — a classic from the Korean kitchen, Spicy Galbi — tenderloin marinated in traditional sweet Korean sauce and barbequed to perfection, and Chicken and Kimchi Casserole with Tofu are not less wonderful. Crispy Aromatic Duck, Fish with Laksa, Crispy Spicy Avocado Makimono, and Chi Chow Dumpling are the signature dishes at Shiro, Delhi. “A ‘must try’ category at Shiro food menu includes Udon noodles, which are

Japanese thick noodles made of wheat. Our recipe offers a good balance between various flavours of homemade sauce (over 20 ingredients used) & fresh chilies. This preparation entails a complete poise between nutrition & taste; cherished by all,” explained Parampreet S.Luthra, Executive Sous Chef, Shiro. However, while savouring these gourmet delights, it is advisable to leave some space in your stomach to indulge in the classic platter of chocolate sushi flavoured with kahlua, bailey’s and seasonal fruits. Or try tiramisu with kahlua. It is absolutely delightful to the extent of being sinful! Be it for a date, or just for a get together with loved ones and family, Shiro is the place to be. It is a visually seductive restaurant/bar where the sophistication of the atmosphere is matched only by the unique influences I of an exotic and exhaustive menu.

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CHEF VOICE

Exuding Simplicity With

Culinary Excellence By Sharmila Chand

Recently, I have had the opportunity of meeting a simple Chef with great talent who leaves his stamp of outstanding taste and flavours in his culinary creations. With an experience of more than two decades of working with some of the most renowned names in the hospitality industry, Chef Mohamed Haneef is presently working as the Chef of GRT Grand Chennai. A hotel management graduate, Haneef has worked with some of the finest hotel chains in India and abroad and his priorities have always been to serve great food and to exude health with every bite. What is remarkable about Haneef is that he does not get ruffled by any stressful situation. Rather, he is always called in as a peacemaker by his colleagues whenever the situation goes out of hand. For instance, on the recent Valentine’s Day, when there were many people waiting to get the table and the crowd was getting a bit unmanageable, Chef Haneef came out of the kitchen and spoke to the restive crowd in his characteristic polite sensible tone, and his words did the magic! Everybody waited patiently, had a good time and went off thanking him. Managing stressful situations is Chef Haneef’s greatest strength, apart from his wonderful culinary skills, of course. The excerpts of the interview follow:

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How do you define yourself?

I would describe myself as a simple Chef who believes in keeping his cooking style simple and non-complicated. You can also explain me as a dedicated Chef who is wanting to travel on the road less travelled. Who are the biggest inspirations for your career?

They are Chef Satish Arora, the Corporate Chef, Taj Group of Hotels, and Chef Sheetharam Prasad, Director, Culinaire of GRT Hotels and Resorts. What induced you to become a Chef?

It was my passion to choose a field where creativity, skill and human touch all come into play. Kitchen gave me all that. Kindly describe how you developed your love for the authentic Indian cuisine?

I had a special liking for Indian food right from my young age. It must have been to do with my mother’s secret recipes for biryani and salna. We serve wonderful biryanis at GRT Grand Chennai. We have the crowd flocking to the restaurant even in the early hours of the morning for our biryani. However, I have a penchant for Indian and Continental food alike. What do you enjoy most about your work?

I prefer talking less and seeing the expression of content on

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Feb-Mar ’12


CHEF VOICE the guests’ faces after they enjoy my specialties. Once my food reaches their soul, it makes it easier for me to pick up the conversation. After all, a Chef ’s core job is to cook wonderfully.

In your restaurant, who would be your ideal diner?

My ideal diner is the one who gets dazzled by my food. So I look forward to a diner who is a great foodie. What are your proud moments on the job?

What are your greatest stresses?

I believe that stress is all in the mind. It can be handled if you have a matured head. Keeping stress with you for long does not take you anywhere.

They occur when any creative dish from my own recipe gets acknowledged by most of the guests, and I get an instant feedback from them. What’s your favorite ingredient?

What are some of the qualities that you feel a successful Chef should have?

It is the simple good old mace. It is so distinctive!

A successful Chef need to sustain the quality of food and trustworthiness of his guests, and must update oneself to the latest gastronomic trends available.

Kindly name your hot selling item?

They are tender kebabs, idiyappam biryani, and year varuval. Where do we see you, ten years from now?

What do you consider to be your best creations?

Curry Leaf Crusted Fish and Cheese Fondue are just a few of my creations that I feel great about. What is your favourite kitchen tool?

I understand that ‘stomach rules the mind,’ and so I consider the best tool in the hands of the Chef is the ability to dazzle and delight the guest, which will convert the guest to a frequent visitor.

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You are likely to see me continuing in the same journey of exploration of the culinary arts. According to you, what is the position of Chefs today in India? How is it different from that of the international level?

These days we are seeing that restaurants within the hotel are considered as food theatres and in these theatres the Chefs are given the hero’s status. Need I say more on the position of the Chefs in the Indian food & beverage industry?

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O P E R AT I O N S

From Baking to Success R unning a bakery operation successfully requires the consideration of various factors. It involves much more than just displaying the regulars like fresh breads, cakes, pastries, muffins and other assorted bakery products. Of course, freshness in bakery products is a crucial aspect behind running of bakery operations, which should not be overlooked or compromised. Ideally nothing should be showcased on the shelves of your bakery that are older than a day unless it is accompanied by a substantially reduced price. It is wise to remember that the fresh baked aroma emanating from bakery shops facilitates in triggering in impulse sales in those bakeries, and it is wiser to use this knowledge to your advantage. However, besides placing a great premium on freshly baked products, introspection and consequent efforts on various other facets of your bakery operations are needed to make your bakery business a success story. As an operator, you must visualise what will attract your existing consumers and potential consumers into your bakery. You must follow this visualisation

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with pragmatic and creative ways to attract your existing and potential consumers, so that they are induced to visit your bakery again and again; for years to come.

Display, Feedback and Research If you want to serve your consumers to the best of your abilities, it is important that you know their baked preferences really well. It is better to undertake an informal survey of your current and potential consumers to see what they think of your bakery items, and what they think you could do to make your bakery better. Also ask them about your products range and the service of your staff. You should try to gauge whether your products are in abreast with the latest consumer trends. These questions deserve answers through customer feedback. You must also study your competition well through research if you want to stay ahead of them. As a bakery operator, you should build your bakery displays in a manner which would enable the existing and potential customers or simply visitors to your bakery outlet to see your products from across the facility. It is better to include

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fresh fruits, fresh and dried flowers, in addition to ears of wheat and corn in your product displays. You may use custom-designed wood tilted racks or simply dishes or rattan baskets or all of them, but use bright colours in your display, which would nicely complement the predominant brown and beige shades in the bakery shop. Also label each item to introduce total transparency. Furthermore, signage should be concise and articulate and their primary purpose would be to inform your existing and potential customers about your products. Fancy creativity in signage is not bad, but it should not distract the consumers from its main objective. If you go for handwritten signage, ensure that they are legible and appealing at the same time. Otherwise, along with your signage, the potential customers may ignore your products too. Employ cross merchandising and it may augment your sales. Simply market your related bakery products together and their sales can increase. For example, give some discount on your organic cakes for the purchase of a packet of healthy breads. Or display some exotic coffees

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O P E R AT I O N S along side your high-end muffins or pastries and your discerning target consumers may be even more interested in buying them. Also what about the combination of cream cheese and bagels, or fruit and lemon cakes with whipped cream? Yes, ideally they should be displayed in tandem to get optimum sales out of them.

Lighting and Cleaning Lighting of your bakery facility can also play a crucial role to your revenues. Do not go overboard with your lighting so that the existing and potential consumers’ attention diverts from the bakery products to the lighting itself, and neither do keep your facility enveloped in dim light. Your bakery is not a disco or a bar. Always remember that lighting in bakery should be done with the objective of infusing life to your bakery products while at the same time clearly showcasing the details of your products. They should also show how spic and span your bakery is. Therefore, it is always better to opt for warm, comfortable, understated

Feb-Mar ’12

lighting that embodies elegance and class, and exudes transparency. Of course, it doesn’t deserve a mention that cleanliness in your bakery operations is of paramount importance. Cleanliness in your bakery operations should be comprehensive and should extend from your floor to food counter and display racks to the staff ’s uniforms and the hygienic measures employed by them. You also must ensure that your trained staff does not forget to wear hairnets, disposable gloves and hats while handling bakery items. It is likely that customers in these health conscious times will prefer a spotlessly clean bakery with ordinary products over an untidy bakery with wonderful products, provided pricing of their products remains more or less the same.

Servicing Trends Keep abreast with the prevailing consumer trends. In the Indian context this entails that if your bakery is located in an up-market locality of a metropolitan city or any other big city of India, try to stock an impressive

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range of healthy bakery products, which are low on fat or cholesterol. But wherever your bakery is, it is better to introduce variety in your items time and again, so as to prevent your target consumers from getting bored. Also make sure that all the favourite items of your target consumers are always on the stock. Customer service in your bakery operations should ideally be impeccable, yet personalised and friendly. Try to offer the best possible service to your consumers within your existing infrastructure and financial capabilities, with a prompt pace and a smiling face. At least one or two staff should be trained enough to impart valuable information on your displayed bakery items so as to help your target consumers arrive at a decision. But at the same time, they should be restrained enough to not thrust their choices on the existing and potential consumers. All these factors together can facilitate to make your bakery operations a success story worth emulating in the industry. I

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PRODUCT PREVIEW

Facilitating Food Service

Importing Taste, Affordably

With its wide range of enticing products Topline Food Equipment Pvt. Ltd. (Topline) strives to provide sound and customised solutions in the field of food tray and cup sealing machines and food service equipment to the food service industry. Topline has been offering a novel range of food packaging equipments such as ManualTop Sealing machines for cups and trays which are being widely used by restaurants and fast food outlets everyday.

BMS Enterprises is involved in the imports of traditional frozen food from Singapore, seafood from Vietnam, and some exotic food from Australia, for over 15 years, and has distribution network across the country. Its sister concern, Connoisseurs is a four-year-old company involved in imports of exotic frozen IQF fruits like blueberry, raspberry, strawberry & blackberry, and also some seafood from Vietnam. BMS Enterprises is also engaged in the manufacturing of frozen snacks like ready to fry spring rolls, samosas, seekh kabab, satays, and paranthas. This year, the company launched cold cuts like sausages, ham, frankfurtters, salami, mortedellas (chicken & pork) to name a few. Also this year the company has come up with frozen hara bhara kebab, vegetable shammi kabab, and potato cheese balls. The company has to its credit of introducing IQF frozen exotic fruits in the retail pack of 200gm across India. These packs are very reasonably priced despite being exotic and imported. BMS Enterprises bms39@hotmail.com

The sealing machines are being used by leading food chains such as Haldiram, Bikanerwala, Barista Coffee company, Spring Leaf Retail and several other small and big users all over the country. Topline is also a strong contender for offering comprehensive food solutions to its customers for strengthening its back-end operations in the area of food business. Over the years, Topline has managed to create a niche for itself by offering high quality products to its clientele across the country at cost-effective rates. Topline Food Equipment Pvt. Ltd. info@tfepl.com

Pasta and Noodles Machine Introducing the world’s finest and popular MARCATO pasta and noodles making machines. These manual machines are a must for restaurants, fast food outlets, hotels, and caterers. Attach a motor if you desire, for convenience. All our equipments are small and compact, sturdy and economical. Attachments are available to make the entire range of pasta like chowmein (Chinese), spaghetti, fettuccini, trenette, ravioli, agnolotti, cannelloni, macaroni, bucatini, fussili, penne and so on. Satellite Plastic Industries indiaeatspasta@gmail.com

Designing Furniture Trends Trend N’ Design, the manufacturer of high quality furniture for hotels, motels, resorts, corporate houses and townships, offers the latest furniture trends in India and international market. The company has a thorough knowledge of sourcing and selecting the best quality raw materials for various applications, which plays a vital role in the quality of its products. The company has its manufacturing unit in Delhi. The impressive array of wooden furniture of the company includes restaurant and bar furniture for public areas and guest rooms, poolside furniture, umbrellas for pool and garden, liquor trolley, and flambé trolley among others. All weather products and accessories include garden chairs and tables, service trolleys, and bar furniture. Trend N’ Design also has a range of banquet furniture, comprising customised foldable buffet table and banquet chairs. Trend N’ Design trendndesign@gmail.com

A Commitment Towards Quality Star Gas Service is an ISO 9001-2008 certified company having an experience of 15 years in this industry. The company’s mission is to make products from premium quality raw materials. Incepted in the year 1996, Star Gas Service is one of the leading manufacturers & exporters of world-class quality gas appliances & LPG equipment like laboratory fittings, high pressure gas pipes, gas burners, gas valves, gas regulators, etc. Made from premium quality by implementing the latest techniques, these products are widely used in commercial & industrial applications. Being a well-known name in this industry, the company also provides consultancy services & ‘Gas Pipe Line Installation’ services at competitive prices. Having the ability to handle the most crucial types of situation, the company’s strength can be classified into sound infrastructure, dedicated workforce and well-qualified and patient management. At the factory premises of Star Gas Service regular inspections are performed during & after production, thus assuring to meet customer’s requirements. Committed towards its services, the company provides design, fabrication and assembly under one roof, which enables it to meet its clients’ requirements within the stipulated time-frame. Today, Star Gas Service is one of the few trusted names when it comes to providing skillfully engineered gas appliances and other products that can further improve its clients’ business. Star Gas Service stargasservice@gmail.com

The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective manufacturer/distributor. In any case, it does not represent the views of Hammer Publishers Pvt. Ltd.

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BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

A D V E R T I S E R ’ S COMPANY

PAGE NO.

I N D E X

COMPANY

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ADAMI WILMAR LTD.

13

PARSHADI LAL & SONS PVT. LTD.

25

AKASA

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RANS TECHNOCRATS (INDIA) PVT. LTD.

BC

ALPHA STACKCHAIRS PVT. LTD.

41

RATIONAL INDIA

16

ANI GLASS CORPORATION

22

REMINGTON STEEL ARTS

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ARCTIC SALES INDIA

39

RESULTS INDIA COMMUNICATIONS PVT. LTD.

BMS ENTERPRISES

43

RODAA JI COMPANY

15

DABON INTERNATIONAL PVT. LTD.

07

SHAMSONS FOODS

53

FCML PROJECTS

27

SIAL CHINA 2012

47

FIDELIO INDIA PVT. LTD.

37

SIAL PARIS 2012

01

GENNEXT LOGISTICS PVT. LTD.

26

SIEMENS LTD.

19

HINDUSTAN REFRIGERATION STORES

67

STACKWELL

69

IFB INDUSTRIES LTD.

23

STEC STAINLESS STEEL PVT. LTD.

61

KANHAIYALAL TANDOOR PVT. LTD.

31

THAIFEX 2012

71

THE NEW INDIA ELECTRIC & TRADING CO.

72

LOOM CRAFTS FURNITURE (INDIA) PVT. LTD.

32,33

08, 09

MANISHA INTERNATIONAL

BIC

TREE OF LIFE PVT. LTD.

17

MEHTA FURNISHERS

29

UNITAS FOODS PVT. LTD.

28

METAL AVENUES

45

VANYA INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENTS

11

MITORA MACHINEX

20

VENUS INDUSTRIES

05

MRS. BECTOR’S FOOD SPECIALITIES LTD.

FIC

VIKALP TECHNO CENTER

24

MUNNILAL TANDOORS PVT. LTD.

18

WINTERHALTER INDIA PVT. LTD.

57

NATURES BOUNTY WINES & ALLIED PRODUCTS PVT. LTD.

21

PRODUCT PREVIEW

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NEENA ENTERPRISES

55

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

72

NRA SHOW 2012

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* BC - BACK COVER

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* FIC - FRONT INSIDE COVER

Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

* BIC - BACK INSIDE COVER

Feb-Mar ’12


INTERVIEW

Driving Away the Blues with bluO By Sharmila Chand

Gautam Dutta is the COO, PVR Ltd. He joined the organisation as the Chief Marketing Officer in June 2006 and was later promoted to the position of COO. He is responsible for the entire marketing and sales of the group. Gautam is entrusted with responsibilities that encompass marketing for the organisation’s entire media product portfolio, leveraging footfalls for better value, strategic planning and the entire services and brand communication of the group across the country. Also planning new projects and new services occupy a large part of his work portfolio. Gautam is married and he and his spouse have two children. He enjoys reading and watching movies in his leisure time. The excerpts of the interview follow: Firstly, tell us what PVR bluO offers in terms of F&B options

What is the marketing strategy to combat competition?

PVR bluO outlets can be construed as one-stop family entertainment destinations, perhaps the only one of their kind in India. bluO serves global cuisine with a menu that has been carefully handpicked and created by a team of experts to provide the customers with a varied and rich eating-out experience. The full fledged kitchens of bluO offer you wide varieties of food items from finger food to complete main course in Chinese, Mexican, Indian, Thai, Lebanese and a range of other cuisines. bluO serves the best of multicuisine dishes as diverse as the world itself, and also serves an exhaustive range of finest wine and liquors. Cutting across all age groups, the places have something for everyone right from a teenager, university student, working professionals and even senior citizens.

A ‘never before’ global concept in India, bluO is a concoction of fashion, bowling, food, music and indulgence. We get around 100,000 footfalls a month on an average, majority of which comprises of youth, students and corporate professionals. In order to sustain stature and vitality, bluO is in various stages of talks & negotiations with various partners for some new-age concepts. The concepts are targeted towards our primary target group namely youth, urbane and upwardly mobile working professionals. We carry out segmented marketing initiatives among students, teenagers, professionals and corporates. Being a PVR group company, bluO leverages the power of cinema as a medium of advertising.

What are its distinguishing features which makes bluO outlets preferred party destinations?

bluO outlets are also preferred party destinations and are well equipped to organise corporate get-togethers, birthdays & farewell parties, theme parties, alumni meets, team building activities, and competitions as well. Unlike the conventional party hang out places, bluO provides lucrative party packages involving bowling and F&B to make the customer engagement a delightful and memorable experience.

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What are the kind of facilities you have introduced to meet and handle customer requirements?

PVR bluO was among the first to introduce light weight five pound light balls & light weight balls for kids with special morning coaching camps. We have a Smoking Lounge, washroom for the differently- abled, guest lockers, and an inhouse DJ churning pulsating music. What are the kinds of challenges you face in maintaining the growth?

The locations of bluO itself – Delhi

Hammer Food & Beverage Business Review

& NCR— pose tough challenge as these areas offer a plethora of entertainment options for people of all ages. Generating a steady footfall is always a challenge, hence we are always open to an idea that helps in engaging our customers to the game of bowling and our delectable cuisine. Be it the special F&B packages for the viewers of the live cricket World Cup telecast or special promotions on the occasion of Father’s & Mother’ Day, Teacher’s Day, Valentine’s Day, Friendship Day, Independence & Republic Day, or live band performances that helps to increase the loyal customer base, we offer a galore of promotions. How many outlets bluO has presently?

Our first center at Ambience Mall, Gurgaon has been doing extremely well and it is one of the most popular joints amongst the youth and families. Our second centre was launched last year at Vasant Kunj, which is the largest bowling centre in the country. What are the expansion plans for bluO?

bluO has proven to be a good business proposition for us and we have aggressive expansion plans for the same. We plan to invest Rs. 70-75 crore in the business towards opening of bluO outlets across cities like Bengaluru, Pune, Mumbai, Chandigarh, Ludhiana, Noida, etc. in the next three years.

Feb-Mar ’12



Food & Beverage Business Review