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Old House New Times SEPTEMBER 2017

COMPLIMENTARY


Big, Blue Houses G

rowing up in a small town in western North Dakota, I remember a big, beautiful, blue house on the corner of Elm Avenue. My grandma, who lived down the street and was the town seamstress, sewed curtains for the homeowners once. She used to take care of me while my parents were at work, so I tagged along when she dropped the curtains off. The house had a grand staircase and huge sunroom. I haven't been there since, but I think that's what instilled my love of all things old. Now I live in another big, blue house in Fargo. While setting up the interviews and photoshoots for this issue, I actually learned quite a bit about the 114-year-old building that I call home. For example, I found out that the third floor was originally a ballroom and that the exterior hasn't always been blue. I also met the greatgranddaughter of the original homeowners and even gave her a tour of the house. At first I was afraid that she would be disappointed by how much had changed. After all, I can't imagine why anyone would want to split an elegant family home into apartments, practical and economic reasons aside. However, she was excited just to be standing where her great-grandparents once stood–or danced.

PHOTO BY Hillary Ehlen | HISTORIC PHOTO PROVIDED BY Mary Gokey

FROM THE EDITOR

Although I strongly believe that historic homes should be carefully preserved, I know that change can be good. I mean, what would I do if the previous homeowners hadn't wired the building for electricity, even if it meant having fewer code violations? Let's not forget modern heat and air conditioning. Whether they have been abandoned, remodeled or restored, I believe that we should appreciate all old homes. From the beautiful wood and tile work to the stained-glass and even rounded windows, what's not to love? For these reasons, we hope you enjoy our ode to old houses in Fargo-Moorhead that still have life, even if they aren't single-family homes anymore. Sincerely,

Becca Opp Editor becca@spotlightmediafargo.com


Design&Living Team At Design & Living, our goal is to create a publication that is just as much fun to read as it is to view. Here are the writers, designers, photographers and contributors who so affably use their time and talents to tell a story and give our pages purpose.

HILLARY

JESSE

TYRONE

PHOTOGRAPHER

PHOTOGRAPHER

CONTRIBUTOR

EHLEN

Ehlen is an editorial photographer for Spotlight Media and owner of Hillary Ehlen Photography. She is a native of Fargo and attended North Dakota State University for visual arts with an emphasis in photography.

HOORELBEKE Hoorelbeke is a former professional baseball player turned photographer. He is the owner of J. Alan Paul Photography in Fargo, and our veteran, lead editorial photographer for Spotlight Media. Hoorelbeke specializes in editorial, commercial, architectural and landscape photography.

LESLIE

Leslie founded Heritage Homes in 1995. It is a custom residential home building company serving the FM metro and lakes areas. He currently serves as the Home Builders Association of Fargo-Moorhead's president. He is also a director on boards of the North Dakota Association of Builders and National Association of Home Builders.

SARAH

MARIA

TREVER

DESIGNER

CONTRIBUTOR

CONTRIBUTOR

GEIGER Geiger is a MSUM graduate with a BFA and an emphasis in Graphic Design. She is the lead publication designer for Design & Living Magazine, Fargo Monthly and Fargo Inc! magazines at Spotlight Media.

BOSAK

Bosak is the owner of Eco Chic Boutique in Fargo and Bismarck, North Dakota. She is also the founder of local events, Junk Market and the Eco Chic Design Conference. She is a sought after local talent in painted furniture, vintage decor and farmhouse chic design. She also offers classes and home staging services.

HILL

Hill founded Trever Hill Design in 2009. Hill works on both residential and commercial design projects around the FM and lakes area. He is also a co-owner of The Private Collection, a furniture rental and home staging business.

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2017

contents

SEPTEMBER

FEATURE STORY

40

Old House, New Times Everyone knows that old houses change over time. This month, we've found five hidden gems in Fargo that have not been changed by time, but changed with the times. See how their current owners are giving new life to these historic homes with remarkable restorations.

25 Pieces of the Past

Across the river in Horizon Shores, Ben and Melanie Anderson have used salvaged materials throughout the construction, interior design and decor of their 2016 build by Benjamin Custom Homes, which reflects Melanie's modish, eclectic style. Join us as we tour their contemporary home with pieces of the past built right into the walls.

91 Restoring Integrity

Gathering sawdust in the front of The Woodchuck Furniture Restoration is a dresser from the 1790s. This is one of the oldest pieces that Nate Warren and Stephanie Bahnij have received since taking over the family business in 2014. Join us as we learn how to restore the original integrity of pieces like this one.

96 Creative By Nature

Adorning the walls of the Family Birth Center in the new Sanford Medical Center are two collections by artist and photographer Meg Spielman Peldo. These whimsical works feature infants swaddled in nature and still life scenes made out of found objects. However, capturing these seemingly serene subjects was much more complicated than you might think.

NEXT MONTH Join Design & Living Magazine as we reveal the winners of our 2017 People's Choice Awards.

ON THE COVER This month, our cover features the 1908 neoclassical property of Audrey Farol and Elizabeth Stewart.

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TAKE A LOOK AT Spotlight Media's Other Magazines

You Can Scale in North Dakota: Just Ask CoSchedule A few years ago, they were a small, Bismarck, North Dakota-web company frustrated with the content-marketing process. Today, they can call themselves the No. 1 marketing calendar in the world. Through the thought leadership of cofounders Garrett Moon and Justin Walsh, CoSchedule's reach and influence only continues to grow—they have more than 8,000 customers in more than 100 countries—and they've done it all from right here in North Dakota.

The Avengers The Bison football team is back and so are the hopes for another national championship. Seniors Nick DeLuca, Nate Tanguay and Tre Dempsey spearhead a Bison defense that already has fans across Bison Nation whispering that this group could be the best-ever version of "Code Green" at NDSU.

Do It All Downtown Does Downtown Fargo truly offer everything one might need in life? Whether you're an empty-nester looking to downsize, a family of five, a young professional or a college student, downtown is for anyone and everyone. With the help of a dedicated group of downtown diehards and business owners, Fargo Monthly took a look at how it's possible to live your life in Downtown Fargo without ever really needing to leave.

LEARN MORE ABOUT US spotlightmediafargo.com


SEPTEMBER 2017 Design & Living Magazine is a free publication distributed 12 times a year. Our mission is to showcase all that the Red River Valley has to offer in terms of interior design, architecture and landscaping, profiling the people that make these possible. We also strive to provide a quality and fun reading experience and improve the way of life in our community. The publication is mailed to homes across the US and has stand distribution throughout North Dakota and Minnesota.

PUBLISHER

Spotlight Media LLC

PRESIDENT

Mike Dragosavich

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR EDITOR

Andrew Jason Becca Opp

DESIGN/LAYOUT

Sarah Geiger, Matt Anderson

CONTRIBUTORS

Maria Bosak, Trever Hill, Tyrone Leslie, Becca Opp

COPY EDITORS CONTENT STRATEGIST WEB TEAM SALES MANAGER SENIOR SALES EXECUTIVE ADVERTISING/SALES CLIENT RELATIONS MANAGER SOCIAL MEDIA PHOTOGRAPHY

OFFICE ASSISTANT SALES ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT SALES & OPERATIONS INTERNS PROJECT ADMINISTRATIVE INTERN VIDEOGRAPHY INTERN DELIVERY

Erica Rapp, Becca Opp, Ethan Mickelson, Kara Jeffers Sam Herder Samantha Stark, Huong Tran Layne Hanson Steven French, Wendy Baukol Paul Hoefer, Scott Rorvig Jenny Johnson Becca Opp, Samantha Stark Hillary Ehlen, J. Alan Paul Photography, HBA, Meg Spielman-Peldo, Stephanie Bahnij, Nate Warren, Dan Francis Photography, John Borge Studios, Morgan Schleif, Chris Hanson, Melanie Anderson Emily Peterson Pam Mjoness Nick Hackl, Tatiana Hasbargen, Kyle Gliva, Ruth Olson Kelsey Wolters Scott Cramer Mitch Rapp, Hal Ecker, Nolan Kaml, Tom Wegner, Kent Hagen, Thomas White

Design & Living Magazine is published by Spotlight Media, LLC. Copyright 2017 Design & Living Magazine & designandlivingmagazine.com. All rights reserved. No parts of this periodical may be reproduced or distributed without written permission of Design & Living Magazine and Spotlight Media, LLC is not responsible for, and expressly disclaims all liability for, damages of any kind arising out of use, reference to, or reliance on such information. Spotlight Media, LLC accepts no liability for the accuracy of statements made by the advertisers.

ADVERTISING: 701-478-SPOT (7768) spotlightmediafargo.com Send change of address information and other correspondence to: Spotlight Media, LLC 15 Broadway N. Suite 500, Fargo, ND 58102 or info@spotlightmediafargo.com


HBA EDITORIAL DESIGN&LIVING

By Tyrone Leslie, HBA President Heritage Homes

TO P

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Reasons to Parade and Tour

Tyrone Leslie founded Heritage Homes in 1995. It is a custom residential homebuilding company serving the FM metro and lakes areas.

September is finally here and so is the Fall Parade of Homes and Remodeled Home Tour, our local homebuilding and remodeling industry's showcase of their work and renovation projects!

The Fall Parade of Homes runs two weekends: Sept. 16-17 and 23-24. The Remodeled Home Tour runs Sept. 23-24 only. Hours are noon - 5 p.m. each day. Visit www.paradefm. com for all the details, or pick up a magazine starting Sept. 11 at any Hornbacher's. It's a great time to buy or remodel and to take advantage of great interest rates, tax incentives and contractor promotions to realize the benefits of a new home or renovation. We've got your top ten reasons to check out these awesome events, and we've broken them down into two categories.

Bonus tip: Be sure to wear comfortable, slip-on shoes and socks. This ensures a seamless entrance and exit from each home, and the socks are a hygienic courtesy to current and future homeowners. Happy touring!

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Nuts-and-Bolts

These are five reasons you need to attend if a build/remodel is right around the corner, and even if it could be years down the road.

1. Research - Explore ideas and trends to update your current home. Do your homework now if you're planning to build or renovate. It's a very detailed process. 2. Meet the men and women behind the work - Acquaint yourself with the builders/ remodelers in our community. Many of them and their staff work in the homes. Get a feel for their personalities and construction style. 3. Understand construction - Discover how floor plans and traffic flows work. 4. Experience your community - Get out of your daily routine and travel to areas you have yet to discover in the F-M community. 5. Visualize the future - The Internet and magazines are great, but walking into a new or remodeled home to see it firsthand, helps you picture the possibilities.

Bells-and-Whistles

The Parade or Remodeled Home Tour has reasons for attendees of any age to head out!

6. Be inspired - Whether it is technology, design or decor, every year, the Parade of Homes and Tour offers opportunity to dream! 7. Socialize - These events are great excuses to get your friends and family together and head out for a fun afternoon. 8. Stretch your legs - Fall always features beautiful weather. Enjoy it by walking from house to house. 9. Support a charitable cause - Our luxurious featured homes/renovation projects charge a $5 admission that goes to Home Builders Care of F-M Foundation, the HBA's charity supporting workforce development, scholarships and projects related to the housing industry. Learn more at www.hbcfm.com. 10. Satisfy your curiosity - Interested in stepping into a remodeled home similar to yours to see exactly what they did to change it up? Who doesn't like to take a peek into a brand new high-end home and all it offers? Here's your chance!

The HBA of FM promotes an environment in which members and their businesses can prosper.

For more information, contact: hbafm.com info@hbafm.com facebook.com/ HBAFargoMoorhead twitter.com/hbafm Blog: homebuildersassociation. areavoices.com


DESIGN&LIVING HOME TOUR

Pieces Past OF THE

MEET BEN & MELANIE ANDERSON Ben and Melanie Anderson are the husband-and-wife team at Benjamin Custom Homes. The couple met while in high school in Frazee, Minnesota, and both went on to attend NDSU. Ben Anderson has had a passion for building ever since he was young and when she isn't decorating, Melanie Anderson is a nurse at the Sanford Family Birth Center in Fargo. While Ben Anderson designed their home, Melanie Anderson was responsible for the dĂŠcor. Together, they have three sons: Jakobi (8), Maks (5) and Henrik (3).

When new construction pays homage to historic homes, the outcome is timeless. Across the river in Horizon Shores, Ben and Melanie Anderson have used salvaged materials throughout the construction, interior design and dĂŠcor of their 2016 build by Benjamin Custom Homes, which reflects Melanie's modish, eclectic style. Join us as we tour their contemporary home with pieces of the past built right into the walls. BY Becca Opp PHOTOS BY Hillary Ehlen and Melanie Anderson

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HOME TOUR DESIGN&LIVING

Tour

THE

Entry Upon entering the Andersons' home, you are greeted by a white, tongue-in-groove, 24-foot vaulted ceiling. To the right, a floating staircase makes a statement with reclaimed wood from Dakota Timber Company. Meanwhile, a two-tier chandelier featuring vintageinspired light bulbs stuns from above. Ben Anderson noted that he chose not to have steps leading up to their front door, making the first-floor handicap accessible.

GET THE LOOK Staircase - Dakota Timber Company Railing - Bob's Customs Lighting - Restoration Hardware Flooring - Carpet World

Ben Anderson made this bench when he was 13 years old, which is what taught him to love building. "It's the bench that built the company," he laughed. 26

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T H E B E ST T H I N G S STA R T I N H O M E S . C E L E B R AT I N G 9 Y E A R S O F M A K I N G S I G N S .

2008 2017

7 01 - 5 2 6 - 3 8 3 5 | 310 N P AV E N


HOME TOUR DESIGN&LIVING

Mudroom To the left of the entrance, a doorway leads to the mudroom, which is adjacent to a powder room and home office. In the future, Ben Anderson will install a sliding barn door to close this area off from the rest of the home. "The idea is that I can have an office here and that I can get in and out without the kids knowing," he said.

GET THE LOOK Cabinetry - Wendt Cabinets Tile - Carpet World

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Powder Room

Office


HOME TOUR DESIGN&LIVING

Kitchen In the kitchen, dark blue lower cabinets contrast against the bright white, extended upper cabinets. Meanwhile, brass hardware creates a dramatic effect. On the island, the Andersons opted for minuet quartz countertops and a farmhouse sink. Attached to the kitchen is an oversized pantry, which has enough room for a deep freeze as well as plug-ins for all of their small appliances, which prevents their kitchen from becoming cluttered.

This wall features a modern take on a classic butler's pantry.

GET THE LOOK Cabinetry - Wendt Cabinets Island Countertop - Lg Tile backsplash - Walker Zanger Barstools - Restoration Hardware Wooden Beams - Dakota Timber Company 30

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HOME TOUR DESIGN&LIVING

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DESIGN&LIVING HOME TOUR

Living Room

Dining Room

"I am very eclectic. I take inspiration from old houses as well as Scandinavian, industrial and MidCentury modern decor, so I really like to mix it up," Melanie Anderson said. When selecting finishes and fixtures for the interior, she worked with her brother, Adam Laplante, who is also a team member at Benjamin Custom Homes.

The dining room has history built right into the walls. "This is the wall that came from the historic Lewis Home in Fargo," said Ben Anderson. "We were doing restoration work and these bricks were no longer structurally sound, so we palletized them. Three years later, we ended up cutting them up, so we actually made four pieces out of every brick." Those bricks can now be seen adding major wowfactor to the Andersons' dining room. Pieces of Melanie Anderson's personal history are also engrained in the space. The white oak structural columns supporting the majority of the home's weight are from her childhood home in Detroit Lakes. The brick wall also contains a brick that she found on a friend's family farm, that Ben Anderson sourced all the way back to the Sabinsky Brothers in upstate New York.

GET THE LOOK Table - Finnu Designs Settee - The White House Co. Greenery - Love Always Floral

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DESIGN&LIVING HOME TOUR

This metal-wrapped bed weighs over 600 pounds.

Master Suite One of the most convenient features of the master suite is a stacked washer and dryer hidden away in a closet off the master bath. Melanie Anderson calls their master bath "The Black and White Room" because of the vintage-inspired concrete tile. In addition to a soaking tub, the Andersons' master bath has a walk-in, subway-tile shower with a rain shower head.

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HOME TOUR DESIGN&LIVING

Catwalk Because he was concerned that their boys would try to climb up the sides of the catwalk, Ben Anderson made the railing higher than codes required. He also came up with a solution for a different challenge when designing the catwalk. "It was defined as a hallway and needed its own separate lighting source and we didn't want to hang lights up there, so we lit the handrail instead," Ben Anderson said.

Guest Bedroom The Andersons opted for a lower ceiling in the boys' bathroom to make room for a loft in the guest bedroom. Because the loft has a twin mattress, the space can sleep a small family. To access the loft, the Andersons use a ship ladder.

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HOME TOUR DESIGN&LIVING

THE BOYS Maks, Jakobi, Henrik

Playroom The windows in the playroom overlook the kitchen so the boys can see Melanie Anderson when she is preparing meals or working at the island.

Bathroom The boys' bathroom is a style straight out of the 1920s. When they were first found at a flea market by a friend, Melanie Anderson knew she needed to have these 1926 sinks. The Andersons had the bases refinished and were able to reuse the original handles. Although they did have to install new faucets, there are still two lines: one for hot water and one for cold.

Henrik's Room The dresser in the corner of Henrik's room belonged to Benjamin Anderson when he was a little boy. "His name is carved in the top," Melanie Anderson pointed out. She also crafted the mobile hanging above the dresser out of branches from her parents' house in Detroit Lakes and paper decorations from The White House Co. 38

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DESIGN&LIVING HOME TOUR

Maks & Jakobi's Room Maks and Jakobi's nautical-themed room is great for sleep-overs. The double-bunk beds by Pacc Woodworks each have their own electrical outlet and ship-inspired light fixture. The lower bunks also feature built-in shelves made by Ben Anderson's father, which Melanie decoupaged with paper from Zandbroz. "I wanted to give dimension and character to those spaces, so they weren't just white," Melanie Anderson said.

Jakobi's Hidden Office Hidden behind a mirror in the closet is a secret room, or "Jakobi's office." The decor in this room features a planet mobile, dinosaur models and a microscope because Jakobi is fascinated by science. "This house was built in a lot of weekends and a lot of nights," Ben Anderson said. The Anderson's would like to give special thanks to their crew, vendors, friends and family for all their hard work. In order to celebrate the work that Benjamin Custom Homes as put into the build, the Andersons will be having an open house on (insert date here) that will be open to the public Sept. 16 from noon-5 p.m. Details will be posted on their Facebook page.

For more information, contact: Benjamin Custom Homes 4025 4th Ave. S. #1, Fargo 701-388-9172 Search "Benjamin Custom Homes, LLC" on Facebook.

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Old House New Times 40

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DESIGN&LIVING OLD HOUSE, NEW TIMES

O

Old houses have their secrets, but everyone knows that old houses change over time. Historic homes are constantly being picked up and moved, torn down or remodeled beyond recognition. However, we've found a few hidden gems in Fargo that have not been changed by time, but have changed with the times. See how their current owners are giving new life to these historic homes with five remarkable restorations. PAINTING BY KIM JORE

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DESIGN&LIVING OLD HOUSE, NEW TIMES

FROM B&B TO MULTI-GENERATIONAL

V

Home

Very rarely do houses in North Dakota make their way onto popular websites like Old House Dreams. However, the Historic Lewis Home has gained recognition on this site. Built by R.C. Lewis for his wife in 1899, it subsequently belonged to the Red Cross and later became the Chez Suzanne bed and breakfast. Now, three generations live under its roof. They took us on a tour through nearly 5,000 neoclassical square feet of magnificent woodwork, frescos and stained-glass windows. BY Becca Opp PHOTOS BY Hillary Ehlen HISTORIC PHOTOS PROVIDED BY ReNae Simmons

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OLD HOUSE, NEW TIMES DESIGN&LIVING The Culp family The first floor belongs to the Culps, who are the oldest generation currently residing in the house. It has a living room, music room, library, smoking room, dining room, pantry and kitchen, as well as a breakfast nook.

FIRST FLOOR

ENTRANCE

In addition to rounded, stained-glass windows and woodwork, the entrance also features individually cut tile. "It was a true mosaic," ReNae Simmons, one of the current homeowners, said. The mosaic had a large crack in it because the original foundation did not extend under the porch. Simmons and her family actually had to hire someone to build a foundation underneath the front porch, which had been held up with bricks and disintegrating mortar. This is where Ben Anderson came across the bricks that he and his wife ended up using in their dining room.

Original fireplace

This fresco can be seen in the library.

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OLD HOUSE, NEW TIMES DESIGN&LIVING

Dining Room This historic photo reveals that the dining room once had tile floors. When they started to show excessive wear, the bed and breakfast had them carefully replaced with a wood floor to match the rest of the house.

The dining room has four large frescos that were meant to represent the four seasons.

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DESIGN&LIVING OLD HOUSE, NEW TIMES

Music Room This was originally a smoking room.

Butler's Pantry

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OLD HOUSE, NEW TIMES DESIGN&LIVING

Main Kitchen This historic photo shows the original kitchen.

The kitchen still retains some of its original woodwork and tile today.

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This dumbwaiter in the kitchen goes all the way from the basement up to the third floor.


DESIGN&LIVING GARDENING

Main Stairwell Simmons repainted the stairwell by leaning over the railing with a paint roller fixed to a pole.


OLD HOUSE, NEW TIMES DESIGN&LIVING SECOND FLOOR The Simmons Family The Culps share the second floor with the family of their daughter, ReNae Simmons. Together, she and her husband have four daughters aged 16, 14, 10 and 2. While the east rooms are occupied by the Culps, the Simmons family have the west bedrooms.

The second-floor sewing room has balcony access.

The Culps and Simmons remodeled this second-floor bathroom using finishes and fixtures that blend in with the period of the house.

In another bathroom, Simmons uncovered this gold accent tile.

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This steep staircase was utilized by servants.


OLD HOUSE, NEW TIMES DESIGN&LIVING

THIRD FLOOR The third-floor former ballroom and servants' quarters are the Simmons family's domain. Today, the ballroom is used as a living and dining area, while the servants' quarters serve as an office, schoolroom, playroom, bedroom and kitchen.

In her bedroom, Simmons has integrated a vintage dress that once belonged to a relative into the dĂŠcor.

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OLD HOUSE, NEW TIMES DESIGN&LIVING

The Gray House

TheLaws OF TIME BY Becca Opp PHOTOS BY Hillary Ehlen HISTORIC PHOTOS PROVIDED BY Audrey Farol

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DESIGN&LIVING OLD HOUSE, NEW TIMES

The Plum House

O

Over the years, these breathtaking historic homes have transitioned from residential to commercial properties. Recently, some of their former glory has been returned by the current owner, Audrey Farol. Now, she has opened their doors to share the time and effort that she and her family have put into these loving restorations.

Audrey Farol

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OLD HOUSE, NEW TIMES DESIGN&LIVING

THE GRAY HOUSE TheGrayHouse

T

his house was built in 1907 for just $10,000, which is worth about $250,000 today. Milton Earl Beebee was the architect. He also designed NDSU's South Engineering Building. In 1972, the house was sold from the Lewis Family to Wayne Solberg and Garylle B. Stewart. Together they turned the home into the headquarters of their law firm, Solberg Stewart Miller. Farol is the daughter of Stewart. After he passed away last year, Farol and her sister, Elizabeth Stewart, inherited The Gray House and part of the Plum House from their father. Along with her sister's late partner, Charles Willette and other members of the family, Farol started working on the first floor of the The Gray House with the goal of preserving it for the 21st Century without compromising its historic character. "I wanted to keep it in the family, no matter what it took," said Farol.

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Stewart's secretary had her desk in what is now the reception room.


DESIGN&LIVING OLD HOUSE, NEW TIMES

Stewart had the original building blueprints on display.

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OLD HOUSE, NEW TIMES DESIGN&LIVING The front entrance had green and white tiles, but they were damaged beyond repair. However, Farol did her best to imitate the look of period tile.

Stewart restored the oak woodwork on the beautiful staircase and window seat. Now, Farol has picked up where he left off by refinishing most of the wood floors.

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DESIGN&LIVING OLD HOUSE, NEW TIMES

This room once served as Stewart's office. Now, it is being used by Snyder Gokey of Gokey Immigration Law Office.

This 100-year-old, stained-glass window is still in excellent condition.

"Eventually I would like to change this back into a home. I think that would be really amazing." - Audrey Farol

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OLD HOUSE, NEW TIMES DESIGN&LIVING

The second floor is home to the office of appraiser Rose Hoef, who has access to the balcony.

Farol's father planted this pear tree in the lawn between The Gray House and The Plum House. Someday, he had planned to connect the houses with an underground tunnel because Solberg Stewart Miller had offices on both sides.

When they were girls, Farol and her sister would play in the attic. In the future, Farol would like to remodel the third floor to create more usable square-footage.

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OLD HOUSE, NEW TIMES DESIGN&LIVING

THE CARRIAGE HOUSE

B

ehind The Gray House is a well-preserved carriage house. It still has two horse stalls inside. Because Farol's family owns race horses, she wants to use the carriage house to showcase their memorabilia. The caretaker's quarters and the original hay loft still exist on the second floor of the carriage house.

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Hay was dropped down these shoots to feed the horses in their stalls.


DESIGN&LIVING OLD HOUSE, NEW TIMES

THE PLUM HOUSE ThePlumHouse The Lewis family would use this concrete block when stepping out of their carriages. Although it is no longer being used, it is still on the property.

T

The Plum House stood at 402 8th Street South for 87 years and was going to be torn down in 2001. However, Stewart convinced his partners at Solberg Stewart Miller to relocate the house to its current lot instead of building a new office on the same site. "It was going to be demolished, but he said 'no,'" Farol explained. Stewart wanted to make sure that the new office looked as if it belonged in the historic area.

The tile in The Plum House is original and closely resembles the tile Farol tried to imitate in the front entrance of The Gray House.

In 2001, streets were closed to make way for the house. "It was quite the adventure," Farol said. Stewart and his late fiancĂŠe, Judy Cooke, passionately restored the original woodwork throughout the house. Though he was ambitious, Stewart was physically unable to see all of his plans to fruition. Now, Farol and her sister have honored their father's memory by picking up where he left off. Together they will continue to care for The Gray House and The Plum House and preserve them for the next generation.

GOKEY IMMIGRATION LAW

Gokey Immigration Law began renting the first floor of The Gray House in March 2017. The Gokeys have special ties to this area. In fact, Snyder Gokey's father had his office in The Plum House for 50 years. "As a kid, I used to empty wastebaskets for them for 25 cents a day," he said. Meanwhile, Mary Gokey's great grandparents lived in the house right across the street. Left to right: Richard Humann, Anneli Johnson, Snyder Gokey and Mary Gokey

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Hybrid

A MODERN-HISTORIC

F

From the front, Donovan and Hidie Larson's home looks like an old house. However, when you look at it from a different angle, you can see that the Larsons have created a modern-historic hybrid. Throughout their exterior and interior design, it is clear that the Larsons appreciate the past of their home. In fact, they've used pieces from the former carriage house to build their new addition. BY Becca Opp PHOTOS BY Hillary Ehlen HISTORIC PHOTO PROVIDED BY Donovan and Hidie Larson

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OLD HOUSE, NEW TIMES DESIGN&LIVING Entryway In 1905, the home was built by the Kuppe family, who lived in the home until 1995. Interestingly, the interior had hardly been touched when the Larsons purchased the house in 2000. Much of the original fixtures and finishes were still left intact, including vintage light fixtures, radiators and stunning woodwork.

The Maid's Stair This staircase was used by the maid to access the kitchen, second floor and basement.

Office When the Larsons moved in, every room on the main floor, except for the kitchen, was decorated with wallpaper. "We kept it for a long time until it finally started wearing out," Donovan Larson said. In the office, they replaced the old wallpaper with new, paintable, textured wallpaper. The main floor also had wool carpet, but that too started to wear. However, removing the carpet revealed wood floors. The Larsons thought about refinishing them but decided to embrace their patina.

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DESIGN&LIVING OLD HOUSE, NEW TIMES

Kitchen The Larsons rearranged the layout of the kitchen but kept the original cabinets. In fact, when five grandchildren of John Kuppe visited this summer, "They couldn't believe that we still had the kitchen sink," Hidie Larson said.

Living and Dining Rooms What the Larsons consider their living room, the Kuppe and later Kuppich family used as a dining room. The Larsons also use the old parlor as their dining room. Before the addition, Hidie Larson made repurposed jewelry in the dining room for her business, Let Your Spirit Soar.

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ADDITION "We took the 1,960 square-foot house and added 1,835 square feet. When you see it from the street, it seems like two structures." - Donovan Larson Exterior Donovan Larson and his 18-yearold son, Christian Larson, built the 1,835-square-foot addition where the former carriage house and garage once stood. "It was falling down because when cars got bigger, they added on four feet this way and six feet this way," Donovan Larson said. Hidie Larson also lent them a hand along with several friends and family members.

Interior Donovan and Christian Larson milled the wood from the former carriage house and used it as the trim in the new addition.

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OLD HOUSE, NEW TIMES DESIGN&LIVING

HIDIE'S STUDIO SPACE Instead of being confined to the dining room, Hidie Larson now creates on the second floor of the addition. "We live close enough to downtown that we could have rented a space, but we decided to reinvest here in our neighborhood instead," she said.

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DONOVAN'S WORKSHOP

DESIGN&LIVING OLD HOUSE, NEW TIMES While the second floor is Hidie Larson's studio, the first floor is Donovan Larson's workshop. In their spare time, the Larsons are pickers and also use the first floor of the addition to store their vintage and antique finds. So far, they have sold at venues like Junk Market. Someday, they would like to have sales out of the first floor of the addition.

Donovan Larson intends to add a glass work surface to the top of this old Norwegian work bench.

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DESIGN&LIVING OLD HOUSE, NEW TIMES

Classic

CONTEMPORARY

T

This 1922 home has contemporary style, thanks to a remodel. This summer, a family of five moved in. We took a tour with Angie Behr and she explained why this house is the perfect mix of both her and her husband's style.

Meet Angie Behr: Originally from Detroit Lakes, Behr is a teacher at Park Christian School. She is also a mother of three. In her spare time, Behr loves to go antiquing. She also collects old dishes.

BY Becca Opp PHOTOS BY Hillary Ehlen

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Entryway

"My husband's style is modern, and mine is not." - Angie Behr

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DESIGN&LIVING OLD HOUSE, NEW TIMES

Kitchen One of Behr's favorite things about the kitchen is the exposed brick. Meanwhile, her husband likes the use of corrugated metal and stainless steel appliances. However, they both appreciate the industrial light fixtures.

Dining Room In the dining room, Behr uses an original builtin to display her dish collection. "Some of it is my husband's great grandma's, some of it is my great grandma's," she explained.

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Living Room The living room still has the original fireplace and built-in shelves.

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OLD HOUSE, NEW TIMES DESIGN&LIVING

Master Bedroom This sliding barn door leads to a walk-in closet and master bath.

Kid's Rooms The second floor has two more bedrooms. In his room, one of Behr's sons showed us how to sit in an antique rocking chair.

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Basement Workshop The Behr's house also includes a finished attic and lower level. In the basement, Angie Behr has a workshop where she stores all of her craft supplies. Meanwhile, the attic houses her daughter's room as well as a schoolroom for her eight-year-old son.

Sales agent & designer - Jamie R. Swenson, Park Co. Realtors General Contractor - Pieper Construction, Fargo ND


DESIGN&LIVING OLD HOUSE, NEW TIMES

1932 COTTAGE

Remodel THE STORY

This house recently sustained extensive water damage. It started when the previous homeowners went away for a long weekend. One of their toilet's holding tanks overflowed and continued to run water, flooding the second floor all the way to the basement. Instead of living in the middle of a full-on remodel, the homeowners decided to relocate and begin again somewhere new.

A

After a bout of misfortune, this 1932 charmer was in need of some help. The exterior may have looked move-inready, but the interior was another story. Luckily, Jamie R. Swenson saw the hidden potential in this character cottage. BY Becca Opp PHOTOS BY Hillary Ehlen

THE RENOVATION

Since then, Swenson and Pieper Shingling & Construction have started the flip. One of the biggest challenges during this process has been bringing the building up to code. In addition to remodeling the interior, they also replaced the old garage. Swenson wanted to retain some of the original features of the home such as the staircase, fireplaces and windows. However, she also wants to incorporate modern elements such as open-concept floor plan and barn wood accents. Stay tuned to see the final result.

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Original fireplace

The front of the house used to be hidden behind shrubs, but Swenson highlighted the house's curb appeal with landscaping.

Bedroom with original built-ins

This house has a secret: a walk-out patio above the garage that can be accessed through the master bedroom.

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Original windows

For more information, contact: Jamie R. Swenson 28 10th St. N, Fargo 701-799-1779 701-237-5031 jamierswenson@parkcompany.com


DESIGN&LIVING RESTORATION

Restoring Integrity

F

argo was founded in 1871, but North Dakota didn't become a state until 1889. That being said, it's not often that you come across antique furniture in the FM area that predates the late 1800s. However, gathering

sawdust in the front of The Woodchuck Furniture Restoration is a dresser from the 1790s. This is one of the oldest pieces that owners Nate Warren and Stephanie Bahnij have received since taking over the family business in 2014. BY Becca Opp / PHOTOS BY Hillary Ehlen, Nate Warren and Stephanie Bahnij

About the Woodchuck The Woodchuck Furniture Restoration was originally started about 25 years ago by a gentleman named Chuck Stenso. The business changed hands in the late '70s or early '80s. Then, in 2011, Warren's father bought the business. After his father passed away in 2014, Warren and Bahnijtook over the business. "We didn't know if the two of us could take it on ourselves, but it's three years later and we're still here," said Warren, a thirdgeneration woodworker who has been woodworking all his life.

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Strip Tank

What is

Restoration? 1. res·to·ra·tion /restəˈrāSH(ə)n/ noun The act of returning something to its original condition–in this case, a piece of furniture. Nate Bahnij has customers all over the country. "There are very few people who do exactly what we do. We do restorations, so we're able to replicate pieces that are broken, do custom builds or match things that are gone," he said.

How do you restore antique furniture? When restoring an antique, Warren normally starts by lowering the furniture into the strip tank. "We start by removing any hardware, put the piece in the tank and then pump it over with methylene chloride. Once the old finish is removed, we rinse it with water to neutralize the chemicals and let it dry for a couple of days," he said. The next steps depend on the piece of furniture, but sanding and staining are usually involved.

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Warren and Bahnij have a stockroom full of old lumber, which he often uses when working with period furniture. "When you're missing a piece of wood in a piece of furniture, it can be awfully difficult to find a hundred-year-old piece of wood to go back into it," Warren said. Luckily, they have quite the collection of antique wood.


????? DESIGN&LIVING RESTORATION DESIGN&LIVING

After the pieces have dried, Warren and Bahnij move them into the workshop to be sanded. This is also where missing pieces get replaced.

These molding planes were made in England during the early 1800s and Warren uses them for shaping wood to match missing pieces on period furniture.

This is where they stain the furniture. Warren and Bahnij mix all of their own stains, while trying to remain as environmentally friendly as possible. After applying the stain, Warren moves the furniture over to the drying room.

"We want to make sure that it's nice and dry because the wood can change when it takes on moisture." Nate Warren

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When Warren Bahnij aren't working, they like to collect antiques. These earrings were Stephanie Bahnij's first real find. They were given as a gift from mother to daughter on December 25, 1921. The note reads, "My Dear Dell, These earrings were given to me over 50 yrs. ago. They were made from the floor of old Independence Hall in Philadelphia." Warren and Bahnij have contacted museum curators and antique appraisers who have both confirmed the earrings' authenticity. For more information, contact: The Woodchuck Furniture Restoration 1418 1st Ave. N. #2, Fargo FargoWoodchuck@icloud.com thewoodchuck.net


ARTIST DESIGN&LIVING

ARTIST FEATURE

creative BY NATURE Meg Spielman Peldo

A

dorning the walls of the Family Birth Center in the new Sanford Medical Center are two collections by FMVA Member of the Year, artist and photographer Meg Spielman Peldo. These whimsical works feature infants swaddled in nature and still life scenes made out of found objects. However, capturing these seemingly serene subjects was much more complicated than you might think. We met with Spielman to discuss her recent achievements and what it was like behind the scenes during the "Nature Baby" photoshoots. By Becca Opp Photos by Meg Spielman Headshots by Hillary Ehlen

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DESIGN&LIVING ARTIST

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ARTIST DESIGN&LIVING

THE TASK

Spielman was one of many artists selected to be featured in the new Sanford Medical Center in South Fargo. She had previously collaborated with the healthcare provider to create an award-winning coffee-table book in 2012. This time, Spielman was asked to create whimsical artwork for the Family Birth Center that would take patients' minds off of being in the hospital. She then came up with two concepts that led to the creation of "Nature Baby Project" and "Nature Still Life Study."

"I was honored to be selected as one of the artists for the new hospital. - Meg Spielman

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SPIELMAN'S "NATURE BABY PROJECT"

The "Nature Baby Project" includes 38 images of infants in nature-inspired still life scenes and a nursery in the forest. Sanford Medical Center requested that Spielman feature babies of Birth Center employees. "I didn't start until October, so I had to hunt and gather. I was chasing leaves in the street," Spielman laughed.


DESIGN&LIVING ARTIST

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This woodland nursery featuring furniture from The White House Co. was shot at Lindenwood Park in Fargo and MB Johnson Park in Moorhead. Spielman later combined the images in Photoshop to create this magical forest.

Spielman had nature scenes set up all over her studio.


DESIGN&LIVING ARTIST

Normally, you would need a whole team of people to do costuming and comforting during these types of photoshoots. "When working with babies, especially little ones, there's a lot of waiting and trying to soothe the baby," Spielman explained. Sometimes, Spielman had to shoot the backdrop and the infant at separate times, then she would put the images together in Photoshop. "It was extremely time consuming, but I'm really happy with the results," Spielman said.

SPIELMAN'S "NATURE STILL LIFE STUDY"

The other series of works that Spielman created for the Family Birth Center was "Nature Still Life Study." This study consists of eight still life images made of items found in nature. These images were printed on large canvases, most of which were 5-and-a-half feet by 3 feet.. Each canvas has stitching details, which you will often see in Spielman's work. "Because it was such a large print, I had the entire image printed on the background and had additional pieces printed, which I cut apart and sewed onto the surface of the canvas, so it still has the look of being sewn together," Spielman explained.

For more information, contact: Meg Spielman Studio 701-238-4264 megs@spielmanstudio.com spielmanstudio.com

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EVENT PREVIEW DESIGN&LIVING

Junk Market Q&A

F

rom crisp air to hot apple cider, there's so much to love about fall, including Junk Market. We sat down with event founder, Maria Bosak of Eco Chic Boutique to find out what to expect this year. We'll give you a hint: you and your kids just might meet a few four-legged friends. BY Becca Opp PHOTOS BY Morgan Schleif HEADSHOT BY Hillary Ehlen

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SEPTEMBER 22-24


DESIGN&LIVING EVENT PREVIEW

Q: Where will the event be held?

Q: What inspired these changes?

A: We're back out at the fairgrounds. We heard that people wanted to be back at the fairgrounds because they feel like it has more of a festive feel out there. We'll be on the south side, but you'll come in the main entrance and you can't miss us.

A: We just really value families. We want it to be something where not only can a mom can get out and do some shopping, but the whole family can come. Maybe dad has a beer. We really want it to be a family event.

Q: How will this event be different from previous Junk Markets?

We also value teachers. We think that teachers are fantastic. They'll be back in school at this point. They'll have taught for a few weeks, so we want them to come into Eco Chic and get a free ticket.

A: This time, it's three days. Sunday is when we're going to have a special family day. Kids are always free, but Sunday is when you'll want to bring them. We're going to have jumpy games and a petting zoo. Camp Bosak is what we call it. The early bird shopping on Friday night is also something we haven't done before. Usually, early bird was Saturday morning. Now it's Friday night for two hours so you can have a whole evening to yourself. You need a special ticket for that and you can buy it online or at the gate. We're also doing something new where if you're a teacher, you can come to Eco Chic Boutique to get a free ticket.

Q: What kind of vendors will be there? A: There will be 100+ booths with indoor and outdoor vendors from all over the Midwest. We've got everything from repurposed to antique, salvaged, vintage and handmade along with great shopping and great food. We also have a pumpkin vendor that comes out every year. Q: How are you getting ready for Junk Market this time around? A: I'm blessed with a great staff that works really hard. This is our 12th event. There's a lot of work that goes into it, but now that we've done it 12 times, it feels

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easier than the first couple of times. It used to stress me out. I would lay awake for nights on end leading up to the event, but it gets easier the more we've done it. We try to reach out to find as many great vendors as we can. We try to add new things. It's a labor of love. We really do love putting on this event for Fargo-Moorhead, and we want to continue to grow it. Q: What will you be doing on the day of Junk Market? A: I wander around. I have tried to place myself in one particular spot numerous times, and it doesn't work because something always happens so I have to go here or there. Sometimes you'll see me at the ticket booth, sometimes working the Eco Chic booth. I try to help out wherever I'm needed. My husband and I spend an hour at each event walking around and checking in with the vendors, so I do get time to enjoy it. Q: What challenges do you anticipate on the day of Junk Market?

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A: Every event has its own challenges, but you learn to deal with whatever comes your way. You just learn to roll with the punches. Living in North Dakota, you always wonder what the weather will do. That's the one thing that we can't control, but the outdoor vendors have tents so the event will go on, rain or shine. Q: What are you looking forward to the most this time? A: My husband and I love animals, so I'm excited to have the petting zoo there. It sounds silly, but we really love the petting zoo. The other thing is that in the past, we have said no dogs, but now I feel like we're in an environment where we can have pets. We would love to see families come out with their animals.

The 2017 Fall Junk Market will take place Sept. 22-24 at the Red River Valley Fairgrounds. For more information, visit FargoJunkMarket.com.


DESIGN&LIVING DESIGN

How To

Decorate a Historic Space

L

For this unit, I chose a cool, gray and white color pallet.

et's say you fall in love with a historic building, but your style isn't exactly traditional. How do you stay true to the original character of the space without compromising your own taste? Through my experiences as an interior decorator, I've picked up a few tips and tricks that will help you do just that. Allow me to demonstrate with two units I staged for the historic Woodrow Apartments in Downtown Fargo. BY Trever Hill | PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED BY Dan Francis Photography and John Borge Studios | HEADSHOT BY J. Alan Paul Photography

TREVER HILL

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DESIGN DESIGN&LIVING

For this unit, I chose a warm, tan and off-white color pallet.

1. Draw your color inspiration directly from the space. When observing these units, two features stood out to me. There were chrome light fixtures and exposed brick walls with orange hues. For the first unit, I complimented the chrome with a cool color pallet. For the other, I went with a warm color pallet that worked well with the exposed brick. In both units, I used cut flowers and house plants for minimal pops of color.

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DESIGN&LIVING DESIGN

2. Don't be afraid to go modern. Clean lines can be used to accentuate the natural features of a home or building by creating contrast between old and new. In this case, those natural features were the exposed brick and wooden beams, which pair well with contemporary furniture and dĂŠcor. In many downtown lofts like this one, you'll find clean lines, multiple textures and minimalistic style.

Notice how the clean lines let the exposed brick and ceiling stand out.

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DESIGN DESIGN&LIVING

3. Follow the 80/20 Rule. Right now, the reclaimed, industrial look is on-trend. It has a warmth and familiarity about it that many people find relatable. When I was decorating these apartments, pulling in that restored feeling was essential. Even though I adore this trend, I still decided to stick to the 80/20 rule. That means choosing 80 percent of the furniture and accessories in the space for their timeless appeal while devoting 20 percent to current trends. I generally like to keep finishes and furnishings timeless because they usually aren't replaced very often. When it comes to accent pieces and accessories, I'm more apt to follow trends because they can easily be switched out or replaced whenever the homeowner desires.

For more information, contact: Trever Hill treverhilldesign.com 701-715-3077 treverhilldesign@gmail.com

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OFFICE TOUR DESIGN&LIVING

The Last

FALSE FRONT

W

hile the City of Moorhead modernized over the course of the 20th century, time stood still in one little house on Main Avenue. Now, that building is home to architects YHR Partners in the 21st century. This structure is the last of its kind in Moorhead, but even more remarkable is the fact that its still in use. Join us as we explore the history behind its false facade.

BY BECCA OPP PHOTOS BY HILLARY EHLEN | HISTORIC PHOTOS PROVIDED BY YHR PARTNERS

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DESIGN&LIVING OFFICE TOUR

Timeline 1879 Frank Burnham, President of Red River Loan and Land Company, built a one story office.

1884 The structure was converted into a residence.

1901 Louis and Inga Langseth bought the property.

1904 The Langseths turned the residence into a half-way house for Norwegian immigrants by adding a second floor with five bedrooms and a bathroom.

This is how the building looked when YHR Partners purchased it in 1984.

1948 After his wife passed away, Louis Langseth gifted the residence to his nephews, Lawrence and Hans Langseth.

1972 Lawrence died and Hans became the sole owner.

1975 Hans became ill and moved in with relatives.

Moorhead's Main Avenue. looking east in 1879.

1976 The "boarding" house was boarded up.

When Royce Yeater, Richard Hennings and Dale Ruff of YHR Partners purchased the house, the inside had hardly changed since the 1930s. Architect Julie Rokke said, "There were still bedsheets on. It had just been locked and boarded up for years."

1980 The house was entered into the National Register of Historic Places. It was listed as the only remaining building of its type in the city in an unaltered state.

In 1991, YHR Partners added a historically-sensitive expansion that would double the building in size. "We designed the woodwork to match," Rokke said. Now, it is hard to determine which rooms are original and what is a part of the new addition.

1984 The house was purchased by YHR Partners.

Unchanged BY TIME

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This small conference room was once the Langseths' living room.

Last Front STANDING

The YHR Partners office is the last of its kind in Moorhead. Featuring a false front, this building is an example of boomtown architecture, which was popular in the Old West. Business owners would invest more into the front of their buildings, while leaving the other sides plain. This allowed commercial spaces to go up quickly, hence the name. Back in the day, buildings like this could be spotted all over downtown Moorhead.


DESIGN&LIVING OFFICE TOUR

Although many of the belongings that the Langseths left behind were donated, an antique buffet and radio can still be seen in the office.

YHR Partners staff

For more information, contact: YHR Partners 420 Main Ave., Moorhead 218-233-4422 info@yhr.com

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HOME TOUR DESIGN&LIVING

Into the

Limelight

L

imelight Builders LLC is a new custom home builder that has recently stepped out onto Fargo's center stage. This company was established by married couple Jacob and Ashley Manly along with family friend Landon Fetzer. This tight-knit team has made its debut with a ruralthemed home in Rocking Horse Farm. We'll give you an exclusive look inside of the house with a silo that will make you feel like you're out in the country.

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DESIGN&LIVING HOME TOUR

By Becca Opp Photos by Hillary Ehlen

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HOME TOUR DESIGN&LIVING

T

his home was built for Ashley Manly's brother, Travis Anderson, along with his wife and their two young sons. It all started with one photo. Anderson found an image of a house he liked and then shared it with Chris Hawley of Chris Hawley Architects, who drafted a design based on Anderson's initial inspiration. After that, Anderson asked his family at Limelight Builders LLC for help turning the renderings into a reality.

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Living Room

For the interior of their home, the Andersons wanted an open-concept floor plan. The main floor has a great room that includes the entry, living area and kitchen. In the living area, the homeowners wanted to incorporate reclaimed wood from the farm where Anderson's wife grew up. The wood came from a 100-year-old barn where her family hosted many barn dances.


DESIGN&LIVING HOME TOUR

Kitchen

The Andersons also found color inspiration in their country roots. Throughout the home, they used gray, white and brown with pops of red and green. For example, the kitchen features white, farmhouse cabinets and a green backsplash reminiscent of fresh fields in the summertime.

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DESIGN&LIVING HOME TOUR

Stairwell

One of the most unique features of this house is the modern stairwell that connects the upper, main and lower levels. The second floor is actually open to the basement.

Bonus Room

In addition to four bedrooms and two bathrooms, the upstairs also has a bonus room where the Andersons keep their gaming systems, musical instruments and workout equipment. Notice how the ceiling is affected by the exterior roof lines, which add character to the room.

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DESIGN&LIVING HOME TOUR

Lower Level

The lower level includes a wet bar, game area and projector screen. It also has enough space for a guest bedroom and bathroom. As their family grows, the Andersons could see this becoming a favorite hangout spot for their kids and their friends.

Jacob Manly

President and Managing Director

Ashley Manly

Vice President and Finance Manager

For more information, contact: Limelight Builders LLC 701-219-9693 limelightfargo.com

Landon

Vice President and Project Manager

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Design & Living September 2017  

See how the current owners of five historic homes in Fargo are giving their old houses new life. Also in this issue, you can view two new co...

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