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FRLA'S MARKETING + OPERATIONS SUMMIT PREVIEW HOSPITALITY AWARDS NOMINATE NOW 4 KEY ELEMENTS OF BRANDING SUMMER 2016 | WWW.FRLA.ORG

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To learn more, contact Angela Ihry 605.940.9861 or angela.ihry@e-hps.com heartlandpaymentsystems.com


contents SUMMER 2016 WWW.FRLA.ORG

DEPARTMENTS

4 Food for Thought Sip And Savor FRLA’s Beverage Issue 4  From the Chairman’s Desk When Is Your Event Season? 8  Great Florida Events Don’t Miss Out on the Fun 12  Path to Power Follow Industry Leaders’ Path to Success 14  Chefs that Sizzle Douglas Braselman, Emeril’s Orlando 16  Welcome FRLA New Members 2016 20  Be Prepared Menu Cops and Hurricane Season 22  Hospitality Happenings Glance at the Happenings Around the State 24  Hospitality Industry Award Nominations Nominate Your Favorite Employee 46 Branding with Richard G. Rosen Don't Just Say Your Brand Is Good, Prove It 48 Business Matters Technology Is Your Most Useful Tool 49 ADA Compliance Commercial Websites Must Be ADA Compliant 53  Educational Foundation National Competition Recognition 55  ENGAGE Orlando Update 58  Movers and Shakers and FRLA’s Corporate Calendar What Is Happening with FRLA and the Industry

SPECIAL FEATURES 15 VISIT FLORIDA — FRLA’s Tourism Partner

The Best Meetings Don't Always Look Like Meetings

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Secrets of Success — Okeechobee Steak House

One of Florida’s Legacy Restaurants

27 FRLA’s Annual Beverage Edition

Find Out What Is Happening In This Segment of Your Business

50  Price Check

Control Your Health Care Costs

51  Worker’s Compensation Minimize Strain Injuries

54  A La Carte

Industry Information You Need to Know

ON THE COVER: Bourbon favorites provided by Southern Wine & Spirits. w w w.FRL A .org

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FROM THE CHAIRMAN’S DESK

Sip And Savor FRLA’s Beverage Issue By CAROL B. DOVER

I

t’s the perfect season to sip and savor your favorite beverage. That’s why we dedicated this edition of FR&L Magazine to the delicious drinks that flawlessly pair with flavorful foods. From a glass of bubbly to a cold beer, we made sure to cover a broad range of trends to be enjoyed at the dinner table, bellied up to the bar or out on the beach. Whether you’re picking a menu or making vacation plans, we’ve filled our pages with industry insights designed to ensure you pick the brew that’s best. Grab a glass, because our state’s success is certainly something to celebrate. Recent research from VISIT FLORIDA indicates that in 2015, tourism resulted in $89.1 billion in spending. That’s an increase of $7.1 billion over the previous year. Not to mention, total taxable sales in restaurants were $39.3 billion while lodging accounted for $23.5 billion. Our incredible growth is a direct result of the hospitality showcased at your wonderful venues, which are exclusive to the Sunshine State.

We’re on track to continue breaking records. We’re just halfway through 2016, and what a year it’s already been. With your help, we’ve advocated for the industry and tackled tough issues at the local, state and federal level. We’ve also hosted signature training sessions, including our first-ever Independent Operators Workshop which we hope you’ll read about on page 47. Plus, don’t forget about the countless hospitality happenings we’ve participated in and the wonderful moments we’ve shared with industry colleagues, all featured on pages 22 and 23. Our future looks bright. Your support of our Educational Foundation allowed high school students from Florida to compete on a national stage. Gainesville’s Eastside High School placed second in this year’s National ProStart Invitational and the students received thousands of dollars in scholarships. Tampa’s A.P. Leto High School showcased their culinary skills and received seventh place. Two top ten

finishes! We are incredibly proud of our student all-stars, and you can read about them on page 53. As always, we are thankful that you are actively engaged in our association. Truly, you make Florida a wonderful place to live, work and play. We hope to see you soon at the Great Florida Events we have in store. Cheers!

Carol B. Dover FRLA President & CEO

When Is Your Event Season? By LINO MALDONADO

T

ime really does fly when you’re having fun, doesn’t it? After a whirlwind spring season filled with perfect weather and nearly fifteen special events along Northwest Florida beaches — from wine, art, and music festivals to tennis tournaments — we’re all taking a breather from overindulging in lots of spring fun and our favorite adult beverages! No matter where your business is located or what your goals are year after year, it’s so important to stay ingrained in your community. When our team vets local event sponsorship opportunities, there’s so much to consider. What is the anticipated ROI? Who is the target demographic? Will this event positively impact the community? We’re blessed to live in a community where bringing in new visitors during our perfect seasons goes hand in hand with benefitting local charitable organizations. 4  SU M M ER

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This fall, round two of event season kicks off with festivals every weekend from Labor Day to Columbus Day, including one-ofa-kind events like the Destin Beer Festival, Nashville Songwriters Florida Sunshine Tour and the Destin Seafood Festival, among countless other events from Perdido Key to Panama City Beach. Be sure to check out FRLA’s Great Florida Events web page for FRLA’s in-state tourism marketing sponsored events at frla.org/great-florida-events for information about more events statewide! You all have a great summer and come see us during our next perfect season. Cheers!

Lino Maldonado 2016 Chairman of the Board

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Mobile Offers

New South Florida mobile app uses COMPLIMENTARY DRINK offers to get customers in your door SIMPLY BY OFFERING CONSUMERS A FREE DRINK, THEY VISIT. THE MAIN GOAL OF HOSPITALITY ADVERTISING IS TO GET THE CUSTOMER IN THE DOOR, AND NOTHING DOES THAT QUITE AS WELL AS THEGOAPP!

T

o your customers, their smart phones are their connection to their world; their friends, family, work life and, most importantly, their social life. Beyond being a communication device, the smart phone entertains them, keeps them informed and, at times, even comforts them. Like no other app on the market, theGOapp connects you to our members’

CREATING BRAND AMBASSADORS

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provide them with relevant, real-time information about your business. Always on the GO, our growing network of members is on the lookout

We build and grow 1 to 1 relationships around your brand. Our mission is to activate and identify fans and turn them into brand ambassadors by rewarding them to share their genuine moments eating & drinking your products, while at your location, on social media to all their circles of

LIVE ON DEMAND GPS PLATFORM

With a live on demand platform vendors can now get as creative as they want, when they want. Business is slow, create a promo and send a push

specials, special events… when they want to know, they turn on and incentives to share their fun on social media, turning that customer into a marketing opportunity.

THINKING OUTSIDE THE BOX try markets, using unique advertising technology to bring in more costumers and save your businesses money.

OFFER PLATFORMS -

unique functions of which one is designed to turn your consumers into style” promotional platform that puts the power and more importantly the money back into the restaurant or bar owners hands.

5 Different platforms - Zero fees

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does not collect payments nor take fees. 2. Instant Credits - Increase check averages by getting the consumers to spend more to get instant credits. 3. 4. drink, appetizer etc… 5. Happy hour & daily specials – Promote your happy hours / daily specials and have them on auto rotation by days and hours.

TO GET YOUR BUSINESS LISTED TODAY ON A COMMITMENT FREE TRIAL CALL 954-696-0882 OR EMAIL NEWVENDORS@THEGOAPP.COM www.thegoapp.com www.thegoappworks.com Free app for iOS & Android phones keyword: thegoapp


CHAIRMAN

Lino Maldonado ResortQuest by Wyndham Vacation Rentals VICE-CHAIR

Don Fox Firehouse of America, LLC SECRETARY-TREASURER

Kevin Speidel

Hilton Fort Lauderdale DIRECTORS

Chau Nguyen Kobe Japanese Steakhouse

Pam Avery Holiday Inn Tampa Westshore, Tampa

Paul Hineman First Watch Restaurants, Sarasota IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIR

Andrew Reiss

Andrew’s Downtown, Tallahassee PRESIDENT/CEO

Carol B. Dover, FMP EDITOR

Susie R. McKinley EMAIL: EDITOR@FRLA.ORG PUBLISHED BY

Rowland Publishing, Inc. 1932 MICCOSUKEE RD., TALLAHASSEE, FL 32308 Phone: 850-878-0554 Fax: 850-807-5037

Nothing boosts your bottom line like the ultimate TV experience with DIRECTV. • Keep customers entertained with the best in sports, news and entertainment • Drive traffic and repeat business with the undisputed leader in sports • 99% Worry-Free Signal Reliability

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Blackout restrictions and other conditions apply to all sports programming. Actual number of games varies by market due to blackout rules and other conditions. Next-day installation is subject to availability. $19.95 Handling & Delivery fee required. Applicable use tax adjustment may apply on the retail value of the installation. Programming, pricing, terms and conditions subject to change at any time. Taxes not included. Receipt of DIRECTV programming subject to terms of DIRECTV Commercial Customer Viewing Agreement; copy provided with new customer information packet. ©2016 DIRECTV. DIRECTV is a registered trademark of DIRECTV, LLC. AT&T, the AT&T logo and all other AT&T marks contained herein are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

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MAGAZINE Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine is the official publication of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association, Inc. (FRLA). FRLA reserves the right to accept, modify or reject any and all content submitted for publication, whether paid or otherwise, solely at its discretion. Unless otherwise expressly indicated, FRLA does not endorse or warrant any products or services contained herein. In addition, unless otherwise expressly noted, the opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and not necessarily those of FRLA, its directors, officers, members or staff. Content submissions may be made to the Publisher’s Office by regular mail or by email. Please note that submitted materials will not be returned. FRLA Headquarters 230 S. Adams St. Tallahassee, FL 32301 850/224-2250 Fax: 850/224-9213

Printer’s Address 13487 S. Preston Hwy. Lebanon Junction, KY 40150

Ad rates and submission Guidelines at www.FRLA.org Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine (USPS 002-629; ISSN 1044-03640) is published bi-monthly. FRLA Members receive this publication as part of their membership dues. Non-members receive it as a marketing and promotion effort to inform the Florida foodservice and lodging industry of efforts made on its behalf by FRLA. Printing and mailing services: Publisher’s Press, Inc., Lebanon Junction, KY. Address changes may be sent to: FRLA, 230 South Adams St., Tallahassee, FL 32301 or via email to susana@frla.org. Send subscription address changes to susana@frla.org.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


SUPPORT THE NRA AND FRLA PACS

2016 GOLF CHAIRS • Robin Sorensen, Co-Founder, Firehouse Subs • President, Bloomin’ Brands • Lino Maldonado, Vice President of Operations, Gulf Region Wyndham Vacation Rentals • Jason Emmett,

AD 2016 JEFF GRAYSON COMMITTEE ADAM COREY, Tallahassee Hospitality Group LLC HARRY PRICE, Coca-Cola North America BRUCE CRAUL, Legendary Inc. JOHN HORNE, Anna Maria Oyster Bar MONIQUE YEAGER, Tijuana Flats JEN OSGOOD, Cintas JASON FIALKOFF, VGM Client Rewards MIKE VINIK, BJ’s Restaurants JAN GAUTAM, IHRMC and AAHOA MIKE VENEZIANO, The Doherty Group RAY HOLDEN, Miller’s Ale House DAVE REID, World of Beer

SPONSORSHIPS/TEAMS AVAILABLE, PLEASE CONTACT MSTONE@FRLA.ORG EXT. 226


Check frla.org/great-florida-events for more information about our upcoming events! Don't miss any of our Great Florida Events coming up later this summer and in the fall!

FRLA sponsored FSU’s Spring Game held in Orlando in April.

R&B session player Steve Cropper at the Smokin’ Tuna venue during the Key West Songwriters’ Festival. Cropper played on “Knock on Wood”, “The Dock of the Bay” and more.

Jake Owen street concert at the Key West Songwriters’ Festival

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Sunfest 2016 held in West Palm Beach was a world-class venue with world-class music.

Vilano Beach Dish N Fish was a Main Street Florida event.

Savor the EDGE was held in St. Petersburg celebrating the EDGE Main Street District.

The South Walton Beaches Wine & Food Festival drew attendees from all over the Southeast offering songwriters, a wine festival and a wine auction.

Downtown Brew held at Church Street Station attracted beer lovers from all over Central Florida.

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


2016 MARKETING + OPERATIONS SUMMIT WEDNESDAY JULY 27, 2016 WHAT

WHEN

MORNING WELLNESS: YOGA

10:00–11:00 AM

REGISTRATION & INFORMATION DESK

11:00–5:00 PM

REFRESHMENTS in the SUPPLIER SERVICE & PRODUCT GALLERY: Exchange information with sponsors & attendees WELCOME: Bruce Craul – COO, Legendary Inc., Terri L. Wallace – Executive Director, Camarderie Foundation, Inc., Paul Phipps – Chief Marketing Officer, VISIT FLORIDA GENERAL SESSION: Destinations at the Center of Discovery Presented by: Kelly Frailey Covato, Client Partner-Global Marketing Solutions, Facebook

11:00–11:45 AM 11:30 AM–12:00 PM 12:00–12:45 PM

OPENING KEYNOTE: UnMarketing Presented by: Scott Stratten – Marketing, Branding & Social Media Expert Sponsored by: Florida Power & Light

1:00–2:15 PM

SPONSOR NETWORKING MEET & GREET: Take a break: interact with innovative and creative industry suppliers and executives

2:15–2:30 PM

EDUCATION SESSION BLOCK #1 (choose 1 of 3) Option 1: Trust, Transparency & Ice Cream: Business as a Force of Good — Richard Rosen – President & CEO, ROSEN Convergence Marketing Option 2: Workers Compensation in Florida...It is Getting Hot in the Kitchen — Rick Thompson – Vice President Claims Legal, Zenith Insurance Option 3: IT and Communications Teams: Collaboration is Key — Chris Demery – Group VP - Customer Experience Technology, Bloomin’ Brands Inc.

2:30–3:15 PM

EDUCATION SESSION BLOCK #2 (choose 1 of 3) Option 1: How to Use Compensation to Increase Sales and Profits — Fred LeFranc – Chaos Strategist, Results Thru Strategy and Bennie Arbour – CEO/President, Goldco, LLC (Burger King Franchisee) Sponsored by: MBA Option 2: Building a Global Destination (Hotel Panel) — Panelist TBA Option 3: TBA

3:30–4:15 PM

EDUCATION SESSION BLOCK #3 (choose 1 of 3) Option 1: Trends that Impact Our Industry Landscape and Strategies to Stay Ahead — Melissa Wilson – Principal, Technomic, Inc. Option 2: Crisis Survival Skills: How to Protect Your Business When Trouble Strikes — Rick Van Warner – President, The Parquet Group Option 3: Strategies to Up Your Cocktail Game (Panel) — Renee Korbel Quinn – Founder, Spirited South Florida

4:30–5:15 PM

HOSPITALITY HAPPY HOUR: Sip & Mingle with sponsors and executives

5:15–6:15 PM

DINNER, DESSERT, DANCING with NRA AWARD PRESENTATIONS

6:30–8:30 PM

THURSDAY JULY 28, 2016 WHAT

WHEN

EARLY BIRD MORNING WELLNESS: WALK/JOG

8:00–9:00 AM

EDUCATION SESSION BLOCK #4 (choose 1 of 3) Option 1: How to Go from Good to Great — James McManemon – General Manager, The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island Option 2: High Value Insights: Get the Digital Edge to the Affluent Traveler — David Capece – CEO and Founder, Sparxoo Option 3: 360 Degree Chef: Balancing Artistry, Craftsmanship, Business Acumen and Service in Today’s Industry — Chef Kevin – Director of Restaurants and Bars, Boca Resort & Club

8:15–9:00 AM

WELCOME BACK: Bruce Craul – COO, Legendary Inc.

9:15–9:30 AM

GENERAL SESSION: What Makes Great Teams Great Presented by: Don Yaeger – Business Leadership Coach Sponsored by: Dannon Yogurt

9:30–10:30 AM

SPONSOR NETWORKING MEET & GREET: Take a break: interact with innovative and creative industry suppliers and executives

10:30–11:00 PM

EDUCATION SESSION BLOCK #5 (choose 1 of 3) Option 1: Growing My Restaurant Chain: Where Do I Get the Capital? — Paul Samson – Founder, The Franchise Edge Option 2: Targeting Millennials — Dave Reid – VP Director of Operations, World of Beer Franchising Inc. Option 3: VIP Industry Panel — Preparing for the Future (Panel) Moderated by: Mary Rogers – Vice President of Operations, Fontainebleau Presented by: Gene Prescott – President – Biltmore Hotel, Steve Keup – Regional Director of Operations, Hersha Hospitality Henry Delgado – General Manager, Smith & Wollensky, Chef Allen Susser – James Beard Award Winner, Joseph Natale – Vice President of Food & Beverage, Menin Hospitality

11:00–11:45 PM

NETWORKING LUNCH

12:00–12:45 PM

CLOSING KEYNOTE: Customer Experience Differs From Customer Service Presented by: John Moore – Branding Expert and Marketing Mastermind from Starbucks and Whole Foods

1:00–2:00 PM

CLOSING: Bruce Craul – COO, Legendary Inc., Terri L. Wallace – Executive Director, Camarderie Foundation, Inc.,

2:00–2:10 PM

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PATH TO POWER

Chan Cox C

han Cox has been in the wine and liquor business since the early ’70s and has accumulated a vast amount of knowledge and experience in all aspects of the trade. Wine World was founded in 2000 by Chan Cox with its first location in Destin. His founding principle was to provide unparalleled selection and customer service delivered at highly competitive pricing. That founding principle remains strong, and this spirit along with innovation has enabled Wine World to capitalize on evolving market conditions and strategies through various initiatives. Wine World is Northwest Florida’s largest, most successful and influential full-service retailer of fine wine, spirits and beer. Wine World also provides a selection of gourmet foods, cheeses and accessories in each of the seven locations from Pensacola to Panama City Beach. Adjacent to three retail stores is The Wine Bar, famous for its happy hour wine selection featuring over 40 wines served in a relaxed atmosphere. Today there are seven Wine World locations and three Wine Bars in Northwest Florida. In July of 2014, Chan Cox launched his newest restaurant project - The Craft Bar. The concept was born amid the growing interest in American craft beer and high quality artisan spirits that began sweeping the nation. At the heart of The Craft Bar are the 30 extraordinary craft beers on tap. These beers include some of the rarest and most sought after in the nation and provides a unique experience for diners in Northwest Florida. The beers are curated by our beverage specialists to showcase a diverse and high-quality selection.

Main Logo - Most applications.

How did you get started in the hospitality industry?

My first job after college was as a sales trainee for a wholesale wine and spirits distributor. Keep in mind, this was 1970 and the best-selling wine in Northwest Florida was Italian Swiss Colony Very Dry Sherry.

Early in your career what was the most valuable lesson you learned? I learned the most valuable lesson of my career

working for Standard Distributing Company: “If you can’t outsell ’em, outwork ’em.”

Do you have any mentors who were instrumental in helping you achieve your goals? The people who in-

fluenced my career the most were my mother Mary Cox, for her unconditional support, and John Kugelman, my first boss, who taught me essential business principles.

What is the single greatest factor in the success of your career? The single greatest factor of my success has been the dedicated work ethic inherited from my family.

How has participation in Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association positively affected your business? FRLA has allowed me to develop relationships with VISIT FLORIDA and inspirational people like Carol Dover and Ray Green. I am in awe of their commitment and accomplishment for FRLA statewide.

How have your philanthropies and giving back to the community affected your business decisions?

My business has been blessed by the Northwest Florida Community. I started a little wine festival 31 years ago which has grown tremendously in the past decade. Ten years ago I founded the Destin Charity Wine Auction Foundation, and it was most recently named Wine Spectator Magazine’s fourth-largest Charity Wine Festival in the United States.

Is there anything you would like to share with Florida’s hospitality industry members? Giving back to the community that supports you is good business.

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Interested in advertising in Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine?

COOL

Contact Susie McKinley Editor at Editor@frla.org or 850.508.1139

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Douglas Braselman CHEF DE CUISINE OF EMERIL’S ORLANDO

Chef Doug comes to Emeril’s with 14 years of experience. He is a New Orleans native and has worked with some of New Orleans finest: Chef David Slater, Chef Gregg Collier, Chef Susan Spicer, Chef James Wong and Roy Barre. Chef Doug worked at Chef Emeril Lagasse’s flagship restaurant in New Orleans prior to his arrival at Emeril’s Orlando. Describe your restaurant concept.

Emeril’s Orlando is based on the original Emeril’s restaurant in New Orleans. We serve “New” New Orleans Cuisine while featuring the great products available here in the state of Florida. Does being located at Universal’s CityWalk® inspire your menu? If not, is it your native New Orleans?

Being located at Universal’s CityWalk® provides us the opportunity to feature our “New” New Orleans Cuisine, as well as the freshest local ingredients, with guests from around the world. Please describe your open kitchen and chef’s food bar.

Our Food Bar is a great place to experience the inner workings of our kitchen. It allows you the opportunity to sit back and relax while we cook for you … or you can get into the zone and ask questions and be more interactive. Do you create menu items to complement local produce, meats and seafood?

Yes, absolutely. I feel like the best way to connect with locals is to use and embrace fresh local products that they’ve been using their whole lives. We also believe that local product will always be the freshest available regionally. Most of the seafood is coming from off the Florida coast, such as Cape Canaveral shrimp, yellowtail snapper from the Florida Keys and Cedar Key oysters … just to name a few. Describe some of your most popular menu items.

SHRIMP PO’ BOY Flash-fried Gulf shrimp, lettuce, tomato, red onion, mayonnaise, pickle SWEET BARBECUE SALMON Andouille + potato hash, crispy onions, house-made Worcestershire sauce GRILLED DOUBLE CUT PORK CHOP Caramelized sweet potatoes, tamarind glaze, green chili molé EMERIL’S BANANA CREAM PIE Graham cracker crust, caramel sauce, chocolate shavings

HotChef? Are You Considered Among 2016 Hottest Chefs? Florida’s

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Douglas Braselman, Chef de Cuisine

What is your “sizzle” — for example, cuisine and food that are your signature or “specialties,” unique food presentations or any new ideas that you are using?

We have a lot of “signature” dishes and all of the above items are in that category. One new dish that has garnered a lot of hype is our Duck Wings. It has been a “special” for the past several weeks, however, it may end up on the menu permanently in the near future.

What is your favorite ingredient right now?

I’m not sure I have a favorite ingredient right now. I truly enjoy utilizing whatever’s in season. Right now, I’m using Plant City strawberries and fresh Trevi pasta from College Park. What do you attribute your success in the restaurant business to?

I credit my successes to the great people I’ve surrounded myself with throughout my life … from chefs to general managers to family and friends.

Know a chef who is creating a buzz with innovative cuisine, exceptional presentation or fresh new ideas? FRLA wants to tell the state about them in a bi-monthly feature in FR&L Magazine. Submit your favorite chef du jour to editor@frla.org. Please include a brief explanation of why your submission should be considered one of the hottest chefs in Florida. Be sure to include restaurant and contact information. Submissions will be featured in FR&L Magazine as Chefs That F LO RSizzle! I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


The Best Meetings Don’t Always Look Like Meetings. #MeetFL By LILY ETEMADI

F

lorida welcomed a record 106.3 million out-of-state and international visitors in 2015. Nearly 6.2 million of them traveled to the Sunshine State to attend a meeting, conference or trade show. Meetings visitors stay an average of 3.3 nights and spend nearly $120 more per day than leisure travelers. This represents an economic impact of $1.2 billion in hotel night stays alone. To accommodate these visitors, Florida boasts 12 million square feet of hotel meeting space. There are currently 384,000 square feet under construction and another 1.4 million in the planning stages. Clearly, the meetings industry is big business in the Sunshine State, and VISIT FLORIDA has created a host of programs to reach this vital market. Florida Encounter is VISIT FLORIDA’s signature event for the meetings, conventions and incentive travel industry. This highly regarded appointment-only trade show showcasing Florida suppliers is designed to match qualified meeting professionals from target markets with meeting destinations, properties and services. Maintaining a true one-to-one ratio between buyers and suppliers ensures that appointment books are as full as possible for all attendees. To learn more, go to FloridaEncounter.com. VISIT FLORIDA’s Meetings & Travel Trade team coordinates and hosts innovative “Very Important Planner” events in top domestic markets where a high concentration of meeting professionals are located or headquartered, such as Atlanta, Boston, Chicago and New York. These in-market events include up to 12 industry partners who help co-host unique and memorable networking opportunities that

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allow attendees to build relationships and share information about their products and services. Through our partnerships with key meeting industry organizations such as Meeting Professionals International, Professional Convention Management Association, IMEX America and Connect, VISIT FLORIDA is able to offer partners several participation options and sponsorship-share opportunities at their appointment-based shows and marketplaces targeting meeting professionals. These options include stand sharing, meal sponsorships, in-room gifts, registration bag inserts, e-marketing to planners and even speaking opportunities. VISIT FLORIDA has also created a Cover Your Event insurance program that offers supplemental coverage for costs directly related to re-booking a meeting or convention should it be displaced due to a named hurricane. This ensures your clients can plan their meeting with confidence and take full advantage of Florida’s venues any time of the year. To learn more, go to FloridaMeetings.com. To take full advantage of discounts on meetings programs and engage with visitors through VISIT FLORIDA’s multiple marketing channels, join as a Marketing Partner at VISITFLORIDA.org/join. If your property has designated meeting space, you can have a listing on FloridaMeetings.com, a resource for planners looking to book their next meeting in Florida. To enroll today, call the VISIT FLORIDA industry hotline at 877-435-2872 or email partner@VISITFLORIDA.org. Lily Etemadi, is VISIT FLORIDA’s Manager of Meetings and Travel Trade.

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PAY LESS for GAS AD

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2016

FRLA 2016 ••101 Cantina, Gainesville ••AAA Lakeside Cafe, Heathrow ••ACA Talent, Fort Lauderdale ••Ackuritlabs Inc, Tallahassee ••Adam’s Rib Co, Gainesville ••A-Niks Outdoor Comfort Solutions, Tampa ••Anticipation Luxury Yacht Charters, Fort Lauderdale ••Aqua Prime Seafood & Steaks, Indian Rocks Beach ••Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale, Fort Lauderdale ••Atlas Insurance Agency, Sarasota ••Ava Country Inn & Suites, Tallahassee ••Avedon Group, Coral Gables ••Azu Lucy Ho’s Restaurant, Tallahassee ••Azul of Key West, Key West ••Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz PC, Tallahassee ••Baldwin Krystyn Sherman Partners, Tampa ••Banko Cantina, West Palm Beach ••BarVision, Boca Raton ••Beacha Pizza, Fort Myers Beach ••Beef ‘O’ Brady’s, Gulf Breeze ••Bella Bella, Tallahassee ••Bella Napoli Pizzeria & Restaurant, Port Charlotte ••Bemka House of Caviar & Fine Foods, Fort Lauderdale ••Berry Fresh Cafe, Stuart ••Billy’s Stone Crab, Hollywood ••Bistro AIX, Jacksonville ••Blue Martini Phoenix, Phoenix ••Blue Orchid Thai Cuisine, Jacksonville ••Bobby Rodriguez Productions, Fort Lauderdale ••Bolay Wellington, Royal Palm Beach ••Bookel, Lake Worth ••BRE Polygon Prop Owner LLC, Spartanburg ••Bread Box, Orlando ••Brilliant Supply, Delray Beach ••Bull & Tarpon, Punta Gorda ••Cafe Vico, Fort Lauderdale ••Cantina Laredo, Miramar Beach ••Carmelo’s Italian Ristorante, Punta Gorda ••Casino Beach Bar & Grille, Gulf Breeze ••Charlotte Harbor Visitor & Convention Bureau, Port Charlotte ••Chicken Salad Chick, Naples ••Christoff’s Bistro & Wine Bar, Tallahassee ••Cinnabon, Orlando ••Clancy’s Irish Sports Pub, Bradenton ••Cleveland Kitchen, Lakewood Ranch ••CMSText, Lexington ••Coca-Cola Refreshments, Tampa ••Coco Bambu Restaurant, Miami Beach ••Coconuts, Fort Lauderdale ••Cold Stone Creamery, Orlando ••Comfort Inn International, Orlando ••Comfort Restaurant, Jacksonville ••Comfort Suites Panama City, Panama City ••Connor’s Steak & Seafood, Fort Myers ••Country Inn & Suites, Gainesville ••Courtyard Palm Beach Jupiter, Jupiter ••Cowfish Sushi Burger Bar, Orlando ••CPS23 Marketing, Tallahassee ••Culver’s Jupiter, Jupiter ••Daily Eats Sarasota, Bradenton

••Daily Eats, Saint Petersburg ••Dan Marino Foundation, Fort Lauderdale ••Dannon Company ••DaVinci’s Pizza & Pasta, Port Charlotte ••Days Inn Historic Pensacola, Pensacola ••Disney Vacation Club Timeshares, Orlando ••E-Form Inc, Tallahassee ••El Criollo Grill, Tallahassee ••Embassy Suites Orlando Downtown, Orlando ••Excellent Fruit & Produce Inc, Miami ••Eyeson Digital Surveillance & Management Systems LLC, Medley ••Faith Cosmetics America Inc, New York ••Firehouse Subs of America, Jacksonville ••Fishale Taphouse & Grill, Panama City ••Flavor Palette, Ponte Vedra Beach ••Focus Development, Odessa ••Food Court At Universal Citywalk, Orlando ••Foxy Brown, Fort Lauderdale ••Freckled Fin, Bradenton Beach ••Fresh Hen, Sarasota, Bradenton ••Fresh Kitchen, Saint Petersburg ••Fries To Caviar, Boca Raton ••Fuzzy’s Taco Shop, Fort Myers ••Gaines Street Pies, Tallahassee ••Gandhi’s, Lake Worth ••Gateway Bank of Southwest Florida, Sarasota ••Goldco LLC, Dothan ••GoPuck, Sarasota ••Gratuity Solutions LLC, Naples ••Guard Dog Valves, Naples ••Hamaknockers, Crawfordville ••Hampton Inn & Suites PCB, Panama City Beach ••Hawkers Asian Street Fare, Jacksonville ••Hawkers Asian Street Fare, Saint Petersburg ••Heartland Lanes, Sebring ••Holiday Inn Express, Pensacola ••Holiday Inn Sanibel Island, Sanibel ••Home2 Suites, Tallahassee ••Hometown Grill, Port Charlotte ••Hospitality Furniture Inc, Safety Harbor ••Hot Spot, Pensacola ••HUB International, Jacksonville ••HUB International Florida, Winter Park ••Hutchinson Island Resort, Jenson Beach ••IBAR, Palm Beach Gardens ••Iggy’s Seafood Shack, Fruit Cove ••IL Desco, Jacksonville ••Integrative Corporate Solutions LLC, Tampa ••Island City House, Key West ••Island Gypsy Cafe & Marina Bar, Naples ••Jackson Lewis PC, Tampa ••Jardin, West Palm Beach ••Jim ‘N Nick’s Bar-B-Q, Niceville ••Johnny O’Quigley’s Ale House, Destin ••John’s Pass Village & Boardwalk, Madeira Beach ••K&L Gates LLP, Miami ••Kearney Center, Tallahassee ••Keiser University, West Palm Beach ••Krave Restaurant & Lounge, Sunrise ••Kubicki Draper, Fort Lauderdale ••Kubicki Draper, West Palm Beach ••Laundry Plus, Bradenton ••Lewellyn’s of Fort Lauderdale, Fort Lauderdale

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


New Members Choose Infinite Energy &

••Liquors USA Corp, Miami ••Little Chalet, Boca Raton ••Littler Mendelson, Orlando ••Lorenzo Bomnin Chevrolet, Miami ••LoSalt, East Kilbride, Scotland ••Lots of Yachts, West Palm Beach ••Love Street LLC, Jupiter ••Lucy Dog, Orlando ••Lykes Insurance Inc, Sarasota ••Maa Kitchen, Jacksonville ••Main Street Entertainment, Tallahassee ••Mango’s Tropical Cafe, Miami Beach ••Marriott Stanton, South Beach, Miami Beach ••McCall Service, Jacksonville ••McConnell’s Irish Pub & Grill, Key West ••McHenry’s Irish Sports Pub, Keystone Heights ••Mellow Mushroom, Lakeland ••Menchie’s, Orlando ••Miller Construction Company, Fort Lauderdale ••Mirabito Natural Gas, Fort Lauderdale ••Mission BBQ, Davie ••Mission BBQ, Tampa ••Morton’s Siesta Market, Sarasota ••Nana’s Diner, West Palm Beach ••NBC Sports Grill & Brew, Orlando ••Niroc Consultants Inc, Lauderhill ••Norton’s Eastside Sports Bar, Clearwater ••Norton’s Riverside Sports Bar & Grill, Crystal River ••Norton’s Southside Sports Bar, Clearwater ••Norton’s Sports Bar & Grill, Dunedin ••Oak Room, Boca Raton ••Obi’s Fillin’ Station, Saint Augustine Beach ••One Ocean Resort & Spa, Atlantic Beach ••Original American Kitchen, Gainesville ••Original Pancake House of Naples, Naples ••Orion Wine Imports LLC, Clearwater ••Orkin Commercial Services, West Palm Beach ••Osaka Japanese Steakhouse & Sushi Bar, Panama City Beach ••The Other End, Destin ••Palm Beach Food & Wine Festival, Boca Raton ••Pasco County Office of Tourism Development, New Port Richey ••Pelican Cove Resort & Marina, Islamorada ••Pelican Hotel, Miami Beach ••Perfect Caper, Punta Gorda ••Pizza Shack Wood Fired, Jacksonville ••Postcard Inn Beach Resort & Marina, Islamorada ••PPG Paints, Greenacres ••Prevatt’s Sports Bar & Grill, Middleburg ••Quality Inn Pensacola, Pensacola ••R&M Mill Work, Clearwater ••Radiant Energy, Tampa ••Red Cow Barbecue, Fort Lauderdale ••Red Oven Pizza Bakery, Orlando ••Red Roof Inn, Palm Coast ••Resort Security Solutions, Roswell ••Revolution Tea, Hallandale Beach ••Riley Hotel Group, Medina ••Rodeway Inn Panama City, Panama City ••Rowe Bar, St. Pete Beach ••Royal Vapor Lounge, Largo ••Sacred Pepper, Tampa ••Salvati’s Pizza Factory, Fort Walton Beach

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••Samurai Japanese Steakhouse & Sushi, Navarre ••School Board of Broward County, Fort Lauderdale

••SEC Consulting LLC, Fort Walton Beach

••Sempermed USA, Clearwater

••Senior Care Group Foundation, Tampa ••Senor Frog’s Miami, Miami Beach

••Ship 2 Shore Seafood & Steaks, Jacksonville ••Shrimp Boat Restaurant, Panama City ••Silverball Museum, Delray Beach ••Small Box Energy, Chandler ••Sombrero Resort & Marina, Marathon

SAVE!

••South Central A\V, Tampa ••South University, Tampa ••Southtel, Pensacola ••Spring Brothers Irish Pub, Miami Beach ••Spring Chicken Coral Gables, Coral Gables ••Square 1, Winter Park ••Starbucks, Orlando ••StarlIT Technology, Naples ••Staymore Extended Studios, Kissimmee ••Suncoast Commercial Imaging & Art, Bradenton ••Super 8 Pensacola NAS Corry, Pensacola ••Sushi Song, Miami Beach ••SVN South Commercial Real Estate Advisors, Miami ••The Ryan Wells Foundation, Palm Harbor

AD

••The Vault, West Palm Beach ••The Wine Loft, Naples ••Top Hat Deli, Fort Lauderdale ••Trane US Inc, West Palm Beach ••Travinia Italian Kitchen & Wine Bar, Miramar Beach ••T-Ray’s Burger Station, Fernandina Beach ••TriMark Strategic, Jacksonville ••TriMark Strategic, Largo ••TriMark Strategic, West Palm Beach ••Trust & Co, Miami ••Uncle Nick’s Pizza, Port Charlotte ••Unconventional Strategies, Tallahassee ••Urban Farming Institute, Oakland Park ••Urgent Care of the Palm Beaches, West Palm Beach ••US Foodservice, Tampa ••Utmost Energy Partners LLC, Miami Beach ••Venus Group Inc, Miami Shores ••Vertigo Burgers & Fries, Tallahassee ••Village Inn, Largo ••Village Inn, Seminole ••VistaServ, Sarasota ••Wave Bar & Grill, Palm Beach Gardens

The best natural gas plans for your business. Call for a quote today!

(855)375-2555 FRLA@InfiniteEnergy.com www.InfiniteEnergy.com

••Westwinds Inn, Key West ••Wine Loft, Tallahassee ••Winter Park Raquet Club, Winter Park ••Woody’s Bar-B-Q, Jacksonville ••XBomb Energy Drink, Windermere ••Yummies Donuts and BBQ, Venice

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

17


Secrets of Success

Okeechobee Steak House By SUSIE MCKINLEY // Photos provided by Okeechobee Steak House

O

keechobee Steak House is one of Florida’s legacy restaurants. It’s been open since 1947, first as the Okeechobee Drive-In, and has been a member of the Florida Restaurant Association, now the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association, since the inception of the organization. It is centrally located in Palm Beach County.

PLEASE EXPLAIN TO READERS THE STORY OF OKEECHOBEE STEAK HOUSE.

My grandparents, Ralph and Norma Lewis, met in 1935 at the Hotel George Washington in West Palm Beach, where Ralph Lewis was the Executive Chef and Norma worked the front of house. They married that same year and made a commitment to work as hard as they could, saving all their money for the next ten years. In 1947, they opened the Okeechobee Drive-In, 2.5 miles west of downtown. At that time, guests could hang a steel tray on the car window, and a curb hop waitress would bring dinner and drinks to enjoy in the comfort of their automobile. At that time it was so far out of town that vendors would not deliver to such a remote area, so they purchased a paneled truck and made runs into town picking up supplies six days

a week. The building was constructed out of Dade Pine frame, rough-cut tongue-andgroove cypress board exterior, and tongue and groove pine inside with no insulation. There was an open charcoal pit with a chimney that all of the steaks were cooked on from 1947 to July of 1974, no air-conditioning and a gravel parking lot. My grandmother said just about everyone told them it was a terrible idea to open a place that far out of town and the restaurant would never make it. My grandfather always said the only way the town could grow was to the west. On the day of the grand opening in October 1947, there was a two-hour wait, and sixty-eight years later, we are still here and as busy as the good old days. Curtis Lewis took over the operation in the summer of 1974, and he changed the name to Okeechobee Steakhouse. Today, the third generation of the Lewis family hosts guests at the business that has been in their family for generations. The steakhouse is still in the original location, an original building owned and operated by the same family. October 2016 will mark the 69th anniversary of the restaurant. The family’s long-term goal is to celebrate their 100th anniversary one day. WHAT MAKES YOUR RESTAURANT UNIQUE?

We are a classic steakhouse, where hospitality rules. Steaks are aged on premises in our custom-dry aging rooms, all steaks are hand cut inhouse and handpicked by either a family member or the watchful eye of our Executive Chef Jamie Stienbrecher. We have old-school charm that echoes memories of a time long past.

CAN YOU TELL READERS ABOUT YOUR SIGNATURE DISHES?

Our dry-aged Prime Bone-In 27-ounce Ribeye is in a class of its own, with extreme robust flavor and very tender. It’s the type of steak that when you take a bite, you just want to lean back in your chair, close your eyes and savor the moment. It’s the manly steak-eaters choice of steaks.

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Our dry-aged 24-ounce Prime Porterhouse is simply amazing. You get the best of both worlds: a succulent tender filet on one side and the hearty classic NY sirloin strip on the other side. It’s a classic. You can’t go wrong with this steak. Our signature Black and White Filet is two filet mignon medallions topped with grilled shrimp, one with bordelaise sauce the other with house made béarnaise. It is classic fine dining at its best. Our Coconut cream pie is what everyone raves about. EXPLAIN TO READERS ABOUT YOUR COCKTAILS AND WINE LIST.

Our cocktails and wines have evolved so much over the past seven decades. Years ago patrons wanted simple whiskey cocktails, Schlitz and Budweiser beer in steel cans that you had to use a can opener on, F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


and very little wine. Today customer’s palates are more sophisticated. Martinis, bourbons along with an array of wines is what they are looking for now. Some of our most popular cocktails are The Ultimate Dirty Martini, Okeechobee Manhattan, Orange Moscow Mule and our new edition of the Black Beauty. DESCRIBE YOUR HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL AND SOUGHT-AFTER “FREE DINNER ON YOUR BIRTHDAY” PROMOTION.

This really caught on quickly. My father Curtis Lewis started this about 25 years ago. Simply come in on the day of your birthday, and we will give you an 8-ounce New York Strip dinner free with the purchase of another dinner of equal or greater value. Last year we celebrated over seven thousand birthdays!

WHAT IS THE MOST IMPORTANT THING YOU EMPHASIZE WITH STAFF ABOUT YOUR CUSTOMERS?

“Success is the sum of small efforts repeated day in and day out.”

WHAT CRITICAL OR PRIORITY AREAS DO YOU EMPHASIZE IN TRAINING YOUR STAFF AND HOW DO YOU MANAGE EMPLOYEE TURNOVER?

Employee turnover is something we have very little issue with. There are dishwashers who have been with us over twenty years, a waiter, Wesley Thomas ,over forty years, and all of our lead managers have been with us over ten years. The key to that is: Pay employees well, treat them like family, because as an owner they should be that important to you, don’t micro-manage and allow everyone to do their job. Our GM, Luis Fernandez, always tells our employees, “Go make money, smile and have fun.”

We emphasize that customers are our most valuable asset, and we are in the business of getting and keeping customers who want a great dining experience. Customers pay all of our salaries. Without them we have an empty building.

Attitude is everything. Employees must always be enthusiastic and have a sense of urgency. We are here to provide hospitality and service to our guests, as well as each other. Never allow your problems or the business’ problems to become the customer’s problem. Follow our systems because we don’t compromise our standards. These are non-negotiable.

WHAT ARE OKEECHOBEE STEAK HOUSE’S SECRETS OF SUCCESS?

I’m not really sure there is a secret, but there are key points to being successful. • Systems — this is where so many independent owners fail. They spend too much time trying to do it all themselves, and play the guessing game by thinking they know everything that’s going on in their restaurant. Ironclad systems must be in place, and staff must use them every day, all day. It’s the only way to achieve consistency in your daily operations and your bank account. • Beware of fads and be cautious of trends. Most of the time they have very little or no staying power. • Hire managers and staff who are better than you and hold them accountable. We have amazingly talented managers and staff. I have absolute confidence that our managers could open their own restaurants and be extremely successful.

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• Lots and lots of hard work, long hours and taking risks. Sometimes the risks pay off and sometimes they don’t. When they don’t, just move forward, don’t dwell on it, learn from it and get back to taking care of business right away. • Keeping up with the times without losing your identity or culture. This is the trickiest part of everything we do. Keeping our old-school look and culture without letting the building become run down and technology outdated, it must be planned out carefully then gradually introduced to guests. We recently did some major upgrades, but we took two years to complete them. • Be open to new ideas and be a visionary. My grandfather, Ralph Lewis, acted on his vision of the town moving westward, and over time our location became one of the busiest intersections in Palm Beach County. My father, Curtis, realized in the early 70s that things were changing, so he completely remodeled the restaurant, dropped the Drive-In from the name, and that’s when the name Okeechobee Steakhouse came to be. And as this is being written, we are in the stages of another visionary transformation that we believe will take us through the next several decades. • Hospitality, hospitality, hospitality! There are only a few things that you can offer a guest: food, service, atmosphere and hospitality. Take the food and service, wrap them up in hospitality and then serve it. My grandparents were masters at hospitality. They practiced it in every aspect of their lives, creating the core for the culture we have today. By the way, service and hospitality are not the same thing. • This simple quote sums up what it takes to succeed: “Success is the sum of small efforts repeated day in and day out.” –R. Collier F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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BE PREPARED

RED ALERT: THE MENU COPS ARE COMING By GEOFF LUEBKEMANN, FRLA VICE PRESIDENT OF EDUCATION AND TRAINING Unless you’ve been completely off the grid for the past month, you’ve no doubt heard the latest hot topic among restaurant watchdogs: indictment of farm-to-table menu claims. Spawned by a lengthy and well-researched Tampa Bay Times investigation, the media are on high alert for fraud or misrepresentation — intentional or otherwise — regarding restaurant food-sourcing claims. Many popular eateries have been called out by name for specific and false claims regarding the names of farmers, farms, fisherman, boats, species and other buzz-worthy marketing words that tap into the “locally” or “sustainably” sourced food mantra so many diners currently value. FRLA has long warned operators to be aware of and prevent fraud of any type, and claims regarding food sourcing is no different: Ignore this at your peril. Food service operators communicating specific claims regarding food sourcing must be prepared to prove such claims to consumers, media or

regulators that seek verification. The most reliable verification could be invoices for purchases from the claimed source, although a documented statement from the source confirming the supplier-purchaser relationship may suffice. Examples of claims currently attracting attention include naming a source farm, fisherman, geographic location, and/or species in printed menus, specials boards, chalk boards, server presentations or any other offer to patrons. Some of the errors identified in the recent media coverage include citing specific sources that were either never used, or had been used at one time but no longer were and the claim remained in use with patrons. FRLA reminds all operators that fraud of any type is unacceptable and exposes the operator to significant regulatory penalties and potentially fatal media attention. Take a moment right now to verify that all sourcing claims communicated by any means to your patrons are current, accurate and true. Don’t be the next headline.

PREPARING FOR HURRICANE SEASON: SECURE A FREE WEB LISTING ON VISITFLORIDA.COM TODAY By KATE CHUNKA, VISIT FLORIDA As the Florida tourism industry approaches the start of the 2016 Hurricane Season, VISIT FLORIDA has taken steps to prepare for any potential weather threat that might impact the state. As in past response efforts, VISIT FLORIDA uses Travel Alert and Advisory features to provide our visitors with real-time, hyper-local information. These features include official state response resources, live Twitter feeds from DMOs, webcam feeds from tourism destinations, videos created by our content team and an aggregation of industry and consumer social media posts that include #FloridaNow. Should a widespread evacuation order be declared within the state, VISIT FLORIDA will activate the Emergency Accommodations Module (EAM). When activated, this feature will provide statewide accommodations availability on VISITFLORIDA.com, 20  SU M M ER

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its associated mobile site and the Florida Division of Emergency Management’s FloridaEvacuates.com. Only accommodations with free or paid listings on VISITFLORIDA.com will be able to populate availability information for their accommodation in a time of emergency. It is important that your property’s web listing be active on VISITFLORIDA.com in advance of any potential weather threat. To secure a web listing now, go to VISITFLORIDA.org/join, populate the required fields and select the “Free Web Listing” option.

VISIT FLORIDA hosted a brief webinar for lodging businesses on May 17 to share how we will populate your property’s availability directly through the Data Engine. To listen to the recorded webinar, go to VISITFLORIDA.org/library. Lastly, please visit the Hurricane Information page within the Crisis Preparation section on VISITFLORIDA.org. It contains a link to the EAM webinar, helpful FAQs, media relations tips and resources for communicating with key audiences in times of crisis. For more information, please visit regcomplianceusa.com.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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HOSPITALITY HAPPENINGS We are proud to highlight the latest happenings in hospitality. This section is designed to serve as an update on our industry and provide a snapshot of what we’re accomplishing together. If you would like to share something significant that’s happening in your area, feel free to submit your story to editor@frla.org.

Members from FRLA’s Florida delegation discussed industry issues with Senator Marco Rubio during AH&LA’s Legislative Action Summit in Washington D.C.

Engage Orlando held an Opportunity Jobs Academy event featuring Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer.

Representative Kathy Castor spent time with FRLA’s Florida Delegation while in Washington D.C.

King Kai is welcomed to the Mai Kai! (left to right) Jim Hayward - Fort Lauderdale Blogger, Kern Mattei - Mai-Kai Manager, Dave Levy - Mai-Kai CEO, Will Anders - Sculptor, Max Vrahimis - freelance writer, Pia Dahlquist - Mai-Kai Marketing Director/FRLA Broward Board Member

Firehouse Subs received the National Restaurant Association’s Restaurant Neighbor Award.

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


HOSPITALITY HAPPENINGS

235 folks attended the Palm Beach Chapter’s EATS event which raised $10,000 in scholarship funds.

A handful of FRLA Chapters hosted “A FISH! Experience,” one of the most popular training programs ever.

The First Coast Political Luncheon took place this spring with Representatives Paul Renner and Cyndi Stevenson.

Department of Business and Professional Regulation Secretary Ken Lawson received recognition for participation in the Broward Excellence in Education Gala.

FRLA’s First Coast Chapter hosted its first-ever Bust-A-Clay.

FRLA Broward Chapter President, Eduardo Fernandez with retiring Broward Tourism Czar, Nicki Grossman

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2016 FRLA HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY AWARDS

N O M I N AT I O N S ! DON’T MISS YOUR CHANCE TO NOMINATE YOUR FAVORITE HOTEL OR RESTAURANT EMPLOYEE FOR THE 2016 FRLA HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY AWARDS ! FRLA is receiving nominations through August 30 for the following award categories: • Restaurant General Manager of the Year • Hotel General Manager of the Year • Restaurant Employee of the Year • Hotel Employee of the Year • Chef of the Year

CONGRATULATIONS

A panel of judges consisting of restaurateurs, hoteliers, and allied members will select the top three nominees in each category. Following the judging process, FRLA will notify the nominators and the top three nominees in each category. Those nominees will be invited to the Awards & Installation Gala on September 28, 2016, held in conjunction with the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show, where the winners will be announced! Nomination form is available on www.frla.org

2017 FRLA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE! 2017 Chairman of the Board

DON FOX – Firehouse of America, LLC, Jacksonville 2017 Vice Chairman of the Board

KEVIN SPEIDEL – Hilton Worldwide Fort Lauderdale Restaurant Director for 2016-17 & Designated as 2017 Secretary-Treasurer

CHAU NGUYEN – Kobe Japanese Steakhouse, Altamonte Springs Lodging Director for 2016-17

PAM AVERY – Holiday Inn Tampa Westshore Airport New 2017-18 Restaurant Director

ALAN PALMIERI – Marlow’s Tavern, Orlando New 2017-18 Lodging Director

SHELDON SUGA – Hawk’s Cay Resort, Duck Key Immediate Past Chairman, which is an automatic appointment:

LINO MALDONADO – Wyndham Vacation Rentals, Fort Walton Beach 24  SU M M ER

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


FLORIDA RESTAURANT INDUSTRY AT A GLANCE Restaurants are a driving force in Florida’s economy. They provide jobs and build careers for thousands of people, and play a vital role in local communities throughout the state.

995,600

39,325

Restaurant and food service jobs in Florida in 2016 = 14% of employment in the state

Eating and drinking place locations in Florida in 2014

And by 2 026, that number is projected to grow by 17.4%

$40.3 billion

= 173,000 additional jobs, for a total of 1,168,600

Projected sales in Florida’s restaurants in 2016

1 MILLION+ serving millions every day

LOCATIONS

HOW BIG IS AMERICA’S RESTAURANT INDUSTRY?

$783 BILLION = 4% of the U.S. GDP

SALES

14.4 MILLION PEOPLE = 10% of the nation’s workforce

EMPLOYMENT

JOBS AND ENTREPRENEURIAL OPPORTUNITIES IN EVERY COMMUNITY EATING AND DRINKING PLACES:

U.S. SENATORS

Bill Nelson (D) Marco Rubio (R)

Establishments in the state

Employees in the state*

39,325

704,400

EATING AND DRINKING PLACES:

U.S. REPRESENTATIVES

Establishments in the state

Employees in the state*

EATING AND DRINKING PLACES:

U.S. REPRESENTATIVES

Establishments in the state

Employees in the state*

1

Jeff Miller (R)

1,505

26,953

15

Dennis Ross (R)

973

2

Gwen Graham (D)

1,427

25,563

16 Vern Buchanan (R)

1,517

27,179

3

Ted Yoho (R)

1,169

20,935

17

Tom Rooney (R)

955

17,098

4

Ander Crenshaw (R)

1,663

29,780

18

Patrick Murphy (D)

1,402

25,110

5

Corrine Brown (D)

1,749

31,336

19 Curt Clawson (R)

1,732

31,019

6

Ron DeSantis (R)

1,558

27,914

20 Alcee L. Hastings (D)

1,822

32,629

7

John Mica (R)

1,425

25,525

21

1,131

20,260

8

Bill Posey (R)

1,482

26,546

22 Lois Frankel (D)

2,204

39,484

9

Alan Grayson (D)

1,134

20,305

23 Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D) 1,806

32,342

1,593

28,532

24 Frederica Wilson (D)

1,507

26,995

971

17,400

25 Mario Diaz-Balart (R)

1,062

19,032

1,265

22,653

26 Carlos Curbelo (R)

1,153

20,652

1,742

31,204

27 Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R)

1,701

30,477

1,678

30,051

39,325

704,400

10 Daniel Webster (R) 11

Richard Nugent (R)

12

Gus M. Bilirakis (R)

13

David Jolly (R)

14 Kathy Castor (D)

Theodore E. Deutch (D)

TOTAL

17,426

*Florida’s 704,400 eating-and-drinking-place jobs represent the majority of the state’s total restaurant and foodservice workforce of 995,600 jobs, with the remainder being non-restaurant foodservice positions.

FOR MORE INFORMATION: Restaurant.org • FRLA.org

Source: National Restaurant Association, based on data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics & U.S. Census Bureau, 2014

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HOW ABOUT A NEW FUSION OF FLAVOR? The story of Taylor’s Ultimate Gourmet Sauces was born in Miami with a heritage of great food and a family who loved to cook. Taylor Hicks had the opportunity of growing up in a family of wonderful, talented cooks. His dad 26  SU M M ER

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is from Peru, and his mother’s family is from Georgia. You could say Taylor’s parent’s cooked Southern food with a Peruvian twist. Treasured sauce recipes have been the keystone to the food Taylor’s family has shared and

passed down from generation to generation, a cultivation point to his sauces of today. Taylor realized that this unique and flavorful mix of culture could become both the inspiration and influence for his desire to create and bottle superior hot sauces and marinades. Taylor’s Ultimate line of gourmet sauces has been expanding rapidly, taking pride in the fact that both his restaurant and retail account base growth has been strategically attributed through word of mouth. This commercial success and expansion has created passionate devotees from Miami to Central Florida, including the Bahamas proving that news of something special in the culinary world spreads fast. Currently, Taylor produces seven sauces that are certain to catch your attention. He suggests that the best place to start is with Peruvian-Style Garlic Sauce and Peruvian Gold Hot Sauce. In addition, Taylor’s Mild Jalapeño, Mild Habanero and Tuscan Style Hot Sauces are all climbing in commercial popularity with his latest additions of Andes Fire and Bonzai catching up fast as customer favorites! For more information visit: taylorsultimate.com. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


ANNUAL BEVERAGE EDITION W

GRASSLANDS BREWING COMPANY IN TALLAHASSEE PHOTO BY MALLORY BROOKS FOR VISIT FLORIDA

elcome to the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine’s Beverage Edition! From a great soft drink, an iced tea, a favorite coffee, to a classic cocktail, a Florida brewed craft beer, some bubbly or a fantastic wine, nothing sets the tone for any gathering like the beverage service.

Beverages are as important as any food that is ordered by a guest. Specialty non-alcoholic drinks, caffeine-infused pleasures and a good cocktail can be enjoyable for the patron. Beverages are also a great way to add more to your operation’s bottom line. Enjoy reading what we’ve put together for you, and we hope our beverage feature will inspire you to create something awesome for your operation!

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BEVERAGE

The Frozen Beverage Solution that continues to get better! Island Oasis® has carved out a compelling brand proposition in the food service frozen mix market. Not only are the products the category leader in Florida and the United States, but they are also the leader in more than 25 countries, with distribution in numerous food service channels, including restaurants and bars, hotels, cruise lines, colleges and universities, fitness centers, hospitals, and the K-12 school channel. THE ALL-NATURAL PRODUCTS

The key to Island Oasis’ success is its singular focus on meeting the needs of consumers and food service operators. Operators seek to offer consumers ontrend flavors and beverages that satisfy multiple need states, including refreshing snacks, meal replacements, and sports nutrition. Island Oasis’ product line features 30 frozen fruit purees and dairy-based frozen beverages, with no artificial colors or flavoring, and offer 100% of the recommended daily allowance of vitamin C. The frozen line-up also includes V8-Vfusion® branded products, which are highly nutritious, and a FUEL® supplement line of products. These products, singularly or in combination, satisfy many of consumers’ need states. And for those operators that do not have refrigeration space, Island Oasis offers shelf stable mix products as well. THE UNIQUE EQUIPMENT

In the pursuit of frozen drink perfection, Island Oasis engineers and patents its own blender technology. The company’s leading-edge equipment, which includes its state-of-the-art ice shaver blender line, guarantees perfect, frozen drink consistency every time. THE UNEQUALED SUPPORT

Island Oasis provides exceptional support services that include technical support response within 24 hours; recipe development by Mixologists with unique beverage development expertise; and complimentary customizable merchandising and promotional support materials. THE FUTURE

In October of 2015, Island Oasis was acquired by Kerry, the leading Taste and Nutrition company with more than 24,000 employees worldwide and staff on six continents. This partnership will ensure that Island Oasis continues its leadership position by offering unique solutions to operators and consumers. To learn more visit: islandoasis.com. 28  SU SPR MIM NG ER2016 2016

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BEVERAGE

Taps Specialty Beverage Trend By Clare Pitt, Senior Manager – FSR Channel Planning & Development National Food Service, The Coca-Cola Company

Apple Berry Lemonade. Skinny Peach Freeze. CocaCola Acai.

These are just a few of the creative concoctions The Coca-Cola Company has crafted to help restaurants capitalize on the rising consumer demand for specialty beverages and drive sales. Recent research estimates that specialty beverages will account for approximately 30 percent of beverage growth between 2014 and 2017, with more than half of the growth coming from non-alcoholic offerings. An overwhelming 68 percent of adults said they like the experience of trying new beverages, especially when dining out, and Coca-Cola is leading the charge in providing these adventurous consumers with a plethora of new and unique flavor combinations to try. By working with prominent research partners like Food IQ, Mintel and some of the top chefs within the industry, w w w.FRL A .org

Coca-Cola has analyzed recent trends and changes in consumer taste preferences and used the findings to create unique and ownable recipes to share with its food service partners. Wondering what’s currently trendy? Sweet-and-spicy teas, house-made or handmade beverages, savory flavors, botanicals (including floral garnishes and herbal flavors), and sour and bitter flavors have increased in popularity. A variety of water options are also on the rise, with unique flavors such as dragon fruit, acai and blueberry pomegranate appearing on menus, in addition to more unconventional flavors like coconut-pineapple. For those who may be hesitant to experiment with new specialty beverages, Coca-Cola recommends keeping offerings simple in the beginning by creating beverages with just one or two additional ingredients like fresh, seasonal fruit or syrups. This

strategy gives food service outlets the flexibility of adding new, must-have beverage options to the menu without incurring significant costs. The new beverage can even be spotlighted as a special limited time offer to determine if it is popular enough to remain on the menu. From providing tools and marketing collateral to recommending food pairings and sharing recipe suggestions on CokeSolutions.com, Coca-Cola works with its food service partners to develop or enhance their own specialty beverage programs that can help increase their bottom line. With more than 500 sparkling and still brands to choose from in CocaCola’s portfolio, the specialty beverage possibilities are endless. Need some suggestions to help you get started? Visit the Recipe Box atCokeSolutions.com to discover your guests’ new favorite signature drink. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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Cigars

+Sales +Gratuity +Loyalty

Your Secret Weapon

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itting down with Jeff Brown, president of The Cigar Hunter, Inc., based in South Florida, it doesn’t take long to hear him say “cigars and hospitality go together like, well, cigars and hospitality.” You may know exactly what he’s talking about or you may be asking yourself, what in the world do cigars and hospitality have in 30  SU M M ER

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common. As a veteran of the industry spanning over 30 years, Jeff and his company understand at the center of hospitality is the goal of providing a positive and memorable experience for guests and in the process working to secure their future patronage. For many, a premium hand-rolled cigar complements a meal, a drink, an evening out, a round of golf, a stay at a hotel, you get the idea. Sure, you say, it’s another way to ensure a positive guest experience which is great, but how are cigars a secret weapon? Cigar Hunter explains it like this: “While your guests are enjoying the cigar that they just purchased from the humidor that we manage for you, they are more likely

to purchase another cocktail, a bottle of wine, and more from your kitchen. They’re also fostering relationships with your staff who will now receive a tip on a much larger check. Sounds simple and, when done correctly, it is.” After receiving setbacks all across the country from smoking bans, the cigar industry has remained strong and continues touting the unique nature of premium hand-rolled cigars and their significant differences with the cigarette and vape industries. While not as plentiful as they once were, cigar-friendly establishments remain across the hospitality spectrum and the opportunity, says Cigar Hunter, is to put cigars on your radar and either F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


“...put cigars on your radar and either give them a bit more attention or begin selling them now if you are not currently.” give them a bit more attention or begin selling them now if you are not currently. Don’t have the time or feel like you have the knowledge? That is where Jeff says his company can help the most. From providing and managing the humidor and cigars, to pairing them with your cordials and wines to create your own custom cigar menus. We train your staff on everything they need to know. “Our program is like hospitality for the hospitality industry,” says Jeff. “We don’t leave anything out down to the proper and sanitary way to cut and light a customer’s cigar. Food and safety doesn’t end with food.” With hundreds of accounts across the country, Cigar Hunter began by providing humidors on movie sets, selling to many celebrities and quickly expanded to cover the stars’ other interests including restaurants and bars. Today, Cigar Hunter deals directly with all of the major cigar manufacturers to provide the finest and rarest cigars in the world and all of the accessories to go with them to all types of businesses.

Whether or not cigars are for you and your establishment is an executive decision and one that Cigar Hunter says they make easier by taking the guesswork out of the process with turn-key programs to get you going and keep you successful. Of these programs, most intriguing is the private label cigar program. Through their direct relationships from the largest manufacturers to the smallest boutique brands in the industry, Cigar Hunter provides world-class cigars adorned with your company name and logo on a custom band. “There is no question that it will be one of the best cigars they have ever smoked, and the only place they can get another one is by returning to your establishment.” This, says Jeff, is a renewed focus for Cigar Hunter and a product that is not only utilized by hospitality but also by corporations in all industries including those that service hospitality. Delivering these custom cigars via a live cigar roller

provided by Cigar Hunter is a unique and memorable experience. The growing demographic diversity of those who enjoy a premium cigar and the success experienced by Cigar Hunter and their customers can’t be overlooked. A perfect example is Craig Miller’s Field House located in Orlando, FL who recently emailed Cigar Hunter and said, “So many sticks sold this week— must be a record; cigar menus are a hit!”. With the help of Cigar Hunter’s experienced marketing team, recent events incorporating cigars at retail stores such as Robert Graham, Neiman Marcus and Bloomingdales struck a similar chord with their guests. Anxious to reintroduce its opportunities to the members of FRLA, Cigar Hunter says, “Giving our team the chance to help you succeed will not disappoint.” As allied members of FRLA, Cigar Hunter credits much of their success to their close relationship. We look forward to seeing Cigar Hunter, and all of you, at the annual golf outing again this year.

Services Premium Cigars & Accessories Managed Humidor Programs Live Cigar Rolling Events Private Labeled Cigars Custom Pairing Menus Staff Training w w w.FRL A .org

561. 571.5745 Let us show you how cigars can increase your sales and promote customer loyalty. We’re here by phone, or contact us any time through our website. Cheers!

The Cigar Hunter

www.CigarHunter.net F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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What is the Responsible Vendor Act and how does The Florida Responsible Vendor Act, Florida Statute 561.701-706, protects an establishment’s alcoholic beverage license. Licensed alcohol establishments that comply with the act and train employees in responsible alcohol service practices based on the requirements listed in the statute, earn exemption from suspension or

Does FRLA offer TIPS® training or ServSafe® Alcohol? No, FRLA offers the Regulatory Compliance Services Responsible Vendor Alcohol Training program. Please be advised that where TIPS® training and ServSafe® Alcohol Program are excellent programs recognized in several other states, they may not meet Florida requirements for achieving responsible vendor status with the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation’s Division of Alcoholic Beverages & Tobacco. Is alcohol server training mandatory in Florida? Alcohol server training and compliance with the Florida Responsible Vendor Act are voluntary. How old do you have to be to serve alcohol in Florida? You must be 18 to serve alcohol in Florida. What are the acceptable forms of ID for the sale and service of alcohol in Florida? 1. 2. 3. 4.

State issued driver’s license, foreign or domestic State issued ID Active military ID Passport


Regulatory Compliance Services protects your business by making sure you are compliant with the Florida Responsible Vendor Act (Florida Statute 561.701-706)

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For less than the price of one drink per day, you can protect your alcoholic beverage license from suspension or revocation.

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BEVERAGE

Explosion of the Consumer Demand for Bourbon & Whiskey FRLA Interview with Southern Wine & Spirits Beverage Leaders, Herman Fernandez and Armando Rosario HERMAN FERNANDEZ, JR.

Vice President – National Accounts Southern Wine and Spirits, Florida

BIO: Herman Fernandez has over 41 years of experience with Southern Wine and Spirits. His extensive knowledge and experience has been instrumental to market leaders such as Publix, Outback Steakhouse, Disney, Hyatt Hotels, along with many other clients. He has held positions at Southern Wine and Spirits as Wine Salesman, Liquor Salesman, Area District Manager, Vice President General Sales Manager and Vice President of National Accounts. ARMANDO ROSARIO, CSS

Master Mixologist and Spirits Educator Southern Wine and Spirits, Florida BIO: Armando is a graduate of Hotel Management School in Portugal. He has won State and National USBG Cocktail competitions, represented the USA in the World Championship achieving the highest position ever by a USA bartender. He has been in the industry for 20 years, worked at Le Cirque in NYC, and opened the Wynn Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas. He was with Southern Wine and Spirits Las Vegas before coming to Orlando. Armand is the creator and director of the “O”Bar Facility, a state-of-the-art drink development and education center. FRLA: Why have we seen an explosion in the bourbon and whiskey category in the last 5 years? HF: Several points have contributed to this success. Bourbon is an American Spirit and can only be made in the USA. Originally, it was named the Official American Spirit by a Congressional Resolution in 1964 that declared Bourbon as.“ America’s Native Spirit” and again in 2008. Hollywood and television have also w w w.FRL A .org

glamorized cocktails with shows such as HBO’s Boardwalk Empire, AMC’s Mad Men and Sex in the City. AR: The Food Network and the Cooking Channel are now doing food segments that include pairing food with Wine and Spirit cocktails. The growing interest of Pre-Prohibition and mixology have greatly impacted this latest cocktail boom. The mixology profession is becoming more professional, moving away from flare “bottle juggling” to understanding the importance of creating notable cocktails with greater diversity in flavors and fresh ingredients, with the focus being on balance. There is a great history in Kentucky and Tennessee of family owned distilleries that go all the way back to the Whiskey Rebellion in America that needs to be told. Today’s consumers love a good story and want to know. FRLA: What is bourbon? HF: Bourbon is made from a mash that is at least 51% corn. The rest of the mash is made up of rye, wheat and/or malted barley. Federal standards state that bourbon must be aged in new, charred oak barrels; distilled to no more than 160-proof (80% alcohol by volume). While most bourbon today is still made in Kentucky, it can legally be made anywhere in the United States. All American whiskeys are distilled from a fermented mash (mixture) of cereal grain and water without any coloring or flavoring additives. Unlike Scotch or Cognac, American Whiskey must by law be aged in new, charred oak barrels and no more than 160-proof [80% alcohol by volume]. FRLA: What is Tennessee whiskey? AR: Tennessee whiskey has a similar production of bourbon, except it can only be made in Tennessee and is filtered through, or steeped in, charcoal chips before going into the casks for aging, known as the Lincoln County Process.

FRLA: What is Rye Whiskey? AR: Rye whiskey can be made anywhere. It must contain at least 51% rye, be distilled at less than 160-proof and aged at least two years in new charred barrels. FRLA: Are men the primary consumers of bourbon and whiskey? HF: Yes, but women are actually consuming 30% of the category and that count growing. The bourbon category is increasing twice as fast as vodka category. • Super Premiums are growing 23% • Premium bourbon’s are growing 10% • Rye whiskey growth 500% over the last 5 years • Flavored whiskey is growing at 40% FRLA: What cocktails are the most popular in the bourbon and whiskey category? AR: Old Fashioned, Manhattan, Sazerac, Whiskey Sour, Mint Julep and a simplistic Whiskey and Ginger Ale. FRLA: Can we say that Bourbon/Whiskey reached his peak or is there anything new in this category? AR: I just read an article in the Spirits Business about the hot new trends in Bourbon/ Whiskey and they claim that favored whiskeys, or whiskey-based liqueurs are the “hottest growth segment in the U.S. spirits market,” flavored whiskies generated more than half of the spirits segment volume growth outpacing flavored vodka. For the moment we are not seeing any signs of slowing down, not only in the bourbon segment but brown spirits in general. Millennials are driving the growth because they are willing to try new concepts. HF: The Brown Whiskey category has a bright future in Canadian Whiskey, Rye Whiskey, Tennessee Whiskey, Irish Whisky, and flavors. However, bourbon whiskey has serious regulations on where it is made. What you drink comes from the barrel, no additives except water to lower the proof, it is unique in tradition, age is measured in years not days … this is a true American product. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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BEVERAGE

Focus on Florida Draft By Jeremy Fowler, Sommelier – Cypress Restaurant

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MALLORY BROOKS WITH VISIT FLORIDA

t Cypress we love to use local ingredients in our food, partnering with local farms from our area to create a uniquely seasonal menu. We are now able to mimic this trend behind the bar, with a local and seasonal approach to our beer program. It’s exciting to taste and select beers from all over the state that treat the seasons change as a way to brew fresh styles and experiment with funky combinations. We’re following the growing list of Sour Beers, Goses, Black IPAs, and many other up-and-coming seasonal trends in the beer scene with lots of anticipation. In the past few years, craft beer in Florida has taken off like a rocket, continuing once again in 2015 to be among the fastest growing beer economies in the country. Since 2012, Florida has doubled its number of breweries and now boasts over 150 different beer producers around the sunshine state. At Cypress Restaurant we’re trying to keep up with this exciting trend, and now pour Florida Beer almost exclusively. We continue to grow our great relationships with the likes of Cigar City Brewing, Swamphead and Oyster City; but since last year have finally been able to pour suds from our own Tallahassee backyard. Proof Brewing Company and Lake Tribe have each earned their spots on our tap line-up, and we couldn’t be more proud. As our state and country push forward to more and more craft beer, we encourage other restauranteurs and bar owners to join us in supporting the local guys. There is nothing quite like a refreshingly cold pint after work, when it’s been brewed right down the road. Cheers!

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BEVERAGE

Mocktails for Everyone

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hef Emeril Lagasse’s namesake restaurant, Emeril’s Orlando, located at Universal’s CityWalk® has recently begun to offer “mocktails” on their kids’ menu. Children are a big part of the clientele since the restaurant is located in one of Central Florida’s most popular theme parks. Andy Vaughn, General Manager of Emeril’s Orlando, noted “Offering delicious mocktails using fresh ingredients from the state of Florida was our next natural progression here at Emeril’s Orlando … especially since we’ve already been incorporating the ‘Fresh from Florida’ mindset in our cuisine and adult beverages where possible.” The children are thoroughly enjoying the variety of options…from our ‘Castaway’ mocktail made with a fresh assortment of fruit juices, nutmeg and coco lopez to our ‘Cotton Candy Fizz’ made with cotton candy seltzer and homemade lemonade.”

If you are looking for water cooler solutions for your operation, check out Gr8Taste Bottle-LESS Water Coolers. These coolers are currently in use throughout South Florida at some of the most prominent properties in the region. Contact Gregg Weinberg, Chief Hydration Officer at Gr8Taste Water for more information (954)558-8228. 40  SU M M ER

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BEVERAGE

1944

MAI TAI ROA AE 1.00 oz. Barbancourt Three Star rum 1.25 oz. Myers Dark rum .50 oz. Orange cucracao .50 oz. Monin Orgeat syrup .50 oz. Simple Syrup 1.00 oz. Fresh lime juice (strained) Garnish: Cherry/Lime Flag & Fresh Mint Sprig Glassware: Double Old Fashion, Served over ice Instructions: In a mixing glass/tin add all of the ingredients along with a scoop of ice (crushed, if possible) and shake for 10-15 seconds. Pour contents into the glass and garnish.

Emeril’s Tchoup Chop (pronounced chop-chop) is the second eatery by Emeril Lagasse at Universal® Orlando. The name is a nod to New Orleans’ famous Tchoupitoulas Street, where Emeril’s flagship restaurant is located, and the word “chop” — a bold culinary term. From the stunning design to the innovative menu, Emeril’s Tchoup Chop is a unique and exotic journey through the Pacific Seas and a perfect complement for the lush surroundings of the Loews Royal Pacific Resort at Universal Orlando.

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BEVERAGE

Coffee:

Finding the Most Satisfying Cup Contributed article from THRIVE Farmers

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ife’s greatest celebrations, joyful moments and important memories happen around the table. Coffee farming culture is very meal-centered. Yet in an industry marked by inconsistent pricing, many farming families’ table conversations circle back to financial hardship. In the States, coffee lovers have roast and brew preferences but rarely know about the men and women who grew their beloved coffee. THRIVE Farmers connects coffee drinkers to the farmers in a new way to give an even more satisfying cup. The THRIVE Farmers’ farmer-direct model reshapes that conversation by eliminating the commodity market price. This model makes each farmer a partner in his or her business by providing a stable, predictable and higher price for coffee. With a consistent income, farmers can focus on what they care most about: creating exceptionally good coffee. Ask any farmer — his biggest joy is knowing the coffee he grew creates an enjoyable experience for the coffee drinker. A barista has the privilege of presenting the farmer’s year of hard work to consumers. Get to know who grows. Provide a more satisfying cup to the people at your tables and help farmers thrive at theirs.

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BEVERAGE

Looking For Something New in Spirits?

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t. Augustine Distillery is a locally owned and operated, artisanal spirits distillery in historic, downtown St. Augustine. Founded by Philip McDaniel and Mike Diaz, along with a group of community members, the Distillery opened its doors in March of 2014 and is located within a beautifully restored ice plant from the turn-of-the-century. The company’s mission is simple: Educate and inspire guests about handcrafted, award-winning rum, bourbon whiskey, gin and vodka. All of the Distillery’s spirits are made from local and regional agricultural products for an undeniable result; super-premium spirits that create the best local cocktails imaginable. Want to know more? Visit them at staugustinedistillery.com.

HOT TRENDS NON-ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES 1. House-made/artisan soft drinks 2. Gourmet lemonade 3. Specialty iced tea 4. Mocktails 5. Coconut water

ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES 1. Craft/artisan spirits 2. Locally produced beer/wine/spirits 3. House-brewed beer 4. Non-traditional liquors 5. Craft beer SOURCE: National Restaurant Association Forecast 2016 Top Tableservice Menu Trends

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Kyle Martin FPL energy expert

Let our smart tools help you save energy and money. FPL can help you save up to $500 a year on your bill. With your Online Business Energy Dashboard, and a free Business Energy Evaluation, you’ll find smart, new ways to help your business save energy and money. Schedule your free Business Energy Evaluation today at FPL.com/EasyToSave. w w w.FRL A .org

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BRANDING

Don’t Just Say Your Brand is Good,

Prove It

By RICHARD G. ROSEN, PRESIDENT & CEO OF ROSEN CONVERGENCE MARKETING

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t’s an exciting time to be a marketer. We have more tools to reach customers than ever before, but so often, it’s easy to confuse tactics with strategy. It’s important to take a step back, assess the way the tides are shifting, and determine how we canbest keep up with consumers’ expectations. We are in the midst of an era of rapidly changing consumer values that’s forcing companies to make big changes. Companies that are more prescient and nimble are coming out with big competitive advantages, while the more timid or stubborn are losing their edge. According to Edelman, 87% of global consumers believe that businesses needs to place at least equal weight on society’s interests as they do on their business’ interests. However, less than a third believe business is performingwell in addressing those societal issues (Edelman 2012). This indicates a huge performance gap between consumer expectations and what companies are actually doing. It’s led consumers to have a feeling of mistrust for big business, aided largely by corporations who overstate or outright lie about how great they are for the world, a practice that has earned the term “greenwashing.” As a result, marketers often find consumers in a state of mistrust. Fortunately, there’s a silver lining and it paves the way for companies who genuinely want to make a difference and forge new bonds of trust with customers. The only way to rebuild trust is with genuine values and transparency. You have to prove you’re authentically committed to aligning your brand with consumer values. Don’t just say your brand is good, prove it! 46  SU M M ER

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Patagonia’s Worn Wear campaign is an excellent example of how to forge trust by aligning with cultural values. The campaign, unveiled on black Friday of 2013, is a passionate plea for anti-consumerism. It celebrates stories of beat up old Patagonia products that have been used (and loved) for years. Brand enthusiasts are encouraged to share the stories of their most beloved, beat up products on the company blog. A partnership with the website, Ifixit produces video tutorials that teach customers how to repair their old Patagonia products. A partnership with Yerdle, a reusable economy app, provides customers with an opportunity to buy second-hand Patagonia products. And if that isn’t enough, the “Worn Wear Repair truck,” can drive by to fix up your old puffy jacket. Patagonia tapped into a cultural value that is shared among its customers: consumption for its own sake is not gratifying, is overly impactful on the environment and burdensome to future generations. Wait, what?! Patagonia is paying money to encourage you to buy less stuff? How could this possibly be a winning strategy? Perhaps this strategy will cause Patagonia to miss out on a few short-term sales, but they touched the heart of their loyal customers by appealing to their socially responsible commitment to re-use, which in return is far more profitable. Patagonia is a dramatic example of how business is changing. Moving forward, success will not come from short-term sales. In our increasingly transparent world where customers share their stories with millions instantly, success will be determined by trust. And trust only comes through a long-term vision of authentic values that align with those of your customers. Build trust and sales will follow. HOW CAN YOUR BRAND DO THIS SUCCESSFULLY? There is of course no magic formula. We can’t all be like Patagonia and sell more product simply by telling customers to re-use their old stuff. But every company is capable of aligning with a subset of their customers’ values in a way that is authentic and meaningful. Here are four key elements of a values-driven strategy: 1. Identify the “Sweet Spot” The “sweet spot” is the intersection between what your customers care about and the higher

values your brand can meaningfully stand. For AT&T, it’s eliminating teenage fatalities that occur when texting while driving. For Ben & Jerry’s it’s sustainable agriculture (leading to delicious ingredients). For Patagonia, it’s conserving the very natural world their products help people enjoy. Whatever your brand stands for, you have a unique opportunity to meaningfully intersect it with what your valued customers genuinely care about. 2. Be Unique! Don’t go for the lowest common denominator. Just as you wouldn’t want to put an identical product into a crowded market, you don’t want to offer the same values as everyone else. Think of the last time you heard “eco-friendly.” Did you even care? Did it mean anything to you? Did it tug on your heartstrings? To be impactful, your values have to be authentic and unique enough for you to dominate that space. 3. Take an authentic stand. If the values the brand stands for get watered down, then you’re just cluttering your brand’s messaging. Think of how impactful Patagonia’s message was. With their campaign, they said, “We care about conserving the planet’s resources so much that we would rather you don’t buy from us.” That kind of authenticity is awfully convincing. Would it be as effective if they said, “We care about conserving the planet’s resources so much that we’ll donate 1% of the purchase price to replant trees?” The first message is authentic. The second is just trying to capitalize on customer’s values. Customers are smart. They can tell the difference. 4. Be Transparent. By now, many companies have proven that customer don’t expect you to be 100% perfect. But, they do need you to be honest with them. Think about a friend. Would you trust them more if they painted the rosiest picture possible, or if they were forthright with you? Set ambitious goals, but be honest about where you’ve fallen short on your promises and what you’re going to change so that, next time, you do it better. So, my challenge to you is – practice these four key elements. It will help you to align your brand with your customer’s values in a real and authentic way. Your brand will become far more relevant in today’s world if you genuinely embrace this new shift. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


INDEPENDENT OPERATORS WORKSHOP September 27, 2016 | 8:30am - 12:30pm @ Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show Orange County Convention Center | Orlando, FL INDEPENDENT OPERATORS ATTEND TO... Find solutions IMMEDIATELY applicable for business growth. SHARE BEST PRACTICES and learn relevant new management skills. Leave with PRACTICAL, REAL-LIFE TIPS & TECHNIQUES to accelerate your business.

Join us for a Chairman’s Breakfast followed by these featured presentations: KEYNOTES Kathleen Wood

Kathleen is a nationally recognized growth strategist and specializes in shifting leaders and businesses to new levels of success. She is the co-founder of her own self-serve yogurt, gelato and sorbet shop, Suzy’s Swirl, and was previously the President & COO of Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers.

Jim Knight

Jim is a training & development veteran for 30+ years, and oversaw all training initiatives for Hard Rock International for 21+years. With his experience and creativity, he has consistently developed cutting-edge training concepts and speaks on developing worldclass service, organizational culture, employee branding and leadership skills.

SPECIAL INDEPENDENT OPERATORS PANEL Successful Independents Sharing Best Practices

Leading independent restaurant operators from Central Florida share and discuss their tips and techniques to solve the issues that keep them up at night and best practices & skills to turn these problems into profit.

PLUS: Access to the hottest menu trends, state of the art design and décor, the best in business education and 450 of the leading vendors and purveyors dedicated to serving the restaurant and foodservice community -- all under one roof as part of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show. After a full day of education, networking and sourcing new products... Enjoy appetizers, entertainment and drinks at the Independent Operators Party @ Lafayette’s!

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Learn more & register today at www.flrestaurantandlodgingshow.com/Independents PRESENTED & SPONSORED BY

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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BUSINESS MATTERS

Today’s Most Essential Business Tool:

Technology By SHELLY QUATRINE, GORDON FOOD SERVICE®

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he restaurant industry is making great strides in accepting and adopting new technology. The good news is that plenty of opportunity exists for restaurants to capitalize on technology as a tool for boosting business and margins. Technology has made great strides in the last decade; a smartphone, after all, is a hand-held computer. Such advances have made technology more user-friendly, and have also made it an indispensable business tool. A few months ago I was at a meeting with a customer. He looked at his smartphone several times. He told me he was “running his business” thanks to cloud applications that link his smartphone to his restaurant. Up-to-the-minute technology can help trim food costs, keep a business (and its customers) secure, schedule staff easily, keep books accurately, run a robust customer-loyalty program, and even keep an eye on the business while you’re at a meeting or on vacation. Technology, too, helps market to millennials (born 1977 to 1992) and Gen Z (born 1993 and after), who’ve used technology their whole lives. According to data from the Chicago-based research firm Technomic Inc., millennials use their smartphones 45 times a day, and five out of six connect with companies on social-media networks. Generation Z takes it a step further; they’ve never known a world without the internet. They can and do multitask on up to five screens at once. Older customers are increasingly tech-savvy, too: Technomic research finds that 60 percent of adults use more than two devices daily, and 25 percent use three devices. It doesn’t require

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a study to make the point that everyone expects technology that they use at a restaurant to be safe and secure. Updated systems help all customers use their devices quickly, safely and securely at your operation. HARNESS THE POWER OF TECHNOLOGY

What steps to take? If your computer system is more than five years old, seriously consider buying a new one, no matter how well your old one seems to function. Outdated systemstake longer to run — that’s a waste of your time — and expose a business to viruses and malware. How so? Hackers have tools that scan computer IP addresses for vulnerabilities, and research shows that 99.9 percent of breaches are based on those vulnerabilities. The older the software and the machine, the easier it is to take advantage of those vulnerabilities. Stay up to date. Program the computer to automatically update its operating system and antivirus software. System updates provide computers with “patches,” which cover vulnerabilities in software and keep them safe from hackers. For efficiency’s sake, set the computer to automatically update browsers like Firefox, Chrome or Safari. Browsers work best when they’re using the latest update. Be secure. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security recommends password-protecting every device you use, from your smartphone to the office computer. Make the password complicated, a combination of numbers, letters, and characters; write it down and put it in a safe place; don’t tape it to the computer monitor. Share the password only

with staffers who need it, and change it every quarter. Homeland Security also advises using caution with email. The rule of thumb: When in doubt about the provenance or authenticity of an email, don’t open it. Opening a spam email and following its prompts exposes your business to hackers. Firewalls and spam filters file iffy emails in a separate folder, so there’s little chance of opening them accidentally. Get the right tools. Once your new computer system is up and running, explore the tech tools that can help you run your business better in terms of inventory management, recipe costing and management, online ordering functionality, etc. All require up-to-date software, and all can help operators manage functions seamlessly and in seconds. Along similar lines, third-party reservation systems and customer-loyalty programs run more smoothly on up-to-date software. Cloud applications store information — inventory, scheduling and the like — on third-party servers than can be accessed from any device, anywhere. Cloud apps enable operators to keep an eye on their restaurants from anywhere in the world, and also enable safe storage of data. The bottom line? Using the latest technology is as important as implementing the latest food trends on your menu. Both servey our customers well and keep your business thriving. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


ADA COMPLIANCE

Commercial Websites Targeted For ADA Non-Compliance

New Boss in Town!

By KELLY H. KOLB, SHAREHOLDER, BUCHANAN, INGERSOLL, ROONEY, PC

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itle III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) requires that “places of public accommodation” be readily accessible to the disabled. Title III covers, among other entities, “place[s] of lodging,” “establishment[s] serving food or drink,” and “other sales or rental establishment[s].” Any retail or lodging establishment with a physical (i.e., brick and mortar) presence open to the public must be accessible to the disabled. WEBSITES MUST BE ADA COMPLIANT

While websites are not specifically mentioned in the ADA, the courts have determined that Title III’s accessibility requirements apply to commercial websites of places of public accommodation. For example, Target’s website was recently found to have a sufficient connection with its stores to be subject to Title III. Most courts have reasoned that website inaccessibility is the functional equivalent of inaccessibility to the physical store. The Department of Justice (“DOJ”) has recently extended this reasoning to mobile apps, filing lawsuits against retailers with non-compliant mobile apps.

WHY THE FUSS?

Two years ago, as the first website ADA lawsuits surfaced in the Northeast, we began urging our clients with an online presence to audit their websites for ADA compliance. Website ADA lawsuits have now reached South Florida. Urban Outfitters was sued Monday in a class action alleging that its website is inaccessible to blind customers. Other retailers sued recently include H&M, Tory Burch, Swatch and Hugo Boss. While the DOJ is empowered to seek civil penalties of up to $55,000 for the first violation and $110,000 for subsequent violations, the DOJ rarely pursues such relief. Most ADA lawsuits are filed by “testers” — private citizens who seek out potential violators and who have a relationship with an attorney willing to file suit on their behalf. Most ADA lawsuits seek only injunctive relief (requiring future ADA compliance) and legal fees. These lawsuits are filed with no prior notice — since the end game is the generation of recoverable legal fees, not compliance.

COMPLIANCE DETAILS

In the abstract, a website’s software code must be written so that (for example) an epileptic can safely navigate the website without risk of seizure, or a blind person can use screen-reader software to submit online orders for goods and services. Specifically, the DOJ requires compliance with a standard known as WCAG 2.0 Level AA — accessible at w3.org/TR/WCAG20. While the details of WCAG 2.0 are beyond the scope of this article, there are several steps hotels, retailers and others should take: • Test your website for compliance by entering its url at wave.webaim.org. • Engage a third-party vendor to independently audit your website and identify any deficiencies and/or provide written confirmation of compliance. • Invest in website archiving software which captures and stores your webpages in case you need to rebut a later allegation of past non-compliance. • Repeat website audits every year to insure continued compliance as changes to your website are implemented. Consider auditing your websites for ADA compliance now. Even if your website is not fully compliant before you are targeted, the existence of a written plan for compliance could be a complete defense to a lawsuit filed before full compliance is achieved.

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Move over sauces lovers, there’s a new “Sauce Boss” in town. Taylor’s Ultimate produces a line of wonderfully tasty hot and mild gourmet sauces using unusual ingredients from around the world. Sauces can be found at the following South Florida Restaurants and Retailers: Bagel Emporium, Blue Moon Fish Company, Duffy’s Sports Bar, Garcia’s Fish Market and Grille, Hog Heaven, Lokal, Milam’s Market, Sandbar Sports Bar and Grille, Taurus Beer and Whiskey House and Whisk. “From spicy hot to savory and mild, we use Taylor’s Ultimate to complement everything from our pulled pork burritos to adding subtle heat and acidity to salad dressings.” - Chef Brendan Connor, WHISK GOURMET FOOD + CATERING, South Miami, FL “Taylor’s Ultimate Tuscan Style, Andes Fire & Bonzai hot sauces have contributed greatly to our menu providing a unique balance and blend of heat, garlic and flavor.” - Nelson Cabrera, Pincho Factory Franchisee, Pembroke Pines, FL “The taste driven flavors of Taylor’s Ultimate hot sauces have been with us for over two years and we’ve recently made both Tuscan Style & Bonzai sauces available for our wing recipes which have delivered outstanding results.” - GM, Brett Dusharm, Sandbar & Grill

www.taylorsultimate.com For Sales & Distribution Inquiries please contact Taylor Hicks at: Email: taylor@taylorsultimate.com | Phone: 305.299.3557 F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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HEALTH CARE

How Businesses Can Help Bring Clarity to Out-of-Control Health Care Costs By SAMMY MACK AND TOM HUDSON

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sk what something costs in medical care and you could easily come back with a half dozen different answers. Health care costs are complex and often secret — and for most Floridians, it’s money out of their paychecks. Four out of 10 Floridians get their health care coverage through an employer, making the employer-based health insurance market the largest in Florida. “Premiums and the cost of insurance are going up and up and up every year,” says Doug Wolfe, a health care lawyer with Kozyak Tropin Throckmorton. “We’re starting to see that the employers are doing a lot more to educate consumers and to manage the claims, and make sure to keep people out of emergency rooms,” says Wolfe. But it’s hard for consumers to make sound financial decisions about their health when they can’t parse the cost of care ahead of time. And the lack of transparency in health care prices also poses a challenge for employers.

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Co-pays, deductibles, in-network, out-ofnetwork, co-insurance, patient responsibility, negotiated rates, negotiated discounts — all these phrases describe some part of the price patients pay for health care in addition to their monthly premiums and their employers’ contributions. Most consumers won’t see the final cost until after the episode. “It would be like going into a Starbucks for a cup of coffee today, and them telling me they cannot tell me the price of coffee right now, but I will get a bill two months from now,” says Dr. Steven Ullmann, head of the Health Sector Management and Policy department at the University of Miami’s business school. That’s part of why WLRN is launching PriceCheck, a reporting project aimed at bringing clarity to the cost of health care in Florida. The PriceCheck tool, at WLRN.org/PriceCheck, lets people share their health care costs with the journalists at WLRN — the charges from the doctor or hospital, what consumers

paid and, if they have insurance, what their insurance paid. Consumers can do this without identifying themselves. It also lets users see what other people paid — essentially crowd-souring health-care prices. The information WLRN hopes to get from PriceCheck will give us a way to tell stories not just about what things really cost, but about the larger financial implications. Workplace benefits, the effect on a business’s bottom line, the policies that created this situation in the first place — these are just some of the stories we’re hoping to shed light on with PriceCheck. The more entries we get, the more transparency PriceCheck can bring to this opaque market. For more information about PriceCheck and how to get involved, visit WLRN.org/PriceCheck. Or contact Sammy Mack at smack@ wlrnnews.org.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


WORKERS COMPTENSATION

Minimize Strain Injuries to Help Maximize Productivity

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ealthy employees are critical in delivering service, an excellent product and healthy returns in our industry. So, where can we focus our attention to help keep employees healthy, maximize limited space, and improve productivity? Quite simply, the answer is to minimize the amount of manual lifting required in the operation. For restaurant and lodging employees in 2014, the median days away from work for lost-time injuries was six days. Of these lost-time injuries, 44% involved strains and soreness. Employee strain injuries can be significant. They can be debilitating, chronic and difficult to diagnose and treat. Not to minimize cuts and burns, but short-term bandages don’t work for soft-tissue injuries. It should also be noted that the risk for slips/falls, cuts and burns may also be elevated when carrying items around the restaurant. Minimize the potential for strain injuries, maximize space, and improve productivity with the following: • Arrange storage items so that the heaviest are within the “power zone.” The power zone is between mid-thigh and mid-chest height. • Organize storage so that awkward postures are not required when lifting over or across items. If storage volume does not allow, items should be moved out of the way first to gain direct access. • Provide a rolling ladder or step stool to reach items on upper shelves. • Use lifting aids, such as carts and hand trucks, when receiving or relocating product. Ensure that this equipment is well maintained and accessible. • Utilize team lifting when handling large, heavy items or when rotating stock. • To avoid collisions, verbally communicate to other employees when lifting. This includes kitchen pathways and areas other employees may enter during the lift. • Where possible, coordinate with vendors for assistance with heavy, awkward items. For example, full and empty kegs or bag in box syrups, may be better handled by a vendor with more experience and better lifting aids. • Trash handling: –– Limit the weight of trash bags. –– Use a wheeled cart or bin when transporting to the dumpster.

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• • •

• •

–– Use side loading dumpsters to reduce the height trash must be lifted when being disposed of. –– Provide a pair of cut-resistant gloves for use when emptying bags into the dumpster. This minimizes the temptation of swinging the trash bag with one arm. Utilize auto ice-making equipment to minimize the amount of ice handling. When manually handling ice, ensure that the proper size buckets are being utilized and avoid lifting over shoulder height. Locate frequently used cooking utensils for quick access to the use area to avoid extended reaching. Limit the size of trays, and weight, used to deliver food to customers. When possible, utilize additional staff to deliver customer food and utilize tray jack stands. Tray jack stands should be strategically located so that they are readily accessible. Install an automatic cooking oil refill system. Train supervisors and employees to plan each lift: –– Where will it be going? –– Do I have a clear pathway to get there? –– Should I get assistance? –– Can I use a cart or hand truck? –– Will I be able to use the correct postures throughout the lift?

In summary, don’t lift what you don’t have to and, what you do have to, keep it short and light. Your employees, your customers and your bottom-line will thank you. Take these three tips to go: 1. Assess and adjust positioning of equipment and storage. 2. Provide lifting equipment best suited for the operation. 3. Train employees in safe lifting techniques, use of tools and expectations; and assure supervisory enforcement.

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SAFESTAFF CITY

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

LOCATION

ALTAMONTE SPRINGS

12

9

13

4

Ramada Inn

BOCA RATON

21

18

15

20

Hilton Garden Inn

BRANDON

6

3

7

5

Embassy Suites

DAYTONA BEACH

20

17

21

12

Best Western Plus International Speedway Hotel

FT LAUDERDALE

19

16

13

11

Embassy Suites

FT MYERS

7

4

1

6

Hilton Garden Inn

FT PIERCE

7

4

1

6

UF Indian River Research

FT WALTON

12

2

13

4

Wyndham Garden

GAINESVILLE

-

-

-

-

Hilton Garden Inn

GAINESVILLE

12

4

1

4

Best Western Gateway Grand

ISLAMORADA

20

16

22

13

Islander Resort

JACKSONVILLE

12

9

13

11

Lexington Jacksonville Riverwalk

JACKSONVILLE BEACH

14

11

15

6

Four Points by Sheraton

KEY WEST

11

3

6

4

DoubleTree Grand Key Resort

KISSIMMEE

Seralago Hotel & Suites Maingate East

LAKELAND

8

5

9

7

Courtyard by Marriott

MELBOURNE

14

11

8

13

Holiday Inn Hotel & Conference Center

MIAMI

21

25

22

20

Homewood Suites by Hilton Miami - Blue Lagoon

MIAMI SPANISH

12

16

13

11

Homewood Suites by Hilton Miami - Blue Lagoon

NAPLES

12

18

16

28

DoubleTree Suites

OCALA

26

23

20

18

Homewood Suites by Hilton Ocala at Heath Brook

ORLANDO ENGLISH ORLANDO ENGLISH - FRLA SHOW

Dates subject to change without notice. Please see SafeStaff.org for current schedule.

Food Manager Training & Testing Schedule To register, call toll-free 1-866372-SAFE (7233) or visit www. safestaff.org. Registration for training begins at 8:00 a.m. and for exam at 12:30 p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Rosen Inn International -

-

27

-

ORLANDO SPANISH

Orange Country Convention Center Rosen Inn International

ORANGE PARK

6

2

13

4

Hilton Garden Inn

PANAMA CITY

12

9

13

11

Gulf Coast State College Student Union East Gibson Lecture Hall

PENSACOLA

19

16

20

25

Hilton Garden Inn Airport

PORT RICHEY

27

24

28

19

Days Inn & Suites

SARASOTA

7

4

1

6

Holiday Inn Lakewood Ranch

ST AUGUSTINE

18

15

19

17

Holiday Inn Express & Suites

ST PETERSBURG

29

26

30

21

Holiday Inn Express

TALLAHASSEE

28

25

TAMPA - ENGLISH

18

15

Hilton Garden Inn Central 19

17

TAMPA - SPANISH

Hilton Garden Inn Hilton Garden Inn

VENICE

11

8

12

10

Ramada

WEST PALM BEACH

25

22

26

24

Holiday Inn West Palm Beach Airport

ServeSafe® Goes Hi-Tech! All ServSafe Food Protection Managers Exam results are being upgraded to complimentary ServSafe® eCertificates. No more waiting for certificates in the mail. Log in and download your certificate as soon as your exam is graded! You can even share it electronically with your company via an email share link. Find out more: ServeSafe.com.

* Dates are tentative

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


PROSTART CULINARY COMPETITION

Florida Schools Earn High Honors

Gainesville’s Eastside High School Wins Second Place while Tampa’s A.P. Leto High School Wins Seventh Place at High Stakes National Culinary Arts & Restaurant Business Competition

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igh school students from Gainesville and Tampa, who are enrolled in the Florida ProStart program, tested their mettle in a sophisticated, real-world culinary and business management competition focused on the restaurant and foodservice sector. Held April 29–May 1 in Dallas, Texas, the National ProStart Invitational challenged student teams from secondary schools across the nation to create a three-course meal, while corresponding teams presented business proposals for an original restaurant concept. The Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association’s Educational Foundation is thrilled to announce Gainesville’s Eastside High School placed second in the nationwide competition. The school’s management team developed a business proposal for opening and operating a restaurant and were asked to solve the types of daily challenges faced by restaurant managers. The team was evaluated by an expert panel of industry judges. Tampa’s A.P. Leto High School placed seventh in the Culinary competition were they showcased their creative abilities through the preparation of an appetizer, entrée and dessert in 60 minutes. “We are so proud of our students who are incredibly talented, passionate about hospitality and worked tirelessly all year,” said Carol Dover, President and CEO of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association. “They are Florida’s all-stars and certainly proved they can compete on the national stage. We are glad to support these students, the future of our industry.” In total, there are 238 schools who participate in the Florida ProStart program, a program crafted by the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF). ProStart unites industry and secondary school classrooms to train students with the skills that help them achieve long-term and rewarding careers in the restaurant and food service industry. Research indicates that students and educators agree that ProStart is effective in teaching culinary skills as well as restaurant management theory and practice, including critical employability skills such as teamwork, communication and professional behavior. Seventy percent of students enrolled in ProStart programs indicate they plan to pursue post-secondary education. UNIVERSAL SPONSOR

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Participating teams were as follows: Eastside High School’s Management Team Instructors: Billie DeNunzio and Pam Bedford Students: Jayla Herring, Isaiah Smith, Erin Livingston, Kelsey Nimmons and Brandon McDonald Leto High School’s Culinary Team Instructor: Debra Hladky Students: Angel Nieves, Juraima Pena, Alexandrea Vargas, Elissia LaPorte and Fernando Hernandez

Florida ProStart A.P. Leto High team posed with Mickey Mouse during practice for the event.

Eastside High School won 2nd place at the National ProStart Invitational for their Management team. GLOBAL SPONSORS

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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A LA CARTE

FLORIDA TOURISM BREAKS ANOTHER RECORD! Governor Rick Scott recently announced that 29.8 million out-of-state and international visitors came to Florida in the first quarter of 2016 (January-March), marking the highest number of visitors in one quarter in the state’s history. This is an increase of 4.8 percent over the same period last year and exceeds the previous high of 28.5 million in the first quarter of 2015. The average number of direct travel-related jobs in the first quarter of 2016 was also a record high, with 1,231,100 Floridians employed in the tourism industry — up 3.8 percent from the same period in 2015. The Florida First budget Governor Scott signed in March invested $76 million for VISIT FLORIDA to attract even more tourists to the Sunshine State. To view additional Florida visitor data, go to the Research page on VISIT FLORIDA’s media website: visitfloridamediablog.com.

INDEPENDENT OPERATORS WORKSHOP SERIES In late Spring, FRLA held the first in a series of independent operator workshops. FRLA identified a need to help independent operators reach more customers and implement best practices. To facilitate this process, FRLA is holding these workshops around the state to target specific areas of need and provide support for these businesses. The next workshop will be held in Orlando on September 27, 2016 in conjunction with the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show. Find out more at www.frla.org!

SAFER DINING IS THE EXCLUSIVE FOOD ALLERGY TRAINING PROVIDER FOR REGULATORY COMPLIANCE SERVICES Regulatory Compliance Services (RCS), a subsidiary of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association (FRLA), recently announced an agreement enabling Safer Dining to be the sole food allergen training provider for RCS. This partnership assures RCS can provide Safer Dining food allergen training options as requested by business owners. RCS will also include Safer Dining as an additional training option during employee food safety training and certified food protection manager classes. Safer Dining is the leader in food allergy training. RCS’ alliance with Safer Dining underscores its continued dedication to providing food allergy awareness and education to both distributors and consumers alike. Through Safer Dining’s training, operators will be equipped with knowledge to not only prevent potential cross contamination, but also how to handle an allergy situation should one arise and how to better manage liability. “This sends a clear message that we take the health of the food allergen community seriously, and are committed to earning their confidence and patronage,” said Geoff Luebkemann, FRLA Vice President of Education & Training. “Businesses that actively invest in effective

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food allergen control and raising staff capability are quickly identified as friends of the food allergen community, and that community is very loyal to the businesses that care for them. This isn’t just the right thing to do, it’s smart business.” For more information on raising awareness of and incorporating food allergy best practices, contact Dr. Jordan Maeson at 727.313.4055 or via e-mail at eat@saferdining.com.

DBPR Adds New License Type Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation is adding a license for Culinary Education Programs. For more information contact DBPR, Division of Hotels and Restaurants at dhr.rules@myfloridalicense.com.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


ENGAGE

Engage Orlando Update

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he Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association’s Engage Orlando program has been continuing to gain momentum in the central Florida area. The Engage team has had successful meetings and built relationships with multiple local elected officials and engaged in multiple initiatives across the community. Most recently, the team has been involved in a program called Opportunity Jobs Academy. Opportunity Jobs Academy is run through the City of Orlando, and is a partner program of After School All Stars. OJA matches high school students with mentors in the hospitality industry that teach students real world, life skills for entering the job market. Any student that was seeking a job found placement through the program. One class was also featured on Channel 9 News. This spring 2016 class started in February, and many of our Engage Orlando members were mentors to students. Red Lobster Director of Communications & External Relations and Engage Orlando member Erica Ettori came and spoke about the importance of solving workplace issues, resumes and the importance of good communication skills.

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Additionally, Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer, City Commissioner Robert Stuart and City Commissioner Tony Ortiz visited an Opportunity Jobs Academy class at Edgewater High School to speak with students about their career paths. As a National Reputation Initiative for the month of March, the FRLA Engage Orlando program highlighted Women’s History Month and collected stories of women in the hospitality industry. This was an initiative the National Restaurant Association was promoting across the country. On March 28, 2016, Orlando City Commissioner Regina Hill presented a proclamation announcing March as “Women’s History Month” in Orlando to recognize the many accomplishments and contributions made by

American women and to encourage all residents to learn more about the generations of women who have played such an important role in our history. Within the proclamation, women in the hospitality industry were specifically highlighted as business owners who provide career opportunities for every race, class and ethnic background and who help shape the lives of employees in a positive manner. The FRLA commends Mayor Buddy Dyer and the Orlando City Council for recognizing exceptional women leaders in the hospitality industry. We are excited for the Engage program to continue growing and to expand to other markets across the state including Miami, Broward and Tampa.

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REGIONAL DIRECTOR & MANAGER TERRITORIES

HOLMES

ESCAMBIA SANTA ROSA

JACKSON OKALOOSA WALTON

NASSAU

WASHINGTON

GADSDEN LEON

CALHOUN

BAY

HAMILTON JEFFERSON

MADISON DUVAL

BAKER LIBERTY

WAKULLA

SUWANNEE

COLUMBIA

TAYLOR GULF

FRANKLIN

UNION CLAY

LAFAYETTE

DIXIE

SAINT JOHNS

BRADFORD

GILCHRIST

ALACHUA

PUTNAM FLAGLER

LEVY

DANNETTE LYNCH

MARION

PINELLAS, HILLSBOROUGH, SUNCOAST, SOUTHWEST FL, POLK, CENTRAL FL, SPACE COAST

VOLUSIA

DIRECTOR OF MEMBERSHIP

dannette@frla.org

727.642.3404

727.953.6803

LAKE

CITRUS SUMTER

CORKEY BERGAMO 904.993.6287

NORTHEAST FLORIDA

cbergamo@frla.org

LOIS CROFT 561.410.0035

ORANGE PASCO

904.880.6964

OSCEOLA

HILLSBOROUGH

PALM BEACH & HENDRY COUNTY

POLK

PINELLAS

LYNNE HERNANDEZ

561.270.6878 SAINT LUCIE DESOTO

888.612.7115

MARTIN

CENTRAL FLORIDA LEE

GLADES

HENDRY

PALM BEACH

dlavan@frla.org

NICK LOWE 850.661.4256

850.516.2803

COLLIER

nlowe@frla.org

MARCO ISLAND MONROE

ESCAMBIA & SANTA ROSA COUNTY

cradford@frla.org

ROSIE RICCARDI 407.304.8773

BROWARD

TALLAHASSEE & NORTHWEST FL

COLLEEN RADFORD CENTRAL FLORIDA

rriccardi@frla.org

ANNE SALLEE 954.253.0850

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HIGHLANDS

SARASOTA

CHARLOTTE

407.280.6599

OKEECHOBEE

HARDEE

SOUTH FLORIDA

lhernandez@frla.org

DANIEL LAVAN

BREVARD

INDIAN RIVER

lcroft@frla.org

MANATEE

305.710.3962

SEMINOLE

HERNANDO

BROWARD COUNTY

asallee@frla.org

844.253.0850

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MOVERS AND SHAKERS

Daniel Lavan Is FRLA’s New Central Florida Regional Director We are pleased to welcome Daniel Lavan to FRLA as our Central Florida Regional Director. Based in Orlando, Daniel will be responsible for membership, retention, fundraising and organizing grassroots efforts. Daniel has more than 20 years of experience in community economic development projects and initiatives. His background includes the following positions: Community Development Coordinator for Transamerica; Community Development Consultant for the City of Miami Gardens Mayor’s Office; Boundaries Commission Director for the Miami Dade Board of County Commissioners; and Executive Director of Vision Community Developers. Throughout his career, Daniel has worked toward achieving goals for organizations at the local, state and federal levels. Daniel received his bachelor’s degree in Political Science from Knoxville College in Knoxville, Tennessee. He is also an ordained minister, Florida insurance agent and a Florida Supreme Court Mediator. We are pleased to add Daniel to our stellar Membership team!

SUMMER BOARD MEETING JUNE 6–8

Opal Sands Resort Clearwater Beach, Florida

Boca Raton Resort & Club, A Waldorf Astoria Resort Boca Raton, Florida

Richard Gonzmart Honored With Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice Medal Bestowed By Pope Francis

Colleen is a native of Pensacola with 14 years of experience in the banking industry. In those 14 years she worked in Pensacola and Gulf Breeze, Florida. Colleen joined AmSouth Bank in 2003 and was the assistant branch manager. She helped complete the merger between AmSouth Bank and Regions Bank in 2006. From there she continued her career with SunTrust Bank and was the branch manager. She then went on to work for Beach Community Bank. In her spare time, Colleen likes to spend time with her husband Reid and son Jaxon. She also enjoys boating, spending time on the beach and traveling.

Richard Gonzmart, fourth-generation family member and president of the Columbia Restaurant Group, has been honored with the Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice medal. The medal is an award of the Roman Catholic Church. At the recommendation of Father Richard Hermes, S.J., President of Jesuit High School in Tampa and the nomination of Bishop Lynch, Pope Francis bestowed this papal honor on Gonzmart. It is given for distinguished service to the church by lay people and clergy. It is the highest medal that can be awarded to the laity by the Pope. Gonzmart received the award on April 17 at Bethany Center in Lutz, Florida.

Elizabeth Ray Had A Big Spring! FRLA’s own Elizabeth Ray was recently named by FloridaPolitics.com as one of the rising stars in Florida politics. The 30-Under-30 series features the “next generation” of the political scene in Florida. In addition to that nomination, Elizabeth also received her Master of Arts in Integrated Marketing and Communication from Florida State University. Congratulations Elizabeth!

Dave Reid Moves to World of Beer

Bern’s Steak House Awarded James Beard Award

Former FRLA Chairman, David Reid, has recently been named as Vice President of Operations for the World of Beer. This “craft tavern” concept has units located throughout the Southeast. Congratulations Dave!

FLORIDA RESTAURANT & LODGING SHOW SEPTEMBER 27–29

MARKETING + OPERATIONS SUMMIT JULY 27–28

Colleen Radford

Orange County Convention Center Orlando, Florida

NRA / FRLA BOB LEONARD GOLF CLASSIC SEPTEMBER 26

ChampionsGate Golf Course ChampionsGate, Florida

Tampa’s Bern’s Steak House was named the Outstanding Wine Program for the 2016 James Beard Foundation Awards. Fantastic!

FALL BOARD MEETING

FLORIDA TOURISM DAY

SEPTEMBER 27–29

MARCH 14, 2017

Orange County Convention Center Orlando, Florida

INSTALLATION & AWARDS GALA

Tallahassee, Florida The FRLA hosts a full slate of state and local industry events throughout Florida. Make plans to join us at our statewide events! We encourage you to get involved locally in our chapter events, too. Contact your local FRLA Regional Director on FRLA.org, to find out what's happening next.

SEPTEMBER 28

Hyatt Regency Orlando Orlando, Florida

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE VISIT WWW.FRLA.ORG/EVENTS

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2016

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Exceeding Culinary Expectations — MASTER THE EMERGING TRENDS —

AD September 27-29, 2016

Orange County Convention Center

Orlando, FL

Ferdinand Metz Foodservice Forum, Food Trends Experience, NEW! Sabor Latino Pavilion, Beer, Wine & Spirits Pavilion, Culinary Demonstration Theater, ACF Culinary Competitions, FRLA Events, Japan Pavilion, New Product Gallery, 500+ Leading Vendors, and much more!

FRLA MEMBERS — Register today for your three complimentary show passes

with your FRLA Member ID# at www.expologic.com/cReg / FRLS Presenting:

S p o n s o re d b y :

Fe a t u r i n g :

Produced & Managed By:

Competition Sponsor:

Highlights Include:

SM

GAIN A FRESH PERSPECTIVE ON YOUR BUSINESS

®

www.flrestaurantandlodgingshow.com


s r o t i s i V e r o M t c A a r D t I t R A O L F T I S I V a p i h h s r wit e n t r a P g n i t e k r Ma

Learn more by contacting the Industry Relations Team at (877) 435-2872 or Partner@VISITFLORIDA.org.

Profile for Florida Restaurant and Lodging Magazine

Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine Summer 2016  

FR&L Magazine is an official publication of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association. This is the Annual Beverage Edition featuring n...

Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine Summer 2016  

FR&L Magazine is an official publication of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association. This is the Annual Beverage Edition featuring n...