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INTERIOR DESIGN

News

San Joaquin Delta College

2010-2011

INTERIOR DESIGN San Joaquin Delta College Trends Certificates and Degrees Interior Design Events


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San Joaquin Delta College Interior Design Newsletter


INTERIOR DESIGN

News

San Joaquin Delta College

2010-2011

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: COLOR TRENDS IN INTERIOR DESIGN 2010-2011

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COLOUR OF THE YEAR 2010

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COLOR TRENDS 2011

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FIVE MAIN TRENDS AND COLORS 2011

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TRENDS IN COLOR FAMILIES

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DELTA COLLEGE INTERIOR DESIGN STUDENTS WORK WITH HABITAT FOR HUMANITY .

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10 TRENDS THAT CHANGED INTERIOR DESIGN

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GREEN DESIGN

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THINKING OF A CAREER IN INTERIOR DESIGN?

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SAN JOAQUIN DELTA COLLEGE’S INTERIOR DESIGN PROGRAM .

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COLOUR OF THE YEAR 2011

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INSPIRING NEW INTERIOR DESIGN TRENDS 2011

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BEING AND INTERIOR DESIGNER IN TODAY’S INDUSTRY

Cover image courtesy of coco+kelley/Courtesy Flickr.

UPCOMING EVENT: MEET THE INTERIOR DESIGN INDUSTRY INSIDERS Industry experts provide advice, information and insights into the Interior Design Industry; career advice, inside knowledge and guidance to help you on your way to success. Wednesday, October 20, 2010 from 5-7 pm Danner Hall, SJDC Campus This event is free and open to the public! HEADLINER: Kerrie Kelly from Kerrie Kelly Design Lab- Interior Designer, Furniture Designer, Author, Consultant 3

San Joaquin Delta College Interior Design Newsletter


COLOR DESIGN TRENDS 2010-2011 2010 Next HOT Color Mardi Grape

According to Kiki Titterud of Sensational Color blog, “This sophisticated crossover between brown, purple, and gray is a transfer from fashion with European roots. Mardi Grape was a fashion color, now it’s all set to be the year’s biggest star for everything else.” “Purple has been with us for a while now, but the big story today is that we’re seeing purple as a neutral for the very first time, said James Martin, president of Color Marketing Group. “This purple is browner and grayer, a neutral we can love long-term. These days everyone is seeking versatile colors with staying power. Colors used to be the focus while neutrals were the understudies. Today, neutrals are the lead performers, chameleon colors that shift and change.” In a recent House Beautiful Magazine article, “The Hottest New Paint Colors,” Pratt & Lambert Paint’s Peggy Van Allen, CMG, was asked what she sees as the most popular color for the new year. Here’s what she had to say… “I think this is the year purple will really get picked up. People want a sense of their own personal space, and this is something different — a grayed purple, like a field of lavender on a foggy morning. It’s soft, not scary. I see it in a bedroom, or as a secondary color in a living room with warm beige and camel.” —PEGGY VAN ALLEN: Grape Hyacinth, Pratt & Lambert Paint. Titterud reports that purple is a color that forecasters have been tracking for some time now, this only proves that a true color trend has longevity and staying power. Check out one of Titterud’s favorite posts, Trend Tuesday: Passionate Purples (http://www.sensationalcolor.com/colorforyourhome/trendtuesday-cmg-announces-2010-next-hot-hue/), for more on this directional color. Over time purple has shifted from blueinfluenced, to red-inspired, and now infused by gray. The application and interpretation of the new dusty grape is absolutely soothing, but don’t just take my word for it, take a look at a few interior image. Source: Sensationalcolor Images: Courtesy of flickr

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San Joaquin Delta College Interior Design Newsletter


Color of the Year 2010 – Icy Blue is Icy Hot “In keeping with the 2010 overall theme of ‘Reclaim’, we are looking towards the qualities of truth, integrity, openness and hope. The Color of the Year is an airy and optimistic blue that symbolizes infinite horizons, new beginnings, renewed energy and a positive dynamic,” according to Color Sensations.

In addition to Mardi Grape, there are other color trends in our future. So be on the lookout for these colors too.

This clear, transparent shade encapsulates a sense of purity and goodness – a hopeful and chemical free color full of possibility. It puts over an image of vast skies, breezy ozone freshness and the energy and essentiality of water. Given these associations plus the fact that it is a receding color it will always create a sense of space.

Notice how many of these colors are bright, optimistic accents for pops of

Blue, in color psychology terms, is the color associated with sky and sea. Airy light blues are recognized

color to pair with neutrals. Green

as being refreshing, soothing and liberating. They are good in helping to combat mental strain and stress,

shifts towards blue creating a bright

physical tiredness and feelings of exhaustion whilst at the same time being re-energizing and

clear mix reminiscent of turquoise!... another important color on the

encouraging fresh starts. They are also thought to enhance powers of communication, which can help to promote feelings of confidence.

horizon. A balance of the spiritual and the intellectual is represented by the allusion to air, sky and water – the Red – Reds are strong with pink intuition; bright and clean with energy and excitement – a clean pop to go with neutrals.

freedom of the spirit married to the rationality of the mind; the vision of the artist to the knowledge of the

Orange – A rich, sophisticated color that moves away from earth-based colors to an optimistic orange, seasoned with a touch of gray.

with stronger and more traditional interior shades such as crimson, burgundy, plum, teal, pewter and gold.

Yellow – A greener, more natural yellow, softened with gray. Green – Optimistic and uplifting, a clear and bright accent green with a slight shift toward blue.

scientist. Both in interior and exterior settings this blue has an important role to play. It complements perfectly the contemporary materials and modern neutrality of glass, steel and concrete, but also works

This color speaks of hope and clarity – a pure, clean and unpolluted direction for the future of our planet; a chance to reclaim possibility with renewed vigor and energy – the clear new horizon of tomorrow.”

Source: Sensationalcolor; Images: Courtesy of flickr

Blue – A saturated blue with gray influences; rich without being too luxe. Beige-Brown – A true chameleon to complement darker hues, it can be either matte or metallic. Neutral-Gray – Gray with a touch of purple, drawing inspiration from mineral, concrete and steel.

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San Joaquin Delta College Interior Design Newsletter


COLOR TRENDS 2011

The one dominant trend for 2011 is “appreciation” and five relating trends, which stem from this one idea. Each trend is translated into a contemporary color palette and from these one “Color of the Year: is selected- the single color that sums up the prevailing mood, attitude and fashion of the time. In an era when everything seems possible, we now yearn to return to a more relaxed and informal style of living. In a world with so much choice, we seek simplicity and a more essential response to life and home on the one hand, and a more creative and carefree approach to how we spend out time and money, on the other. We find a promise of sublime comfort and relaxation, things we have taken for granted, that have been under our noses, close to every individual but seemingly commonplace- places, skills, relationships and emotions. We are more turned on to the magic of rediscovered beauty and t he continuity of concepts that stood the test of time. Basic to our needs and preferences, they were ignored in favor of the ultrafashionable, the startling new and stylish innovative. We are rediscovering collective values, working together and sharing the joys of achieving. Gone are the days where success was exclusively the reserve of star designers and celebrity culture; it is being replaced by more common partnerships, associations or groupings. Testosterone-fuelled masculinity has given way to an age of femininity- the serenity of tea is surprisingly replacing the coffee culture, fruit and vegetable juice bars are appearing everywhere in response to our need for something more pure, honest and vital.

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We find a new balance in our everyday existence between the closeness, simplicity and security of home and innovative technological frontiers. Meaning and truth can be found in humble objects, familiar surroundings, recapturing cultural roots and a balanced coexistence with the natural world. They can also be found in the temporary and transient; in not waiting for ideas to become permanent before enjoying them, but rather responding to the moment and finding instant joy in something less designed. It’s time to be CONTENT WITH WHAT WE HAVE, to TREASURE AND NURTURE IT, to HOLD IT DEAR AND TREAT IT WITH PRICE AND CARE--- to find out way forward to a more RELAXED REALITY.

COLOUR TRANSITIONS FOR 2011. This year, there is a continuing move towards colors that are cleaner in character and much more optimistic and hopeful in the feeling they create. Shades for 2011 bring joy and charm to our loves and create an overriding mood of clarity and freshness in all palettes. Each individual color family is contained and self sufficient with little or no room for heaviness or somberness. Brighter mid-tones tend to predominate but when deep shades do exist, they are eminently usable and work wonderfully with brighter and lighter colors. The year also features cleaner more optimistic and playful brights. This new directions speaks of hope, charm and a clearer vision of the culture.

~Source: ColourFutures/ AksoNobel Paints

San Joaquin Delta College Interior Design Newsletter


~Source: ColourFutures/ AksoNobel Paints

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San Joaquin Delta College Interior Design Newsletter


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San Joaquin Delta College Interior Design Newsletter


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San Joaquin Delta College Interior Design Newsletter


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San Joaquin Delta College Interior Design Newsletter


~Source: ColourFutures/ AksoNobel Paints

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San Joaquin Delta College Interior Design Newsletter


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San Joaquin Delta College Interior Design Newsletter


TRENDS IN COLOR FAMILIES

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San Joaquin Delta College Interior Design Newsletter


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San Joaquin Delta College Interior Design Newsletter


~Source: ColourFutures/ AksoNobel Paints

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San Joaquin Delta College Interior Design Newsletter


Inspiring new interior design trends in 2010 Here are five new design trends to inspire from 2010: Color Color is a good starting point, as a new coat of paint can totally transform a room giving it a fresh, revitalized look and, if it's a DIY project, be fun and therapeutic at the same time. Pantone LLC, based in Carlstadt, NJ, has announced the color of the year 2010 is turquoise, specifically Pantone 15-5519. And, it appears, that most designers universally agree. According to Pantone, turquoise "combines the serene qualities of blue and the invigorating aspects of green" and is an "effective escape from the everyday troubles of the world while at the same time restoring our sense of wellbeing." Categorically, it is a flattering color that can be mixed and matched with any color. Other popular lively colors in 2010 are sunny, golden yellows, leaf greens and rich plum purple. Grey is back in vogue as the new neutral, replacing beige. Grey paired with warm colors – magenta, orangey reds or tangerine or juxtaposed with turquoise and aqua can have a mercurial effect. Orange, on the comeback trail as well, is seen in accents and accessorizing. Accessorize In a complicated world and uncertain economy, people tend to retreat into the comforts of home – the "stay-cation." What can be more comfortable than accessorizing with lots of pillows, giving a room a bright fashionable look without spending a lot of money? Rather than reupholster a sofa, you can totally change its personality with a new assortment of throw pillows in different textures, shapes and accent colors. An accessories trend that started in 2009 and is becoming huge in 2010 is the use of metallics. According to interior designer, Rob Amend, who is a partner of Red Ginger Home in Red Bank, "We're using metallics in accessories, wall coverings, wall art and fabrics. The metallics are softer and more muted and are intermingled in a melange of bronze, copper, warm gold, brass and silver." Simplicity without losing the glamour "People are purging themselves of ‘stuff," says Amend. "They want a more simplified, easy-to-take-care lifestyle, more casual and more comfortable. We may still see traditional draperies, but without the swags and jabots." Fabrics are warmer, less complex, and in softer textiles e.g. chenille and velvet. Texture is important in selecting a fabric and there is virtually no pattern – chintz, florals, toiles are all out of fashion. In floor coverings, layering has become very popular, sometimes using several small area rugs of the same design, to cover an odd size floor. Rethinking tradition In defining the overall trend in home interiors and furnishings, Amend explains that style has moved to a contemporary version of traditional, where it may echo a feeling of the past. Furniture designs have cleaner lines and are constructed in warm, often exotic woods. A collection may have a theme, but each piece in the collection is individually styled. A great interest has arisen in collections of artisan works in furniture, rather than brand names. The collections of two women furniture designers, Adriana Hoyos from Ecuador and Californian Maria Yee, are showcased at Red Ginger Home. Both women create furniture as forms of art rather than as a manufactured assembly line piece. Lighting as an art form The most significant trend in lighting is variety and selection. Amend explains that sculptural pendant lighting has replaced the crystal chandelier. Lamps have become more beautiful, and recessed lighting is more for ambient lighting. He describes the current trend in lighting as "task lighting," having a variety of lighting in a room to serve different functions. Lighting by glass artists has become a growing trend in creating lighting as an art form. Looking ahead in 2010, the future of interior design appears to be bringing us home to the past, when life was simpler and less complicated, yet comfortable and reflective of our own unique lives.

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San Joaquin Delta College Interior Design Newsletter


San Joaquin Delta College Interior Design Students Work On A Very Special Project With Habitat for Humanity of San Joaquin County Inc.


 The
advanced
design
students
in
the
Interior
Design
Program
at
San
Joaquin
 Delta
College
are
working
on
a
project
for
Habitat
for
Humanity
of
San
Joaquin
 County
Inc.,
the
well‐known
organization
building
houses
in
partnership
with
 people
in
need
of
decent,
affordable
housing.
 
 The
project
is
one
of
the
first
of
its
magnitude
in
which
the
college's
program
 has
been
involved.
It
became
a
reality
after
a
conversation
between
two
long‐ term
friends
who
had
an
idea.
Ron
Saito,
the
instructor
of
the
class
is
a
good
 friend
with
John
Shores,
the
President
of
Habitat
for
Humanity
of
San
Joaquin
 County
Inc.
 
 Saito
has
been
teaching
at
Delta
in
the
Interior
Design
Program
for
the
past
12
 years
but
has
never
had
such
an
opportunity
where
his
students
could
be
 involved
in
a
project
of
this
importance
and
one
that
could
really
make
a
 difference
in
the
own
community.

Saito
has
known
John
Shores,
for
over
12
 years
and
asked
him
if
there
was
anything
his
students
could
be
involved
in
to
 gain
some
real
experience
in
the
interior
design
field.

Shores
had
just
such
a
 project,
working
with
Habitat
for
Humanity
of
San
Joaquin
County
Inc.
 
 Shores
knows
the
construction
industry
well,
and
felt
that
this
project
would
 be
a
great
fit
for
both
the
students
and
HFH.
Shores'
most
recent
position
was
 as
Vice
President
of
Operations
for
John
Laing
Homes,
a
large
development
 company
based
in
Newport
Beach,
California.
John
Laing,
who
has
had
a
 history
of
strong
community
involvement,
selected
Habitat
as
the
organization
 to
which
his
company
would
lend
its
support.
Shores
came
to
the
Habitat
as
a
 volunteer/project
manager
during
the
construction
of
the
homes
in
Stockton
 at
the
corner
of
Shasta
and
Miner
streets.
The
construction
process,
and
 primarily
the
involvement
on
the
Family
Selection
Committee,
was
what
led
to
 John’s
interest
in
being
involved
for
the
long
term.
It
was
the
organization's
 efforts
to
help
people
in
need
that
led
to
his
need
to
stay
involved
and
lend
his
 services.
He
now
serves
as
the
president
of
the
San
Joaquin
County
affiliate.
 
 Saito,
along
with
teaching
several
courses
at
Delta,
is
also
works
in
commercial
 interior
design
sales
with
Durst
Contract
Interiors,
established
in
1982
in
 Stockton.
For
him,
this
is
the
first
large‐scale
project
in
which
he
has
involved
 his
students
and
he
is
excited
at
the
growth
they
have
made
through
the
 process.
He
hopes
to
see
some
of
their
ideas
come
to
fruition
through
the
 project.



 Shores
is
meeting
with
the
City
Council
in
the
next
few
weeks,
in
the
hopes
of
 getting
the
city’s
support
for
the
project
and
a
commitment
to
doing
some
good
 things
for
the
people
in
this
community,
helping
out
people
who
are
desperately
 in
need
of
clean,
safe
housing.
The
Stockton
area
has
been
hit
particularly
hard
 by
the
recession
and
there
are
many
families
in
dire
need
of
housing.
Habitat
 will
be
a
valuable
project
to
the
community.
 
 Habitat
for
Humanity
of
San
Joaquin,
Inc.
recently
purchased
19
lots
in
Stockton
 with
an
option
to
purchase
40
additional
lots.
Plans
are
to
break
ground
this
 summer
on
the
first
homes
within
this
new
community.
HFH
hopes
to
offer
 three
floor
plans,
ranging
in
size
from
996
square
feet
to
1298
square
feet.
 
 Habitat
for
Humanity,
as
a
national
organization,
has
helped
change
the
lives
of
 more
than
30,000
American
families
since
its
first
U.S.
affiliate
was
founded
in
 San
Antonio,
Texas
in
1978
and
the
organization
has
built
more
than
300,000
 houses
around
the
world,
providing
more
than
1.5
million
people
in
more
than
 3,000
communities
with
safe,
decent,
affordable
shelter.
They
hope
to
continue
 this
mission
through
the
projects
in
San
Joaquin
County.
 
 The
Interior
Design
students’
involvement
has
been
incremental,
designing
more
 than
just
the
interiors.
They
are
responsible
for
designing
the
interior,
utilizing
 eco‐friendly
and
sustainable
materials,
for
suggesting
ideas
for
the
exterior
and
 the
community
itself,
and
for
the
naming
the
subdivision
project.
They
also
had
 to
begin
to
plan
their
own
Interior
Design
Businesses,
as
well
as
naming
their
 Interior
Design
business,
considering
all
aspects
of
the
designer’s
positioning
in
 the
field.
They
received
instruction
from
several
local
small
business
owners,
 including
Fabian
Ceballos
of
Fabina's
Auto
Body.
Fabian
has
an
MBA
and
 presented
the
steps
a
small
business
owner
would
take
to
develop
a
business
 plan
and
understand
start‐up
costs
and
expenses.
Saito
wanted
to
give
them
a
 multi‐dimensional
project
that
is
rooted
in
many
different
aspects
of
the
 industry
and
in
real
scenarios
and
the
real
business
of
design.

 
 In
the
first
session
with
the
students,
Shores
presented
the
project
to
the
class,
 explaining
HFH’s
mission,
and
the
idea
for
the
sub‐division
of
homes.
He
asked
 them
to
specify
both
the
interior
and
exterior
finishes
and
materials.

The
 second
session
was
a
presentation
on
estimating
cost
for
materials
and
labor.
 John
started
with
a
power
point
presentation
to
the
class,
showing
estimating


Habitat for Humanity Projects on display at the end-ofthe year exhibit of student work, called A STORY OF DESIGN

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San Joaquin Delta College Interior Design Newsletter


construction
cost
by
using
formulas,
cost
control
measures,
and
forecast
 cost
for
future
projects.
To
keep
the
project
real,
the
students
had
to
cost
 all
of
the
specifications
of
their
proposals,
as
well
as
unforeseen
costs
that
 might
arise
through
the
project.
 
 The
students
then
had
to
create
their
visions
in
a
professionally
presented
 proposal
to
Shores.
On
Wednesday,
April
3,
2010,
they
presented
their
 ideas,
answered
questions
and
concerned
and
received
some
critique
and
 feedback.
The
students
had
ideas
for
all
of
the
interior
finishes,
with
the
 costs
for
the
materials
and
specifications
for
each
plan.
Shores
then
 critiqued
the
ideas
and
offered
suggestions
and
insights
into
what
might
 work
and
what
would
not,
within
the
reality
of
the
project.
His
critique
is
 valuable
to
the
“real‐world”
experience
the
students
are
gaining
with
this
 project.
 
 Their
ideas
for
the
community
names
ranged
from
“Creekside
Cottages,

A
 Sustainable
Community”
to
“Mosaic
Village.”
Reanai
Koch,
the
student
 designing
the
Creekside
Cottages,
included
products
that
are
green,
 sustainable
and
eco
friendly,
researching
products
such
as
allergy‐free
 green
products
for
her
design.

Joan
Chapman,
another
student
working
on
 the
project
chose
a
design
for
her
Mosaic
Village
plan,
drawing
inspiration
 from
the
East
Coast
cottages
one
might
see
in
areas
like
Maine
or
 Massachusetts.
Joan
wants
to
see
a
more
colonial
and
traditional
village,
 where
the
residents
who
might
be
suffering
from
a
more
desperate
 economic
situation
will
feel
a
sense
of
pride
and
safety
in
their
community
 and
take
pride
in
where
they
live.
Ryan
Mar's
concept
was
full
of
color,
 focusing
on
life
and
living.
"I
think
Stockton
needs
that,"
he
said.
“Magnolia
 Port”
was
the
idea
of
Jennifer
Cadieux.
Her
design
concept
was
inspired
by
 the
Magnolia
District
in
Stockton
and
the
Stockton
Port
to
blend
the
 community
with
the
history
of
the
city.
Jennifer’s
sustainable
ideas
were
 affordable
and
accessible,
using
materials
that
are
easy
to
care
for
and
will
 last
for
a
long
time.
She
wanted
to
give
the
residents
multiple
options
that
 had
good
value
and
benefits.
 
 Kia
Creighton,
another
student,
also
works
for
Home
Depot.
She
presented
 materials
and
finishes
that
had
cost‐effective
and
maintenance
benefits
 with
ease
of
installation
and
care,
as
well
as
many
tax‐credit‐eligible
 products
for
homeowners.
Other
students
showed
recycled
materials
or
 reclaimed
materials,
blending
them
with
more
luxurious
materials
like
 granite
and
quarts.
Mar's
design
used
rich
colors
with
eco‐friendly
materials
 like
bamboo
and
natural‐fiber
carpeting.

 
 The
students
were
asked
to
provide
a
cost‐effective,
basic
design,
as
well
as
 an
upgraded
design,
where
homeowners
could
choose
a
little
luxury
in
 their
interiors.
Mar's
options
included
a
myriad
of
colors
in
paint,
wood
 tones
and
window
coverings.
 
 Based
on
the
project
presentations,
the
interiors
of
these
homes
will
 definitely
be
innovative,
creative
and
will
provide
residents
with
a
very
 luxurious
ambiance.
Shores
would
like
to
provide
residents
with
a
menu
of
 options
from
which
they
can
choose
to
create
an
environment
that
they
 can
call
home
is
an
honor."
 


Habitat for Humanity Projects on display at the end-of-the year exhibit of student work, called A STORY OF DESIGN

18

San Joaquin Delta College Interior Design Newsletter


10 Trends that changed Interiors Assisted by the plethora of home improvement TV shows, decor magazines and celebrity interior designers, the focus on design and style for the home has strengthened over the last 10 years. Technological innovations are constantly developed and refined, while craft aesthetics and traditional motifs continue to be reworked and reinterpreted in a contemporary way. According to WGSN, these are 10 trends that have changed the way we design our interior spaces: Wallpaper. What: The re-emergence of wallpaper as interior decoration. With painted walls being the style trend of the late 80s and 90s, this reinvention of wallpaper has been fuelled by the desire for more decoration and is now more affordable through advanced technology. Why: Wallpaper ranges appear at every level of the market from high-end bespoke panels through to the mass-market retailers. Eco-aware. What: A combination of both attitude and material; ethically responsible manufacturing techniques are as important as the sustainable recyclable materials used. Why: Good for the planet and our children's future, but also a massive selling point. Wood is being used as the material of choice over new plastics. Ethnic inspiration. What: The strength of inspiration which derives from global art, cultural motifs and specialized techniques can be applied to all manner of textiles and decoration – from rugs and cushions to throws, towels and bedlinen. Why: The prevalence of ethnic motifs and techniques, including suzani from Uzbekistan, paisley from Persia and geometrics from Africa, being used throughout the interiors industry. Minimalism. What: Design innovator John Pawson was a key player in the late 90s trend for a minimalist interior. The principle of the movement was to take away all unnecessary ornamentation and be left with only the essentials, revealing the naked object. Why: A design trend embraced by hotels, restaurants, mass-market retailers and interior designers is set to be permanent style option. Craft. What: A strong craft revival combined with innovative technologies to create a new workable aesthetic has meant a revaluation of design parameters – designers are fast becoming the masters of multiple trades. Why: Cross-over between design disciplines is key to both sustainable manufacture and keeping products and collections original. Baroque and rococo revival. What: A continuing romantic and decorative trend where the mixing of modern lines and materials has been combined with 17th and 18th century charm and detail. Why: Reinterpretation of historical references is pivotal in the development of design. This trend has been the greatest inspiration on the mass market in the last decade. Superstar status. What: In the past decade top international designers have enjoyed the status of superstars, successfully marketed through collaborations with big-name brands. Marcel Wanders, Patricia Urquiola, Tom Dixon, Hella Jongerius, Paola Navone and Jaime Hayon are the most significant super-designers of the present day. Why: Collaborations are not limited to the high-end, with Target, Habitat and Graham & Brown also capitalizing on superstar designers' skills and status. Embellishment. What: Beaded and sequined home accessories inspired by the fashion of the early nineties. Why: Embraced by the home wares industry as a staple glamorous fix for all home environments. High-gloss finish. What: High-gloss finishes achieved by lacquered or polished materials continues to be a key patina for furniture and accessories alike. Why: Gives an added sense of luxury which has filtered down to the masses via Ikea kitchens. Limited editions: blurring the boundaries between art and design. What: Limited edition pieces/collections of furniture and accessories designed by artists and architects exhibited in exhibitions and galleries. Why: The blurring of disciplines allows for a new more diverse aesthetic while the notion of limited editions also prevails in the lower end of the market as exclusivity will always be a selling point.

19

San Joaquin Delta College Interior Design Newsletter


GREEN DESIGN – WHAT IS IT? Sustainable
design
(also
called
environmental
design,
environmentally
sustainable
design,
environmentally‐conscious
design,
etc)
is
 the
philosophy
of
designing
physical
objects,
the
built
environment
and
services
to
comply
with
the
principles
of
economic,
social,
 and
ecological
sustainability.
 A
term
used
in
the
building,
furnishings,
and
product
industries
to
indicate
design
sensitive
to
environmentally‐friendly,
ecological
 issues
 A
design,
usually
architectural,
conforming
to
environmentally
sound
principles
of
building,
material
and
energy
use.
A
green
 building,
for
example,
might
make
use
of
solar
panels,
skylights,
and
recycled
building
materials.
 The
design
of
products,
services,
buildings,
or
experiences
that
are
sensitive
to
environmental
issues
and
achieve
greater
efficiency
 and
effectiveness
in
terms
of
energy
and
materials.
 Sustainable
design
methods
utilizing
recycled
,
renewable
and
environmentally
friendly
materials
and
design
elements.
ie:
energy
 efficient
insulation,
solar
power,
water
conservation
methods,
renewable
bamboo
flooring,
etc.
 Designing
energy‐efficient
and
environmentally
sound
components,
computers,
servers,
cooling
equipment,
and
data
centers.


GREEN DESIGN ALL OVER THE WORLD! Zero-Energy Housing Wedge in Denmark Covered in Solar Panels A proposal for an eco-housing development on the coast of Aalborg, Denmark takes a radical approach to sustainable design with its dramatic south-facing sloped roof, which is completely covered in solar panels. The entire housing development aims to run completely off renewable energy while achieving high energy efficiency through the use of passive-house standards. Besides the solar roof, four small wind turbines located on site take advantage of the ocean breezes to produce even more energy, which could be used to charge electric vehicles.

20

Stunning Swedish Treehotel Do you have your sights set high for your summer vacation? This gorgeous mirror-walled Swedish Treehotel, which opens this weekend, may just be the ticket. Set in the pristine forests of northern Sweden, just miles away from the Arctic Circle, the Treehotel combines stunning design with prefabricated treehouse construction plus ecofriendly building strategies that may have you drooling over a vacation in sunny -- yes sunny – Sweden.

San Joaquin Delta College Interior Design Newsletter


Thinking of a career in INTERIOR DESIGN? Do you have an interest in physical spaces? When you are in a space do you tend to take notice of your surroundings? Do you frequently make suggestions on how to improve your home surroundings, or do you like to design or redesign your personal space? Can you some day see yourself as the person responsible for redesigning the interior of your school, your favorite restaurant or nightspot, or a clothing store? Are you creative or artistic? Do you work well in teams to solve problems and overcome challenges?

What is An Interior Designer? Interior designers are creative, imaginative and artistic. They also need to be disciplined, organized and skilled business people. Combining knowledge with aesthetic vision, interior designers work with clients and other design professionals to develop design solutions that are safe, functional, attractive and meet the needs of the people using the space.

Keys to Success As members of a service profession, interior designers’ fortunes depend on their ability to satisfy clients. Thus, they must understand artistic and technical requirements of a project, interpersonal communication, and management strategies.

Artistic and Technical Requirements Interior designers must know how to plan a space and how to present that plan visually so that it can be communicated to the client. Interior designers must also know about the materials and products that will be used to create and furnish the space, and how texture, color, lighting and other factors combine and interact to make a space. In addition, interior designers must understand the structural requirements of their plans, the health and safety issues, building codes, and many other technical aspects.

Interpersonal Communications Interior designers must be comfortable meeting and dealing with many kinds of people. They must communicate clearly and effectively, as well as be attentive listeners. Because they often must work with architects, contractors and other service providers, interior designers need to be both good team leaders and good team players. They must be willing to negotiate and mediate when necessary to solve problems.

Management Strategies Interior designers must have excellent time and project management abilities since they frequently work on more than one project at a time under demanding deadlines. Interior designers must understand business planning, and they need to know how to sell their ideas to clients, create informative and persuasive proposals and presentations, and maintain good client relationships.

21

San Joaquin Delta College Interior Design Newsletter


BEING AN INTERIOR DESIGNER IN TODAY’S INDUSTRY Ross is a senior interior designer working for ABC Designs, a 15-person firm in Houston. A major solar energy firm has just hired ABC Designs to design a new corporate headquarters in downtown Houston. The offices will occupy five floors in an existing office tower and the solar energy company will relocate employees from three other facilities to this one new location. Ross has been assigned as the lead interior designer on the project, and he and his team of four other interior designers will be responsible for • • •

• •

• • •

• • •

interviewing the client to determine their business objectives for the new space, and interviewing some of the employees to get a sense of what they need and want in the space taking an inventory of existing furniture and equipment, and obtaining information on expansion plans; assessing meeting room, boardroom, classroom and lunchroom requirements preparing for presentation to the client three different design concepts of the new space, each including plans for a reception area that is a modern showcase for the many visitors to the new headquarters and adequate classrooms to accommodate the numerous seminars the employer offers employees making the presentation to the client’s senior management team and subsequently working with the client to incorporate requested changes into the final concept that will be implemented preparing all the working drawings for implementation of the plan, including structural, mechanical and electrical drawings prepared by other professional consultants (e.g., engineers and architects); preparing furniture plans; and preparing detailed drawings for all custom-designed furniture (e.g., custom bookshelves, custom boardroom table) sourcing all products for use in the project, including new systems furniture, custom boardroom and reception furniture; carpet, paint and wallpaper; special glass walls for lobby; and lighting and floor tiles for meeting areas coordinating construction schedules and ensuring that all trades are working towards the same completion date coordinating move-in for the client, ensuring that all three locations are ready for occupancy on the targeted completion date Can you see yourself in Ross’s shoes? Would you be excited by the challenge that this project brings? Can you envision the company’s new space?

Example of Contract Interior Designer

Example of Healthcare Interior Designer

Greg has been an interior designer with RPS Design for the past 25 years. Now one of three partners who manage a firm that specializes in office and retail design, he started as a junior interior designer just out of university. The firm handles corporate office design for hundreds of corporate clients and retail design for major recognizable brand accounts, such as NIKE, The Gap, HMV and Victoria ’s Secret.

Sandra joined a large interior design firm after working at two or three small firms since graduation. One of the reasons Sandra was hired at the firm was because of her past experience in designing medical and dental offices and clinics. This large firm’s client list includes several major hospitals, and Sandra was hired as an intermediate designer to work on healthcare projects the firm secured for the design of hospital interiors.

Example of Residential Interior Designer

Example of Hospitality Interior Designer

Jane graduated in 1970 and worked her way up from junior interior designer to senior interior designer at two design firms throughout the 1970s. In 1979 she opened her own residential design firm. Since that time, she has developed her design firm into one of the leading high-end residential design firms in her city. She now designs residential space for an average of 40 clients per year, many of whom have retained Jane two or three times as they have redesigned their existing space or moved to new homes.

One of the best things about Jennifer’s job as a hospitality designer is that she gets to create new and exciting restaurants, clubs and bars and then watch her newly designed spaces become the hottest spots in town. As a hospitality designer, Jennifer spends a considerable amount of time ensuring that the spaces she creates are functional and safe, yet inviting and creative.

Example of Interior Design Educator After earning her bachelor's degree in interior design, Alison worked in the field for six years. During this time, she frequently taught night classes as an adjunct faculty member at a local college. She decided to return to school to earn a graduate degree and become a fulltime faculty member in interior design. It took her two years to earn an MFA degree. She is now an assistant professor on a tenure track at a major university, and she continues a small design practice. Alison enjoys helping students become professionals.

22

Example of Government Interior Designer Gary is a government employee. His job as an interior designer for one of the major federal departments is to coordinate design and construction for any of the department’s office relocations or renovations. On average, 35 departments either change location or renovate on an annual basis. Gary and his team of five designers are responsible for managing these projects on an annual basis and for planning and budgeting the projects that will be undertaken in the next year.

San Joaquin Delta College Interior Design Newsletter


CERTIFICATE IN INTERIOR DESIGN TOTAL UNITS REQUIRED: 30 All courses to be completed with a grade of “C” or better. ID 002 ID 008 ID 006 ID 010 ID 013 ART 1A ART 16 OR ART 33A ARCH 001

ID ID ID ID

ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE IN INTERIOR DESIGN

011 019 021 056

CONST 078 ARCH 002 BUS 1A

Introduction to Interior Design History of Interior Design & Furniture Textiles Residential Interior Design Specification and Professional Practices Art History Descriptive Drawing and Rendering

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Beginning Drawing Basic Architectural Drafting

3 units 3 units

ELECTIVES AND SUBSTITUTIONS Commercial Interior Design Retailing for Fashion and Interiors Trend Forecasting for Fashion and Interiors Internship & Portfolio Development for Fashion and Interiors Uniform Building Codes Architectural Practice: Working Drawings Principles of Accounting

units units units units units units units

3 units 3 units 2 units

3 units 3 units 3 units

Requirements for Associate of Arts Degree in Art and Communication with a concentration in Interior Design GENERAL EDUCATION : Complete one of the following general education patterns: A. California State University General Education (CSU-GE) pattern. B. Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC), CSU or UC version, for transfer to CSU, UC, and many independent colleges and Universities. (Students using IGETC, UC version to satisfy General Education must also take COM ST 001A to satisfy the Associate Degree Oral Communication Requirement). C. San Joaquin Delta College Associate Degree General Education Pattern.* COURSES WITHIN THE MAJOR Complete each of the following with a grade of "C" or better: ID 002 Introduction to Interior Design 3 units ID 008 History of Interior Design & Furniture 3 units ID 006 Textiles 3 units ID 010 Residential Interior Design 3 units ID 013 Specification and Professional Practices 3 units ART 1A Art History 3 units ART 16 Descriptive Drawing and Rendering 3 units OR ART 33A Beginning Drawing 3 units ARCH 001 Basic Architectural Drafting 3 units

ID ID ID ID

011 019 021 056

CONST 078 ARCH 002 BUS 1A

23

ELECTIVES AND SUBSTITUTIONS Commercial Interior Design Retailing for Fashion and Interiors Trend Forecasting for Fashion and Interiors Internship & Portfolio Development for Fashion and Interiors Uniform Building Codes Architectural Practice: Working Drawings Principles of Accounting

3 units 3 units 2 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units

San Joaquin Delta College Interior Design Newsletter


VISIT WWW.DELTACOLLEGE.EDU for information about the INTERIOR DESIGN PROGRAM at San Joaquin Delta College. WHY DELTA COLLEGE? Strong industry ties Faculty are industry professionals Classes incorporate real-world projects and education Exciting classes, projects and events Affordable

START YOUR INTERIOR DESIGN CAREER TODAY!

UPCOMING EVENT: MEET THE INTERIOR DESIGN INDUSTRY INSIDERS Wednesday, October 20, 2010 from 5-7 pm Danner Hall, SJDC Campus This event is free and open to the public! HEADLINER: Kerrie Kelly from Kerrie Kelly Design Lab Interior Designer, Furniture Designer, Author, Consultant

INTERIOR DESIGN

News

San Joaquin Delta College

2010-2011

5151 Pacific Avenue . Stockton . CA . 95207


INTERIOR DESIGN NEWS  

Compilation of news in Interior Design; produced by San Joaquin Delta College Interior Design Department

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