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P H I L A D E L P H I A ’ S

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U R B A N

M A G A Z I N E

MONEY TALKS F I N A N C I A L

L I T E R A C Y

D I S C U S S I O N S

US DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

SCHOOL TO PRISON PIPELINE

LET’S TALK CASH

FLOW

JULIAN LEGGET

Money Talks

MONEYTALKSEDU

CRYSTAL EVANS REVEALS HER MISSION TO END POVERTY

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Our Mission & Vision Money Talks is proud to unveil our 2019-2020 International Initiative to "Help End Generational Poverty," by empowering individuals through Financial Literacy.

Our mission is to transform the mindset of youths and adults who have been generationally bound by poverty, drugs, and violence.

20

Our program’s vision is to make these personal, finance focused programs affordable and accessible to teens and adults from impoverished communities. Our Outcome-Based Program content includes “Financial fitness for Teens: LIFE Leadership Essential Series by bestselling authors Orrin Woodward and Chris Brady, who are also INC magazine top leadership and teachers #20 & #39. Other knowledge areas identify how culture affects financial decision making and core principles needed to manage finances more efficiently.

However, to afford the cost of materials for 500 prticipants and maintain a high-profile media campaign throughout 2019-2020, we rely on the generosity of individuals, corporations, and influencers for cash and media sponsorship.

At this time we hope you will take part in our exciting initiative and share the gratification and the societal benefits derived through financial literacy with your network of friends and colleagues.

Again, your generosity will make a significant difference for our community. Thank you in advance for your kindness and support.

Crystal Evans The Money Talks, President One Union Avenue P.O Box 2815 Bala Cynwyd, PA 19004

MONEY TALKS |   www.moneytalks.education

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2019 MONEY TALKS

HELP END POVERTY TOUR TABLE OF CONTENT

5-9

POVERTY IN AMERICA

10-11

DENISE L. WALTER

12-14

US.BOARD OF EDUCATION

15

GENTRIFIED

16

SOMERSET ACADEMY

19

LET’S TALK CASH FLOW

20

DAHN VO- VBIT TECHNOLOGY

21-23

CREDIT REPORTS

24-25

QUICK TIPS


DEVIN W. BULLOCK August 12 , 1995 - May 5, 2014

Devin Bullock, High School Basketball Star was only two months away from choosing the college of his dream. I never knew anyone so eager to succeed and determined to beat the odds. Since he was a toddler, he loved emulated famous NBA Star's like Michael Jordan, Lebron Jame, Allen Iverson, and Koby Byrant. During Devin's senior year of high school, he had a few hurdles to overcome, but he never stopped believing in himself. Every morning Devin would wake up to prepare for school at 5:00 am, never complaining; he worked full-time at Footlocker and always found time to play and practice basketball. Unfortunately, my baby brother fell victim to senseless gun violence and lost his life before he could walk down the aisle to obtain his high school diploma, read his scholarship letters or pick the college of his choice.

Five years, later we have yet to get justice for Devin. I always think about what he could have achieved if he had a fair chance at life. It's heartbreaking to lose a loved one to gun violence, and it's even more devasting to see that senseless violence is now a norm in society. I will never understand, why or how we tolerate these traumatizing act in our communities, and I refuse to live my life in silence and do nothing. So, in loving memory of Devin Bullock, I dedicate the Money Talks Platform to him, and all the other lives lost to senseless violence.

Love, Crystal

MONEY TALKS |   4


PULSE

MONEY TALKS

Poverty The year 2030’s goal of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) to end extreme poverty still looks like a mirage to the United States. U.S. Census Bureau’s 2017 estimates of the official poverty rate are 12.3 percent, based on its report of Q3 2018.

The Census Bureau affirmed that 18.5 million people disclosed deep poverty, which means a household income below fifty percent of their 2017 poverty threshold. These individuals represented an estimated 5.7 percent of all Americans and 46.7 percent of those in poverty.

Scarily, March 2018’s Poverty Fact Sheet by Kairos- Center For Religious, Rights and Social Justice, disclosed that one in seven citizens live below the federal poverty threshold (13.9% or 44.7 million) and Over half of all children are poor or low income (51.9%). Half of all children will qualify or food stamps before they turn 20, including 9 out of 10 African American children.

A study measuring "economic insecurity" found that 4 out of 5 (79%) of people in the US live in danger of poverty or unemployment at some point in their lifetime. Only 48% of people could handle a $400 emergency expense without selling something or borrowing money.

In his article last year, Steven Pressman, professor of economics, Colorado State University, reported that substantial research reveals that growing up poor adversely affects children's health, as well as their intellectual and social development. It lowers earnings in adulthood and lessens future tax revenues.


POVERTY IN AMERICA BY DONTUE IBIWOYE

POVERTY IN AMERICA

CHILD POVERTY

The United Nations describes America as a one the developing country's of the developed world incapable of providing it's citizens safety net support and economic mobility. A sense of despair and inferiority is the main feeling of poverty, and it kills dreams.

The annual cost of child poverty comes to around $1 trillion. Meanwhile, every dollar spent reducing child poverty is estimated to yield $7 in the future. This cost exceeds the return on most private investments. According to CareerBuilder, 3 out of 4 American workers are living paycheck to another paycheck, still unable to meet any significant expense at home.

In his article last year, Steven Pressman, professor of economics, Colorado State University, reported that considerable exhibits that are growing up in poverty could adversely affect children's health, as well as their intellectual and social development. It lowers earnings in adulthood and reduces future tax revenues for the government while increasing government social spending. MONEY TALKS |   6

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD Monday, A report by by Common Dreams in July last year states that For every $1 in expenses twenty years ago, an American household now pays $1.25. But for every $1 earned twenty years ago, the median household still earns just $1.


MONEY TALKS

AMERICAN HOUSEHOLDS Housing, child care, and health costs are crushing Americans. Nearly HALF of renters are costburdened, paying 30 percent or more of their income to their landlords. The median American household in most states would have to spend over 10 percent of its income just to send a 4-year-old to full-time preschool.


In spite of being one of the most developed countries in the world, the United States has one of the highest rates of childhood poverty globally. Children born or raised in poverty face many disadvantages, most evidently in education. Poverty reduces a child’s readiness for school because it leads to poor physical health and motor skills, diminishes a child’s ability to concentrate and remember information, and reduces attentiveness, curiosity, and motivation. Another severe effect of poverty in the United States is that poor children enter school with this readiness gap that grows as they mature. Children feel alienated from society; suffer insecurities because of their socioeconomic status; fear the consequences of their poverty; endure feelings of powerlessness, and are angry at society’s inability to aid in their struggles.

MONEY TALKS |   8


Poverty remains a serious issue MONEY TALKS

Children from lower-income families are more likely than students from wealthier backgrounds to have lower test scores, and they are at higher risk of dropping out of school. Those who complete high school are less likely to attend college than students from higher-income families. For some children, the effects of poverty on education present unique challenges in breaking the cycle of generational poverty and reduce their chances of leading rewarding, productive lives. The effects of poverty on children is complex and causes a range of diverse challenges for children and their families. Although the economy of the United States is showing signs of improvement, poverty remains a serious issue in many states.


Money Talks

RISING ABOVE POVERTY FINANCIAL LITERACY DISCUSSIONS

I must admit walking away from a 13-years of marriage was harder than I could ever imagine. Especially, as a mother of five, starting over was one of the toughest things I've ever had to do. After cosigning for my ex-husband business loans and being overwhelmed with debt and the heartbreak of a failed marriage. The thought of not be able to provide for my children triggered daily anxiety attacks and paralyzing frustration. I was working from check to check, and the money I earned went into one hand and out the other. I had no savings, and I felt like I had no control over my finances. I had to figure out where was my money going, so I began prioritizing my needs and wants. During this time I realized, if I had a better understanding of my spending habits, then I could save and improve my finances health and not worry so much about my children's security. I had to learn how to say the word "no," it took time getting comfortable; but after a while, it rolled off my tongue. My children, on the other hand, began to question me. Especially my youngest son, he would ask "mommy why don't you have any money?"   I replied, "I have to pay bills." "What bills, I never see you pay any bills," my son was restless.  Now, of course, I gave him a look as if he was crazy and went into a frenzy,  yelling "how do you think u have a roof over your head, hot water, electric, cable, and wifi?" I was so frustrated and determined to get out of debt and create residual income.  But at that very moment, it came to me, how would my son know what it takes to keep a roof over his head?

MONEY TALKS |   10

DENISE L. WALTER REALTOR & SERIAL ENTREPRENEUR


Money Talks

RISING ABOVE POVERTY FINANCIAL LITERACY DISCUSSIONS

I've never taught him or any of my children for that matter how I manage household expenses.  I couldn't believe that I was so preoccupied with life that I wasn't controlling my finances sufficiently and failed to teach my children the importance of saving and managing their personal finances. Immediately, I called a family meeting to discuss my finances, and my responsibilities astheir primary guardian. I had to explained my gross and net income, all household expenses incurred and when the payments were due.  We had so much to learn, and the questions they ask gave each of us a more in-depth perspective and understanding of our expectations of each other. Subsequently, each of my children began to pick up little jobs around the neighborhood, only asking for money to put towards what they need. Things are starting to change for my household, and gradually we’re rising above poverty..

MONEY TALKS |   11


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Six decades ago, hundreds of civil rights activist fought and lost their lives, so that black

30 MILLION

ADULTS IN

AMERICA

children could have the right to the same education as white children? However, in the 2019 civil rights data proves that educational strife still exists.

CANNOT

In 83 of 97 urban cities in America, over 85% of African American and Hispanic students that attend public schools qualify as poor or low-income; and more than 30 million adults

READ,

in America cannot read, write, or do basic math above a third-grade level. The statistic also claims that minority parents and adults from impoverished communities are more likely not academically qualify, compete or attain a secondary education compared to

WRITE OR

their caucasian counterparts. Subsequently, making them incapable of adequately preparing their children for succes in day to day life and business. In addition to these

DO BASIC

disparities, elementary and secondary education curriculum's do not properly introduce the importance of essential lessons needed to advance students.

MONEY TALKS |   12

MATH.


30 SCHOOLS CLOSED AND SOLD Since 2012, at least 30 schools in the  Philadelphia School District were closed and sold due to a $1.35 billion deficit. While newly built detention centers are targeting the minority youths who will most likely fall victim to this negative impact of the School Reform; Real estate Developers are renovating these schools into luxury living spaces for young professionals, small business hubs; independent living for seniors.


SCHOOL TO PRISON The chaos does not end here; since 2009, there have been over 200 school shootings in the United States; this includes grades Kindergarten, Middle and High School, Colleges, Universities, and vocational schools.

Then there's the notorious "School to Prison Pipeline" a disturbing national trend designed to racially profile and channels African American children out of public schools into the juvenile and criminal justice system. What happened to equality and justice for all? Â Why are these children racially profiled and positioned for failure? What will the Philadelphia School Board and the United States Department of Education due to offset these adverse actions?

85% 85% of African American and Hispanic students that attend public schools qualify as poor or low-income.


GENTRIFIED MONEY TALKS FINANCIAL LITERACY DISCUSSIONS While Philadelphia's ten-year tax abatement creates saving benefits for investors; public schools are being sold and converted into luxury condominiums, social lounges, and business incubators. For example, a friend extended an invite to join her for a drink at Bok Bar, once known as Bok Highschool at 1901 South 9th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19148. This learning institution is currently a hub for small businesses, and on the rooftop, Bok Bar serves craft beers & appetizers. As I enter the building, the lighting was dim, security guards requested my identification, checked my purse for weapons and directed me to the elevator. I have to admit that I pissed and I couldn't enjoy myself. Especially, after speaking with a member of management who is ironically obtaining a degree in early childhood learning. I couldn't help but express several oppositions. I asked him, what happened to the hundreds of displaced children that once attended the school?" The gentleman's response was "I don't know, we don't have this problem in suburbia

It's their parent's responsibility to worry about their education; the building was old and deteriorating. Would you instead we demolished the building?" Sarcastically, I said "of course not! I would have informed your investors of the current disadvantages the families and children are facing and suggested a plan of action for the community to help fund the cost to rehab the condemned learning institution.   Furthermore, I wouldn't be as disturbed about the issue if it was one or two schools closing because of lack of funding, but there are two dozen or more schools involved in these budget cuts. My final statement to him was," I'm not opposed to change, but if the children are the future and the parent are economically disadvantage, who's responsibility is it to defend children when they are vulnerable?" He was speechless.

MONEY TALKS |   15


FEATURE

SOMERSET ACADEMY Somerset Academy is a non-profit 501(C)3 organization serving our most vulnerable children and families in North Central Philadelphia. Mrs. Barbra Chavous, is the CEO of Somerset Academy Early Learning Center, a culturally diverse preschool and K-3 private school. Mrs. Chavous has over 20 plus years effectively and successfully conducting trainings, seminars, forums and leadership on cultural diversity, economic development, advocacy and community organizing. She is a strategic partner of Money Talks and served as President, Executive Director, and Senior Manager for municipal agencies, and corporations, Her expertise in fund development and grant writing resulting in securing and managing millions of dollars for governments and organizations. We look forward hosting our financial literacy bootcamp at the Sometset Academy and continuing our mission to “End Generational Poverty!�

Mrs. Barbra Chavous, CEO of Somerset Academy Early Learning Center 719 W. Girard Ave Philadelphia, PA 19123

Our Mission Our mission is to provide quality early childhood education through the lens of the family. At Somerset Academy Early Learning Center, we provide a case management approach to education; we integrate service deliveries to address a multitude of student needs and build on the strength of the family and commupnity. We address the needs of the whole family system as we build the character of each child and develop the genius within. We are a proud partner and sponsor of the Money Talks Financial Literacy Iniative and believe that the tailored curriculum and content will help young adults learn about money; the value of money, use of money, and ways they can better understand the world of money. Participants will gain the tools needed to be free from debt while learning how to create a lifestyle in which they are empowered to understand money as an asset to use on their behalf thus, making better money choices, savings, use of time, money management, and wealth creation.

www.somersetacademypa.org


JULIAN LEGGETT Digital Photographer

Photo by Julian Leggett

Let's talk CAsH FLOW

"I DON'T

RECALL MY My name is Julian Leggett, and I was born in the Germantown section of Philadelphia. I was raised in a two-parent home for most of my life before my parents separated. I would say that I had a fantastic childhood and an

TEACHERS

EDUCATING ME

equivalent family life. We ate dinner at the table together, and we took family vacations around the country. My mother was a secretary, and my father was a carpenter, so I don't recall any financial struggle until after they broke up.

 As a child, I attended a Catholic school up until 8th grade; then I attended high  Martin L. King High School in Philadelphia where I took up Business

ABOUT

MANAGING MY

FINANCES, OR

MAYBE I

Charter Courses. The business classes taught us how to write checks and type professional letters. Other than those two things I have never received financial coaching.  In college, I started with a major Computer Science and

DIDN'T LISTEN,

OR I MISSED

eventually switched to something I loved, which is Digital Video Production (Film).

THE LESSON."

MONEY TALKS |   17


Photo by Julian Leggett

 Today,  I am a freelance Audio Technician for the Public television show "Classroom Close-up" in New Jersey. In my spare time, I also provide services for other entrepreneurs like myself, who need digital videography and photography to help market their businesses. Being self-employed is not an easy job. I have tremendous responsibilities outside of delivering footage.

For example, I have to manage and control my cash flow. Knowing my cash flow schedule is a vital part of my business life cycle, if I don't know what is coming in and what's going out of my bank accounts, I can't pay bills, implement savings strategies or budget.  

"Sometimes, I feel like I'm at a disadvantage, I don't recall my teachers educating me about managing my finances, or maybe I didn't listen and missed the lesson. As a result, I was a novice at saving money and investing throughout my 20's. Perhaps, if I received financial literacy training in my earlier childhood , I would have avoided common pitfalls and mistakes. Now, I'm 35 years old, and through maturity and research, I've learned to spend smarter and save more.

Because society is so different from when I was growing up, with the implementation of social media; financial literacy and entrepreneurship should be a part of the curriculum in public schools. By introducing children to real business concepts and entrepreneurial projects like starting a lemonade stand, or online business, this could encourage deeper ambitious, the  desire to seek real-working experiences and help them understand  how to use money to their advantage.

MONEY TALKS |   18


Dahn Vo VBIT TECHNOLOGIES, CEOÂ Danh Vo is a first generation Vietnamese native

Now in 2019, Dahn is the CEO of VBit

and a successful serial entrepreneur who

Technologies, a full-service cryptocurrency

specializes in Financial Technology.

mining company committed to helping venture capitalist, traders, or crypto platform access

Raised in Brooklyn, New York, Dahn's humble

reliable and expert mining services on their

background, ingenuity and resourcefulness

behalf.

inspired him to learn how to build custom computers and sell them to buyers online at the

To support VBit Technologies mission to

age of thirteen.

provide bitcoin mining support, packages, referral programs and ducation on the world

Surprisingly, his business became profitable, and

of crypto. Dahn Vo and his team of gurus are

he sold his home-based business for six figures.

co-locating their mining machines at several

Then at the age of sixteen, he launched and sold

data centers around the world as they continue

his second tech company. Unremarkably, his

to construct their state-of-the-art Bitcoin

talent helped him and his family rise above

mining center.

poverty.

"Don't give into hardship, embrace possibilities and the mind will unlock your human potential."

For more information visit www.vbittech.com


CREDIT & REPORTS UNDERSTANDING CREDIT SCORES AND REPORTS A credit report shows account activity and includes information that assists creditors and lenders evaluate your financial health. This credit history includes past and present debt; and how regularly you make payments. Employers, creditors, landlords, and other individuals and business entities who choose to inquire about this information have access to this historical data. Equifax, Transunion, and Experian are the three major credit reporting firms that collect and sell your credit history. Each year you are entitled to requesting and receiving one credit report from each of the mentioned reporting agencies. You can also visit www.annualcreditreport.com to claim all three reports. Your credit scores are also referred to as a "FICO score," and is the rating that provides money lenders with your overall credibility and level of risk.

MONEY TALKS |   20

Credit scores range from 300-850, and scores higher than 720+ are ideal. The determination of your FICO Scores based on 35% of your payment history, 30% of outstanding debt, 15% of the duration of your credit history, 10% of the total number of inquiries per year. FICO scores do not include your race, color, religion, national origin, sex or marital status, child support obligations or rental agreements. Good and bad activity remain on your credit report for seven years.  Personal bankruptcy usually stays on your report for ten years. Bad credit can prevent you from getting a job, loan, and insurance. To improve your credit include paying your bills on time and get current on any missed or late payments. Keep credit card balances low and do not exceed 50 % of your available credit. You can dispute fraudulent and erroneous information on your credit report, and the process may take up to 45 days or more. .


The Federal Trade Commission is the bureau of consumer protection, and the purpose of this entity exists to prevent and stop unfair, unlawful, deceptive and fraudulent business practices by collecting complaints and conducting investigations, suing companies and people who violate federal laws.

The FTC also develops rules to maintain a fair marketplace, and making consumers and businesses aware of their rights and responsibilities.

Flitter Milz, a consumer law firm, works extremely hard to protect consumers from abusive debt collection tactics, and make consumers aware of their rights and responsibilities. If you feel like your consumer rights, have been violated visit www.consumerslaw.com.

MONEY TALKS |   21


www.mcglawninsurance.net

LIFE INSURANCE EMERGENCY PLANNING | AUTO INSURANCE | GENERAL LIABILITY

CONTACT US 215-782-8574 500 OFFICE CENTER DR FORT WASHINGTON, PA 19034


WE ARE STOCK TRADERS, LLC FINANCE REVIEW

John Proctor, CEO We Are Stock Traders LLC  

We Are Stock Traders, LLC is a community of professionals stock traders who are making a living from the markets. We know many people lack an understanding of financial markets and how to begin investing. Unlike most in the industry, we won’t tell you what you want to hear; we will tell you what you need to know. We host free seminars to educate, receive and share ideas, and strategies about investing in the stock market.

SWhether you’re a beginner or professional learning new skills of investing will always help and improve your trading technique. We Are Stock Traders, LLC most trusted investors host free seminars for beginners who are interested in learning how to make their active income passive. Other tips include the best ways to diversify your portfolio, knowing when to buy and sell and your investment tolerance.

For more information visit www.wearestocktraders.com


QUICK TIPS INVESTING If your making a shortterm or a long-term investment, Â make sure you understand the associated risk and the expected rate of return on your investment.

INCOME To manage your income more efficiently, establish financial discipline using a budget that only permits you to spend less than your earning.

SAVING Regardless, if you have a full-time or a part-time job, make sure you deduct $25$50 per paycheck and have it directly deposited into a retirement or savings account.

EXPENSES Start minimizing your monthly expenses and consolidating your debts to transform your financial future.


8 TIPS FOR SUPBERB PROFESSIONAL ETIQUETTE

Professional etiquette is a code of conduct among professionals. When we use proper professional etiquette, our work environments are usually comfortable and pleasant. However, when you are rude and are don't use proper professional etiquette, we can create uneasy relationships and stressful environments. It is essential that we aware of how we act and treat our colleagues. Here are 8 tips etiquette rules you practice and share.

1. Always say "hello," with a smile when introducing yourself, this helps establish an inviting presence.

5. Be on time; punctuality is a golden rule. Prioritize and master time management.

2. In the United States, a handshake is the official business greeting. Make sure you look your colleagues in the eye and use a firm grip.

6. When attending networking events, don't over indulge in the free alcoholic beverages.

3. Do not use your phone — no texting or emailing, its rude. 4. Avoid gossip, unhealthy communication in any form is no good for work environments and colleagues.

7. Be slow to speak and eager to listen, especially when dealing with difficult people. 8. Create an action plan to improve professionalism in work areas.

MONEY TALKS |   25


DowntownHottRadio.com


EXCLUSIVE

MONEY TALKS FINANCIAL LITERACY PANEL DISCUSSION Philadelphia, PA- On September 29th, 2017, at Temple University's Howard Gittis Student Center we held our first Money Talks Power Summit. During the event community leaders and advocates, gathered to discuss strategies to help us combat socioeconomics and economic hardships that minority youths and adults struggle with every day throughout Philadelphia. Discussion topics examined the power of Financial Literacy, Banking, Credit Restoration, Emergency Planning, Retirement Planning, and Stock Investments. Even more importantly, the summit will help cultivate the use of cutting-edge resources and talk many have agreed must be adopted by the United States Congress and United States Board of Education. Our invitation to residents, community leaders, and other social service organizations exhibited how partnerships from the public, profit, and nonprofit sector can be both powerful, engaging and aid the strengthening of communities and individual development. To highlight the event, Charles Holiday, Outreach Officer and Legislative Assistant for Pennsylvania State Representative Donna J. Bullock help us present our First Money Talks Financial Literacy Advocate Award to Brandon Fisher, President of New Beginnings Credit Restoration Services.


NO MATTER HOW HARD LIFE GETS, GET UP, GET OUT AND FIGHT JUST AS HARD FOR YOUR DREAMS money Talks edu


SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR SPONSOR

Helping end generational poverty Everybody Loves Bubbles Workforce Development Agenda; a 501(c)(3) Organization. Presents "Money Talks" Financial Literacy Discussions, an exciting international platform with a mission to make personal finance focused programs both affordable and accessible to youths and adults who aspire to end, generational poverty. However, to afford and sustain our efforts, we rely on the generosity of individuals, corporations, and influencers sponsorship and other contributions. Thank you in advance for your support. -Money Talks

Fill out this sponsor form and send to ELBWDA, PO Box 2815 1 Union Avenue, Bala Cynwyd, PA 19004

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Make checks payable to "ELBWDA" and mail to PO Box 2815 1 Union Avenue ,Bala Cynwyd, PA 19004.

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Money Talks Magazine is a commodity of a nonprofit organization that advocates for financial literacy curriculums to be a nationally mandate...

MONEY TALKS MAGAZINE  

Money Talks Magazine is a commodity of a nonprofit organization that advocates for financial literacy curriculums to be a nationally mandate...

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