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The Paper of Record for Greenwich Village, East Village, Lower East Side, Soho, Union Square, Chinatown and Noho, Since 1933

March 6, 2014 • $1.00 Volume 83 • Number 40

Bill blocks U.N.H.S. and Bergtraum school co-locations BY SAM SPOKONY

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PHOTO COURTESY NORTH SHORE-LIJ

Work is ongoing to ready the new Lenox Hill HealthPlex E.R. — in the nautically themed former St. Vincent’s O’Toole Building — for opening by this summer.

he previously planned charter school co-location at Murry Bergtraum High School will no longer go forward, the city’s Department of Education announced last week. Last year, D.O.E. under former Mayor Bloomberg had proposed to place a

BY LESLEY SUSSMAN

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he North Shore-LIJ Health System announced on Thurs., March 6, that its new comprehensive-care center now under construction in Greenwich Village will be called the Lenox Hill HealthPlex. Located at Seventh Ave. between W. 12th and 13th Sts., the facility, according to a press release, “represents a new model of communitybased care that integrates health and wellness services with seamless ac-

cess to 24-hour emergency care and a full range of medical specialists.” The first phase of the more than $150 million project is set to open in late June, with the debut of Manhattan’s first freestanding emergency center, which will provide patients with around-the-clock access to board-certified emergency physicians, specialty trained nurses, specialist consultations and other healthcare professionals. Future plans for Lenox Hill HealthPlex include imaging services,

an ambulatory surgery suite, home care and other programs designed to meet the current and future needs of the community. Michael Dowling, president and chief executive officer of North Shore-LIJ Health System, said, “In the shadows of buildings that housed St. Vincent’s Hospital for 160 years, Lenox Hill HealthPlex represents the dawning of a new era of healthcare for West Side residents, who have had to travel out of their

CO-LOCATE, continued on p. 5

C.B. 3 delays vote on landmarking of old dispensary

HealthPlex E.R. opening June at St. Vincent’s site T

BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

Success Academy charter school, serving grades K to 4, in part of the Murry Bergtraum building, a District 2 school at 411 Pearl St. But that move was heavily criticized and protested by many Downtown parents, education advocates and elected officials.

he fate of a historic dispensary located at 75 Essex St. remains uncertain as Community Board 3 decided to postpone a vote last week on whether to support its landmark designation. The former Good Samaritan/Eastern District Dispensary was

constructed in 1890 with charitable donations and operated for 60 years with city funding. C.B. 3’s full board voted overwhelmingly for the delay at its Feb. 25 meeting despite an earlier vote by C.B. 3’s Landmark’s Subcommittee and the board’s Executive Committee in favor of such a DISPENSARY, continued on p. 6

E.R., continued on p. 2

Push to landmark L.G.B.T. sites.........................page 4 Taking a hard look at Vision Zero......................page 7 www.TheVillager.com

Progress Report....pages 13 to 24


Lenox Hill HealthPlex E.R. set to open this summer West Village,” said John Gupta, executive director of the Lenox Hill HealthPlex. Gupta added that, in addition to “filling a healthcare void on the West Side,” the new medical complex will bring hundreds of new jobs to the neighborhood, giving a boost to small businesses that have suffered in the wake of St. Vincent’s closing.

E.R., continued from p. 1

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March 6, 2014

‘Lenox Hill HealthPlex represents the dawning of a new era of healthcare for West Side residents.’ Michael Dowling

PHOTOS COURTESY NORTH SHORE-LIJ

neighborhoods to access emergency and other critical healthcare services for the past four years.” North Shore-LIJ Health System has 16 hospitals across the metropolitan area, including Lenox Hill Hospital and the Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital, both on the Upper East Side. The HealthPlex Emergency Center, which will occupy the first floor of the six-story building, is designed and will be staffed and equipped to accommodate up to 45,000 emergency visits annually, according to Dr. John D’Angelo, senior vice president of emergency medicine at North Shore-LIJ. It will serve as a receiving facility for the city’s 911 Emergency Medical System, have 24/7 access to lab services and advanced radiology, and include an ambulance to transport patients who need to be hospitalized. “The advanced life-support capabilities at the facility will enable local residents to receive emergency care at their most critical time of need,” D’Angelo said. Among other areas of expertise, the HealthPlex will also include sexual-assault nurse examiners who have received special training to perform sexual-assault evidentiary exams for rape victims. The emergency center anchoring this neighborhood medical complex is “based on a successful model for emergency care being implemented across the country,” according to North Shore-LIJ. “The approach is designed to reduce waiting times and enhance customer convenience for emergency care that is efficient, accessible and linked to a continuum of care available to all patients, regardless of their ability to pay,” D’Angelo said. To ensure success, the press release states, Lenox Hill HealthPlex is drawing on the collective knowledge of North Shore-LIJ’s 200 emergency physicians, more than 300 paramedics and emergency medical technicians (E.M.T.’s), and roughly 2,000 emergency department staff, who have gained their experience operating 14 emergency departments that treated nearly 665,000 people and transported more than 102,000 patients in 2013. “Even though the HealthPlex will not open until June, we are already hiring nursing staff, who will undergo intensive training in the coming months,” said Carleigh Gustafson, RN, the health system’s vice president of emergency services and a longtime Lenox Hill nurse. The HealthPlex will be housed in the historic National Maritime Union Building, which was known for the past four decades as the O’Toole Building. North Shore-LIJ is investing more than $150 million to redevelop the interior of the 50-year-old, Albert Ledner-designed building, while maintaining all of its exterior nautical features. “We took great pains to respect the architecture of this landmarked building, recognizing the distinctive character of the

Work is ongoing inside the former O’Toole Building to open the new E.R. at the new Lenox Hill HealthPlex by the end of June.

A construction worker in a tunnel that leads to the roof of the former O’Toole Building and what used to be a small elevator, which, from the outside, looks like a ship smokestack. Belowground, tunnels that used to link O’Toole to other parts of the former hospital campus are being filled in.

Among its outreach efforts to the community, the HealthPlex has created a partnership with the L.G.B.T. Center on W. 13th St. Also, in 2013, Lenox Hill donated $100,000 to the AIDS memorial that will be created in the park located in the triangle across from the HealthPlex at the intersections of Seventh and Greenwich Aves. and W. 12th St. Neighborhood critics of the new facility have repeatedly slammed it — and may well continue to do so — for not being a full-service hospital with many beds, like the old St. Vincent’s. The HealthPlex will only have two beds, plus these will not be used for long-term patient stays, but only briefly. If patients require longer or more intensive treatment, they’ll be transported by ambulance to a local hospital. However, the most important thing that people said they wanted restored after St. Vincent’s closed was a top-notch emergency room. North Shore-LIJ assures that the new HealthPlex’s E.R. capacity will be “vast,” plus will be complemented by the services offered by the comprehensivecare center to follow. In fact, the new facility, taken as a whole, represents a growing trend in healthcare. “As part of a new model of care that North Shore-LIJ is developing for the communities it serves across the metropolitan area,” the press release states, “the HealthPlex’s vast emergency capabilities will be complemented by imaging services, an ambulatory surgery suite, rehabilitation, health/wellness, home care and other comprehensive medical programs that will be rolled out in future years.”  North Shore-LIJ is one of the nation's largest healthcare systems. Its 16 hospitals, plus long-term care facilities, have more than 6,000 beds, employ more than 10,000 nurses and have affiliations with more than 9,400 physicians. With a workforce of more than 47,000, North Shore-LIJ is the largest private employer in New York State.

TheVillager.com


BLAME IT ON THE VORTEXES: Last we heard, Phase III — the final part — of the Washington Square Park renovation, was supposed to be finished by the end of last year. Two or three polar vortexes and, oh, a couple of soggy slushapocalypses later, Phase III still isn’t open yet, and the park’s southwestern corner remains cordoned off by a chain-link fence. The new park building, which will include facilities for Parks Department employees and new public restrooms is looking pretty good from what we saw of it at a distance through the fence. However, preservationists might take exception: It looks sort of like it might fit in better up at Lincoln Center, and it’s got a lot of the “G” word — glass — which we sincerely hope is tinted in the bathrooms. Which is another thing to think about. Hopefully, there won’t be another panic in a park like the one with the Standard Hotel on the High Line with its floor-to-ceiling windows. Anyway, getting back to the main point, when will Phase III finally be finished? “We’re looking to have it all complete and open by April — end of March / possibly early April is likely,” Parks spokesperson Phil Abramson told us. So what was the delay? Blame it on the vortexes? Apparently, yes, they didn’t help things. “Winter weather conditions were a large factor,” Abramson said. SAL LETS LOOSE ON LULUS: Some might say that new City Councilmember Corey Johnson seems to have some pretty reasonable justifications for accepting an $8,000 “lulu,” or stipend, in return for serving as chairperson of the City Council’s Health Committee: The biggest one

being that, under new Council Speaker Melissa MarkViverito, the lulu field has reportedly been leveled, with all Council committee chairpersons now getting the same payment — $8,000. Well, former City Councilmember Sal Albanese, for one, ain’t buying it. Tweeting at @SalAlbaneseNYC, the recent mayoral candidate sounded off in response to our article in last week’s issue “Johnson takes lulu but says process has been reformed.” “I hope Johnson doesn’t believe people in Village are gullible enough to believe lulu process has been reformed. It’s worse,” Albanese tweeted. “Wait a second, it’s actually worse now — not better?” we replied to him via Twitter. Albanese promptly tweeted back, “They have increased the stipends and created a bunch of phony ‘leadership’ posts to dole out more $ than in past councils.” He added, for good measure, in another tweet right after that, “Virtually no legislature in country provides lulus they are a waste of taxpayer $ Johnson should be ashamed of himself”. Ouch! “Kudos to The Villager for highlighting the wasteful & bad government practice of City Council lulus,” Albanese shouted out in another tweet. Gee, thanks! We didn’t want to sound like, well, a twit after all of Albanese’s indignant tweets, but we had to ask: Did he ever take a lulu while he was in the Council? “did not take lulus bc you have to give up your independence & vote with leadership on what they deem ‘key’ votes,” he answered. “It doesn’t have to be too much either it could be one vote that’s important to Speaker.” Albanese really could be called “Mr. Reform” — during the primary campaign he was very public about shunning any contributions from the real estate industry and developers. For his principled stand, he was rewarded with 0.9 percent of the vote.

GOING NOWHERE FAST? What the heck is going on at 544 E. 13th St.? As we reported this past summer, Isabel Celeste, actress Rosario Dawson’s mom, was caught jackhammering a hole from her first-floor apartment down to the squat’s basement for a spiral staircase, all without permits. The Fire Department and Department of Buildings responded and the place was slapped with violations, including for a flimsily attached exterior fire escape and a dangerous parapet. Those conditions have since been fixed, at least partially, we’re told. But the place has got bigger problems. For example, the building hasn’t had any gas for about a year and a half, not since September 2012. Which means the building’s occupants — while braving the Winter of the Vortexes — have been surviving by using electricity to heat their apartments and heat water, and hot plates to cook. According to a source, a representative of the Urban Homesteading Assistance Board — who had not been seen at the building for quite some time — finally recently paid a visit to check things out. It turns out the gas meters have been moved and gas lines rerouted, meaning

that, for the building to have gas service properly restored, everything would have to be totally redone. “We’re looking at $30,000 to $40,000 to install a whole new system,” our source told us with exasperation. Meanwhile, the building should have already been converted long ago into an affordable co-op per the deal under Mayor Giuliani when 11 remaining East Village squats were sold to the squatters for $1 apiece. But there has been zero progress toward bringing the building up to code. The place is evenly divided between two factions: one group that says they are the original squatter group and another led by Celeste and the Dawson family and their friends and allies. Can anyone get control of this out-of-control building? City Councilmember Rosie Mendez told us the first thing that’s needed is that there has to be one tenants group for people to deal with. A gardener who is a member of Good Old Lower East Side (GOLES) told us this past summer that there had been some constructive meetings with Celeste and her allies. But the other side accuses local community leaders — and even UHAB — of being “starstruck” by Celeste and Rosario, and thus doing nothing. The squatter group also say they are the ones that signed the contract with UHAB after the deal with the city. And, they further charge, Celeste is not even a legitimate tenant of the building, since, after she broke up with her husband, he kept his unit, while she went and just took another unit illegally in the building without getting everyone’s approval. Meanwhile, Celeste and the Dawson faction rent out some of their units and other commandeered spaces and are using the building as a cash cow, the other side says. It’s a mess, to say the least. How about — just for starters — if the gas is restored? If UHAB refuses to sort things out, shouldn’t the city get involved?

WHEN WILL THEY LEARN? Scam super-sleuth Doris Diether has sussed out yet another ruse that someone tried to use on her. Diether recently received a postcard stating she could get $100 in gift cards to Walmart and other big-box retailers if she called the number on it. She called. She was told that for a $4.95 fee, she would receive the $100 in gift cards. She gave them a credit card number to pay the $4.95. She was told someone would call back in 15 minutes with a confirmation number. But no one called back, so Diether canceled the card. But then someone did call her back, saying that she would be charged $69.95 a month for canceling unless she took the offer. So the octogenarian Community Board 2 member sicced the U.S. Postal Service on the fraudsters. She noted that the con artists dumbly used a printed permit number on the envelope, with a Lakeland, Florida, address, instead of a stamp, so it’s easily traceable. Another case solved by Inspector Diether. … Cue the “Dragnet” music… . Actually, we think the same knuckleheads recently called us at The Villager with the same bogus $100 gift-card offer, though they didn’t say we had to pay any fee. But they probably wanted to suck out some of our info. We just hung up on them — but we should have sent up the Diether Signal.

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Preservation push to protect L.G.B.T. historic sites BY SAM SPOKONY

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upport is growing for an effort by preservationists to secure stronger and more specific landmark protections for three local sites that have played key roles in the city’s L.G.B.T. History. All the sites in question — the Stonewall Inn, at 53 Christopher St.; Julius’ Bar, at 159 W. 10th St.; and the Gay Activists Alliance Firehouse, at 99 Wooster St. — already lie within landmarked districts, the first two within the Greenwich Village Historic District and the latter within the Soho Cast-Iron Historic District. Thus, any changes to their buildings require approval from the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission. Stonewall, of course, was the site of the iconic 1969 riots which carried the gay rights movement forward; and Julius’, along with being the city’s oldest gay bar, was the site of a 1966 “Sip-In” protest that helped spur the movement to overturn the state law that banned serving alcohol to gay people. The Wooster St. site (actually a renovated 19th-century firehouse) served from 1971 to 1974 as the headquarters for the Gay Activists Alliance — a group founded after the Stonewall riots by dissident members of the already radical Gay Liberation Front. But because L.P.C.’s designation reports for their respective districts were drawn up in the late 1960s and early ’70s — the Greenwich Village Historic District report was written just months before the Stonewall riots — they do not specifically cite those facts that mark the buildings’ historical importance to the L.G.B.T. Community. So, fearing that their cultural significance could be lost over time, preservationists are calling on L.P.C. to either individually landmark each building, or to update its historic district reports with information on their roles within the gay rights movement. “This is long overdue, and it’s a vital step toward further preventing future changes to these sites that could compromise their history,” said Andrew Berman, executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, which is leading the push. Berman stressed that, although the Wooster St. building has not yet been considered for its L.G.B.T. history, the other two sites have already been specifically recognized for that significance at the state and federal levels. Stonewall was named a national landmark more than a decade ago, and is listed on New York State’s Register of Historic Places, while Julius’ has since been named eligible for both the state and federal registers. Along with those precedents, G.V.S.H.P.’s proposal has garnered immense support over the past two months from city elected officials, as well as major L.G.B.T. advocacy and preservationist groups. Those backing the effort now include City Councilmembers Corey Johnson and Margaret Chin, state Senator Brad Hoyl-

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March 6, 2014

In the early 1970s, 99 Wooster St. was home to the pioneering Gay Activists Alliance Firehouse.

man, Assemblymember Deborah Glick, Borough President Gale Brewer and Public Advocate Letitia James. “It would be a tragic loss to the city’s history and communities if we do not act to protect these sites from future development and give them the recognition they deserve in the designation report,” wrote Johnson and Chin in a joint Feb. 20 letter to L.P.C. Chairperson Robert Tierney. In a March 3 statement, James told The Villager she supports further protections for the three sites because it is “incredibly important to recognize the historical significance of L.G.B.T. landmarks throughout New York City.” In addition to Berman’s initial letter to Tierney, leaders of both the National Trust for Historic Preservation and the Preservation League of New York State have written to L.P.C. to urge for the additional recognitions. And Glennda Testone, executive director of the West Village-based L.G.B.T. Center, has also written in support of the G.V.S.H.P. Proposal.

But amid all this, L.P.C. has still not committed to either individually landmarking Stonewall, Julius’ Bar and the Gay Activists Alliance Firehouse, or updating its historic districts’ reports. The three sites will be included in an ongoing, citywide L.P.C. study of culturally significant buildings that already lie within historic districts, putting them up for consideration for individual protection or amended reports, according to Kate Daly, executive director of L.P.C. Daly added, however, that approaches to the study “would have to be balanced among various priorities, potential regulatory issues, and the need to make the designation process as inclusive as possible.” Responding to the L.P.C. position, Berman said he was “perplexed” that the agency would need to take so much time before acting to further protect the sites. “This should be a no-brainer, and it’s really surprising to me that [L.P.C.] hasn’t been more receptive and given a clear ‘Yes’ on this,” the preservationist told The Villager in a Feb. 24 phone interview. And Berman apparently has already begun looking forward to different possibilities in the future, pointing out that he doesn’t believe Tierney — who was appointed by former Mayor Bloomberg in 2002 — will remain the L.P.C. chairperson for much longer. “So now we’re looking to see who the new chairperson will be, and hopefully that person will be more receptive to this,” said Berman. Although Mayor de Blasio has shown great support for the city’s L.G.B.T. community — most recently with his actions regarding the St. Patrick’s Day Parade — he has thus far remained silent on the issue of further protecting Stonewall, Julius’ Bar and the Gay Activists Alliance Firehouse. When asked for comment on whether he supports the preservation push for the three sites, the Mayor’s Office did not respond.

Burglaries spike in Village; ‘Lock your doors’: Inspector

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ad news: burglaries are booming within the Village area in 2014, with a shocking 135 percent increase compared to last year’s totals at this point. As of March 2, 40 break-ins were reported throughout the Police Department’s Sixth Precinct, compared to just 17 reported through the first two months of 2013, according to police statistics. Inspector Elisa Cokkinos, who commands the Sixth Precinct, reportedly said two weeks ago that many of the recent burglaries took place after West Village residents left their apartment doors unlocked, and that police believe a single culprit or team of culprits is behind those crimes. One such daytime apartment break-in

took place just steps away from the W. 10th St. precinct on Feb. 11, when an unknown burglar made off with three laptops, an iPad and $500 in cash from a 516 Hudson St. home. Village cops have already dealt with one — albeit smaller — burglary pattern earlier this year, after Adrain Longo, 36, was arrested on Feb. 3 for three commercial break-ins that all took place on Jan. 27. In that case, Longo hit a bar and two restaurants just below the Meatpacking District — but he caused more alarm than financial damage, after only making off with a bottle of liquor, according to police records.

Sam Spokony

TheVillager.com


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Murry Bergtraum High School had been set for a Success Academy charter school co-location. Now it’s reportedly in line possibly to get two other co-located schools, including one that was planned for University Neighborhood High School on the Lower East Side.

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Bill blocks two school co-locations CO-LOCATE, continued from p. 1

The Feb. 27 announcement showed a clear shift — by Mayor Bill de Blasio and his new education officials — away from the charter school-friendly policies of Bloomberg’s D.O.E. under ex-Chancellor Dennis Walcott. “If there is one thing school communities should know, it’s this: We’re going to do things differently,” said new D.O.E. Chancellor Carmen Fariña, in a statement released with last Thursday’s announcement. Today, we are turning the page on the approach of the past. We are going to listen and be responsive like never before, and that will be reflected in everything we do.” The reversal of the Murry Bergtraum co-location plan was one of nine such reversals throughout the city, and one of three blows dealt to Success Academy that day. D.O.E. also blocked the charter’s proposed move into a Jamaica, Queens, high school, plus removed a Success Academy school from a Harlem location — which also serves two other schools — where it had been co-located since 2008. Success Academy, which is run by former City Councilmember Eva Moskowitz, immediately shot back after the announcement, with harsh words for de Blasio. “With so few good school options in many of the city’s neighborhoods, it’s shocking that Mayor de Blasio would limit families’ access to high-performing schools,” said Success spokesperson Ann Powell. “Instead of the progressive politics he ran on, the mayor is waging a campaign of personal politics that hurts the very communities he vowed to protect.” As part of Thursday’s announcement, D.O.E. also said it is shutting down a previous proposal to co-locate a new public high school at University Neighborhood High School, a District 1 school at 200 Monroe St. That co-location plan had also faced heavy opposition, as supporters of U.N.H.S. said there was no way its building could successfully house two schools due to severe lack of space and resources.

TheVillager.com

D.O.E.’s announcement was enthusiastically applauded by Downtown education advocates. “I am pleased that the Department of Education heard the voices of the parents, students and educators who understand firsthand the educational needs of our community,” said Councilmember Margaret Chin in a statement released last Thursday night. Chin had written letters to D.O.E. and joined parents in rallies against both Downtown co-location proposals. “This is a major victory for U.N.H.S. and M.B.H.S., and I thank Chancellor Fariña and Mayor de Blasio for putting our children first,” she said. Lisa Donlan, president of the District 1 Community Education Council, said she was “pleased that the new administration heard the real concerns raised by District 1 parents, students, staff and community members about the negative impact the proposed co-location would have had on [U.N.H.S.].” Shino Tanikawa, president of the District 2 Community Education Council, said she was “delighted by the decision that responds to the needs of the community, and I am deeply grateful to the chancellor for listening to the parents.” However, D.O.E. said on Thursday that it still plans to propose two co-locations at the Murry Bergtraum campus, including both the public high school that had previously been planned for the U.N.H.S. building, and another public high school that had previously been planned for colocation in Long Island City. In a memo detailing the plans, D.O.E. spokesperson Devon Puglia called those new proposals “better building matches” for the schools. In fact, despite the city’s axing a number co-locations, over all, the de Blasio administration is still moving forward with about 36 other previously planned school co-locations — about 10 of which are charter schools. In addition, Governor Cuomo is now pledging to ensure that the city’s charter schools have adequate space and funding to thrive.

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C.B. 3 delays vote on landmarking old dispensary DISPENSARY, continued from p. 1

designation. Board members wanted to give the building owner, Shalom Eisner, more time to present his case against landmark status. The free-standing, four-story brick building was designed by noted architects Rose & Stone in the Italianate style and is the only structure of its kind in the area. The dispensary, which closed in the 1950s, served as a free and low-cost walkin community healthcare facility for the impoverished immigrant community of the Lower East Side. The now mostly vacant building is located adjacent to the proposed Essex Crossing development, a mixed-used project set to break ground this year on a former Seward Park Urban Renewal Area site. The building now houses a sports retail store owned by Eisner on the ground floor. The property has been on and off the market in recent years, and is reportedly now on sale for $21 million. At the C.B. 3 full-board meeting, attended by about 100 local residents, Eisner told the board that he and his family have devoted years to the building’s upkeep and that a landmark designation for the historic structure would make him lose up to 60 percent of the building’s value because it would place development restrictions on any new buyer. “It was a very bad neighborhood in 1985 when my brother and I bought the building,” he said. “I was almost going to leave. Finally, things changed for the better, although my business is still zero. The only way my property is valuable is by not landmarking it. If it is landmarked, this is not fair to me and my family for all the work I’ve done there over the years.” Speaking in support of Eisner was Jan Sasson, a local businessman, who concurred that landmarking it would sharply decrease the building’s value. “Sure, it would be good for the community,” he added, “but it will put a hole in the life of his family and that’s not fair to him. While the whole area is being redeveloped, he will be left out in the cold. I think there’s a middle ground we can

Now home to a sports retail business, 75 Essex St. was for 60 years a low-cost healthcare facility serving the Lower East Side.

reach here somehow.” Speaking in support for landmark designation were members of Friends of the Lower East Side, a preservation group that, last January, asked the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission to protect 75 Essex St. The preservation group is concerned that the building could be damaged from construction work on the Essex Street Crossing project and would be “vulnerable to inappropriate alterations or demolition” by whoever purchases the structure. They noted that the building is a prime candidate for conversion to a luxury hotel, an upscale condo or any number of uses. Joyce Mendelsohn, author of “The Lower East Side Remembered and Revisited” and a member of the preservation group, said it was essential that the building be protected. “It is our responsibility to preserve buildings that reflect the core immigrant character of the Lower East Side,” she said. “Plans for the new Essex Crossing present a vision of the future. The former dispen-

sary provides a reflection of the past.” Mitchell Grubler, a founding member of Friends of the Lower East Side, told C.B. 3 members that the building must be landmarked “in recognition of its architectural and historical significance.” “Surrounded on three sides by the planned new construction of the massive Essex Crossing development, and, as yet, unprotected by landmark designation, this historic structure is vulnerable to demolition or inappropriate alternations,” he said. “The former dispensary needs to be preserved, not just for its architectural excellence, but saving it will have a positive effect on the environment.” As the moment arrived for a final vote to be taken on the issue, board member Morris Faitelewicz was one of several members who asked C.B. 3 Chairperson Gigi Li to send the measure back to the board’s Landmarks Subcommittee for more discussion. “There’s no rush on this,” he said. “It shouldn’t be approved just by the Executive Committee. Eisner should be given

more time to present his arguments and show his community support.” Li said that the proposal came before the Executive Committee because “the ball was already rolling. Eisner wasn’t present at the Landmarks Subcommittee meeting, so we got it to vote on.” Carolyn Ratcliffe, chairperson of the subcommittee, said that Eisner “was aware of the meeting and it’s not our responsibility to notify people.” She admitted, however, that there was “some confusion” and that her committee would be willing to reconsider the matter. After the full-board meeting, Eisner told The Villager that he didn’t make it to the subcommittee meeting because of the “snowy weather” that day. He said that all he wanted was a “compromise” regarding the fate of the former dispensary building. “If I could get air rights for my building I would be satisfied,” he said. “I have no special strategy. I just want things done that are right for me and my family.” The Essex Crossing project is being developed by Delancey Street Associates, and calls for an Andy Warhol Museum to be built right next door to 75 Essex St. The parcel of land has frontages on Broome and Ludlow Sts. In addition to the museum, the developers plan to develop residential units on SPURA Site 1. The former dispensary building is about 12,400 square feet, and the property has nearly 32,000 feet in additional air rights. The developers, to date, have not indicated whether they would be interested in purchasing the privately owned building. The building is located in the Lower East Side Historic District and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The four-story structure, which is in excellent condition, is clad in orange and tan brick, and laid in Flemish bond with a brownstone trim. It features a series of five round-arched openings on the first story along Essex St. The former dispensary building survives as a testament to social reformers in the late 19th and early 20th centuries whose vision and commitment propelled New York City to pioneer progressive change.

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March 6, 2014

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Hoylman: State could be roadblock to safer streets BY ZACH WILLIAMS

D

rivers on the main arteries of Lower Manhattan are on notice as community leaders announced their support of increased ticketing for those who speed or fail to yield to pedestrians. Cracking down on such behavior was a main theme at a public forum on Feb. 25 at John Jay School of Criminal Justice. About 100 people attended the town hall, hosted by state Senator Brad Hoylman, who sought to focus discussion on Vision Zero. The initiative was unveiled Feb. 18 by Mayor de Blasio, with the stated goal of eliminating traffic-related fatalities citywide by 2024. Efforts at the state level, meanwhile, could determine the degree to which the city can control progress toward that goal. Hoylman announced legislation at the onset of the meeting that would establish “home rule” on reducing the default citywide speed limit to 25 miles per hour, as well as increasing the use of traffic cameras to catch traffic violations. Such matters are currently decided at the state level. “New York City should not have to go to Albany like a precocious child to change its traffic laws,” said Hoylman, whose district spans from Hudson Square and the East Village to the West 70s. There was also an emphasis on community

outreach at the meeting, which included officials representing the West Village, where plans to establish a “slow zone” next year have already received the green light. City Councilmember Corey Johnson, who represents the West Village and Chelsea, and formerly chaired Community Board 4, said the local community boards are a vital resource on street safety.

‘People are dying on our streets on a nearly daily basis.’ Tom DeVito “The community board has so much more knowledge and experience,” he said. “They’re hearing from constituents on a daily basis, they’re hearing from people in public sessions at their community board meetings.” Making streets such as Lafayette and Hudson more accommodating to pedes-

trians and cyclists would be a high priority under the mayor’s plan, said Polly Trottenberg, the city’s new Department of Transportation commissioner. While 50 new improvements would be made each year to such thoroughfares, “creating a real political force on the ground” would be just as important as increasing lighting, reducing the speed limit and conducting the mass public education drive called for by the plan, she stressed. “In the end, Vision Zero’s power is really going to be about our collective efforts,” she said. Last year, 27,747 traffic-related accidents occurred in the New York Police Department’s Manhattan South, which covers all of the borough below 59th St. Of that total, 1,723 involved injuries to pedestrians, according to department statistics. Sergeant Amber Cafaro, who represented Manhattan South at the meeting, emphasized that there had been a recent two-week publicity blitz aimed at raising safety awareness among pedestrians and cyclists. While she spoke mainly of publicizing the issue, cracking down on careless strollers could be a future possibility. “One thing we are going to be doing is focusing on jaywalking education,” she said,

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adding, “We’re not looking to necessarily hand out summonses.” The police will also step up efforts to ticket drivers who speed, fail to yield to pedestrians and use cell phones while driving, she added. But community activists who spoke at the meeting said the stress should be on reining in dangerous drivers. Combating speeding and safeguarding crosswalks is critical, according to Tom DeVito, the Manhattan organizer for Transportation Alternatives. “People are dying on our streets on a nearly daily basis and we know it’s much more appropriate to be focusing on the actual threat,” he said. He said recent polling supports prosecution in pedestrian fatalities. Christine Berthet, co-founder of Hell’s Kitchen Coalition for Pedestrian Safety, who also chairs Community Board 4, echoed DeVito, calling for tougher enforcement. “Forty-four percent of pedestrians who are injured or killed in Manhattan happen to be in the pedestrian crossing and at the green light, and these are the pedestrians I really care about,” she said. Hoylman reiterated that Albany remains an obstacle to the city’s control over the fate of Vision Zero, and of the safety of its own streets. “Those who have power, don’t want to give it up,” he said of legislative colleagues reluctant to surrender their authority over municipal traffic regulations.

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PHOTO BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

New addition reflects better on hotly disputed garage Work is still underway on the three-district Department of Sanitation garage at Spring and Washington Sts., including adding energy-efficient, rotatable, vertical slats on the building’s southern side. A construction worker on the street observing the slats’ installation the other week said they will be electronically controlled, and will be used to deflect sunlight away from the building’s interior in summer, helping to keep it cool, and alternately to bounce light into the building’s interior in winter, helping to keep it warm. However, the hightech panels aren’t likely to cool off neighboring residents, who are still hot under the collar — make that boiling mad — over the massive garage having been sited in Hudson Square, charging that it violates “fair share” regulations.

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March 6, 2014

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POLICE BLOTTER L.E.S. hit and run Police arrested Shenequa Gayle, 20, after she allegedly ran over an elderly man on the Lower East Side and then fled the scene. Gayle was driving a 2014 Infiniti Q50 west on Hester St. shortly before 7 a.m. when she made a left turn onto Bowery and struck the 63-year-old pedestrian, who was within the crosswalk, police said. The man suffered injuries to his head and hands, and after witnesses reported the incident, paramedics rushed him to Bellevue Hospital where he remains in critical condition, according to police. After barreling the man over, Gayle reportedly stepped outside her car, took a look at him, and drove away. But a witness was able to snap a photo of her, which he quickly provided to police. An immediate investigation by the Police Department’s Collision Investigation Squad soon revealed that, following the incident, Gayle fled to Brooklyn over the Manhattan Bridge, police said. Later that day, cops learned that the same Infiniti had been slapped with a parking ticket in Prospect Heights, after which officers there canvassed the area and spotted the car — although they found it was now being driven by a man, Tyrone Morant, 23. Shortly after that, both Gayle and Morant were arrested. Gayle was charged with leaving the scene of an accident, and both were charged with unlicensed operation and unauthorized use of a vehicle.

Thwarted robber An alleged robber was nabbed nine days after he tried to rip off two banks, including one in the West Village. Police said Rodney Griffin, 49, reportedly walked into a Bank of America near the corner of E. 63rd St. and Third Ave. shortly after 11 a.m. on Feb. 18, and passed a note to the teller in which he demanded cash. Moments later he fled empty-handed — but five hours later, Griffin hit a Chase Bank near the corner of W. Fourth and Christopher Sts., and tried the same act, passing a note and demanding cash, according to police. He once again ran away with nothing to show for it, and was able to elude cops until Feb. 27, when he was arrested and charged with two counts of third-degree robbery.

Hudson hit again An unlocked door led to a West Village residential burglary on Feb. 25, police said. Sometime between 9:20 a.m. and 12:45

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p.m. that day, two unidentified men reportedly got inside the 512 Hudson St. apartment and made off with numerous pieces of electronic equipment. The fact that there were no signs of forced entry made it clear to cops that the suspects had been able to enter through an unlocked door. That incident happened just two doors down from a similar burglary at 516 Hudson St., which took place on Feb. 11. Both buildings are just a block away from the Sixth Precinct.

Got his Galaxy Police are still searching for three unidentified men who reportedly attacked another man and then stole his cell phone on the Lower East Side back in January. The victim, 28, told cops he was walking past the corner of Ludlow and Canal Sts. around 2:15 p.m. on Jan. 16, when the three alleged thugs approached from behind and punched him in the head. The blows caused the man’s Samsung Galaxy phone to fall to the ground. He tried to pick it up, but the the suspects kicked him in the back, swiped the phone and fled west on Canal St., police said. The victim wasn’t seriously injured and declined medical attention. All three of the suspects are described as black males, about 18 to 20 years of age, police said.

Dishonorable theft Police arrested a brazen woman nearly three months after she allegedlystole $3,500 from her employer — a Meatpacking District museum dedicated to remembering the recovery efforts that took place in Lower Manhattan following the 9/11 attacks. Phoenix Toliver, 28, was working at the Ground Zero Museum Workshop, at 420 W. 14th St., when she reportedly pocketed the cash on Dec. 8, police said. Her manager later realized that the money was missing after looking through his financial documents, after which he reportedly sent four of his friends to check on Toliver at work in February. Those friends apparently confirmed the boss’s suspicions, and after he confronted Toliver she confessed to stealing the cash and wiring it to her mother, police said. Cops eventually apprehended Toliver on Feb. 24, and although the money hasn’t yet been recovered, she was charged with grand larceny.

device to steal customers’ credit card information. Nigel Wilson, 24, was working the register at Crate and Barrel, near the corner of Broadway and Houston St., when someone spotted him using the skimmer and immediately reported the activity, police said. When officers arrived on the scene minutes later to check out the situation, they found that Wilson was in fact in possession of not one, but two card skimmers, along with two illegally altered credit cards that he’d doctored using stolen information. After further investigation, cops said they also learned that the cashier had used a skimmer at work on Feb. 16 and 18. Wilson was charged with two counts of possession of a forged instrument, two counts of criminal possession of a forgery device and identity theft.

Scary fares Police arrested two teens on March 2 after they allegedly threatened a cab driver with a knife following their refusal to pay him. The cabbie, 35, told cops that he dropped off Jakwon Ramos, 18, and his 17-year-old male friend near the corner of MacDougal and Bleecker Sts. around 4:45 a.m., after which they walked away without paying the $3.50 fare. And when the driver got out of the taxi and again asked for payment, Ramos reportedly whipped out a large, serrated knife and waved it at him, while the 17-year-old friend yelled, “Get back in the car!” The cabbie then drove away and circled around the block until he could flag down a cop, after which he led the officer to the two teens. Ramos had reportedly thrown the knife away into a pile of garbage, but cops recovered it before apprehendeding the two perpetrators. Both were charged with criminal possession of a weapon.

Car break-in A potential carjacker was caught in the act early on March 1 and was stopped before he could finish the job, police said. Officers said they spotted Art’emdi Doe,

25, inside a parked car — which he did not own — at the corner of Hudson and Barrow Sts. around 2:15 a.m. They also saw that Doe was holding pliers — possibly in an attempt to hotwire the vehicle and drive it away. He was arrested and charged with possession of burglar tools and unauthorized use of a vehicle.

Wallet snatcher Police arrested Gustavo Lins, 25, after he allegedly snatched a woman’s wallet in a Meatpacking District bar early on March 1. The victim, 22, told cops she was hanging out inside Brass Monkey, at 55 Little W. 12th St., around 2:20 a.m. when she suddenly felt someone rifling through her purse. After looking into it moments later, she realized the wallet was gone — and when the woman then spun around, she reportedly spotted Lins with the wallet tucked under his arm. She immediately confronted him and took back the property, after which security stepped in and detained Lins until officers arrived on the scene. He was charged with grand larceny and criminal possession of stolen property.

Glass smasher In another instance of Meatpacking District mayhem, police arrested Brendan McCafferty, 22, 10 days after he allegedly smashed a bar glass over another man’s head. The victim, 35, told officers he was in 675 Bar, at 675 Hudson St., around 1 a.m. on Feb. 15, when he got into an argument with McCafferty. After the dispute heated up, McCafferty reportedly hit him three times with the glass, leaving three cuts that were later treated by paramedics. McCafferty fled the scene before police could nab him. But his friends — who were at the bar and apparently felt bad about the incident — handed over his name and phone number to the officers. McCafferty was eventually arrested on Feb. 25, and was charged with assault.

Sam Spokony

Card-skimmer busted A department store cashier was busted on Feb. 25 after he allegedly used a skimmer March 6, 2014

9


Named best weekly newspaper in New York State in 2001, 2004 and 2005 by New York Press Association PUBLISHER JENNIFER GOODSTEIN

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The Villager (USPS 578930) ISSN 0042-6202 is published every week by NYC Community Media LLC, 515 Canal Street, Unit 1C, New York, N.Y. 10013 (212) 229-1890. Periodicals Postage paid at New York, N.Y. Annual subscription by mail in Manhattan and Brooklyn $29 ($35 elsewhere). Single copy price at office and newsstands is $1. The entire contents of newspaper, including advertising, are copyrighted and no part may be reproduced without the express permission of the publisher - © 2011 NYC Community Media LLC.

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The Publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The publisher’s liability for others errors or omissions in connection with an advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue. Published by NYC Community Media, LLC 515 Canal Street, Unit 1C, NY, NY 10013 Phone: (212) 229-1890 • Fax: (212) 229-2790 On-line: www.thevillager.com E-mail: news@thevillager.com © 2012 NYC Community Media, LLC

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March 6, 2014

On Tuesday, New School jazz students held a Mardi Gras march down 13th St. from Sixth Ave. to Fifth Ave., where they entered the new University Center building. They continued playing up on the fifth floor, above, where the university’s jazz studies program is based.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Sad about Savoia To The Editor: For a number of years Michele Savoia’s clothing and tailor shop was in a small space on E. Seventh St. between First Ave. and Avenue A, across from where I lived. He was a familiar and noteworthy sight, even by East Village norms. Neither my wallet nor my less-flamboyant style made me a prospective customer, but that did not stop him from being as friendly and neighborly as you can find in the neighborhood. On nice days, he was often at the door of his shop, keeping an eye on things and delivering cheery greetings. I felt my two young children were especially safe because I was sure he would watch out for them. I was saddened by the news of his death at such an auspicious point in his career, and we offer

our condolences to his family and friends. Michael Claes

Hardworking man To The Editor: Re “Johnson takes lulu but says process has been reformed” (news article, Feb. 27): Corey is working very hard and deserves to earn a decent salary. Tom Connor

Little trust is left To The Editor: Re “Taking another bite at the park conservancy” (editorial, Feb. 20): Thank you to The Villager for your coverage of this important

issue. A few points: The “agreement” mentioned is not just any agreement. This is a “license agreement” that would give the Washington Square Park Conservancy tighter rein over maintaining and operating the park. Remember, these four ladies came before Community Board 2’s Parks Committee in June 2013 stating they were really “just a little friends’ group.” Yet, clearly, they planned to become a full-fledged conservancy, like the Bryant Park Corporation, Central Park Conservancy and Madison Square Park Conservancy. These women said they had “no budget” at the one Community Board 2 Parks Committee meeting in early June dedicated to their organization’s “formation,” when, in fact, they had submitted a four-year, projected budget, vetted by the Parks Department, to

New York State six weeks prior to this meeting. The fact that C.B. 2’s leadership isn’t acting more outraged about all the information withheld from the board is alarming. At the least, they should be calling for a hard  — and new — look at this issue, as The Villager editorial also advises, stating that “this represents a chance to fully vet this group” and that “a thorough grilling is in order.” How can there be any degree of trust in this private organization when so much information was misrepresented and intentionally withheld from the public? The conservancy (via Sarah Neilson, their executive director and also a city employee) told The Villager the conservancy doesn’t plan to do the things that it put in its 501(c)(3) documents — at least not now, that is. Well, isn’t that LETTERS, continued on p. 33

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Clearing the air on transferring park air rights TALKING POINT BY MADELYN WILS

T

he Villager recently published an op-ed from Andrew Berman, the executive director of Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, raising concern over whether a recent amendment to the Hudson River Park Act would allow the park to sell unused development rights from our public piers, to support Hudson River Park. As we have discussed with the community in the past, the bill signed into law in November allows us to sell unused development rights pursuant to local zoning ordinances. This means that at present, the Hudson River Park Trust has NO air rights to sell and NO ability or mechanism to transfer them. The amount of air rights available for potential sale, as well as the method for transferring them, must and will be developed within a ULURP process involving Community Boards 1, 2 and 4, and many elected officials. At recent meetings at each of the three community boards, we all agreed to work closely together on the detailed planning and ULURP processes required to create an air rights district. Community partnership and support are

quite simply essential if we are to succeed in ensuring the future of the park. At the Feb. 12 Community Board 2 LandUse Committee meeting and previously at Community Board 4, I stated that although the amended legislation is not explicit about restricting transfers only from commercial piers, the Trust would never seek to argue that public park piers have unused air rights. In fact, as the entity with primary legal responsibility for interpreting and adhering to the Hudson River Park Act, the

ment from park piers. Beyond the restrictions on use that limit certain specified piers to park uses only (and therefore no commercial development, and therefore, by inference, no claim of unused development rights), another provision limits the size of structures on park piers to 10 percent of the surface area, eliminating any unused F.A.R. argument on those piers. In addition, Mr. Berman proposed several ideas in his letter, and the Trust looks forward to discussing some of them with City Planning when we have the opportunity to do so. But, as I said at the C.B. 2 meeting, over the 10 years since the first section of the park opened, properties along the corridor have repeatedly received upzonings and variances from the city, from value largely created by Hudson River Park, yet with no benefit to the park. It is clear that the transfer-of-development-rights concept is NOT what is incentivizing developers to rezone their properties. The Trust believes that creating a welldeveloped plan that governs the whole district along the park’s corridor would be a more thoughtful and predictable way to approach development than the piecemeal approach that has been the practice to date. Our goal is to work with the communities and city to develop a policy that

The agendas of the Trust and G.V.S.H.P are much the same. Trust has concluded that park-use-only piers are legislatively restricted from transferring air rights. The November legislation did not change aspects of the original legislation that make this clear. While the public park piers do retain their underlying zoning (M2-3), there are multiple provisions of the park act that would together prohibit a transfer argu-

prohibits developers within the defined park corridor from securing approvals for upzonings or changes of use to residential unless they are required to buy air rights from Hudson River Park. Such a policy would create a financial benefit to the park while also reducing future commercial development within the park. We believe the agendas of our two organizations are much the same. At heart, the Hudson River Park Trust and the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, as well as the other organizations that have signed Mr. Berman’s most recent letter, are trying to protect a part of the city that we all love. We also believe that the physical fabric of the neighborhoods has to be protected, and that the park itself is part of that fabric. It is heartening to know that the signatories to Mr. Berman’s letter recognize that Hudson River Park, which is both incomplete and underfunded, faces huge financial challenges and that some new ways of thinking are required to address those needs. Moving forward, the Trust aims to keep dialogue open, and hopes to work together, as we navigate these ideas and others in pursuit of our common objective: the preservation and sustainability of the West Side and its backyard. Wils is president and C.E.O., Hudson River Park Trust

Birth of a Voice, Chapter 5: The 4 Voices — Dan Wolf NOTEBOOK BY JERRY TALLMER

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an Wolf, who, like me, had accomplished very little by way of a career — and was some years older than he ever admitted — wanted primarily to shake up the whole damned political establishment, Republican, Democratic, left, right, center. Nobody ever put it better than Dan Wolf himself in his introduction to “The Village Voice Reader” (Doubleday, 1962). Here is how that intro began: The Village Voice was originally conceived as a living, breathing attempt to demolish the notion that one needs to be a professional to accomplish something in a field as purportedly technical as journalism. It was a philosophical position. We wanted to jam the gears of creeping automatism. Though today [1962] at least part of our purpose has been achieved — The Voice’s circulation of over 20,000 makes it a “giant” among weekly newspapers — we often wonder about our original premise. If we had known more, we certainly would have suffered less. On the other hand, if we had been businessmen or professionals, we would probably have failed, because it is not the way of the expert to pursue absurdities in a cool and resistant world. The Voice came into existence in Greenwich Village on October 26, 1955, a time when the vulgarities

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of McCarthyism had withered the possibility of a true dialogue between people. The best minds in America — radical and conservative — were repeating themselves. Up and down the countryside the elect of the Ivy League had taken flight into the reality of the conventional church, the community organization, the lawn mower. Practically no one was testing reality, and General Eisenhower was our leader… .

“The vulgarities of McCarthyism”… . I remember as clearly as yesterday listening day after day, hour after hour, on the radio of my little maroon-colored $700 Jeepster, to every gripping millisecond of the Army-McCarthy hearings — and Joseph Welch’s “Have you, at long last, no shame, Senator?” — that was prologue to the whole creation of The Village Voice.

IRA BLUTREICH

March 6, 2014

11


PHOTO BY PASHA FARMANARA

The church, vendors and the manager all hope the Marketplace at St. Anthony’s will have a banner year.

It’s a whole new Marketplace at St. Anthony’s vendors strip BY PASHA FARMANARA

T

he Marketplace at St. Anthony’s resumed its annual flea market on March 7 under new management. The market will be stationed at its original location, on the south side of W. Houston St. between Thompson and MacDougal Sts., but will feature a new set of vendors. Through its 20 years of existence, it had held itself as one of the premier flea markets in the city, but its quality recently had begun to diminish. By the end of last year’s market, only a handful of vendors appeared to showcase their products. Father John, pastor of St. Anthony’s Church, which receives revenue from the market, decided to make a switch. He removed the flea market’s old manager and brought in Metro Festival Productions LLC.

According to its Web site, Metro Festival runs eight flea markets in New York City, as well as a number of other special events. “We had in excess of 70 vendors contact us expressing interest in the market, which we knew would happen once word got out that the market was under new management,” James Lamorte, Metro Festival’s principal owner, said. One major problem prior to the management change was the market’s inability to keep up with the standards of the surrounding neighborhood. “Major changes will be a conversion to a more upscale market keeping in sync with the neighborhood,” said Lamorte. “We will also be promoting the market citywide to make it a destination and not just rely on walk-by traffic.” The flea market will have the same hours of operation as before, open every Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. till dusk.

L.E.S. BID taking it to the street BY PASHA FARMANARA

I

t takes a community to plan a street. That was the thinking behind a Feb. 19 meeting the Lower East Side Business Improvement District held to get the community’s opinion on how to improve Orchard St. A 16-foot replica of the street was made, and community members were told to place pegs that represent real-life objects, like bike racks, benches and flowerbeds, where they would like them to be constructed. “We teamed up with a local design firm, Pilot Projects, who helped make the replica of the street,” said Natalie Raben, the BID’s director of marketing and communications. Participants at the meeting were broken

12

March 6, 2014

up into groups to share ideas, then each group presented the solutions they came up with. Most, if not all, people who attended had no training in in street design. “Ultimately, I think that community members have a unique perspective on the design of a neighborhood,” said Michael Little, owner of Lost Weekend NYC. “And though many are not experts in urban planning, residents are experts in the usage of the neighborhood.” Two hundred years ago, Orchard St. was home to a cherry orchard owned by New York Governor Captain James Delancey. All that remains is the street’s name. But now the BID wants to bring some foliage back. Designers are planning on planting indigenous trees and bushes.

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2014 A SPECIAL

VILLAGER SUPPLEMENT

PAGES 13 - 24

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March 6, 2014

13


Transforming a district into a hub of the new economy HUDSON SQUARE BY JASON D. PIZER

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“Health Care is a right, not a privilege.” 279 East 3rd Street New York, NY 10009 (212) 477-8500 A satellite of the William F. Ryan Community Health Center

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March 6, 2014

PHOTO COURTESY TRINITY REAL ESTATE

t Trinity Real Estate, our focus continues to be on Hudson Square, one of the most dynamic neighborhoods in New York. With low vacancy rates and solid demand, the future is bright. The neighborhood’s attractive fundamentals are complemented and supported by the new rezoning, which balances growth and stability with its limited, but welcome, residential component, height restrictions and incentives and requirements for preservation. Hudson Square’s appeal is only growing as the city’s economic engine shifts from traditional FIRE (finance, insurance, real estate) sectors to creative and high-tech industries. These diverse creative, media and technology firms are focusing on areas like Hudson Square that are west and south of Midtown Manhattan, and they enjoy the community’s energy and distinctive qualities. It is a vibrant creative hub, and highlights from 2013 emphasize the area’s wide-ranging appeal. The global food and beverage leader PepsiCo chose Hudson Square as the

home for its first Manhattan office space, signing a lease for nearly 20,000 square feet at 350 Hudson St. Meanwhile, Accenture LLP, one of the largest multinational management consulting, technology services and outsourcing companies, signed a longterm lease for 10,000 square feet at 155 Avenue of the Americas. New York magazine, a long-term tenant of ours, renewed its 80,500-square-foot lease for its headquarters at One Hudson Square, our flagship property, for another 10 years; and Horizon Media, Inc., an independent media services agency, continued its expansion at One Hudson Square, signing on for an additional 33,800 square feet and bringing its total occupancy to roughly 190,500 square feet. These companies are part of Hudson Square’s family of major consumer brands and corporate tenants, such as Adidas, 3.1 Philip Lim and Thakoon, Viacom, Omnicom and Two Sigma Investments. In terms of creative, arts and nonprofit businesses, tenants there are Horizon Media, HAVAS, WNYC New York Public Radio/Jerome L. Greene Performance Space, CBS Radio East, Postworks New York, Splashlight Photographic and Digital Studios, One Kings Lane, The Children’s Museum of the Arts and the Jackie Robinson Foundation, among others. This year has also kicked off on a strong note. We signed long-time tenant Workman

An aerial view of Hudson Square, a neighborhood on the way up.

Publishing Company to a 13-year renewal of its 63,200-square-foot lease at 225 Varick St. We also signed a 15-year retail lease at 155 Avenue of the Americas with Mototainment, a dealer of premium Ducati, Triumph and Mission motorcycles. An example of the Hudson Square’s progress and diversity is reflected on five floors at 350 Hudson St. where Medidata Solutions, a software provider for lifescience organizations, has completed its spectacular headquarters space occupying nearly 100,000 square feet. In the same building, global fashion and lifestyle brand Tory Burch, has started construction on its 80,000 square feet of new office space on the fifth and sixth floors. Trinity has played a prominent role in Lower Manhattan and Hudson Square for more than 300 years. Clearly, we take a long-term view. But we are also involved on a day-to-day basis in crafting policy and implementing it to meet neighborhood needs. A special focus, after the six-year collaboration with community members, elected officials and city agencies to win approval for the rezoning, is on our Duarte Square development site, at Canal St. and the Avenue of the Americas. We hope to make progress by the end of the year and are looking forward to realizing our vision for the project, which will bring a new school and park to the neighborhood. In my new role as chairperson of the board of directors of the Hudson Square Connection

business improvement district, I am also looking forward to supporting the BID’s initiatives and improving the area’s public spaces and streetscapes, with a priority on Soho Square, the park at Spring St. and Avenue of the Americas. We are also moving forward on a major project at the core of our Lower Manhattan parish. We will be replacing 68-74 Trinity Place with a new structure designed by Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects to complement Richard Upjohn’s historic Trinity Church. The new structure will include a base dedicated to mission activities and offices, topped by a residential tower. Demolition on the existing structure is scheduled to start in the fall. We have signed a long-term lease to relocate the Trinity preschool from the building to a new home at 100 Church St. Trinity parish offices will be moving temporarily to 120 Broadway until construction of the new building is completed. We are actively engaged on multiple fronts. The new zoning will help ensure the long-term character and vitality of the Hudson Square area, complemented by the initiatives of the BID, adding to its potential and attracting an increasingly diverse range of sectors. Anticipated residential development will also promote street life and enrich retail opportunities. We look forward to building on our success and to playing a prominent role in our city’s bright future.   Pizer is president, Trinity Real Estate

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Staying patient but persistent amid frustration on key issues DISTRICT LEADER BY KEEN BERGER

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have been accused of being too optimistic. My recent prediction for warm weather was immediately followed by yet another snowstorm. Optimism can be cloying. Consequently, you may be comforted to learn that I am disheartened. Years ago, as district leader, I decided to work intensely on three issues: education, immigration and voting. Many other issues (fracking, a hospital, parks, housing) also get my attention, but I have tried to focus. Sadly, NONE of my three is going well. On education, the new public middle school at 75 Morton St. has overwhelming support from parents in the six nearby elementary schools (P.S. 41, 3, 11, 33, 111 and 130), as well as Community Board 2, Community Education Council 2, our three local politicians (Assemblymember Deborah Glick, state Senator Brad Holyman and City Councilmember Corey Johnson) — and yet the closing on the sale of the building has not occurred. March 13 is now said to be the date for this to happen. The state bureaucrats finally left the building in December. (They said hurricane Sandy slowed them down.) But the state says that they cannot close the sale until the furniture is out — and no one is moving it. I stop by every week, asking impatient and exasperating questions; the guard at the desk (a state employee) said I should be arrested for trespassing. I would like that — but it won’t get the school any sooner, so I didn’t ask him to call the cops. On immigration, the Tea Party zealots still seem to think immigrants are evil. They

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forgot who created and sustained this nation. As part of the New Sanctuary accompaniment program, I joined supporters at a deportation hearing Downtown at Federal Plaza on Feb. 28. Our immigrant got a stay until May: That was considered a victory. Not victory enough for me. Finally, on voting, after writing detailed reports for a decade about what is wrong with every election (that’s 28 reports, including primaries) the new head of the Board of Election announced a larger font would be used for the ballots in the June 2014 primary. That’s such a tiny victory that I feel like Sisyphus; I have repeatedly listed dozens of other obvious improvements that are needed. I am not alone in my discouragement. The deputy clerk of the Board of Elections’ Manhattan office, Tim Gay, resigned two months ago. No replacement yet. I need to remember the bright spots — marriage equality, Brad Holyman being elected state Senator, Corey Johnson being elected City Council representative, and the very fact that 75 Morton will be a middle school. Four years ago, I was told the school would never open; maybe I should consider the promised opening, September 2016, a victory. It helps that I raised four daughters here in the Village. One daughter yelled that I was a terrible mother because I had not put the socks, newly washed, in pairs. I learned over the decades that criticism is not always on the mark, and that patience and persistence are eventually rewarded. My daughters are now wonderful young women. Maybe education, immigration and voting will be wonderful as well. Keep reading The Villager to find out when and what to celebrate. The snow will melt, soon.

T

VIL LAGWEL CO F E CRA THE2014

F E

A caffeinated celebration of local coffee culture

MarCH 8-16,2014

GOOD FOR ONE HALF-PRICE COFFEE AT EACH PARTICIPANT LISTED

For details, visit villagealliance.org/events/coffee or call (212) 777-2173

#villagecoffeecrawl

Agata & Valentina

Ciao for Now 107 West 10th St

Astor Place Subway

Amorino

Culture

482 6th Ave

Archie & Sons

le Pain Quotidien

Stumptown Coffee roasters

Café Nadery

Matsunosuke

64 University Pl 60 University Pl 23 third Ave

16 West 8th St

60 West 8th St 1 West 8th St

58 West 8th St

Mud Truck O Café

30 West 8th St

The Nut Box 49 East 8th St

PRESENTED BY

Berger is the female district leader, the 66th Assembly District, Part A March 6, 2014

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PHOTO DONATED BY CORBIS

FILE PHOTO BY JEFFERSON SIEGEL

Keen Berger, left, at a vigil with veteran activist Doris Diether.


Stopping N.Y.U. and fighting for 75 Morton and women STATE ASSEMBLY BY DEBORAH J. GLICK

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his is an exciting time for the Village. I am incredibly proud to be part of the successful lawsuit against the wildly inappropriate N.Y.U. 2031 plan. I have stood with the community from the very beginning of its struggle in fighting this overdevelopment, and in doing so, preserving the qualities that make the Village special. I organized multiple rallies against New York University’s plan and then joined as a plaintiff in a lawsuit to stop its implementation. I am extremely pleased that in this case justice was on our side. The court has found in our favor, and in my estimation N.Y.U. must go back to square one and present a different plan that does not include usurping public parkland for its own development. My experience with N.Y.U., coupled with surviving a Bloomberg administration that never met an upzoning it didn’t like, has led me to call on the city to rezone the South Village. Although it is a historic district, there are no height limits on future development. I think such limits are necessary to help preserve the character of the

neighborhood, since the Landmarks Preservation Commission does not have specific guidelines in this regard. I am extremely hopeful that the administration of Mayor de Blasio will be more amendable to the concerns of community members rather than of developers. In listening to the community regarding its needs, one does not have to look very hard to see that our local public schools are bursting at the seams. We are in desperate need of school seats, which is why I’m so excited about the prospect of the property at 75 Morton St. finally being turned into a school. It is hard to imagine that the community’s fight to claim 75 Morton St. started almost seven years, and three governors ago. Massive school overcrowding in the Village, the loss of our only middle school, plus an underutilized site owned by the state at 75 Morton, presented an opportunity to make a compelling case to the city and state for this to become a reality. However, as we all know, it takes more than a great idea to get results for a community. That is why I am so excited that we are finally on the verge of having this property turned over to the School Construction Authority to begin work on development and construction. Transferring a building from the state to the city is fraught with bureaucratic red tape and unexpected roadblocks. I am pleased that I have been able to use my ex-

perience and influence to help make this project come to fruition. I also would be remiss if I didn’t express gratitude toward community member Irene Kaufman, who has been tireless in her efforts to bring this issue to everyone’s attention (including making a trip to Albany!) as well as our district leader, Keen Berger, who has been unrelenting in placing pressure on both the city and state to make this happen. As for Albany matters, our state laws regarding reproductive freedom were changed before Roe v Wade but fall short of the protections that federal law affords. That is why I have sponsored the Reproductive Health Act, to update our own reproductive freedom laws. I am pleased that it became a part of the governor’s Women’s Equality Act. W.E.A. is a package of 10 bills, to enhance protections for women in areas from pay equity to domestic violence. While the package included less-aggressive versions of previously passed Assembly bills, these bills had never passed the state Senate. W.E.A. is an attempt to pass a comprehensive package of bills, including the Reproductive Health Act. I won’t give up on this basic right of women to make their own personal healthcare decisions. Glick is assemblymember, 66th Assembly District

Deborah Glick.

Brad Hoylman

Senator, 27th District

Village Independent Democrats cordially invite you to the following VID special events to be held at St. John’s Annex, 83 Christopher Street: A History of Greenwich Village

Representing Greenwich Village, East Village, Lower East Side, East Midtown, Midtown, Chelsea, Clinton/Hell’s Kitchen, Times Square, Columbus Circle, Upper West Side 322 Eighth Avenue, Suite 1700 New York, NY 10001 Phone: (212) 633-8052 | Fax: (212) 633-8096 Email: hoylman@nysenate.gov Web: www.hoylman.nysenate.gov 16

March 6, 2014

Presented by John Strausbaugh, author of The Village: 400 Years of Beats and Bohemians, Radicals and Rogues, A History of Greenwich Village. Q&A session to follow the presentation. Thursday, March 13th at 7:00 p.m.

The Power to Change: Clean Energy and the Future of New York City

Facilitator: Frieda Bradlow; panelists: Nancy Anderson, Samara Swanston and Lisa DiCaprio Thursday, April 10th at 7:00 p.m.

Village Independent Democrats 26 Perry Street VillageDemocrats.org

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24-hour medical care returns to the Lower West Side HEALTH BY JOHN GUPTA

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n the shadows of buildings that housed St. Vincent’s Hospital for 160 years, a new era of healthcare is emerging in a ship-like building that once served as the headquarters of the National Maritime Union, on the west side of Seventh Ave., between W. 12th and W. 13th Sts. As part of the historic redevelopment of the West Side, the first phase of what we’re calling the Lenox Hill HealthPlex will open in late June, with the debut of Manhattan’s first freestanding emergency center. It will provide patients with around-the-clock access to board-certified emergency physicians, specialty trained nurses, specialist consultations and other healthcare professionals. This new model of community-based care also includes future plans for: • An Imaging Center • Ambulatory Surgery Suite • Outpatient Rehabilitation • Health and Wellness Services • Medical Specialty Practices • Home-based Services

John Gupta.

As part of the North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, Lenox Hill is investing more than $150 million to redevelop the interior of the 50-year-old, landmarked structure (formerly known as the O’Toole Building). All of the exterior nautical features of the building, designed by

New Orleans architect Albert C. Ledner, are being maintained, including scalloped overhangs, a porthole facade and a rooftop bulkhead that looks like a steamship smokestack. We took great pains to respect the architecture of the 160,000-square-foot building, recognizing the distinctive character of the West Village. In addition to filling a healthcare void on the West Side that has existed since the closure of St. Vincent’s in 2010, this new medical complex will bring hundreds of new jobs to the neighborhood, helping to revitalize small businesses. The HealthPlex Emergency Center will occupy the first floor of the six-story building. It will be designed, staffed and equipped to accommodate up to 45,000 emergency visits annually. It will serve as a receiving facility for the New York City 911 Emergency Medical System, have 24/7 lab services, advanced radiology, and include an ambulance to transport patients as needed. The HealthPlex will provide emergency medical care that is efficient, accessible and linked to a continuum of care to all patients, regardless of insurance status. Our emergency clinicians will be able to treat a wide range of illnesses and injuries. Patients presenting at the HealthPlex with an apparent heart attack, stroke and other life-threatening conditions would be eval-

uated and stabilized using the facility’s advanced life-support technologies, and then prepared for transport to a hospital, if needed. Having those critical resources and services available in a neighborhood facility could mean the difference between life and death for patients experiencing a medical crisis. Among its many close ties to local organizations, Lenox Hill HealthPlex has created a partnership with the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (L.G.B.T.) Community Center. In 2013, Lenox Hill Hospital was recognized as a “Leader in L.G.B.T. Healthcare Equality” in an annual survey conducted by the Human Rights Campaign Foundation, the educational arm of the country’s largest L.G.B.T. organization. Also in 2013, Lenox Hill donated $100,000 to the New York City AIDS Memorial that will be erected in St. Vincent’s Hospital Park, located in the triangle across from the HealthPlex at the intersection of Seventh Ave., W. 12th St. and Greenwich Ave. To find out more about the Lenox Hill HealthPlex go to: http://www.lenoxhillhealthplex.org Gupta is executive director, Lenox Hill HealthPlex

MAX

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March 6, 2014

17


Delayed decades, L.E.S. mega-project set to start DEVELOPMENT

Economic Development Corporation, said the project — notably, its small office spaces — would improve on the neighborhood’s historic strengths.   “The 250-square-foot office spaces for creativity and technology will nurture the next generation of entrepreneurs on the Lower East Side,” he said. Smaller spaces will also help to keep the commercial use more affordable.  Charles Bendit, co-C.E.O. of Taconic Investment Partners, said, “Essex Crossing will transform New York City into an incubator for economic growth.”  Bloomberg applauded City Councilmember Margaret Chin for helping shape Essex Crossing.  “This is such a historic day,” Chin said at the press conference last fall. “People put aside their differences,” she added, referring to how a divided community was finally able to reach consensus on guidelines for the plan.  The councilmember mentioned that people were critical of her for not securing 100 percent affordable housing at SPURA, but she acknowledged that 50 percent affordable housing was pretty good.  When asked if Essex Crossing could be reversed by the next mayor, Bloomberg indicated no.  “We’ve signed contracts,” he said. “It’s a done deal.”

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n September, after nearly 50 years of inertia at the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area, then-Mayor Bloomberg announced that developers had been selected for a $1.1 billion plan for the site’s nine remaining city-owned lots at the foot of the Williamsburg Bridge. The developers are L+M Development Partners, BFC Partners and Taconic Investment Partners.  The nine vacant lots will be transformed into a mixed-use complex of commercial space and 1,000 residential apartments. Half the residential units will be permanent affordable housing for low-, moderate- and middle-income families and senior citizens. The other half will be market rate.  Some highlights of the 1.65-millionsquare-foot development, to be called Essex Crossing, include an Andy Warhol Museum, an expanded Essex Street Market, office space, a dual-generation school run by The Educational Alliance, a rooftop urban farm, a movie theater and a bowling alley.  Designed by SHoP Architects and Beyer Blinder Belle, the project is anticipated to break ground in spring 2015 for five build-

Designs for the sprawling SPURA project on the Lower East Side by the Williamsburg Bridge feature rooftop gardens.

ings. Essex Crossing will also be home to a future potential school, along with a hub for entrepreneurs and the technology sector.  Former SPURA residents will receive top priority when applications are processed for apartments, and can seize the opportunity to return to the neighborhood decades later if they so desire.  “In 1967, the site was demolished by government with promises of revitaliza-

tion. What happened was only neglect,” Bloomberg said in September. “That promise of 1967 is now going to be fulfilled.”  Half of the affordable housing is scheduled for completion three years after ground is broken on the mega-project.  Two more buildings should be constructed by 2021, with the entire project finished by 2024.  Kyle Kimball, president of the city’s

Defending neighborhood character and small businesses COMMUNITY BY SARA ROMANOSKI

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March 6, 2014

PHOTO BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

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ntering our tenth year, the East Village Community Coalition continues to address with concern the preservation of the neighborhood’s architectural and cultural character. In many ways we have made great progress; in others, the work has just begun. In the newly formatted, more accessible Web site www. evccnyc.org, we have a strong digital platform to aid our preservation and advocacy initiatives. The shell of the old P.S. 64 is one such initiative that still remains just out of the community’s grasp even 15 years after the building’s improper sale by the city to private hands. Since April, a revised proposal for a multi-institutional dorm by the building’s controversial owner has inspired action, investigation, and patience as we await the city’s decision. We all know a dorm on the east side of Tompkins Square Park would overwhelm residential E. Ninth and 10th Sts. and does not satisfy the true intent of the deed restriction requiring the magnificent Beaux Arts landmark to be dedicated for community use.

We consider streetscapes composed of independent and local businesses to be essential to the character of the East Village. The products and services provided by local storefront businesses both meet the needs of locals and positively contribute to the neighborhood’s quality of life. Demographic, economic and policy shifts have created an increasingly difficult environment for these enterprises to thrive, and has resulted in the closing of many local businesses — some of which could be considered staples of the East Village in their own right. While we lament each individual loss, in aggregate, they threaten distinct qualities captured in the East Village's diverse retail environment. In response to pressures on small business owners, E.V.C.C. has launched a three-pronged strategy to advocate for stability in the East Village’s retail sector. The first strategy is to guide consumer spending choices. We encourage consumers to commit more local dollars to local businesses. In its seventh edition, E.V.C.C.’s free “Get Local! Guide” to East Village shops now lists nearly 500 businesses and is available in local shops and cafes. In 2013 we introduced two new publications: December’s “East Village Holiday Shopping Guide,” and the “Local Alternatives to 7-Eleven” map, that latter which is a campaign that redirects shoppers toward more

The old P.S. 64, the former CHARAS / El Bohio Cultural and Community Center, has sat vacant for 15 years. Developer Gregg Singer plans to create a dorm there.

than 20 local businesses offering the same products and services as the Texas-owned 7-Eleven outpost on Avenue A. Our second strategy is to make new policies to protect small businesses. The 7-Eleven wayfinding maps reintroduce the concept of Formula Retail Zoning, a tool to limit chain stores’ expansion in the East Village and prioritize the new and existing small businesses. This spring, E.V.C.C. will release a study on ways that the East Village can bring formula retail restrictions to

New York City’s zoning code, followed by actions individuals can take to start challenging their spending patterns. The third strategy is simple: Support local merchants. Earlier this month, E.V.C.C. convened the first informational meeting for the East Village Independent Merchants Association (EVIMA), a growing collective of several dozen business owners working to connect, support and promote small and independent businesses in the East Village. We are excited to have a community partner which shares our commitment to protecting retail diversity and its positive effects on the community.   Join us! If you are a merchant, please consider joining EVIMA. Finally, the Host Committee responsible for planning regular outreach events kicks off E.V.C.C.’s new monthly meetup series on April 1 at Dorian Grey Gallery, 437 E. Ninth St. Stay informed by visiting www.evccnyc.org. Our efforts over the past decade and all that is to come are being chronicled in an organizational archive. In celebration of 10 years, we will share elements of this collection to showcase E.V.C.C.’s experience advocating for the protection and celebration of our neighborhood’s incomparable character. Romanoski is managing director, East Village Community Coalition

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Some amazing victories, but many challenges ahead PRESERVATION BY ANDREW BERMAN

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reservation of the historic architectural and cultural character of our neighborhoods is the mission of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation. The past year, we’ve made some remarkable progress — including the largest expansion of landmark protections in Greenwich Village since 1969, and a stunning victory in court against N.Y.U.’s expansion plan. And in the last 10 years, we managed to secure landmark designation of more than 1,100 buildings, and community-friendly “contextual” rezonings of nearly 100 blocks of our neighborhood. But we still face considerable challenges, and an uncertain future. The real estate industry is waging an all-out campaign against landmarking; it’s unclear where the new administration stands on preservation issues; and there are immense challenges created by 2013 state legislation allowing millions of square feet of air rights to be transferred from the Hudson River Park into our neighborhood for development. But first, the good news. In December, after a 10-year effort spearheaded by G.V.S.H.P., the city finally approved designation of the South Village Historic District, covering more than a dozen blocks and 250 buildings south of Washington Square. This was actually the second phase of G.V.S.H.P.’s proposed South Village Historic District, the first phase of which the city approved in 2010, covering about 230 buildings between Sixth and Seventh Aves. and W. Fourth and Houston Sts. A third and final phase, covering about 200 buildings south of Houston St. between Sixth Ave. and West Broadway, is yet to be considered by the city. This new landmark district protects some of the most historically rich sites, not only in the Village but in the entire city. The story of generations of immigrant struggle and success is embodied in these blocks, as are decades of innovation and progress in music, theater, literature and social justice. Equally importantly, G.V.S.H.P. fought for and got several potential N.Y.U. development sites included in the landmark district. These include low-scale and architecturally significant buildings on Washington Square South, like the Vanderbilt Hall Law School building and the Kevorkian Center. Not only are these worth preserving, but without landmark designation, a 300-foot-tall dormitory could be built on the site of Vanderbilt Hall. Speaking of N.Y.U., in January, G.V.S.H.P. and a coalition of community groups, preservationists, local residents and N.Y.U. faculty scored a major victory in court when a State Supreme Court judge agreed with our lawsuit contending that

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A map by the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation showing the progress in landmarking the South Village. Still not landmarked is the third and final section.

public park land had been illegally given to N.Y.U. by the city for the university’s expansion plan. As a result, two of the four massive, planned N.Y.U. buildings became impossible to build, and a third extremely difficult. Even the fourth is now in jeopardy, since the legal and environmental assumptions of the plan as approved by the city in 2012 have now been upended. G.V.S.H.P. and our coalition partners argue that the entire plan must now go back to square one, and a bevy of elected officials, including our co-plaintiff Assemblymember Deborah Glick, joined us for a press conference in January urging N.Y.U. to do just that. There were some other nice victories as well. In February, in the face of strong opposition, a developer withdrew an application for a zoning variance to increase by 34 percent the size of a proposed office tower on 13th St. and 10th Ave. in the Meatpacking District. Also in February, after significant public shaming and phone and e-mail zap, we got Equinox to take down an illegal three-story billboard it had erected on the facade of its building at 12th St. and Greenwich Ave., in the heart of the Greenwich Village Historic District. Of course, not all the news has been

good. Rather than willingly restart the process to come up with a more reasonable plan, N.Y.U. is appealing the judge’s ruling and seeking to move ahead with its entire expansion plan as is. And it’s not yet clear if Mayor de Blasio’s administration backs N.Y.U. In general, we are waiting to see where the de Blasio administration stands on a whole host of preservation and development issues. The mayor has not yet appointed a new chairperson of the Landmarks Preservation Commission. (Bloomberg’s appointee, Robert Tierney, remains in that position until he does.) We do know that the Real Estate Board of New York is working hard to try to affect the direction of both the commission and the mayor. For the last year, REBNY has waged a campaign to paint landmarking as out of control, preserving nothing but gas stations and vacant lots, and (paradoxically) preventing economic development and making New York City unaffordable to all but the very rich. In response, G.V.S.H.P. gathered affordable housing advocates, as well as neighborhood preservation leaders from Harlem and Bedford Stuyvesant, for a press conference outside REBNY’s Midtown

headquarters, where we refuted this organization’s baseless claims about affordability and diversity. G.V.S.H.P. placed a series of op-eds explaining how landmarking can actually help preserve neighborhoods’ affordability while at the same time encouraging new economic development through adaptive reuse. One need only look at landmarked neighborhoods like Soho, or the Meatpacking and Flatiron Districts, to see that landmarking in no way stifles economic development. And one need look no farther than the Village’s two landmarked affordable housing complexes, Westbeth and 505 LaGuardia Place (the latter within the I.M. Pei-designed Silver Towers complex), to see that landmarking can be a useful tool in helping to preserve affordability. But perhaps the greatest challenge we face may come from a provision passed by the state Legislature in 2013, allowing the transfer of air rights from the Hudson River Park to be used for development inland. The scheme, intended to raise revenue for the park, also raises the possibility of vastly increased development up and down the West Side waterfront. And it provides real estate interests with a longsought-after tool to potentially allow even larger development in our neighborhood than the already-generous zoning allows. Unless safeguards are put in place, this could result in millions of square feet of additional development along the waterfront between W. 59th and Chambers Sts. — in addition to the tens of millions of square feet already slated to be built in that area in the near future. This is especially true after the revelation last month that the new provision actually allows for hundreds of thousands, or possibly millions, more square feet of air rights to be moved from the park inland for development than originally disclosed. But G.V.S.H.P. and a coalition of West Side community groups are pushing to put limits in place that would prevent overdevelopment and the overuse of air rights, while still allowing revenue generation for the park. We’re waiting to see if local state Assemblymembers Deborah Glick and Richard Gottfried, who authored the air rights provision, and state Senators Brad Hoylman and Dan Squadron, who voted for it, will support such measures. Support will also be needed from local City Councilmembers Corey Johnson and Margaret Chin, as well as Borough President Gale Brewer. Without these safeguards, the air rights transfer provision is likely the single greatest threat to preserving the West Side of our neighborhood and preventing largescale overdevelopment. So we’ve made some amazing progress over the past year in preservation of our neighborhood. But looking ahead, with a new mayor, REBNY, N.Y.U., and Hudson River Park air rights, we still have our work cut out for us. Berman is executive director, Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation March 6, 2014

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Lower East Side: A livable neighborhood in progress COMMUNITY BY DIEM BOYD

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s an organization, we believe that livable and diverse neighborhoods emerge and are sustained long term through an informed and empowered community. We are proud of our efforts that have brought those who were once active stakeholders back into the process, and have welcomed new people to claim a stake in their community. A strong city needs strong communities working toward common goals, and this is what we have been building on the Lower East Side. Revitalizing the Lower East Side also means partnering with other communities and organizations that share our common ethos. We share collective experiences and expertise with our neighbors in Hell’s Kitchen, the Meatpacking District, Harlem, Inwood, Flatiron and across the Williamsburg Bridge. The mutually supportive relationships we continue to foster with our extended neighbors allow for the sharing of vital information and resources as we fight on multiple fronts to protect our neighborhoods and quality of life. The broad concerns we face as a neighborhood are the same concerns shared by all neighborhoods in all five boroughs. It’s this common purpose that led us to become actively involved from its inception with the Downtown Action Coalition (D.A.C.), a diverse group of 31 community organizations spanning Lower Manhattan from east to west, unified in response to the often drastic and unwelcome transformation of our neighborhoods.

Being suspended by C.B. 3 last year only strengthened our resolve, and we renewed our commitment. In the Lower East Side, we envision a future in which the entrenched blight of liquor license oversaturation, especially at the hands of negligent operators, is a distant memory. In the past year alone, L.E.S. Dwellers directly addressed more than 50 liquor applications in our tiny area of the Lower East Side, already the most liquor license-saturated neighborhood in the entire city. There were many hard-fought battles that brought much-needed attention — not just at the community level, but also at the local, city and state government levels — to the relentless decimation of our quality of life, plus the public health and safety issues that have resulted from the nightlife free-for-all that we face as a community. These battles have catalyzed a forgotten, disheartened and resigned community into action, paving a way for long-overdue, significant change. With 51 liquor licenses within 500 feet in any direction of the center of Hell Square, our nine small blocks already contain 17 times the legal amount. Twelve percent of all liquor licenses in Community Board 3 are concentrated in this area that represents only 1.7 percent of the entire district. We have worked tirelessly to curb the increase of

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March 6, 2014

A map by the LES Dwellers showing how disproportionately oversaturated Hell Square is with liquor licenses.

that number, and are beginning to see the results as liquor license applications and approvals drop precipitously. On average, we were faced with as many as 11 license applications in any given month. As of February 2014, we are down to four. The steep decline in both applications and approved licenses can be attributed to a three-pronged strategy of organizing and empowering community stakeholders against liquor license expansion; pushing for denials from C.B. 3; and community advocacy at both the State Liquor Authority 500-foot hearings and full board hearings. Advocating on behalf of our community, we have impressed upon the S.L.A. the statutory considerations of the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law’s Section 64(6-a), which imposes a “public interest” standard for on-premise applications. This has resulted in the S.L.A. siding with us the majority of the time, concluding that applicants will need to meet an extremely high “public interest” threshold to be granted a license. The Authority further confirmed that our area is not underserved for alcohol, with the attendant conditions and problems created by high alcohol-outlet density unlikely to change anytime soon. Additionally, despite Ludlow House being granted a “club” liquor license, the prohibiting of alcohol on the exposed section of the rooftop and limiting its hours from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. has set a critical precedent for the licensing

of outdoor spaces in close proximity to residents. This is one of many victories for a community overburdened by more than 60 venues with open windows, rooftops, backyards and sidewalk tables and counters. We will continue to fight against the increase of liquor licenses in our neighborhood and continue to press the S.L.A. to take negligent operators to task. The reporting of nonconforming and noncompliant businesses operating outside of ABC Law and local and state laws and regulations will be ratcheted up from our efforts last year, as we continue to expand our objectives to include real-time action and solutions. We will also continue to partner with business owners on initiatives to improve residents’ quality of life and opportunities for responsible business. Hotel Chantelle was one such partner in relaying the neighborhood’s message that SantaCon is a disrespectful and disruptive event for both residents and local businesses. Just recently, The Meatball Shop has become an integral asset for the neighborhood by organizing a monthly sit-down for local restaurateurs to address both resident and business concerns. We believe these working partnerships are the right step toward developing mutual solutions to the common objectives we face as we try to revitalize and protect the Lower East Side for residents and businesses, so that we all can flourish. With liquor license applications decreasing in our area, we are broadening our focus to include initiatives around enforcement. We believe it is essential that residents play a role in identifying the conditions that give rise to public safety issues, such as crime and social disorder. Equally important is that residents collaborate on the solutions. This is why we are pushing for more-proactive, community-oriented policing for our area. When communities under duress are able to establish trust in and develop close working ties with their local police precinct, solutions that are responsive to the real needs of the community emerge. This interdependent and vital relationship restores social order, safety and quality of life to beleaguered communities, fosters mutual respect between all community stakeholders, and encourages sound, stable and diverse economic growth. Finally, near the end of last year, we found ourselves briefly distracted by the controversy that ensued after being suspended as a community group for three months by our local community board. This incident only strengthened our resolve, renewing our commitment to ensuring that all community stakeholders are represented in a manner that encourages citizen involvement and empowerment, enhances public trust, and promotes open, transparent dialogue and information sharing. Despite this unwarranted distraction, we stayed the course, encouraged by the support we received from our elected officials throughout the year. Assembly Speaker Silver, state Senator Squadron, former Borough President Stringer and Councilwoman Chin stood alongside their constituents when it mattered most. They have been positive examples how government can work, and at times eagerly, to help solve our problems. And now with new leadership at the city’s helm, we are more hopeful than ever that the needs of local residents in this embattled neighborhood will be made a priority after years of neglect. This is why we are pushing forward with a clear vision for our community: widening our focus to proactively seek solutions, not just highlight the problems, working toward creating a community where people feel proud, protected, secure and happy with the quality of life to which they are entitled. We are far from our goal, but we are on the right track. We are making progress. Slower than we would like, yes, but progress, nonetheless. Life abounds with daily distractions, fresh challenges and new hurdles, but we are making lasting positive change, together. Boyd is founder, LES Dwellers (www.lesdwellers.org)

TheVillager.com


Taking control of traffic to increase street safety STATE SENATE BY BRAD HOYLMAN

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TheVillager.com

Brad Hoylman

the bills necessary to fully enact Vision Zero. My first bill (S6651) would grant New York City home rule to set its own, lower speed limit. Reduced speed limits have been proven to reduce fatality rates and give pedestrians, bicyclists, motorcyclists and drivers increased response time. Under current New York State law, citywide speed limits in New York City cannot be set below 30 miles per hour by the City Council. My bill would amend the state law to give New York City home rule power over establishing its own citywide speed limit as low as 25 miles per hour. The second bill (S6648) would require side under-ride guards for large trucks operating in the city to protect pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists and smaller vehicles from sliding underneath them. Perhaps the tragedy that befell Jessie Blue might have been avoided had the tractor-trailer that hit her had an under-ride guard to prevent her from being dragged under its wheels. There are other bills on the mayor’s Vision Zero state legislative agenda that I am co-sponsoring, including ones that would grant New York City full local authority over the placement and number of red-light cameras; increase penalties for driving with a suspended or revoked license; update state driver education to improve interactions with pedestrians and bicyclists; and (in legislation sponsored by Senator Daniel Squadron and Assemblymember Brian Kavanagh) crack down on careless drivers who injure pedestrians and bicyclists. The most challenging piece may be the support from the state Legislature in Albany, where New York City’s priorities sometimes fall victim to Republicans in the state Senate. There is much work to do but the effort will be worth it. In other U.S. communities that have tried Vision Zero tactics, the number of traffic deaths has fallen at least 25 percent faster than the national average. With so many lives at stake, as Mayor de Blasio said, there’s “nothing more urgent” than getting Vision Zero right. If you want to get involved in the effort to support Vision Zero, contact me at hoylman@ nysenate.gov or call 212-633-8052.

PHOTO BY TEQUILA MINSKY

his fall, the principal of P.S. 41 in the West Village saw firsthand the dangers of New York City streets. In front of the school’s W. 11th St. entrance, she witnessed an out-of-control taxi careen into a child and caregiver. Such accidents are not uncommon on our streets. According to the New York Police Department, last year more than 16,000 pedestrians and cyclists were injured in traffic accidents and 178 were killed, many of these incidents occurring in my state Senate district. Last July, a driver jumped the curb in the East Village, killing one bystander and seriously injuring several other pedestrians. Just last month, an M.T.A. bus driver was killed when his bus was struck by someone driving a stolen truck at 14th St. and Seventh Ave. And in 2012, Jessica Dworkin, a.k.a. Jessie Blue, a fixture in the Soho community, died after being struck and dragged by a tractor-trailer at Sixth Ave. and Houston St. There seems to be no end in sight to these tragedies. At the current rate, pedestrian deaths in New York City are on pace to surpass homicides this year. The good news is that the de Blasio administration has developed a bold strategy, the “Vision Zero Action Plan,” to address this epidemic head-on with the ambitious goal of eliminating traffic deaths within a decade. The plan (available at nyc.gov/visionzero) is a unique interagency effort developed by the Department of Transportation, the N.Y.P.D., the Taxi and Limousine Commission and the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. The plan’s 63 initiatives include: increasing enforcement against dangerous moving violations; increasing speeding enforcement at the precinct level; developing borough-wide safety plans; implementing safety engineering improvements at 50 intersections and corridors; implementing eight new neighborhood slow zones and 25 new arterial slow zones; installing speed cameras at 20 new authorized locations; issuing summonses to T.L.C. drivers identified by red-light cameras; creating a T.L.C. safety enforcement squad; ensuring all city fleet vehicles are equipped with technology that records speeding and other dangerous driving behavior; and conducting public health surveillance on traffic-related hospitalizations and fatalities. Community interest in these measures seems high. A town hall forum on Vision Zero I sponsored last week with D.O.T. Commissioner Polly Trottenberg was packed with supporters from across the Senate district. Public support will be key, since both city and state action is required to enact many of the laws and regulations in the Vision Zero plan. I’m proud to have introduced two of

Blue stencils recently appeared on the sidewalk near where Jessica Dworkin was killed by a tractor-trailer in April 2012.

"Together we will continue to fight for progress in the Village and in Albany." Assemblymember

Deborah J. Glick 853 Broadway, Suite 1518, New York, NY 10003

Tel: 212-674-5153 / Fax: 212-674-5530

glickd@assembly.state.ny.us

Hoylman is state senator, 27th District March 6, 2014

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Fire safety to pre-K and protecting pets, a busy start CITY COUNCIL BY COREY JOHNSON

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f the many things I love about the Third Council District, one of them is its place in our city’s history. Everyone brags about their respective district, but the Third District has some of our city’s best individual landmarks and historic districts. The Greenwich Village Historic District is one of our city’s oldest, and protecting it is of utmost importance to me. Some of my earliest actions as a councilmember were around protecting the integrity of the Greenwich Village Historic District. Applications came before the Landmarks Preservation Commission for 130 Seventh Ave. and 100 Barrow St. I submitted testimony objecting to the proposals, both of which were for new buildings that were far outside the historic context in which they were being constructed. The small amount of brick proposed for these two developments in no way outweighed the modern design elements of glass and steel on the buildings. Both would have been a scar in the Village, and could have set a dangerous precedent for future developments in the neighborhood. I was relieved when L.P.C. directed the architects and developers of these projects to go back to the drawing board to come up with designs that are respectful of their historic surroundings and fit into the context of Greenwich Village.  On a related preservation note, Councilmember Margaret Chin and I sent a letter to L.P.C. asking that specific sites in the Village and Soho that played a significant role in L.G.B.T. history ought to be recognized formally by our city. We asked that the Stonewall Inn, Julius’ Bar and the Gay Activist Alliance Firehouse all be recognized as individual landmarks, or that the reports on the historic districts in which they are sited should be amended to reflect the historical significance of these buildings. I will continue to advocate for formal

Corey Johnson.

recognition of sites that played an integral role in our city’s cultural fabric. Regarding legislation, the Council and my own office have been busy. On Feb. 26, the Council overwhelmingly passed two major pieces of legislation, both of which I was proud to co-sponsor. Councilmember Chin, with whom I have the honor of serving as co-chairperson of the Manhattan Council Delegation, introduced a bill to amend the paid sick-leave bill passed by the City Council last year. It requires all employers with five or more employees to provide earned paid sick time, and requires employers with fewer than five employees to provide unpaid earned sick time. No longer will an additional 300,000 New Yorkers have to choose between their paycheck and their health. The Council also passed a resolution in support of the city’s plan to establish highquality universal pre-kindergarten for all eligible 4-year-olds and a high-quality after-school program for middle schoolaged youth. Mayor de Blasio’s visionary proposal would provide secure funding for this program by authorizing New York

of puppies from breeders and require the pet shop to provide prospective consumers with the animal’s medical and source histories. It would also set forth minimum standards of animal care pertaining to the housing, sanitation, providing of food and water, handling, veterinary care and exercise requirements for animals offered for sale in pet shops. The Department of Health has oversight over animal welfare and the animal shelter system, and I look forward to working with that agency and my fellow councilmembers to pass these and other critical bills concerning New York City’s animal citizens. Other legislation I have introduced includes reporting on mobile food vendors, along with Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, and a bill to track hepatitis prevention and treatment efforts, jointly with Councilmembers Chin and Peter Koo.  I have also proposed legislation that would require high-rise residential buildings to install emergency communication systems in stairwells and hallways. This would allow first responders to communicate with residents, telling them to “stay or go.” The proposed law would help protect thousands of residents. The fact that emergency communication systems already exist in commercial buildings and hotels is not surprising. But unfortunately they’re not in place for thousands of city residents living in high-rise buildings that lack the systems. This legislation would fix that. And while the business of the Council takes place Downtown, my district office is also working hard to address the concerns of the community. Housing issues dominate the list of complaints: From heat and hot water problems to tenants facing evictions — we hear it all. We also help people who are having trouble navigating city agencies to address transportation issues, pension problems, and public-assistance programs.  My first months in the Council have proved challenging, rewarding and exciting. It’s an honor and privilege to represent our diverse neighborhoods on the West Side of Manhattan.

City to raise its personal income tax on incomes over $500,000. An estimated 55,000 4-year-olds would be served in the 2014-2015 school year. That number would climb to 73,000 students in the subsequent school year. Not only would universal pre-K relieve the financial burden on many young families, but it would improve the educational performance of low-income children and provide essential early-childhood education. I am proud to support this progressive policy and will join my colleagues in lobbying the governor and state Legislature to support the mayor’s plan. In February, I also introduced two pieces of animal welfare legislation. The first bill, expanding on a law that was vetoed by Mayor Bloomberg — a veto that was then overridden in my first hearing as chairperson of the Health Committee —  would redefine animal abuse for the purposes of enacting legislation to protect animals from being bought or adopted by those convicted of abuse. The second bill, which I introduced with Councilmember Johnson is city councilmember, Third District Tribeca.Trib.Pawel:Layout 1 regulate 2/18/14 5:45 PM Page 1 Elizabeth Crowley, would the sale

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TheVillager.com


As goes the city’s new mayor, so goes the Village DISTRICT LEADER BY ARTHUR Z. SCHWARTZ

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FILE PHOTO BY TEQUILA MINSKY

e Villagers like to think of ourselves and our community as something exceptional. If fact, it was the only community in the city where constituents tried to declare an independent republic. (That was in 1917 for history buffs.) And we have been, during the last 50 years, more successful than most communities at preserving our character — with a few glitches here and there. But we are not an island, and the larger political and societal setting plays a role in our ability to preserve the low-rise, people-friendly feeling that makes the Village such a wonderful place to live. The societal setting has taken the lead these past 40 years, as the desirability of our neighborhood has pushed up property values. A community once full of singers and dancers and opera singers who rented a “flat” for $100 per month has made way for 10,000-square-foot, single-family homes, and $4,500-per-month studio apartments. And Bleecker St.’s western end looks more like Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills than a bohemian mecca.

Bill de Blasio — speaking at a “Hospitals Not Condos” rally in the Village last summer — promised to listen to the community and stakeholders, but must do it, the writer says.

The 1% (and the 2% through 5%) have flocked to the Village. At least they have respected our political leanings, voting for Barack Obama in 2008 (versus Hillary), Bill de Blasio in 2013, and even electing me as district leader despite my representation of Occupy Wall Street and my generally social democratic points of view. But the mayor and the City Council

IMPACT DRIVEN ADVOCACY

leadership — the folks at the end of the land-use process in New York City, and of decisions on school funding and siting — can have a major impact. We have suffered some serious setbacks these past few years, with the loss of St. Vincent’s, its replacement with $3,500-per-squarefoot condominiums, and the approval of the N.Y.U. and Chelsea Market expansion

plans. Were it not for the dedicated push back led by the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, we would have lost a lot more. (If we were a republic, I would nominate Andrew Berman for president.) We had a mayor and a City Council speaker who never saw a development plan that they didn’t love, and it is pretty clear that the shape of our neighborhood will be greatly affected not just by what our new mayor, Bill de Blasio says, but by what he does. Here is my hope. Bill de Blasio, though he spent years as a political operative, was also someone who ran for and served on a local school board. He lived (and lives) on a block with regular people in an integrated, middle-class neighborhood. His kids go to public school. He drives his own car, shovels his own snow, and goes to the supermarket (none of which our prior two mayors did.) Both as a school board member and as a community activist, de Blasio understood the thought and passion that local people give to issues that affect their lives: landuse issues, parks, playgrounds, liquor licenses, school configuration. Members of school boards (now known as Community Education Councils), and community boards listen to dozens of people about isSCHWARTZ, continued on p. 24

Village Activist Arthur Schwartz named one of New York City’s Top Lawyers in the December Issue of New York Magazine.

We salute Arthur Z. Schwartz, rated as an AV Preeminent® Attorney by Martindale-Hubbell for 16 years, one of New York’s leading plaintiff’s employment, civil rights, civil liberties and union-side labor lawyers.

A new type of law firm, offering high-quality legal representation centered around creative, aggressive and passionate advocacy for working people, Advocacy with an Impact! New York 212.285.1400 • www.afjlaw.com • aschwartz@afjlaw.com

Fighting for Workplace Justice, Community Justice, Environmental Justice, & Economic Justice TheVillager.com

March 6, 2014

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As goes the city’s new mayor, so goes the Village SCHWARTZ, continued from p. 23

sues, and debate them thoroughly before taking a position that they believe is both “the community’s decision” and a statement of what is best for their community. Rudy Giuliani would listen — he actually had town hall meetings in every community board in the city — denounce those who disagreed with him or his staff, and then do what he wanted to do. Bloomberg took things one step further. He made sure that all the public hearings were held — sometimes even transcribed — went through the process in a pro forma manner, and then did what he pleased. For example, tens of thousands of parents attended Board of Education hearings over the last five years. This was the period when Bloomberg embarked on his program of making all schools smaller and having multiple school administrations in one building, closing and reopening failing schools, and promoting the growth of charter schools. Most often, the presence of Bloomberg’s Board of Education officials at the hearing was a tape recorder. Parents would then go, en masse, to school board meetings, become part of a crowd of thousands who would yell and scream at the board members, only to see them approve every proposal without discussion. Mayor Bloomberg never attended a public meeting of

any sort at which he could be questioned. My expectation is that under Mayor de Blasio, the public process will be RESPECTED, not just tolerated as a procedural requirement. RESPECTED means that the community’s views will have a presumption of being what the city will do unless the developer, bar owner or government bureaucrat can demonstrate convincingly why that decision is harmful or unlawful. In other words, the community would have a real voice on key issues, acting through their community boards and Community Education Councils. Getting RESPECT will mean that those endless nights at board hearings and meetings would have a meaningful purpose. Listening also would mean that Mayor de Blasio, as the chief employer of more than 350,000 people, listened to his employees in making decisions. It would mean that he would instruct administrators, at all levels, to engage their workforce as people whose opinions mattered, and whose unions were looked at as something more than as the party to negotiate wage increases and medical benefits. Mayor de Blasio certainly talked this talk when he approached unions for support. We have only had two months. Still, some alarm bells are going off. On Feb. 27 the schools chancellor, in a decision blessed by the mayor, allowed 36 of 49 school “colocations” to go forward, including the placement of 16 charter schools in over-

crowded public school buildings. (Two decisions concerning local schools, Murry Bergtraum and University Neighborhood high schools, were reversed, in the case of the former, stopping the expansion of Success Academy charter schools into School District 1.) However, Eva Moskowitz, the $490,000-per-year head of Success Academy, switched on her well-oiled P.R. machine, sucked all the oxygen out of the room and made it seem like she had been attacked because three of her 10 proposed new schools weren’t going to go forward. The reality was that parents at 34 of those schools where plans were approved were angry because they had strongly opposed the proposals. Many had supported de Blasio because he promised to respect the role of parents in the process, and no one from the new Department of Education had spoken with them before the decision was announced. De Blasio had denounced the Bloomberg process as “abhorrent,” because of its disrespect for parent associations and Community Education Councils. Yet, the new mayor made these decisions without the local consultation he had promised. For us in the Village, the filing of a notice of appeal by the city addressed to the N.Y.U. court decision was also disappointing. As a candidate, de Blasio had announced his opposition to the plan, at least in its initial form. While the city still

has time to change its mind and not file an appeal brief, it could have dealt a critical blow to N.Y.U. by not filing the notice, since it is unclear that N.Y.U. can litigate, on its own, the question of park alienation if the city accepts the lower court ruling. It would also be nice for those of us in the Village whose kids use Union Square Park to have the mayor reassess having a restaurant in the pavilion. There are a lot of wrongs to right in this city, and there are a lot of people with a long list of expectations. Yes, de Blasio withdrew the stop-and-frisk appeal, and ordered the Department of Consumer Affairs to give longtime newsstand operator Jerry Delakas a license; but there is a tendency to have a small group at the top making key decisions without involvement of the affected communities. We in the Village have a lot of concerns, and a lot of creative minds willing to contribute. The mayor has to figure out how to ask. Schwartz is a labor and civil rights lawyer and the Village’s male Democratic district leader. He has a pending lawsuit, on behalf of parent groups, Public Advocate Letitia James and Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, challenging 41 school co-locations. He also represents several of the city’s largest unions, including the Transport Workers Union and the Civil Service Technical Guild.

Focus on schools, park air rights, Meatpacking BID BOARD 2 BY DAVID GRUBER

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ust when I thought we could have a breather on Community Board 2 after working through three ULURP’s over .......the last two years and no major new ones in the pipeline, I have again been proven wrong (as are most of my predictions, although I did well with the Academy Awards). We are busy as ever with both new and continuing projects. Our new middle school at 75 Morton St. is still not 100 percent in the hands of the city, and both the Department of Education and the School Construction Authority are reluctant to begin even preliminary work and drawings until the state is out out of the building entirely. Our state and city elected officials are equally frustrated and are pressing on all sides. It will happen at some point, and as soon as it does, we will, along with parent groups from C.B. 2-area elementary schools who have been working alongside us for the past year, engage both S.C.A. and D.O.E. and begin the dia-

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March 6, 2014

David Gruber.

logue with them about how to configure the space and programs. The S.C.A. and D.O.E. people have really made a great effort to work with us, and this process can serve as a model of how government and the community can work together to produce better outcomes. We have also engaged both New York University and Councilmember Margaret Chin’s office, asking them to reopen the restrictive declaration that was imposed by the City Council on the N.Y.U. Plan 2031 ULURP. With the help of Councilmember Chin, the reopened R.D. will allow D.O.E. to have a longer opt-in period for decid-

ing whether or not to build a public school on land donated by N.Y.U. We want to revert back to the original N.Y.U. proposal approved by the Borough President’s Office and the City Planning Commission to have an opt-in period until 2025 and not the reduced 2014 window. This is a major issue for this community board. We are working with various stakeholders, including The Hudson River Park Trust, Community Boards 1, 2 and 4, the recent purchasers of the St John’s Center building, our elected officials and various community-based organization to try and work out some guidelines for transferring the air rights that the state has recently has enabled the park to sell. This will be the vehicle to finally put the park and Pier 40 on sound financial footing. This will enable making the necessary repairs to ensure the safety and viability of this major open space and recreational resource for our community. This project will occupy much of our attention in the coming year or two. The recently finalized Hudson Square Special Zoning District was almost immediately activated. Already the first two major buildings have filed for permits to build a mix of market-rate and affordable housing. This is exactly what we hoped for

in a community that is starved for affordable housing. Eventually, the building at Varick and Canal Sts. and Sixth Ave. will come online, as well, and we will have at the base of that building a new elementary school and a shared recreational facility. It’s a great start for what we hope will be a vibrant, mixed-use, residential / commercial district. One of our partners in all of this, the Hudson Square Connection BID, will be a key player in this new Manhattan “city within a city.” We are also very excited that the new Whitney Museum is also winding its way to completion. I believe  this new institution will be a game-changer for the landmarked Meatpacking District, which has evolved as a huge restaurant and bar zone, causing havoc with noise and traffic for both the businesses and especially the surrounding residential community. We are strongly advocating that the BID offer the surrounding community real seats and representation on the BID board. We have had a full, overflowing plate this year, but this board has met the challenges and will continue to do so moving forward. Gruber is chairperson, Community Board 2

TheVillager.com


All the city’s a stage, its pedestrians major players Pillsbury’s long exposures slow the urban swarm PHOTOGRAPHY © MATTHEW PILLSBURY, COURTESY BONNI BENRUBI

CITY STAGES: PHOTOGRAPHS BY MATTHEW PILLSBURY Through March 27 At Aperture Gallery 547 W. 27th St. Btw. 10th & 11th Aves. (4th Floor) Hours: Mon.-Sat., 10am-6pm Aperture recently published Matthew Pillsbury’s book, “City Stages” Call 212-505-5555 or visit aperture.org

“Sitting on the High Line, New York, Thursday, November 10, 2011.”

BY NORMAN BORDEN

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TheVillager.com

© MATTHEW PILLSBURY, COURTESY BONNI BENRUBI

atthew Pillsbury is a photographer with a unique vision of contemporary metropolitan life. For the last decade or so, he’s been taking long exposure, large format (8x10 inch film) black and white photographs that compel viewers to slow down and smell the roses, so to speak — or at least take a closer look at their urban environment. His current exhibition features 31 images selected from three bodies of his work: “Private Lives,” “Hours” and “City Stages.” Together, they illustrate how urban spaces serve as a backdrop, or stage, for a city’s source of energy: its inhabitants. With his tripod-based view camera — and using exposures that can last well over an hour — Pillsbury lets us view human activity in a palpable way. The time exposures allow us to see indi-

“Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, New York, 2011.”

viduals interacting in their bedrooms or living rooms, or the isolation they experience in front of TV or computer screens. He shows us huge, blurred crowds of people swarming against recognizable cityscapes, landmarks and interior spaces. Although most of the pictures were taken in New York, Pillsbury also photographed sites in Paris, London, Venice and other cities. Nothing is lost in translation. In the Louvre, a blurry mass of visitors crowd around and walk past the Mona Lisa — who remains motionless, still unsmiling and oblivious to her admirers. I’ve watched (and photographed) the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade many times, but Pillsbury has captured it in an unexpected and original way. His camera is perched above the crowds, with the rock-steady buildings along Seventh Avenue a stage for the blurred masses, mostly faceless because of their activity. Even more interesting are the marchers and balloon handlers directly in front. Their balloon’s movement makes it look more mysterious, while hiding its identity. “Sitting on the High Line” adds a new perspective to one of New York’s most popular and iconic destinations. Shooting at night, Pillsbury creates a new cityscape by using the sunken overlook at West 17th Street and the buildings behind them as a stage. The long exposure makes the two people sitting on the steps transparent, while the two (look closely for them) in the first row are ghost-like. One or two ghostly figures seem barely visible in the facing windows. The night setting and the graphic effect created by the crisscrossing lines enhance the image’s strength. It’s one of my favorites. The artist adds another perspective PHOTOGRAPHY, continued on p. 26

March 6, 2014

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Magnifying the details of urban existence

PHOTOGRAPHY, continued from p. 25

to the “Tribute of Light, New York,” the much-photographed twin beams of light that shine above each year to commemorate the events of 9/11. Photographing them from the Brooklyn Heights Promenade, his long exposure captures people walking past, including the tripods set up by other photographers. They’re all transformed into ghost-like figures, which add a mournful touch to a sad event. In Pillsbury’s “Screen Lives” series, the artist took long exposures of friends in their apartments while they were sitting in front of their television or computer screens. When interviewed by the

School of Visual Arts magazine, he explained that he grew up in France and wasn’t allowed to watch TV. He said, “I realized the role these objects (TV and computers) were playing and the time we’re spending with them.” He then began taking long exposures that would last as long as a TV program and show how people interact with the screen. One example is “Tanya and Sartaj Gill, CSI: Miami, New York, Monday, November 25, 2002, 10:00–11:00 p.m.” Over the course of the hour, the couple on the couch has barely moved — their empty dishes and cake plate on the coffee table, the scene lit by the TV’s glow and ambient light from outside. While the cityscape as seen from the windows

© MATTHEW PILLSBURY, COURTESY BONNI BENRUBI

© MATTHEW PILLSBURY, COURTESY BONNI BENRUBI

“La Joconde, Salle des Etats, Musée du Louvre, Paris, 2008.”

“Tanya and Sartaj Gill, CSI: Miami, New York, Monday, November 25, 2002, 10:00– 11:00 p.m.”

looks vibrant, they seem isolated from it. There’s more to see and savor in this show: images of Occupy Wall Street protesters in Zuccotti Park, the sweet joys of Economy Candy on the Lower East Side, crowds swarming among the motionless dinosaurs in the American Museum of Natural History, more images of the artist’s family life and self-portraits. Take your time. After all, Matthew

Pillsbury did. Norman Borden is a New York-based writer and photographer. The author of more than 100 reviews for NYPhotoReview.com and a member of Soho Photo Gallery and ASMP, he currently has an image from the 2013 Village Halloween Parade in the juried show, “Masquerade,” at the New Orleans Photo Alliance Gallery. See more at normanbordenphoto.com.

© MATTHEW PILLSBURY, COURTESY BONNI BENRUBI

"Dinosaur Coming to Life, American Museum of Natural History, NY, 2004."

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March 6, 2014

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Improvised exploration, no net required Lucas Pino’s nine-piece group carries the torch, and moves it forward

MUSIC LUCAS PINO: NO NET NONET March 11 & April 8, at 10:30pm At Smalls Jazz Club 183 W. 10th St., at Seventh Ave. Admission: $20 Venue info: smallsjazzclub.com Artist info: lucaspino.com

PHOTO BY MIGUEL MENGUAL

BY SAM SPOKONY

T

he nonet has long been an enticing format for jazz composers, filling that space that exists somewhere between a nimble trio and a hulking big band. Tenor saxophonist Lucas Pino is one young musician who already understands the nonet’s unique energy, having formed his first nine-piece group five years ago as a student at the New School. Now Pino, 26, is drawing attention with his No Net Nonet. The band has played monthly at Smalls in the West Village, since last summer (with a couple of breaks here and there). And aside from leading a group that showcases some of the city’s rising instrumental talent, he’s given it a very personal voice — by writing most of the material. “I want the tunes to draw people in, not push them out,” said Pino, who was emailing from his recent engagement at Jazz at Lincoln Center Doha, in the Middle Eastern nation of Qatar. “I feel like it’s popular in jazz right now to keep the audience at arms length, and I’m trying to do the opposite — to bring everyone in, because we’re all part of this music.” The nonet’s March 11 gig at Smalls will feature most of the group’s working members, with two notable subs: trumpeter John Raymond, and bassist Rick Rosato. On his own time, Rosato also plays in a fantastic trio with pianist Glenn Zaleski and drummer Colin Stranahan — two regular members of the nonet who will also be present that night, which should lead to some especially dynamic interplay from the rhythm section. Zaleski and Stranahan already play key

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Lucas Pino’s No Net Nonet, during a recent performance at Smalls Jazz Club.

roles in the No Net Nonet, Pino noted, with the pianist contributing an arrangement of Kurt Rosenwinkel’s tribute to Mitch Borden (the founder of Smalls) to the group’s repertoire, and the drummer acting as a “huge facilitator,” as Pino puts it, for the band’s tightly woven sound. “When our rhythm section is playing together, sometimes the measures just shift and glide,” the leader explained, “but essentially, everyone in the band really trusts each other. Like improv comedy, we want to always say ‘yes’ to one another — let’s go there!” Pino added that he’ll be bringing a new tune to the March 11 gig, entitled “The World Ahead,” which draws influence from one of the most iconic groups in jazz history — namely, the Miles Davis Quintet of the '60s. “It’s a picture of an imagined future,” the saxophonist said of his new music. “It’s pretty wild, and takes some unexpected turns, and it’s full of the things that just make me smile and want to shout joyfully at the band.” That feeling of navigating the unexpected is probably the most exciting part of watching a group like this perform live. And it’s not just about the budding virtuosity of these young players, as they grow and discover their powers. In this case, it’s also about the sheer tensile strength of the nonet

format, with all of its members sonically bouncing around, building and expanding upon each other’s ideas until a greater sum bursts forth out of those many parts. “Everyone is bringing their distinct personality to the ensemble and creating an entirely new sound within the band,” said Pino, who’s quick to add that, like Stranahan, Zaleski and Rosato, each member brings the sounds of their own personal projects into the mix. “Coming together, we can create something unique, compelling and new,” he stressed. “I always keep coming back to

that word, ‘new.’ It’s become somewhat of a cliché holy grail idea within the jazz idiom. But for what it’s worth, I believe in it. And I just love this band.” It shouldn’t be too hard for New York’s jazz fans — both experts and new listeners alike — to start believing in the No Net Nonet, as the group will continue its run at Smalls with another appearance on April 8. The fact is, Pino’s band is only going up from here, and now’s as good a time as any to start getting acquainted with nine of the young cats who are carrying the torch, and moving the tradition forward.

Theater for the New City • 155 1st Avenue at E. 10th St. Reservations & Info (212) 254-1109 For more info, please visit www.theaterforthenewcity.net

SOTTO VOCE The World Premiere of a new play

Written & Directed by NILO CRUZ

Featuring: Franca Sofia Barchiesi, Andhy Mendez & Arielle Jacobs

FINAL WEEKEND!!! Wednesday - Sunday, March 5 - 9

Wed-Sat at 8pm, Sun at 3pm All Seats $20 Students & Seniors $15/tdf

DAYLIGHT PRECISION

NOTHING BUT TRASH

Thurs. - Sun., March 6 - 16

(Previews March 6 - 8)

Written by DOUGLAS LACKEY Directed by ALEC HARRINGTON Thu-Sat at 8pm, Sun at 3pm

All Seats $15 Studt’s & Srs $10/tdf

Written by ANDY HALLIDAY Directed by G.R. JOHNSON

March 6 - 23

Tuesday - Saturday at 8pm Sunday at 3pm All Seats $20/tdf Tuesdays: Pay-What-You-Can

TNC’s Programs are funded in part by the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs and the New York State Council on the Arts

March 6, 2014

27


Your Local Drop Dance music around New York

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

On March 13, Julio Bashmore (a house music prodigy who began producing at age 14) appears at Output, along with fellow Brit Huxley and Berlin's Thomas Schumacher.

A product of electronic music’s golden age, Quentin Harris has achieved immense success producing R&B, hip-hop, techno and house. He’s at Cielo, on March 15.

New school Renaissance woman Honey Dijon brings her transcendent flair to Cielo, on March 15.

BY M. VAUGHAN

dle You.” These tracks have even crossed over to other genres. I once heard a footwork DJ spin a Bashmore track at seizure-inducing tempos. As he put it, “Yo, that joint is icy.” Huxley is another fellow Brit who has heavy ties to the UK garage scene. His earlier productions labels, like Tsuba and Hypercolour, propelled him into DJ booths across Europe. More recently, he has put his own watermark on deep house with a sound that incorporates lush pads, simplistic rhythms and a wink at lower frequencies. As a DJ, his mixes include cuts that cross genres: house, garage, techno — it’s all fair game. Berlin native Thomas Schumacher breaks our Brit trend — and as most DJs from Berlin do, he makes Techno. His productions are certainly less industrial than a lot of the connotations that seem to surround modern techno. Schumacher tracks enjoy radio play across the

Atlantic. Vocals and major tonalities lighten up what has become a mostly dissonant genre. Yet here, they maintain enough darkness to wake up a sleepy dance floor like aural cocaine. His show should be a blast. Thurs. March 13, 10pm. At Output (74 Wythe Ave., btw. 11th & 12th Sts., Brooklyn). For tickets ($20 Presale/ $25 Door), visit residentadvisor.com.

facebook.com/mvaughanmusic soundcloud.com/mikawvawn

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This is Webster Hall’s personal flavor of dance-party. Girls & On March 13, Brooklyn’s Output might as well be a UK club. Julio Bashmore — who, despite the ethnically ambiguous name, is actually a redheaded, red-bearded producer borne out of Bristol’s bass scene. He has enjoyed releases on San Francisco’s notoriously subwoofer-friendly label Dirtybird as well as the fun and reputable Futureboogie. The UK native has minted some tunes that are already being considered underground classics, such as “Au Seve” and “Battle for Mid-

All your favorite St. Patrick’s Day Chocolates

March 6, 2014

HONEY DIJON & QUENTIN HARRIS

In this lineup, new school meets old school. Quentin Harris is a 90’s DJ who has achieved immense success producing R&B, hip-hop, techno and house. Born in Detroit, during the golden era of electronic music, he has certainly sharpened his skills in producing and spinning in some of the most revered venues in the world. As an openly gay DJ, he has been active in the LGBT nightlife scene for decades. Recently, Harris has been making his due rounds on the NYC club circuit, dominating the booth as only a Motor City DJ can. Opening is Miss Honey Dijon, a Renaissance woman from Chicago. Known for her fashion sense as much as her music, Dijon has combined her two loves by musically catering events for brands such as Louis Vuitton and Givenchy. Her sound, like that of Harris’, transcends genre. There are accessories from R&B tied in with matching colors of Chicago and NY underground, with a flair for techno added in when need be. In addition to running her own label, Digital Disco, she has released on major labels like England’s Toolroom and Nervous. To top it all off, she is as much of a maverick as she is musician, with an unbelievably photogenic profile and a formidable social media presence. Miss Honey Dijon works. Sat., March 15 at 10pm. At Cielo (18 Little West 12th St., btw. Ninth & 10th Aves.) For tickets ($15), visit residentadvisor.com or call 212-645-5700.

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NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a restaurant wine license, #TBA has been applied for by 815 Broadway NYC LLC d/b/a The Hummus & Pita Co. to sell beer and wine at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 815 Broadway New York NY 10003. Vil: 03/06 - 03/13/2014 NY SNEAKER GAME LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/16/2013. Office loc: NY County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: P.O. Box 165, NY, NY 10033. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. Vil: 03/06 - 04/10/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF AYTA CONSULTING, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/25/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 805 Third Avenue, 15th Fl., New York, NY 10022. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Vil: 03/06 - 04/10/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 189 PKG, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/12/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Aronauer Re & Yudell LLP, Attn: Michael S. Scher, Esq., 60 E. 42nd St., Ste. 1420, NY, NY 10165. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Vil: 03/06 - 04/10/2014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a license, #1147737 has been applied for by the undersigned to sell beer, wine and/or liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 228 Front Street, New York NY 10003. Jeremy’s Ale House Still. Vil: 03/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY NAME: JAX BEACH HOUSE 28, LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 02/25/14. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 487 Greenwich Street, Apartment 7A, NewYork, NewYork 10013. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 03/06 - 04/10/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF JESSICAINMOTION LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 01/22/14. Office location: Manhattan. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to:The JessicaINMOTION LLC, 348 W 56th St New York, NY 10019. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 03/06 - 04/10/2014 747 STUYVESANT III, L.P. filed an App. for Authority with the NY Department of State on 2/13/2014. Jurisdiction: DE, and the date of its formation is 12/7/2010. Office location in NYS: New York County. The Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) is designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. The address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of such process is: Attn: Mr. Gijs vanThiel, c/o 747 Capital, LLC, 880 Third Ave., 17th Flr. NY NY 10022 The address in its jurisdiction if required or the office address: 2711 Centerville Rd., Suite 400, Wilmington DE 19808. A copy of the Articles of Organization may be obtained from Sect’y of State of DE, 401 Federal St., Dover DE 19901. The list of names and addresses of all general partners is available from the Secretary of State. The purpose of the LP is any lawful act. Vil: 03/06 - 04/10/2014 APP FOR AUTH FOR MARSDEN MEDICAL PHYSICS ASSOCIATES, LLC App for Auth filed with SSNY 02/19/2014 LLC. Registered in New Jersey on 05/04/1998 Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, c/o David Marsden, 266 Long Meadow Road, Kinnelon, NJ 07405. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 03/06 - 04/10/2014 CITYSCAPE ABSTRACT LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 02/25/2014. Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, 111 John Street, Suite 1050, New York, NY 10038. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 03/06 - 04/10/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF SKYFALL II LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/12/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 02/03/14. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 350 W. 23rd St., PHA, NY, NY 10011. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of the State of DE, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., Federal and Duke of York Sts., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/06 - 04/10/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF SKYFALL III LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/12/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 02/03/14. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 350 W. 23rd St., PHA, NY, NY 10011. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of the State of DE, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., Federal and Duke of York Sts., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/06 - 04/10/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF ARHC NPNPZNY01, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/21/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/16/14. Princ. office of LLC: 106 York Rd., Jenkintown, PA 19046. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o CSC, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/06 - 04/10/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 110 WILLIAM PROPERTY INVESTORS III, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/26/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/20/13. Princ. office of LLC: 10 E. 53rd St., 37th Fl., NY, NY 10022. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, New Castle Cnty., DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., John B. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/06 - 04/10/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF GG CGS BRAND CAPITAL LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/18/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 411 W. 14th St., 4th Fl., NY, NY 10014. LLC formed in DE on 11/12/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/06 - 04/10/2014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that license #1273366 has been applied by the undersigned to sell liquor at retail in a restaurant under the alcoholic beverage control law at 523 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10016 for onpremises consumption. 523 RESTAURANT CORP. d/b/a TED’S CORNER TAVERN Vil: 02/27 - 03/06/2014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a license # PENDING for beer, wine and liquor has been applied for by the undersigned * to sell beer ,wine and liquor at retail in a Restaurant under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 1271 Broadway unit B NewYork,NY 10001 NewYork County for on premises consumption. 2013 VENTURE CORP. DBA THE HAROLD Vil: 02/27 - 03/06/2014 EL SENOR NEW YORK LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 2/4/14. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process toThe LLC, 159 Essex St., Ste. #C, NY, NY 10002. General Purpose. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF INTIMA CAPITAL, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/11/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 3 Columbus Circle, NY, NY 10019. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 142 DUANE OWNER LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/28/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 150 E. 58th St., 39th Fl., NY, NY 10155. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANT TO LAW, that the NYC Dept. of Consumer Affairs will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday, March 26, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at 66 John Street, 11th floor, on a petition for NORMAN’S CAY GROUP LLC to continue to maintain, and operate an unenclosed sidewalk café at 74 Orchard Street in the Borough of Manhattan for a term of two years. REQUEST FOR COPIES OF THE PROPOSED REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSED TO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS, ATTN: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 03/06 - 03/13/2014

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NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 144 DEBT LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/9/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Bluestone Group, 225 Broadway, 32nd Fl., NY, NY 10007. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 151 BRUCKNER HOLDINGS LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/9/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Bluestone Group, 225 Broadway, 32nd Fl., NY, NY 10007. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 75 125TH HOLDINGS LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/9/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Bluestone Group, 225 Broadway, 32nd Fl., NY, NY 10007. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF RAD & DYLAN, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NewYork (SSNY) on 01/16/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: Rad & Dylan LLC,136W 131 st, apt-1, New York, NY 10027. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 1763 AMSTERDAM EQUITIES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/12/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Exact Capital Group LLC, 100 Park Ave., Ste. 1600, NY, NY 10017. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WINTER ART CO. LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/13/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to princ. bus. loc. of LLC: 730 Fifth Ave., 12th Fl., New York, NY 10019. Purpose: any purposes permitted by applicable law. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 158 AVENUE C REALTY LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/15/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 632 Broadway, 7th Fl., New York, NY 10012. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF MEETSNYC LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/16/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Cooperman Lester Miller LLP, 1129 Northern Blvd., Ste. 402, Manhasset, NY 11030, Attn: Barry R. Carus, Esq. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF VDK, L.P. Cert. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/4/2013. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business addr.: c/o Virginia Commander Knott Family Trust, 232 Cleft Rd., Mill Neck, NY 11765, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. available from Sec. of State. Term: until 12/2/2063. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF BTG PACTUAL COMMODITIES TRADING (US) LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/8/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 400 Atlantic St., Stamford, CT 06901. LLC formed in DE on 10/28/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC:The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF YORK MULTISTRATEGY HEDGEFOCUS FUND LP Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/7/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 11 Madison Ave., NY, NY 10010. LP formed in DE on 2/5/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LP: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF CRANBERRY FAMILY OFFICE, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/29/14. Office location: New York County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/20/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1301 Avenue of the Americas, NY, NY 10019. Address of the office to be maintained in the jurisdiction of its formation: c/o Corporation Service Company, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secy. of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/20 - 03/27/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF KV URBAN ABSTRACT, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/03/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 39 W. 37th St., NY, NY 10018. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Kensington Vanguard Holdings, LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/20 - 03/27/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF IH4 PROPERTY WASHINGTON, L.P. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/05/14. Office location: NY County. LP formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/10/14. Princ. office of LP: 345 Park Ave., NY, NY 10154. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Name and addr. of each general partner are available from SSNY. DE addr. of LP: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/20 - 03/27/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LA CENTRAL MANAGER LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/7/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 826 Broadway, 11th Fl., New York, NY 10003. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/20 - 03/27/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF AIMS SENIOR LOAN ACCESS ADVISORS, L.L.C. App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) 10/9/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 8/28/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 200 West Street, NY, NY 10282-2198. DE address of LLC: 2711 Centerville Road, Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Secy. of State, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/20 - 03/27/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF AIMS SENIOR LOAN ACCESS LP App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/9/13. Office location: NY County. LP formed in Delaware (DE) on 8/28/13. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 200 West Street, NY, NY 10282-2198. DE address of LP: Corporation Service Company, 2711 Centerville Road, Wilmington, DE 19808. Name/address of each genl. ptr. available from SSNY. Cert. of LP filed with DE Secy. of State, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/20 - 03/27/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF RS JZ GREENPOINT, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/3/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 9 W. 57th St., 33rd Fl., NY, NY 10019. LLC formed in DE on 11/12/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/20 - 03/27/2014 PREMIER ASSET LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 11/21/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Brian Pun, 2 Mott St., Ste. 402, NY, NY 10013. General Purpose. Vil: 02/13 - 03/20/2014

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANT TO LAW, that the NYC Dept. of Consumer Affairs will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday, March 26, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at 66 John Street, 11th floor, on a petition for JO_RACH, INC. to continue to maintain, and operate an unenclosed sidewalk café at 148 Mulberry Street in the Borough of Manhattan for a term of two years. REQUEST FOR COPIES OFTHE PROPOSED REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSEDTO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS, ATTN: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 03/06 - 03/13/2014

March 6, 2014

29


LINDSEY POLLAK, LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 01/02/2014. Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, 23 West 69th Street, Suite B, New York, NY 10023. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 02/13 - 03/20/2014 APP FOR AUTH FOR GREENWICH STREET HOLDING LLC App for Auth filed with SSNY 3/9/2007 LLC. Registered in Delaware on 12/27/2004 Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, c/o Vendome Property Management Co., Inc. 330 Spring Street, #1E, New York, NY 10013. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 02/13 - 03/20/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF MANHATTAN GLORY - W 37B LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/04/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/13 - 03/20/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF KEN DEVELOPMENT LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/29/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: c/o Carl Demler, 211 W. 58th St., NY, NY 10019. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/13 - 03/20/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF ORCHARD ANALYTICS, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/31/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/29/14. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Angela Ceresnie, 902 Broadway, Ste. 1611, NY, NY 10016. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/13 - 03/20/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF THREE COHENS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/16/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 250 E. 54th St., Apt. 36A, New York, NY 10022. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014

30

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF LAM FUNDS GP LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/31/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/28/14. Princ. office of LLC: 405 Park Ave., 6th Fl., NY, NY 10022. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. The regd. agent of the company upon whom and at which process against the company can be served is Jeffrey A Keswin, 405 Park Ave., 6th Fl., NY, NY 10022. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of the State of DE, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/13 - 03/20/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WALL STREET PSYCHOLOGISTS, PLLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/03/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o 132 East 35th Street, Apt. 7E, NY, NY 10016. Purpose: to practice the profession of psychology and any lawful activities. Vil: 02/13 - 03/20/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF AGI LIFESTYLE ENTERTAINMENT, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/24/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 9130 W. Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90069. LLC formed in DE on 11/27/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/13 - 03/20/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF URBAN RESTORATION, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/23/14. Office location: NEW YORK County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to:THE COMPANY, c/o Slate Property Group LLC, 850Third Ave., Ste. 16-B, NY, NY 10022, Attn: Martin Nussbaum. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014

March 6, 2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF INTEGRA SERVICECONNECT, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/29/14. Office location: New York County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 1/23/14. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011. Address to be maintained in DE: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF THE FRIENDS OF LENOX LOUNGE LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/20/2013. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: The Friends of Lenox Lounge LLC, 45 West 132nd Street, Suite 10K NY 10037 Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014

LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC) Name: 393w49 2W LLC. Articles of Organization filed by the Department of State of New York on: 01/08/2014. Office location: County of New York. Purpose: any and all lawful activities. Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: c/o Richard E. Feldman, Trustee. Sonnenschein Sherman & Deutsch, LLP, 7 Penn Plaza, Suite 900, New York, NY 10001. The duration date of the LLC is: 12/31/2070 Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF NYSANDY4 NBP22 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/21/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 60 Columbus Circle, NY, NY 10023. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF BOP MW RESIDENTIAL AFFORDABLE LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 01/29/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 250 Vesey St., 15th Fl., New York, NY 10281. LLC formed in DE on 01/16/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF BOP MW RESIDENTIAL MARKET LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 01/29/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 250 Vesey St., 15th Fl., New York, NY 10281. LLC formed in DE on 01/16/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF NYSANDY4 NBP23 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/21/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 60 Columbus Circle, NY, NY 10023. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF NYSANDY5 NBP24 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/21/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 60 Columbus Circle, NY, NY 10023. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF NYSANDY5 NBP25 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/21/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 60 Columbus Circle, NY, NY 10023. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ALCHEMY HOUSTON PARTNERS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/24/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: One Penn Plaza, 34th Fl., NY, NY 10119. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, One Penn Plaza, Ste. 3406, NY, NY 10119. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 7321 KISSENA LENDER LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/27/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 1407 Broadway, 38th Fl., NewYork, NY 10018. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BK FILM PROJECTS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/27/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 750 Lexington Ave., 28th Fl., New York, NY 10022. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BUSTER K DOCUMENTARY PROJECT, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/27/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 750 Lexington Ave., 28th Fl., New York, NY 10022. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LANDED NY L.L.C. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/12/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1 Sheridan Square, Suite #6E, NYC, NY 10014. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF GL FAMILY LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/8/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Maryellen Goble, PLLC, 302 Fifth Avenue, 8th Fl., New York, NY 10001. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF ORCA TV, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/16/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in VA on 5/22/09. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. VA and principal business address: 10717 Falls Pointe Dr., Great Falls, VA 22066. Cert. of Org. filed with VA Clerk of the Corporation Commission, 1300 E. Main St., Richmond, VA 23219. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NAME OF LLC: PPL SERVICES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 12/24/13. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Quinn McCabe LLP, 9 E. 40th St., 14th Fl., NY, NY 10016. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 118 GREENE STREET PARTNERS (NYC) LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/17/14. Name amended to 118 Greene Street Partner (NYC) LLC. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 203 N. LaSalle St., Ste. 1900, Chicago, IL 60601. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 118 GREENE STREET (NYC) LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/17/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 203 N. LaSalle St., Ste. 1900, Chicago, IL 60601. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 165 E 66 PARKING, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/29/13. Office location: New York County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 10/29/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011. Address to be maintained in DE: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Doveer, DE 19904. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secy. of State, Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 3, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF HOT FRESH PIZZA/99C LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/26/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to: 10 W. 15th ST #1822 NY, NY 10011. Purpose: any lawful act. 2220623 w.o Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF NORTHWIND RE, LLP Authority filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 1/6/14. Office location: NY County. Principal business address: 260 Madison AV, Ste 204, NY, NY 10016. LLP formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/03/14. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: 260 Madison AV, Ste 204, NY, NY 10016. DE address of LLP: 1201 Orange St, Ste 600, Wilmington, DE 19699. Articles of Formation filed with DE Secretary of State, Division of Corporations, 401 Federal Street, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF NORTHLIGHT REAL ESTATE OPPORTUNITY FUND I L.P. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/15/14. Office location: New York County. LP formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/18/13. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 64 Wall St., Ste. 212, Norwalk, CT 06850. DE address of LP: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Name/ address of genl. ptr. available from SSNY. Cert. of LP filed with DE Secy. of State, Division of Corporation, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF NINETEEN WEST REALTY COMPANY LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/03/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 11/27/06. Princ. office of LLC: c/o Solow Realty & Development Company, LLC, 9 W. 57th St., Ste. 4500, NY, NY 10019. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o General Counsel at the princ. office of the LLC. DE addr. of LLC: Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ERIN HYNES INTERIORS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/7/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 660 White Plains Rd., Ste. 615, Tarrytown, NY 10591. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF MOLTON BROWN USA LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/30/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/27/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o The Corporation Trust Company, Corporation Trust Center, 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801, also the address to be maintained in DE. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WEST 87 PARTNERS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/13/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 1325 Franklin Avenue, Ste. 255, Garden City, NY 11530. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WALCOTT SHOE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/24/04. Office location: New York County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1536 3rd Ave., 3rd Fl., New York, NY 10028. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF AGR EUROPE LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/7/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 1/6/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Angelo Gordon & Co., L.P., 245 Park Ave., 26th Fl., NY, NY 10167, principal business address. DE address of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF AG OWL GP LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/7/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 1/6/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Angelo Gordon & Co., L.P., 245 Park Ave., 26th Fl., NY, NY 10167, principal business address. DE address of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014

TheVillager.com


Just Do Art

PHOTO BY JIM CHOW

COURTESY OF JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY & THE ARTIST

Richard Mosse: “Vintage Violence” (2011, 72 x 90 in.). Part of the “Fly Zone” group exhibit, on view at Westbeth Gallery through March 16.

L to R: Talia Lugacy, Monique Vukovic and Grant James Varjas in “the Shape of Something Squashed.”

BY SCOTT STIFFLER

lines drawn on beeswax-covered paper to depict a series of children at play. Armed only with a jump rope, her carefree figures transcend culture, politics and all manner of oppression. Free. Through March 16, 1-7pm daily, at Westbeth Gallery (155 Bank St., enter through courtyard btw. West & Washington Sts.). For info, visit flyzoneshow. com, christophermorrisphotography.com, richardmosse.com, martharosler.net, elliottsharp.com, nicholesobecki.com, claudiavargas.net and mariangoodman.com/ artists/lawrence-weiner.

GROUP EXHIBIT: FLY ZONE

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COURTESY OF VAGA & THE ARTIST

Living in an age of interconnectivity and information overload has done little to awaken the global consciousness, when it comes to reducing the toll war takes on its youngest victims. But greed, anger and theft of resources haven’t shattered the “joyful innocence that children carry within them” (according to the organizers of this Westbeth Gallery exhibit). With work both subtle and graphic, seven artists navigate the “Fly Zone” — a contradictory realm in which both inhumanity and resilience exist. That’s hardly the only irony at work here, though. In a series of photographs taken during President Obama’s 2009 address to the nation regarding the addition of 30,000 troops into Afghanistan, Christopher Morris looks upon the “hollow sea of gray” and wonders if the stoic West Point cadets are about to receive Karmic payback for the Russian counterparts “we, America, killed by shooting their helicopters out of the sky” three decades ago. “How would we feel today if the Russians were supplying stinger missiles to the Taliban?” On the same walls, Nichole Sobecki takes a nine-month-old boy — who has just died of severe acute malnutrition — on his mile-long funeral procession from a South Sudan refugee camp to a makeshift burial site. Richard Mosse shoots the eastern Congo conflict with Kodak Aerochrome infrared film — a discon-

Claudia Vargas: “Rope Jump IV” (2013, Charcoal & beeswax on etching paper, 56 x  42 in.). Part of the “Fly Zone” group exhibit, on view at Westbeth Gallery through March 16.

tinued military surveillance technology developed for camouflage detection that keeps the flesh of soldiers as is, but transforms the surrounding greenery into a vibrant landscape of lavender, crimson and hot pink. Bringing a contrasting perspective to these disturbing images, Claudia Vargas uses charcoal

THEATER: the SHAPE OF SOMETHING SQUASHED

A high-strung leading lady, a playwright in need of funding and an aging, once-promising actor: these usual suspects of the greasepaint circuit are certainly a motely crew. But hardwired insecurities, a script of dubious quality and the loss of a legendary star who was the ace in the hole for a looming backer ’s audition aren’t enough to quash their dreams. Whether driven by love for the work, love of self or the simple fact that they’re far too damaged to find gainful employment beyond the footlights, Tom Noonan’s latest play has sharp claws — and a genuine soft spot — for those who’ve spent their lives in the theater. He should know. After three decades spent shepherding original works to the stage, longtime East Village resident Noonan closed his Paradise Factory doors in 2012, for a two-year renovation. Un-

like the desperate, abovementioned thespians who pin their hopes on a cash infusion from coked-up hedge fund types, real-life “Something Squashed” playwright/director Noonan funded his theater ’s $4-million upgrade (a second performance space, vastly improved facilities and room to rehearse!) with a grant provided by the City of New York. Fellow taxpayers, rest assured that it was money well-spent — just as “the Shape of Something Squashed” seems (from the script we were given) to be a solid bet for getting a rich return on your investment of time. Packed with emotionally fragile schemers and dreamers who’ll do anything to ensure that the show goes on, this warts-andall depiction is a decidedly unglamorous inaugural production for the new, much-improved Paradise Factory. It would have been easier to launch with a revival that celebrated past glories. But Noonan and his colleagues (a cast of equally accomplished Factory regulars) take a far more challenging path: lay bare what makes these people tick, and ask for little if any sympathy. By the time the curtain comes down, you may not be cheering for the choices they make — but you’ll at least admire their ability to take a hit, absorb the shock and keep on moving. Through March 16. Wed.-Fri. at 8pm, Sat. at 7:30 & 10pm and Sun. at 5pm. At the Paradise Factory (64 E. Fourth St., btw. Bowery & Second Ave.). For tickets ($30), call 866-411-8111 or visit paradisefactory. org. March 6, 2014

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ACCOUNTING PROCEEDING FILE NO. 2012-2866/A CITATION THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK TO:

Unknown Distributees, Attorney General of the State of New York, Lois Ann Siferd, Janet Swartz, Margaret Malone.

And to the heirs at law, next of kin and distributees of Mary-Jo Vogelsang, a/k/a Mary Jo Vogelsang, if living and if any of them be dead, to their heirs at law, next of kin, distributees, legatees, executors, administrators, assignees and successors in interest whose names and places of residence are unknown and cannot, after diligent inquiry, be ascertained by the petitioner herein; being the persons interested as creditors, legatees, devisees, beneficiaries, distributees, or otherwise in the estate of Mary-Jo Vogelsang, a/k/a Mary Jo Vogelsang, deceased, who at the time of her death was a resident of 2 Washington Square Village, New York, New York 10012. A petition having been duly filed by the Public Administrator of the County of New York, who maintains an office at 31 Chambers Street, Room 311, New York, New York on 10007. YOU ARE HEREBY CITED TO SHOW CAUSE before the New York County Surrogate’s Court at 31 Chambers Street, New York, New York, on April 1, 2014, at 9:30 A.M. in Room 503, why the following relief stated in the account of proceedings, a copy of the summary statement thereof being attached hereto, of the Public Administrator of the County of New York as administrator of the goods, chattels and credits of said deceased, should not be granted: (i) that her account be judicially settled; (ii) that the above named person(s) be cited to show cause why such settlement should not be granted; (iii) that a hearing be held to determine the identity of the distributees at which time proof pursuant to SCPA Section 2225 may be presented, or in the alternative, that the balance of the funds be deposited with the Commissioner of Finance of the City of New York for the benefit of the decedent’s unknown distributees; (iv) that the Surrogate approve the reasonable amount of compensation as reported in Schedules C and C-1 of the account of proceedings to the attorney for the petitioner for legal services rendered to the petitioner herein; (v) that the persons above mentioned and all necessary and proper persons be cited to show cause why such relief should not be granted; (vi) that an order be granted pursuant to SCPA Section 307 where required or directed; and (vii) for such other and further relief as the Court may deem just and proper. Dated, Attested and Sealed. February 11, 2014. (Seal) Hon. Rita Mella, Surrogate. Diana Sanabria, Clerk of the Surrogate Court. Schram Graber & Opell P.C. Counsel to the Public Administrator, New York County 22 Cortlandt Street, 16th Floor New York, NY 10007 (212) 896-3310 Note: This citation is served upon you as required by law. You are required to appear. If you fail to appear it will be assumed that you do not object to the relief requested. You have the right to have an attorney-at-law appear for you and you or your attorney may request a copy of the full account from the petitioner or petitioner’s attorney. Vil: 02/20- 03/13/2014

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March 6, 2014

SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK -- COUNTY OF NEW YORK – MARIA CRISTINA CASANOVA, Plaintiff, Against VLADEMIR BUCHEL, Defendant - SUMMONS WITH NOTICE -- Index No.:307460-13Plaintiff designates New York County as the place trial, the basis of the venue is Plaintiff’s residence: 445 East 14th St. #1D, New York, NY 10009-- ACTION FOR DIVORCE TO: VLADEMIR BUCHEL - YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to appear in this action by serving a notice of appearance on the Plaintiff within 30 days after the service of this summons is complete and in case you fail to appear judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demand in the notice set forth below. NOTICE: The nature of this action is to dissolve the marriage between the parties, on the grounds: DRL§170(7)-Irretrievable Breakdown in Relationship for at Least Six Months. PURSUANT TO the Uniform Rules of the Trial Courts, and Domestic Relations Law §236, Part B, Section 2, the parties are bound by certain automatic orders which shall remain in full force and effect during the pendency of the action. For further details you should contact the clerk of the matrimonial part, Supreme Court, 60 Centre Street, New York, NY 10007 tel. (646)386-3010 TO: VLADEMIR BUCHEL The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an order of the Hon. Carol E. Huff a Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, dated the 23 day of January, 2014 and filed with the supporting papers in the Office of the Clerk of the County of New York. Dated: Jan. 23, 2014 New York, New York – Maria Cristina Casanova, Plaintiff Pro Se DRL 255 Notice. Please be advised that once the judgment of divorce is signed in this action, both parties must be aware that he or she will no longer be covered by the other party’s health insurance plan and that each party shall be responsible for his or her own insurance coverage, and may be entitled to purchase health insurance on his or her own through a COBRA option, if available.

Vil: 02/20- 03/06/2014

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Continued from p. 10

convenient? When will the truth ever be told? I believe the four Washington Square Park Conservancy founders — Betsey Ely, Gwen Evans, Veronica Bulgari and Justine Leguizamo — may have started out “wellmeaning,” as The Villager editorial (perhaps too kindly) portrays them. But they allowed themselves to collude with city Parks Department officials and deceive the public, their neighbors, again and again. It’s time for the ladies to separate themselves from the city’s Parks Department — they are very much connected to it by “sharing” an employee — and act as an independent entity, without special privileged, insider ties (which they have now), part of what makes this “arrangement” so troubling. It’s time for them to make themselves as public as possible, and also to offer an apology to their neighbors — and to the park. They need to go back to the level of existing groups, like the Washington Square Association, and raise money but be given no control — or possible future control — over the park. In addition, the Parks Department owes the public an apology for Parks’ officials role in promoting this deception to the public. I hope C.B. 2 will now take this matter of Washington Square Park and who controls this public space very seriously. The public and this iconic park deserve more. Cathryn Swan Swan maintains the Washington Square Park Blog

Working too hard

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E-mail letters, not longer than 250 words in length, to news@thevillager.com or fax to 212-229-2790 or mail to The Villager, Letters to the Editor, 515 Canal St., Suite 1C, NY, NY 10013. Please include phone number for con-

firmation purposes. The Villager reserves the right to edit letters for space, grammar, clarity and libel. The Villager does not publish anonymous letters.

Casey White

Ted’s tender care To The Editor: Re “Uncle Ted’s is putting a modern spin on Chinese food” (news article, Feb. 13): Recovering from an illness, I suffered a near-blackout at Uncle Ted’s. I tried to keep it cool, but they could tell something was off, and the entire staff was extremely solicitous — which, even in my haze, I greatly appreciated. Good, caring people! Gene Borio

A way to fund pre-K To The Editor: The governor and the mayor may be able to compromise on pre-K funding by granting the city limited taxing authority to cover only any verified funding deficit not covered by state funds. A budgetary mechanism for financing along these lines might be difficult to achieve, but the goal of universal full-day pre-K is worth the effort. Jules Kohn

Ray just keeps on rolling CLAYTON

PHOTO BY CLAYTON PATTERSON

To The Editor: Re “They’re work horses” (letter, by Olga Humphrey, Feb. 13): I’m not a member of NYCLASS. Just saddened by the anachronistic spectacle of depressed, withdrawn horses in our streets, denied a healthful, natural life — for our “entertainment.” I know horses. This issue isn’t about whether or not horses enjoy working. It’s specific to dense conurbations like 21st-century New York City, no longer safe for horses — and where carriage horses have nothing but relentless work: seven days a week, heavy pulling in dangerous streets — noise, crowding, asphalt, fumes, fearfulness — and too-cramped stalls. No turnout to pasture with other horses; no setting hoof on grass, prisoners to our desires. Work shouldn’t preclude welfare. Clayton Patterson fears we’re nature-deprived; horses must never be.

Smoothie, Spotty, Juliet, Misty and 15 other carriage horses died from accidents, collapse, work-related ailments, and 46 people were seriously injured — that we know — from 1982 through 2009. Charlie died in the street in 2011, but the fates of most horses involved in accidents or collapse are withheld from us. We do know that “nose-to-tailpipe” toil on asphalt in extreme weather and humidity induces lameness (from arthritis, hoof problems, infections, tendon issues), heat stoke, respiratory distress. These and hardship can shorten their lives. Some carriage horses are harshly overworked. Some end up at kill auctions. “Nine hour workday”? Work restrictions (hours, temperature, breaks, watering) are routinely transgressed; and the ASPCA has relinquished monitoring duties. With only one exception, every poll for years has shown the majority favor a ban on carriage horses. Homes and sanctuaries await them all (per ASPCA and Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries). New Yorkers care. It’s time to free them.

How time flies — and cigarette prices rise — when you’re serving up delicious fries. Ray a.k.a. Asghar Ghahraman, above in 1992, recently marked the 40th anniversary of running his “candy shop” on Avenue A at Seventh St. He turned 81 on Jan. 1. His holein-the-wall store is the go-to spot for tasty snacks that hit the spot. After a night on the town, revelers flock by for freshly made beignets or Belgian fries with the choice of an array of toppings, from cheese to chipotle sauce. Of course, there are always the popular standbys, like chili-cheese hot dogs, egg creams and lime rickeys. In the summer, Ray has the best soft-serve ice cream and frozen yogurt on Avenue A.

March 6, 2014

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Mophie Juice pack plus PHOTOS BY TEQUILA MINSKY

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If you can just imagine it… The Cooper Square Committee recently hosted an audience test screening of the still-in-progress documentary film “It Took 50 Years: Frances Goldin and the Struggle for Cooper Square.” Directed by Ryan Joseph and Dave Powell, below right, the film chronicles a Lower East Side community struggle that spanned five decades, in which residents fought a sweeping urban renewal plan for a 12-block area from Ninth St. to Delancey St., envisioned their own community-driven alternative plan, and ultimately saved their homes. The film also explores the life of Frances Goldin, a Cooper Square Committee cofounder, organizer and literary agent, whose clients include Barbara Kingsolver and Mumia Abu Jamal, as well as the late Adrienne Rich. At the event, Goldin, 89, also signed copies of the recently released “Imagine: Living in a Socialist USA,” which

she co-edited and which contains essays by the likes of Michael Moore and Angela Davis. During a Q&A with Goldin and the filmmakers, Goldin pointedly stressed that “only The Villager” covered the story when, in 2012, members of the Cooper Square Mutual Housing Association — in roughly 300 co-op closings — were finally able to purchase their units for, as one activist described it, the “jaw-dropping price” of $250 apiece. Based on a Northern European model, it’s the first mutual housing co-op in New York State. Also at the screening, along with many community activists, were Valerio Orselli, the M.H.A.’s executive director, who enjoyed the free popcorn, below left, as well as academics Frances Fox Piven and Tom Angotti, who appear in the film. The screening was held at the Cooper Square M.H.A. office, at 59 E. Fourth St.

119 W 23rd St • 212.929.3645 • tekserve.com TheVillager.com

March 6, 2014

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MARCH 6, 2014, THE VILLAGER