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Introduction

To introduce a number of Indonesia’s potential products which are spread in almost every province, TREDA has organized a series of effort to collect and analyze the relevant information related to the potentials and specific advantages of each of the products.

With pride and joy, TREDA offers this booklet, entitled “Indonesian Silver: Dazzling the Imagination“, to readers who wish to know more about the relevant information. Indonesia is a country with rich cultural heritage and long tradition of metal craftsmanship. This booklet presents an exploration of the history and characteristics of silver crafts as well as its splendor and ingenuity.

Indonesia, with a rich cultural heritage offers the world variety of silver craftsmanship for the people to enjoy. The readers will find interesting background information around this attractive product. A better comprehension on its background will enhance the readers’ awareness and knowledge of these attractive Indonesian silver jewelry and silverware.

We sincerely hope that readers would enjoy this booklet as much as we have in preparing for its publication.

Muchtar D Director General

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Trade Research and Development Agency (TREDA)


Minister of Trade Republic of Indonesia

Message

It is our great pleasure to share with you one special type of numerous product lines belonging to Indonesian creative industries, in this particular case, silver. As a country situated at the cross-road between two oceans and two continents, Indonesian culture displays a unique mix shaped by long interaction between original indigenous customs and multiple foreign influences. Each design of Indonesian silver is unique and has its own story. The creativity of Indonesian people has given birth to numerous attractive art forms.

Silversmithing has run through generations and generations. Each production center in every silver city has its own specialty in making silver design. The success of Indonesian silversmiths in producing traditional and contemporary silver designs has served as the driving force for the revival of Indonesian industry. The basis of the advancement is international competitiveness which is mainly focused on quality and design.

This book has been developed to improve Indonesian share in world market. This booklet presents background information on Indonesian silver crafts for the readers to appreciate. Dedicated to everyone that appreciates the beauty and attractiveness of Indonesian silver, this book will give vivid images of the elegant atmosphere created from Indonesian sterling silver.

Mari Elka Pangestu

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6 Indonesian Silver


CONTENTS

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8 Indonesian Silver


Silver in Human History Silver was one of the first metals used by human being. Silver has always been a valuable metal ever since it was discovered long ago before 4000 BC. Its popularity has done nothing but grow steadily throughout the ages as it possesses a unique ability to be able to keep with the current fashions of the times.

Silver has been used in the currency of many countries and powers of the world. However, the basic most notable use of silver is its beauty and appeal as an item of jewelry. The art of metal work arrived in Indonesia in the Bronze Age from Southern China and Southeast Asian areas. The Chinese are said to have improved refining of silver around 2500 BC to make it even more charming and sought after, as well as easier to excavate. Bronze drums, dated from as early as the fifth century BC, have been found throughout the archipelago, and some of them are believed to have been cast in Bali. Indeed, the most famous of these drums, the massive Moon of Pejeng, still rests in Bali on a temple pavilion in the village of Pejeng. The drums were cast in the lost wax style and in stone molds. Beads of glass, carnelian, shell, silver, gold and other metals have been found in Bronze Age sites as well.

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The earliest metal jewelry was primarily copper with some gold, silver and “suwasa�, which is one part gold and two parts copper. Metal age graves reveal gold necklaces, hairpins, beads and rings. Initially, raw gold made its way to Indonesia from China and India but eventually gold was found in Sumatra, which became famous for its jewelry and dagger hilts.

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In Indonesia, the people of Sumatra and Java had been practicing rice cultivation with irrigation and the use of the buffalo-drawn plow. The accumulation of wealth which ensued encouraged the refinement of many art forms, including jewelry making. By AD 1000, gold and silverwork in Java had reached a level of artistry as high as that of the bronze caster. The abundance of


gold was documented by a Chinese trader who reported in 1225 that Javanese criminals, except for thieves and murderers, were not imprisoned or subjected to corporal punishment but fined in gold. The word “sterling” has been used to mean high-quality silver since the 1200s. At that time, the coins of England had decreased in value and contained only a little silver. The only European coins that contained large proportions of silver, were those made by the merchants of the Hanseatic League, a group of trading cities in Northern Germany. These coins were called “Easterlings” to distinguish them from the low-silver alloy coins of England. English speech contracted “Easterling” to “Sterling”. The quality of silver known as sterling later became used for commercial silver as well as for coins. The standard for English sterling was set in the 1500s by Queen Elizabeth I. It is now accepted as a standard all over the world. During the new world era in Indonesia there has been a significant influx of silver and goldsmiths from the island of Java. Modern Javanese silversmiths specialize in fine filigree work, a style of shiny flat surfaces and clean, streamlined joints. In contrast, Balinese silversmiths specialize in granulation, in which minute spheres of silver are arranged in beautiful geometric patterns. Many designers today want motifs that combine the Javanese and Balinese traditions. Accommodating them requires cooperation and cross training. Silversmiths craft many art objects from silver. The metal is also used by the electrical and equipment industry for wire and other items, because silver conducts electricity better than do other metal. Doctors use thin plate, wires and drainage tubes made of silver during surgery, because silver helps kill bacteria. Silver compounds also have many uses. Compounds of silver include silver nitrate, silver bromide and several silver oxides. Silver nitrate is one of the few water-soluble silver compounds, and is used to make silver plate and silver mirrors. Silver bromide plays an important role as the light-sensitive chemical in photographic film. Manufactures of batteries use silver oxides in small, powerful batteries that are used in calculator, hearing aids and watches. With all the mining of silver throughout the world came different styles and different ways to wear silver. Silver has always been known to enhance the beauty of precious stones such as diamonds when they’re set into a ring or necklace. Many powerful men and women throughout the ages would wear magnificent silver jewelry items to show off their power. In every generation the “Master Smith” would select from his apprentices those best qualified for training necessary to be a jeweler or silversmith. The less skilled craftsmen stayed in the “minor leagues” and became blacksmiths or bronze workers.

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The Fine Art of Silverwork The uniqueness of Indonesian craftsmen is in their skill, which is passed from generation to generation. Traditional craftsmen in one village usually have expertise to produce similar crafts. Because a lot of people run similar crafts, a village would develop to become a craft center. Besides choosing various crafts, buyers and art devotees can enjoy natural scenery or the uniqueness of a village, and they can also watch directly the process of craft making.

Characteristics of Silver Silver occurs in the metallic state, commonly associated with gold, copper, lead, and zinc. It is also found in some 60 minerals including: argentite (a sulfide), cerargyrite (a chloride), many other sulfides and tellurides. Silver has many names, French called it Argent similar with the Italian named it Argento or Latin word Argentum and Spanish word for silver is Plata. Silver can be hammered into sheets so thin that it would take 100,000 of them to stack an inch high. It can be drawn into a wire finer than a human hair. It is this ductility (or ability to be formed) that makes silver the wonderful art form that it is.

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Silver can be shaped by hammering, spinning, or drawing - it can be decorated with etching, chasing, or engraving - sterling silver is the queen of metals. There is no substitute. Through the centuries, the silversmith or goldsmith has, by a process of elimination, become the most highly skilled craftsman in the world today.


Articles of sterling silver are solid silver through and through. Sterling is 925 parts out of a thousand pure. Silver stamped “sterling” must be 925 parts of pure silver in every thousand parts of metal. The additional 75 parts out of a thousand are to add stiffness and durability as pure silver is quite soft. Sterling is the most hygienic metal known to man. It has actual germ killing properties. It is also the most durable art form and the most economical purchase that can be made for the home. Sterling silver grows more beautiful with the passing years, never wears out, and can be passed along as part of a heritage that grows stronger with passing generations.

Indonesian silverworking is so refined, as seen in this highly elaborate and elegant ornament in a kris, a traditional Indonesian dagger, usually used by aristocrats for their mythical powers and symbolic meanings.

General silverwork process The production of a piece of high-quality silverware involves many steps. The process begins with an artist’s design. Working from the design, silversmith makes a steel tool called a die, which forms sheets of metal into desired shapes. The shapes are then trimmed, buffed to remove any roughness, and polished repeatedly o bring out the metal’s natural luster.

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A Model

A Steel Die

Trimming

Polishing

Created by carving a design from sketch into clay or plaster. It will serve as the pattern for the die

For every piece is carved by hand. A blank piece of silver is pressed into the die to imprint the design

To remove excess silver from around the edges of the piece

Rubs out small imperfections. The piece is held against to rotating wheel and policed with oil.

Cosmetic Treatment

Final Inspection

Rubbing the piece with powder to bring out shimmering highlight

Ensures that the finished piece is free from flaws.

Types of Silver There are two types of silver craft in general; Filigree and Solid Silver. Filigree or silver wire is a silver product that is made from silver wire and created or formed to be miniature, jewelry or accessories. Solid silver craft was made from solid silver or silver bar of 100% pure silver and 7,5% copper are mixed into one, it is then pattered to get a bar with 92.5 % of silver level. It is the best standard level in making silver crafts. Please note that 100% pure silver cannot directly be used to make silver objects, as it can caused the final results to become unqualified, loose and fragile. In general there are three stages in silver craft process of production: material preparation, production and finishing. However among those three stages there are detail of process of each stage and the sequences in production stage can be differ between silversmith in each silver production center. In order to make good quality of silver craft, good quality of material is needed. These materials are pure silver--a grain of 99.9% silver; copper, to be added because pure silver might be too soft; silver powder (made from mixed copper and silver), the function is to connect or stick silver; and alum to boil and clean silver craft in finishing The first step of making silver craft is to make silver bars by mixing silver and copper. This ob-

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ject would be mixed into kowi (fushion bowl) and boiled in melting stove until the silver and the copper melted and mixed and then poured into casting mould to form a silver bar. There are two types of silver bars: small and big silver bars. Small silver bar formed a cylinder with diameter of 1 cm and lenght of 15 cm. These small bars are used to make filigree. Big silver bars in the form of square with 2 cm thickness and 15 cm length and 4 cm width are used to made solid silver.


15 Through the centuries, the silversmith or goldsmith has, by a process of elimination, become the most highly skilled craftsman in the world today.

Indonesian Silver


Filigree Silver Products From the small silver bar, the next step was to make silver fiber using press machine to get the correct diameter. Then the bars had to be minimized using the draw plate to get certain diameter fiber. Draw plate is stainless bar with holes, each holes has different diameter. This process need to be done many times to get the expected diameter of fiber, from thin fiber until thick fiber. From the process above, the silversmith gets very soft silver fiber. It needs to be twisted using twist wheel to be a wire (thicker fiber). These silver wires are the material used for making silver craft. The next step is to make design using the brass plate. The wire is used to build pattern according to the design. The silver then must stickled on thin paper such as greaseproof paper. It will be poured by silver powder all over its surface according to its motif and melted by solder. These processes need to be done very carefully in order to get the high quality of silver design. The filigree silver is ready to be crafted according to the original masterpiece design. All process need to be done fast otherwise the silver fiber/wire will be influent, only high skilled silver smith can make it.

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Solid Silver Products First thing to be done is to make a big silver plate. Silver bar needs to be hammered to get suitable width and thickness. To make it softer, the silver is pressed by press-machine. After getting the wanted size, the next step is drawing a motif using pencil. Then, cut the silver and hammered it to get arc shape or wanted curved. The silver is ready to be crafted with other silver pattern or to be carved or filled by jabung then carved according to the design (depend on the model and design). To design a motif on silver, we can use pencil and by using hammer and carving nail we can carve the silver. The whole process needs very accurate and detailed design, wrong doing causing difficulties in repairing silver. After carving jabung, it has to be pulled out by melting it then soften it by sandpaper to clean and to enlighten we use polished machine. Finally silver product is ready. After silver product is ready, it needs to be cleaned in order to wash dirts from burning and soldering. To clean the silver, we need to boil and burn it again to re-enlighten the color of silver. To whiten the color, boil it using alum. Or use Lerak fruit to wash it until we get the sparkling color and polish it again using polishing machine.

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Silver Treatment It is very easy to clean silver for treatment. You can use silver polish or detergent or foam of lerak fruit. First, soak the silver in hot water for 5 minutes. Then brush it with detergent or lerak foam. Using soft tooth brush, scrub it gently. Last, rinse under running water and dried it well. Silver is ready to use. Silver tarnishes when exposed to air. This occurs more quickly in damp weather, but is inevitable in any climate. Store your silver in treated cloth (or tissue paper treated with silver nitrate will deter tarnish) or lined cabinets, never in plastic bags with rubber bands. Polishing silver while wearing rubber gloves promotes tarnish. Instead, choose plastic or cotton gloves. Silver has enemies, rubber, corrodes silver and it can become so deeply etched that only a silversmith can repair the damage. Raised designs can be lost permanently. Avoid using storage cabinets or chests with rubber seals, rubber floor coverings or rubber bands to wrap your silver items. Other enemies of silver include salt, olives, salad dressing, eggs, vinegars, fruit juices. In other words do not mix acid and Silver. Silverware may be washed in a dishwasher but the patina on fine silver or silver plate can only be enhanced by the rubbing that occurs when washing and drying by hand. Hollow handles may be loosened with exposure to heat and detergent in the dishwasher. If washing sterling silver and stainless steel flatware in the dishwasher do not put in the same basket section or let one metal touch the other, or the silver may be permanently damaged. To clean off tarnish, coat the silver with tooth paste, then run it under warm water, work it into sfoam and rinse it off. For stubborn stains or intricate grooves, use an old soft bristled tooth brush. You don’t have to buy an expensive commercial polish unless you want to. Fine whiting, available at paint stores makes an excellent polish. Dampen a soft cloth with a little ammonia or denatured alcohol (flammable), dip it in whiting and apply like any other polish.

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Variety of Sparkling Silver

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Silverware The first man-made spoons were made from wood, bone or horn. Wood was, for the longest time, the material of choice. Knife and spoon were considered personal property and were carried by each diner in a special pouch that was attached to the belt. To eat solid food, people used their fingers or the tip of the knife. During the Middle Ages, in the monasteries, eating habits began to change for the better. In the Renaissance, people began to rediscover some of the pleasures of life, influenced largely by contact with the Orient. Eating was elevated to new heights. The fork is the youngest member of the silverware family, originated in the Orient. It has been on our dinner table only for the last few centuries. The knife’s history dates back to the Stone Age, when it was used for hunting as well as for eating. Liquids were drunk by hunters and gatherers who used hollow-shaped natural products, such as shells. People who knew how to cook were in demand. Carving (done with fork and knife) became an art form, and eating utensils were decorated. Silverware also changed: it became lighter, knife tips became more rounded (the fork had taken over the job of piercing), and knife handles became longer. In later centuries people began to consider knife, fork, and spoon as a set and decorated them accordingly, manufacturing a dozen or more of them at a time. It became a custom to give a set of silverware to each guest. The introduction of coffee and tea encouraged social gatherings, which in turn resulted in new pieces of silverware: coffee, tea, and mocha spoons, sugar tongs and cookie tongs. Many of the special utensils that are still in use today came into being during the Renaissance, such as fruit, dessert, fish, oyster forks and soup ladles. It seems as if the history of silverware is also the history of our culture. Food is not only one of life’s necessities, but it is also one of life’s most pleasurable experiences. You can create an elegant atmosphere in your dining room by decorating it with silver tableware. Sterling tableware is divided into two categories called flatware and hollowware. Flatware

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is the “knife, fork, and spoon” category of silver as hollowware means the bowls, dishes, candlesticks, etc. You can find any kind of silver products in Indonesia. With high skilled silversmith, every product can be made as you wish.


Silver Jewelry Sterling silver jewelry personifies the individualistic approach to style. It can be casual and comfortable and, at the same time, elegant and timeless. An opulent choker, elegant pendant or hair ornament of traditional white or pastel colored pearls set in sterling silver are luxurious and fashionable gifts the groom might consider giving the bride. Sterling silver wedding rings are also very popular right now. Surprise the bridal party with delicate silver and stone drop or stud earrings, a classic bangle bracelet or hoop earrings updated with pearl accents, or a simple strand of pearls or beads with a personalized charm. Accessories to be worn on the wedding day are particularly appropriate, but choose items that will be used and enjoyed after the festivities are over. Sterling silver adds elegance to any occasion and the frequent use of sterling actually reduces tarnish and helps it to develop a glow or patina, which enhances its beauty. It used to be thought that only women were interested in shopping, especially in the area of jewelry and accessories—but no more. Men are becoming the largest growing segment of shoppers behind the traditionally strong female shopper and the increasing teen population. Men’s interest in silver accessories and jewelry is on the rise. And since the old adage “clothes make the man” is true, it’s also true that accessories make the clothes. Not only are men shopping for gifts, but there has also been an increase in men’s jewelry purchases for themselves. Sales of men’s sterling silver jewelry and accessories are on the rise, with cufflinks being most popular. French cuff shirts are back in fashion, calling for dressier, upscale, as well as refined novelty cuff links and stud sets in cigar, martini, automobile, golf, computer and many other motifs. Men have indulged in the silver craze and are shopping for accessory items such as sterling silver key rings, money clips, collar stays and belt buckles. Especially popular are pieces that celebrate

a

hobby or favorite sport. Luxurious looking sterling cigar, pen, bar and

d e s k

accessories are also status collectibles.

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Modern Application of Silver With its appealing, cool and crisp white luster, sterling silver jewelry combines the endurance of a precious metal with mysterious ability to adapt to fashion’s demands. Silver’s pure white color is flattering to all skin tones. The unlimited selection of designs available, from modest and traditional to bold and dramatic, allows you to build a vast and personalized silver jewelry wardrobe as varied as your every mood, style and budget. In Indonesia , silver products from Kotagede, Central Java, vary from accessories product, utility product to decorative product. Silver products from Celuk, Bali, mainly concentrate in accessories product and tableware. Modern application of silver has a huge variety nowadays. The applications not only limited to jewelry but also spread as unique and exclusive ornaments for many items. Many silversmiths make combination between silver and other unusual raw material like cockle, wood or fossils in order to create masterpiece of silver craft. Sterling silver is an important part of the holiday season. It adds shine to a tabletop, serves as the perfect gift and complements festive and glamorous holiday attire. You can create a winter wonderland by dusting the table with artificial snow and decorating it with silver candlesticks. Combine festive green and red candles and a glitter of ornaments. Let your own creativity make for a party that dazzles. Go silver for sparkle.

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The Development of Indonesia Silver Centers Indonesia with its history has left the people with many traditional arts, including silversmithing. Since long time ago the development of silver business has showed a good sign. Some towns even declare themselves as the original silver town however since the business is rising, many other towns try to follow and has made its success story.

Silver Centers in Indonesia Silver Center Center of Silver Craft

Regency

Province

SME

Gianyar

BALI

20

Center of Silver & Brass Craft

Kulungkung

BALI

31

Center of Silver & Brass Craft

Karangasem

BALI

45

Center of Silver Craft

Yogyakarta

YOGYAKARTA

30

Center of Silver Craftmen

Yogyakarta

YOGYAKARTA

253

Center of Gold & Silver Craft

Ponorogo

EAST JAVA

26

Center of Silver Craft

Lumajang

EAST JAVA

30

Center of Gold & Silver Craft

Hulu Sungai Selatan

SOUTH KALIMANTAN

49

Center of Gold & Silver Craft

Mataram

WESTERN NUSA TENGGARA

115

SOUTH SULAWESI

24

NORTH SULAWESI

31

Center of Metal/

Silver Craftmen Pangkajene Kepulauan

Center of Gold & Silver Craft

Manado

24

Source: www.sentrakukm.com

Indonesian Silver

Beside names of silver centers mentioned above, there are still many other silver centers unrecorded scattered in Indonesia provinces.


Kotagede

Filigree is typical Javanese silver crafts with traditional and complicated design that cannot be found elsewhere.

It is about 5 km southeast of Yogyakarta to reach an old town called Kotagede. This old town was the center of Islamic Mataram Kingdom. Even until today the historical proof of the Mataram Kingdom exist, such as old buildings, the palace gate and Sapto Renggo cemetery (where the first king of Mataram kingdom buried). Besides the old building and the inheritance ancient from Islamic Mataram Kingdom, peoplecould also see the other historical inheritance which were well taking care from time to time such as the art of making silver craft. Kotagede with its silver crafts, which is widely known by local as well as overseas consumers. It has become a sort of brand image to the tourists paying a visit to Yogyakarta. What’s more interesting is that its making process of silver jewelry is still in traditional way with typical Yogya carving style. Long before being known as a center for silver craft, Kotagede was once the capital city of the first Mataram Kingdom. The first king named Panembahan Senopati received the land that was still in the form of deep and wild jungle called Alas Mentaok from the Pajang Sultanate. Silver craft developed in order to fulfill the needs of jewelry and other accessories for the King and King’s relatives.

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In the 16th century, the East India Company (Verenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie - VOC) first made their venture in Yogyakarta and they had placed orders for household articles made


up from gold, silver, copper and brass from Kotagede’s craftsmen. Since the order for silver craft were increasing, the Dutch Government built a special institution to keep and to enhance the quality of silver craft. The institution gave training of the technique of making silver craft and developed the market. The institution was called “Stichting Beverdering van het Yogyakarta Kent Ambacht”. The silversmith can be found everywhere in Kotagede. Start from Kotagede market to the town’s Great Mosque, shops are seen offering their various silver products. There are at least four types of products: filigree (its texture with holes), inlaid work (with stuck out texture), casting, and handmade like rings and pendants. Filigree is typical Javanese silver crafts with traditional and complicated design that cannot be found elsewhere.

Most Kotagede’s silver craft ornaments are under the influence of well-known batik cloth motives. The prices vary depending not only on size, weight, but also the artistic values and complexity in the making process. The silversmith has run through generations. Formerly the craftsmen were only a few in num-

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bers, merely it was because that they meant to meet the king and his family’s orders for jewelry and other accessories only. But nowadays, the business has recorded a very fast growth. However, the thing that remains unchanged until today is its typical characteristic on how they make their craft products simply by relying on hand skill.


Bali The Majapahit Empire of Java began colonizing Bali in the 14th century. (The Majapahit imposed a caste system on Bali with themselves on top and the original inhabitants of the island on the bottom). By the beginning of the 16th century Bali became a sanctuary for Hindus forced out of an increasingly Islamicized Java. As the Majapahit Empire crumbled, there was a huge influx into Bali of Javanese noblemen and craftsmen, and Bali became one of the main centers of precious metal craft.

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The area where most of Bali silver products originated is in the outskirts of a village called Celuk. Celuk has a tradition of metal work that stretches back many generations. Its craftsmen catered to aristocrats in the nearby court town of Gianyar and the noble houses of Sukawati and Ubud. Historically, the Royal Courts of Bali were avid patrons of the arts, which they used as expressions of their sacred and temporal power. The Dutch sea captain Arnoudt Lintgens, who visited the court kingdom of Gelgel in east Bali in 1597, was impressed by the lavish display of exquisitely fashioned gold ornaments including parasol fittings, lances and daggers. The Balinese have several traditions concerning the origin of goldsmiths. Ancient Hindu lontars (books of inscriptions written on leaves of the lontar palm) tell of the mythical history of the arts. In one, the gods are sent to Earth to teach men civil behavior. The god Mahadewa trained the goldsmiths and silversmiths while Sang Citra gave them specific instruction in jewelry making. Smiths who worked with precious metals were called, “pande mas,” goldsmiths, from then on. In another inscription, a Brahmin from Majapahit named Empu Sari first taught the Balinese to work gold. Yet another calls the first goldsmith Sang Mangkukuwan, eldest son of Vishnu. Although most smiths come from the lowest ‘sudra’ caste, Balinese metal smiths have always been held in awe. The word ‘pandai’ means both ‘smith’ and ‘clever’. A group of smiths from Singaraja, in the northern part of the Island, trace their line back before the immigration of the Majapahit Javanese. Another clan of smiths consider themselves as direct descendants of Brahma, the fiery Hindu God. The symbolic importance of precious metals in Hindu cosmology is reflected in the belief that the triple peaks of Mount Meru, the abode of the Gods and the center of the world, are made of gold, silver and iron. Balinese smiths still produce beautiful gold ornaments for domestic use but the majority of production is silver work for the export market. International demand has grown so rapidly that new centers of production have sprung up in Denpasar and Kuta. In recent years, Celuk has absorbed young people from diverse backgrounds who train and work side by side with others whose families have been working with precious metals for hundreds of years.

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It’s quite complicated to trace back historical backgrounds of Celuk, a famous center for silver craft in the resort Island of Bali. Silver craft in Celuk has started with the ancestors of Soroh Pande clan. They crafted jewelries in the form of hairpin made up of silver and gold, which were used


for traditional rituals. But, due to soaring gold price and material scarcity, the jewelry for ritual purpose had been supplanted with those made up of silver, whose price was relatively cheaper. And since then, silver has been used to substitute material for making other sort of jewelries. The earliest Balinese silver jewelry designs were copies of traditional gold jewelry. The Balinese use beautiful repose silver bowls and implements for their temple offerings but for jewelry they prefer gold, and would rather go without than wear silver. As a result, silver jewelry developed only recently and has always been an export product. As the market for silver grew, there was pressure to diversify and motifs from many cultures were quickly diffused through the community of smiths. The use by artisans of multicultural motifs is an ancient practice. Gold jewelry found from early Egypt, Greece, Phoenicia, Persia and later Rome, all display motifs borrowed from one another. While in the ancient world migration and Phoenician traders were responsible for slowly diffusing ideas, the process has become almost instantaneous with the advent of television, airplanes and fax machines. Today, buyers come to Bali from all over the world. Designers flock to the island as well. They are drawn by the sympathetic environment as much as by the skill of the craftsmen. Bali seems to nurture creativity. Silver craft from Bali is different from other towns, it has more contemporary style as mixed between traditional and western style. Well noted from I Nyoman Rupadana the Head of Gianyar Silver Association, there are many serious buyer eager to learn Indonesian language in order to be able to communicate well with the silversmith and in return it also force people to learn English to be able to communicate with the buyer.

Bali Export HS 711311 JEWELRY AND PARTS THEREOF, OF SILVER

(US$)

60.000.000 40.000.000 20.000.000

Bali 2003

2004

2005

2006

2007 Source : Ministry of Trade / ITC

Bali Bombing caused a huge effect in doing silver business in Bali, many producers lost orders. However, the touch of Balinese style in silver craft is having its own charm. It did not take a long time for silver business to return to life. Nowadays, many of home industries produce works for foreign designers, but the creative process is always a collaboration in which the influence of the Balinese craftsmen is readily apparent in the finished product.

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Lombok Similar to the development of crafting of gold and pearl in West Nusa Tenggara, silver craft also experience significant growth. The escalating number of existing silver home industries, especially in Lombok Island, are supporting each other for finesse in terms of quality and designed product. In general, silver craft in Bumi Gora is made for accessories and ornament of gold and pearl. This potency recieves the support from the provincial government of West Nusa Tenggara and also the local district government in the form of intensive construction through training. This training is given so that all craftsmen have additional knowledge about the production process in crafting silver. Though there are several famous silver towns in Indonesia, West Nusa Tenggara products can still compete against other silver products from other areas. Strive to come up with difference unique design and newest innovation, silver from West Nusa Tenggara can make good market penetration in and abroad. West Nusa Tenggara as centre of pearl development has made a great synergy with silver craft industries. Silver craft home industries can be found in Lombok Island such as in Sekarbela, Kamasan and Monjok in Mataram; and also in Sakra and Pancor in east Lombok. So far there are 410 silver home industries registered with 1000 workers. West Nusa Tenggara as centre of pearl development has made a great synergy with silver craft industries

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Lumajang Lumajang own the pre-eminent product promising to be developed. Silver product from Lumajang has been known better in and also abroad for its wellness in design and also its quality. The production capacity reach a minimum of 8 tons of silver annually and has been exported through Yogyakarta and Bali. Top 3 biggest foreign buyers for Lumajang silver are Canada, Australia and Japan. Pulo, Gesang, Besuk and Jokarto is some of silver villages in Lumajang. There are many silversmiths in Desa Pulo, Kecamatan Tempeh, Lumajang, East Java. Though in this village the order of silver craft is merely up and down, the production is still exist. Even now the silver fever has spread to other villages.

No Silver Centre

Village

District

1

UD Lokananta

Besuk Village

Tempeh

2

Putut

Besuk Village

Tempeh

3

Alkafi

Pulo Village

Tempeh

4

Arjosilver

Pulo Village

Tempeh

5

Rooby Silver

Gesang

Tempeh

6

Jumarto Siver

Jokarto Village

Tempeh

7

Maghfiro Silver

Jatisari

Tempeh

8

Karya Abadi

Gesang

Tempeh

It started from one famous silversmith from Desa Pulo named Iskak who opened his first silver business in 1940 with only 7 workers helping him. He brought this village into success as silver producer and won an award from the government. Slowly but surely, silver home industries develop to more serious and sustainable source of income for people in Desa Pulo. Now there are 296 registered home industries with more than 1100 workers. You can find silversmith in every houses in Desa Pulo, Lumajang, East Java.

31 Indonesian Silver


Jagalan, Bantul Not so far from Yogyakarta there is Bantul Regency, located in the middle of southern side of Yogyakarta Province which has a quite prospective potency to be developed. One of them is Silver Craft Center located in Jagalan Village. You will find two attractive things when you are walking in Jagalan. First, you will find many shops that sell silver crafts, second you will look ancient buildings. It is not surprisingly, because in past time Jagalan was a city of kingdom and Islam Mataram Palace. Seemingly, Bantul government realizes much of the region potency and builds Jagalan as silver craft center and tourism village then.

Jagalan is a region, which is located in Banguntapan district, Bantul. Most people work as silver crafters. The beauty of its silver craft has been known well either internal or external country. It is proved by a lot of orders from internal country, such as Bali, Jakarta and Yogyakarta. While from outside the country, those orders are from America, Italy, Singapore, Thailand and Japan. “We always have orders, either internal or external country�, Samsudin, one of success crafters in silver craft world says. There are more 40 silver crafters who use 5 kilograms of silver bars every month at that area. Most of silver crafters at Jagalan never get formal education of silver craft knowledge. According to Mulyati Hartowiyono, who is also silver crafter, they got their expertise hereditarily and from

32 Indonesian Silver

experience of reading silver craft book. The products are various such as rings, bracelet, necklace, pendant, earrings, brooch, wall decorations, miniatures such as kereta kencana (golden cart), becak (pedicab), dokar (cart pulled by horse), kapal (ship), animal, etc. The product price is vary, start from Rp 3.000 for a ring, to Rp 1.600.000 for big wall decoration.


Kotogadang Kotogadang is actually a small village located close to one of the most famous tourist attractions in West Sumatra, Ngarai Sianok. The village belongs administratively to the IV Koto (Ampek Koto) district of Kabupaten Agam. The predominant local ethnic group is Minangkabau. This village can be reached by a half an hour walk through the canyon from Bukittinggi or with a local bus via Galudua juncture in Koto Tuo on the road to Lake Maninjau, which is only two kilometers from Koto Gadang. Many households are also involved in the production of embroider and silver. There are many houses with a signboard ‘Silverwork’ in front of it. From word of mouth, silverwork has been started since the epic Pagaruyuang era. When sailing through country Langkasuka, King’s crown fall to the sea. With the science and its skill, Kotogadang craftmen succeed to make its duplicate. The King was so happy have the crown back. This story is representing the eldest source of early silversmith in Kotogadang. Silver craft has become source of income for long time ago. Its consumer came from middle to upper social class. As a gold and silver smith, the craftmen can have promising life. In the 18th century, all craftsmen were included in “Majelis saudagar yang dua belas” ( an association for businessman) and had a very respectful place. Silver has been used as substitute from gold but nowadays the user of silver is progressively increasing and type of silver products is vary. Famous businessman from kotogadang like H.M Syarif, H. Jaafar opened artshop in Bukittinggi, Medan and Jakarta. They also followed international exhibition, all token of appreciation can be seen in Amai Setia building Kotogadang. Today, Amai Setia Foundation is the center of Silver Crafts from all silversmiths in Kotogadang. Type of silver craft is varied with very good quality control. The designs are taken from nature, such as animal, plant and flowers, this is in line with Minangkabau philosophy that nature is the teacher. The art shop provide souvenir for tourist like bracelet, ring and other small product besides traditional products of Kotogadang such as ampiang pendant, manic batanak. Only high skilled silver smith is able crafting the traditional Koogadang products. Silver craft has faced up and down season. The Golden age has gone, the first trial happened in 1930 because of economy crisis almost all craftsmen suddenly jobless. To counter

33 Indonesian Silver


The design of Minangkabau silver taken from the nature such as animal, plant and flowers, this is in line with Minangkabau philosophy that nature is the teacher

the situation Kotogadang citizen established Kotogadangsch Filigrain Wok (KFW) or Kotogadang Silver Company. The first organization had 70 members and obtained capital from sale of stocks. This quick action gave a great impact, a lot of improvement and craftsmen can be saved. Unfortunately, the Second World War has made the good progress change into quick fall. Then many craftsmen started to sell their products to third party directly without through KFW. The third trial on 1998 has made the situation even worse, economy crisis and serious fog problem causing a drop in the number of tourists to West Sumatra, and therefore a reduced revenue.

Blitar Manual labor with enough potency that developed by Blitar regency is cananga oil, coconut sugar, wood lathe, nuts chips and silver jewelry. From all of the five kinds of commodities, the ones that can reach export markets are cananga oil and silver jewelry. Cananga oil is mostly sold to European countries (France, England, Germany), America, Japan, Singapore. The silver jewelry are bracelets, earrings, rings, necklaces and brooches, which are mostly marketed to Australia,

34 Indonesian Silver

New Zealand and Japan.


Jakarta As the capital of Indonesia, Jakarta is also the main gate for many buyers who look for Indonesia products. Though it is unknown to ordinary people, Jakarta has a strong silver industry. Mostly working in jewelry making, Jakarta houses some of the country’s most advance silver workshops. Unlike other provinces which have silversmiths that are steep in tradition, Jakarta is modern. Its industry is a result of creativity and forward-looking vision of its leading players.

Jakarta Exports of Silver Jewelry HS 711311 (US$)

20.000.000 15.000.000 10.000.000

DKI Jakarta

5.000.000 0 2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

Source : Ministry of Trade / ITC

One of the unique brands born out of this creative process is Batik Silver. Fully produced and designed in Jakarta, Batik Silver is an innovative way of connecting modern jewelries to the ancient cultural root of the people. Living up to its name, Batik Silver takes traditional batik motives like Kawung and Parang, usually found in cloth, and implement them in rings, necklaces, and earrings. Batik Silver is nearly unknown in domestic market. The producer designed it to cater to foreign and upscale taste. All of their productions are exported to established markets in Europe and North America.

35 Indonesian Silver


Jambi Jambi, the island of Sumatra is known as Suarna Dwipa or the Island of Gold. Therefore the local government is trying hard to arouse awareness among craftsmen to be more creative. It used to be tourist came to Jambi wanted to get local ornament all they could find was only angso duo motive. Nevertheless, it was the old story. Now Jambi’s ornament is more diverse with special Jambi’s pattern. The local government through National Craft Council in the province gives full support to all gold and silversmith to get new ideas and more creative by organizing training and follow handicraft event.

Kendari Kendari is located in South East Sulawesi. In this city you will find a silver craft with the name Kendari Werek. Mostly the people work on silver jewelry related to cultural need. However, to meet the customer need, they also make jewelry for souvenir purpose. The skill of making silver is brought by a man with the name of Jie A Woi from Kwang Tong province, China, back to more than 100 years ago. She is inspired by a spider when he first time created a silver craft. A Woi product was very famous. One of his customer is Queen Elizabeth from England and Queen Wilhelmina from the Netherland who ordered his product. As appreciation for Jie A Woi work, in the middle of 19th century the Queen sent certificate of appreciation to him.

36 Indonesian Silver


37 Indonesian Silver Modern elegant bracellets designed by Runi Palar has been exported to the world.


Indonesian Silver Centers

KOTOGADANG

JAMBI PALANGKARAYA LOMBOK

JAKARTA

38 Indonesian Silver

BLITAR YOGYAKARTA

LUMAJANG GIANYAR


Regency

Province

Gianyar

BALI

Kulungkung

BALI

Karangasem Yogyakarta

BALI YOGYAKARTA

Ponorogo

EAST JAVA

Lumajang

EAST JAVA

Hulu Sungai Selatan Mataram

SOUTH KALIMANTAN WESTERN NUSA TENGGARA

Pangkajene Kepulauan

SOUTH SULAWESI

Manado

NORTH SULAWESI

MANADO

KENDARI

39 Indonesian Silver


Indonesian Silver in Trade

40 Indonesian Silver


Since 1987, Indonesian export has been dominated by non oil and gas. The change is due to some new deregulation and policies issued by the Indonesian Government. These deregulation and policies have enabled the producers and exporters of non-oil commodities to improve and increase their production and export. In 1998, the value of non oil and gas reached 83,88 percent of total Indonesian export including exports from creative industry. After the economic crisis, Indonesian export has risen again. For the last five years, Indonesian export has shown an increasing trend. In 2007 the Indonesian government through Ministry of Trade started to give more support to creative industry which is part of non-oil and gas commodities. This creative industry is commodities that rely on human skills. Indonesia owns diversity in culture and heritage, that is very competitive than those of foreign designs. That is why business units especially in the field of jewelry are asked to increase competitiveness by creating design innovation in order to follow market demand. Many countries can make silver jewelry or silverware but handmade Indonesian silver for both jewelry and silverware; Indonesia has its own beauty.

Top 20 Producers of Raw Silver Materials in 2007 (millions of ounces)

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20.

Peru Mexico China Chile Australia Poland Russia United States Canada Kazakhstan Bolivia Sweden Argentina Indonesia Turkey Morocco Iran India Guatemala Uzbekistan

112.3 99.2 82.4 62.0 60.4 39.5 38.0 37.3 25.8 22.7 16.9 9.4 8.5 8.2 7.5 7.1 3.1 2.9 2.8 2.8

Source: The Silver Institute

41 Indonesian Silver


History of Silver Price From the table bellow you can see the silver price reaches the highest price in 2007 per ounce from the last 10 years. It means doing silver business worldwide is still promising.

Historical Silver Prices from 1997 - 2007 London Fix (US dollars per ounce)

Year

High

Low

Average

16

2007

15.82

11.67

13.39

14

2006

14.94

8.83

11.57

12

2005

9.23

6.39

7.22

2004

8.29

5.50

6.65

2003

5.97

4.24

4.85

2002

5.10

4.24

4.60

6

2001

4.82

4.07

4.37

4

2000

5.45

4.57

4.95

2

1999

5.4811

5.0315

5.2182

1998

7.8100

4.6900

5.5442

Source: The Silver Institute

10 8

0 1996

1998

2000

2002

2004

2006

2008

The predicate of silver jewelry producer has long been stuck to Indonesia that has exported the products to numerous major markets in the countries around the world, such as Singapore, the United States, Hong Kong, Germany, United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Japan, Italy and Denmark. Data from International Trade Center (ITC) suggests that Indonesia ranked 14th in the world as exporter of articles of jewelry and parts thereof, silver, whether or not plated or clad with other precious metal (HS 711311). In the United States, world’s largest importer of silver jewelry products, Indonesia sat at 6th rank of supplier after Thailand, China, Italy, Mexico and India. Indonesia also ranked 6th as jewelry supplier to Hong Kong, while in Italian market, Indonesia ranked 9th, in German and the UK market, Indonesia ranked 10th, and in Japan’s market, Indonesia ranked 15th. Today, Mexico and Peru still produce the most silver in the world. Australia comes in a distant third. It’s said that 1/5 of all the silver in the world comes from Mexico. Silver occurs in deposits

42 Indonesian Silver

of native metal and as silver ores. Native silvers mines provide only a small amount of the world’s silver. The most common silver ores contain the mineral argentite or the compound silver sulfide. Silver often occurs along with such metal as copper, gold, lead and zinc. Mining obtain 80% of the world’s silver as by-product of mining and processing these metal.


Global Supply and Demand of Silver From the demand side, Western countries still rank high on the list of consumers, with US topping the list. On the supply side, the fabrication of silver jewellerry and silverware is dominated by Asian countries with more than half of world production.

Top Ten Jewelry Consuming Countries (Milion ounces)

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

USA

46.7

46.1

49.6

51.8

52.6

53.7

India

24.8

28.9

19.7

19.2

11.1

14.7

Germany

10.2

10.7

11.0

11.7

11.8

12.0

Italy

10.5

11.3

11.3

11.6

10.9

9.5

Mexico

6.8

7.1

8.2

9.3

8.9

9.1

Japan

5.2

5.8

5.8

6.1

6.6

7.0

UK & Ireland

3.7

4.5

4.9

5.1

4.9

5.1

France

3.9

4.1

4.1

4.5

5.0

5.0

Poland

3.1

2.7

2.5

3.2

3.5

3.9

Canada

2.6

3.1

3.2

3.4

3.4

3.6

Source : The Silver Institude

World Silver Fabrication : Jewelry and Silverware (Million ounces)

COUNTRY

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

Europe

86.2

77.0

71.9

70.4

66.7

61.5

North America

28.4

27.4

29.3

32.4

33.2

33.5

Latin America

2005

4.5

4.1

3.9

4.0

4.3

4.6

Middle East

13.7

11.6

12.5

13.3

14.1

13.2

Indian Sub-continent

76.3

96.1

68.2

67.9

41.5

43.3

East Asia

53.6

58.6

60.1

67.2

72.7

74.4

Thailand

30.8

32.7

32.3

36.2

36.9

36.8

China

9.1

11.5

14.3

17.1

20.5

22.6

South Korea

4.9

4.6

4.5

4.6

4.7

4.7

Indonesia

3.7

4.7

4.0

4.1

5.2

4.5

Other East Asia

5.0

5.0

5.1

5.2

5.4

5.8

Africa

1.2

1.1

1.1

1.2

1.2

1.2

Oceania

0.8

0.7

0.8

0.7

0.8

0.7

CIS

1.5

1.9

2.4

3.2

4.2

5.1

266.2

278.5

250.2

260.3

238.7

237.5

WORLD TOTAL

Source : The Silver Institude

43 Indonesian Indonesian Silver Silver


Indonesian Export by Country of Destinations Top five Indonesian destinations for Indonesian silver jewelry are Singapore, United States, Germany, Hongkong and Thailand.

JEWELRY AND PARTS THEREOF, OF SILVER HS: 711311 COUNTRY SINGAPORE

2003

2004

(in US $)

2005

2006

2007

15,083,804

11,949,418

11,424,394

14,794,427

20,502,110

UNITED STATES

3,824,564

5,942,671

19,238,255

14,131,181

17,921,027

GERMANY

1,036,552

2,103,351

1,245,818

1,378,404

5,109,694

HONGKONG

2,476,642

1,180,199

222,223

476,553

6,245,257

THAILAND

189,436

304,083

561,821

2,100,820

3,060,398

UNITED KINGDOM

586,177

1,137,752

1,047,641

708,973

1,126,440

THE NETHERLANDS

428,452

535,428

465,612

695,069

957,442

ITALY

347,320

317,999

657,604

795,079

861,186

TURKEY

-

14,759

108,243

946,230

1,108,514

JAPAN

351,325

137,916

278,855

311,691

826,747

Others

901,141

1,419,315

1,755,310

1,763,844

3,020,058

25,225,413

25,042,891

37,005,776

38,102,271

60,738,873

Total

Source: Indonesian Central Bureau of Statistics

BASE METALS CLAD WITH SILVER, NOT FURTHER WORKED THAN SEMI MANUFACTURED HS: 710700 (in US $)

COUNTRY

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

226,482

925

1,977

527

14,573

JAPAN

11,323

389

-

12

228,371

FRANCE

43,275

30,879

1,208

12,065

-

-

-

1,448

18,869

21,995

77

13,825

654

71

15,559

252

60

2,191

2,810

17,348

ITALY

1,936

325

6,877

8,596

2,617

SINGAPORE

8,198

-

-

302

3,015

98

270

2,300

7,784

-

-

-

-

487

5,997

UNITED STATES

GERMANY THE NETHERLANDS AUSTRALIA

44 Indonesian Silver

NETHERLANDS ANTILLES BRAZIL Others Total

15,033

4,006

4,093

7,858

2,869

306,674

50,679

20,748

59,381

312,344

Source: Indonesian Central Bureau of Statistics


JEWELRY AND PARTS THEREOF, OF SILVER HS: 711311 COUNTRY

(in US $)

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

15,083,804

11,949,418

11,424,394

14,794,427

20,502,110

USA

3,824,564

5,942,671

19,238,255

14,131,181

17,921,027

GERMANY

1,036,552

2,103,351

1,245,818

1,378,404

5,109,694

HONGKONG

2,476,642

1,180,199

222,223

476,553

6,245,257

THAILAND

189,436

304,083

561,821

2,100,820

3,060,398

UK

586,177

1,137,752

1,047,641

708,973

1,126,440

SINGAPORE

THE NETHERLANDS

428,452

535,428

465,612

695,069

957,442

ITALY

347,320

317,999

657,604

795,079

861,186

-

14,759

108,243

946,230

1,108,514

351,325

137,916

278,855

311,691

826,747

TURKEY JAPAN OTHER COUNTRIES TOTAL

901,141

1,419,315

1,755,310

1,763,844

3,020,058

25,225,413

25,042,891

37,005,776

38,102,271

60,738,873

Source: Indonesian Central Bureau of Statistics

Indonesian Export by Province There are many silver craft centers in Indonesia scattered in many towns and cities, however not all of them can export on their own through their local government. The gate for export mainly comes from Indonesia big cities and it also creates a longer value chain for the silver industry itself. The tradition of jewelry craftsmanship has vaulted Indonesia to the position of 10 world’s biggest jewelry exporters for especially silver jewelry category. Indonesian jewelry craftsmanship mainly stems from Kotagede, a small town in Yogyakarta Province and Celuk, a small district in Gianyar Regency, Bali. Both give their best silver jewelry products contribution to Indonesia.

SILVER, SEMIMANUFACTURED HS: 710692 PROVINCE D K I JAKARTA R I A U LAMPUNG

(in US $)

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

4,260,059

973,233

-

1,115,390

1,487

-

3,240

-

-

20

-

184,790

-

-

-

CENTRAL JAVA

9,528

4,908

8,000

-

-

EAST JAVA

7,051

1,083

-

-

-

105

3,990

-

6

-

4,276,743

1,171,244

8,000

1,115,396

1,507

B A L I Total

Source: Indonesian Central Bureau of Statistics

45 Indonesian Silver


JEWELRY AND PARTS THEREOF, OF SILVER HS: 711311 (in US $)

PROVINCE B A L I D K I JAKARTA EAST JAVA

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

18,903,844

17,346,252

18,352,565

28,575,012

41,918,487

5,071,350

5,602,539

12,002,967

8,113,179

18,364,609

702,975

1,921,135

6,478,215

1,405,626

418,307

-

11,565

-

-

36,172

431,216

5,682

14,176

3,776

1,242

3,074

5,251

21,464

-

56

SOUTH SULAWESI CENTRAL JAVA NORTH SUMATERA EAST KALIMANTAN SOUTH KALIMANTAN D.I. YOGYAKARTA

-

-

78

-

-

1,153

-

-

-

-

34,101

11,343

12,709

-

-

-

-

107,527

-

-

EAST NUSA TENGGARA

-

116,899

-

-

-

R I A U

SOUTH SUMATERA

23,022

-

130

672

-

PAPUA

1,390

-

-

-

-

-

-

466

2,029

-

J A M B I LAMPUNG CENTRAL KALIMANTAN Total

-

22,225

15,479

1,792

-

53,288

-

-

185

-

25,225,413

25,042,891

37,005,776

38,102,271

60,738,873

Source: Indonesian Central Bureau of Statistics

BASE METALS OR SILVER, CLAD WITH GOLD, NOT FURTHER WORKED THAN SEMI MANUFACTURED HS: 710900

(in US $)

PROVINCE

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

D K I JAKARTA

2,444

307

-

5,582,309

65,265

38

-

487,845

2,765,433

9,148

90,073

-

-

-

3,199

B A L I

46 Indonesian Silver

EAST JAVA R I A U Total

-

-

-

240

-

92,555

307

487,845

8,347,982

77,612

Source: Indonesian Central Bureau of Statistics


BASE METALS, SILVER OR GOLD, CLAD WITH PLATINUM, NOT FURTHER WORKED THAN SEMIMANUFACTURED HS: 711100 PROVINCE

(in US $)

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

D K I JAKARTA

-

-

-

-

21,467

CENTRAL JAVA

-

-

-

-

134

SOUTH SULAWESI

-

-

-

33,896

-

R I A U

-

-

242,659

3,850

-

B A L I

15,936

70

5,988

5,876

-

1,961

1,965

-

-

-

17,897

2,035

248,647

43,622

21,601

EAST JAVA Total

Source: Indonesian Central Bureau of Statistics

ARTICLES OF SILVER (OTHER THAN JEWELRY), WHETHER OR NOT PLATED OR CLAD WITH OTHER PRECIOUS METAL HS: 711411 (in US $)

PROVINCE

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

3,647,858

2,409,775

4,127,804

7,785,014

1,542,829

EAST JAVA

212,477

152,110

104,287

66,823

138,782

D K I JAKARTA

B A L I

460,851

219,213

315,100

300,481

115,783

D.I. YOGYAKARTA

3,505

4,653

11,523

15

2,595

NORTH SUMATERA

6,251

-

-

-

-

-

3,322

-

-

-

WEST SUMATERA R I A U CENTRAL JAVA LAMPUNG CENTRAL KALIMANTAN Total

-

36,004

-

-

-

7,440

1,878

3,089

571

-

-

1,984

-

2,187

-

3,128

-

-

-

-

4,341,510

2,828,939

4,561,803

8,155,091

1,799,989

Source: Indonesian Central Bureau of Statistics

47 Indonesian Silver


48 Indonesian Silver Silver Indonesian


Unique Selling Points of Indonesian Silvercrafts Quality Advantages of Indonesian Handmade Silver Silversmiths are very skillfull, resulting hand made products that are high in quality and art. Also, several silver cities in Indonesia have their own superiority. These cities are tourist destinations which will ease the promotion cost of the handicraft itself. Tourist with a purpose in doing tour only could also do business with the locals.

Availability of Skilled Craftsmen All silversmiths gain experience and knowledge from training and apprenticeship that has been done from generation to generation, therefore it is not odd if silver art shop businesses are businesses that run from generation to generation until several generations. In some cases it has reach the 5th generations as silver entrepreneur. In every silver town, it is easy to find skillfull craftsmen. This business has its own charm even for the youngsters. In every silver town, training always given by the community to keep and increase silversmith availability.

Various Types of Unique Design The Unique Selling Point of all Indonesian silver is the traditional touch that will never be found elsewhere. Many places in the world also make silver jewelry and silverware but Indonesian traditional motifs exist only in Indonesia. Even from one town to another, it has different cultural motif related to its history. From the jewelry, houseware and many other modern application of silver, there must be traditional touch that gives more value.

Availability of Raw Material The increasing value of world silver actually indicates a promising sign for silver handicraft industry. Fashion trends that use a lot of silver complexities nowadays also give opportunities and resulting in the silver handicraft product demand. Indonesia which is number 14 as silver producing countries in the world supposedly open the opportunities for silver craftsmen in receiving basic materials and produce more silver products.

Challenges Not all craftsmen realize the importance of international certification for product process (ISO) and in registering their patent design for silver products, resulting in the design being patent by other craftsmen from other countries. Continuity of supply of basic silver materials presents an obstacle for many craftsmen. Longer lead time in process production is also another problem, because most silvercrafts from Indonesia are hand-made.

49 Indonesian Silver


Classic problems occur in almost every small and middle enterprise (SMEs) in Indonesia: the problems are lack of capital and product distribution or marketing. Foreign entrepreneur seems to be more powerful than local entrepreneur because they have mastery of the distribution channels which the local doesn’t have. As a result many talented local people end up as an employee for the foreigners. Basic silver materials that keeps fluctuating is also a challenge of itself and the validation of VAT 10% in buying basic materials through an appointed companies (ANTAM) also burden craftsmen. Craftsmen financial readiness also varied, therefore financial capital is also the main obstacles. Even though VAT 10% doesn’t apply to export products but craftsmen have to pay VAT 10% at the beginning when buying basic materials and not all craftsmen understand the real export procedure on whether they could request restitution for VAT paid. The domestic politics and security instability gives a significant effect to the continuity of silversmith because most of silver cities are also tourist destinations. This result in a decrease of tourist and a decrease of handicraft silver profit. Silver craft business really relies on foreign buyers. This is proven by the movement of foreign buyes to other countries like Thailand, China and Vietnam. Actually those countries have a lower quality than the Indonesian silver. They use mass production machine in making silver products. The biggest competitor is coming from Thailand as the nearest country to Indonesia. The circulation of silver basic materials in the foreign black market with a competitive price could damage silver handicraft market price between craftsmen and resulting in an imperfect competition among silver handicraft businesses. If silver business cannot give the silversmith a proper life, we have to be afraid that we are going to lose another Indonesian heritage as people don’t want to be a silversmith again. Theres a flux of entrance of foreign entrepreneurs to Indonesia which take over many silver businesses and supported by a strong capital base and extensive network distributions. These foreign entrepreneurs could eliminate small silver handicraft businessmen. Many

50 Indonesian Silver

has raised concerns that in the future these local craftsmen cannot survive on their own even in running the business on their own and only rely on foreign entrepreneurs that open their businesses in Indonesia. So, Indonesian craftsmen position lies below these foreign entrepreneurs who received most of the profits and not the domestic craftsmen.


Role of Government Economic democracy system appears into the business enterprises such as small enterprises, cooperation and informal sectors. Real posteriori indicates that these institutions cannot develop well because of limited capital access, skills, technologies, management and weak in accessing government policies, also hard to compete with big enterprises. Naturally, these issues will hamper small medium business enterprises (SMEs) from developing and informal sectors into becoming big enterprises. By looking at the real weakness of Small and Medium Enterprises (SME’s) and cooperatives and the conditions that could hamper their development, it seems that an alternative institution need to be created in order to provide help to small medium business enterprises (SME) and cooperatives in their development.

Venture Capital Institutions Until now there are more that 24 Venture Capital Institutions (Lembaga Modal Venture/ LMV) that were built by the government which are spread all over the country. Venture Capital Institutions will become more important because they are related to government eagerness in paying more attention in managing and developing private sectors in small and medium enterprises (SME) because these two groups of players are hard to be developed into a strong enterprise which could compete with other economic players. Even according to Central Statistics Bureau (BPS), from 34 millions small enterprises none of them can develop into medium enterprises because of big enterprises in each business sectors. Quantitatively, large number of Small and Medium Enterprises (SME’s) and cooperatives need a close attention in developing it seriously. Government’s political will in giving its attention to Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) needs to be supported because their success can be used as a strong foundation in increasing the national economy. It can also decrease social and economic gap that could create instability within the society. Main problem that SMEs are facing is weak access in getting capital fund. Main capital fund originating from bank loan is burdening SME because of high interest rate. On the other hand increasing production and marketing its products could not cover the interest rate. Besides that, entrepreneurs have to provide physical collateral which seldom are hard to provide. For sure the government has acknowledge this issue, proven by the policies and concepts that are issued by the government in order to help and push on the development of SME. At

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first, the government support on small credit loan, KMKP and those programs since 1991 have changes into Small Business Credit. With this program, banking has to provide 20% of its credit for Small Business Credit . Also State Owned Companies have to provide 1-5 % of their profits to small enterprises. Besides that, since 1980, the government have apply partnering concept between big entrepreneur as a godfather and SME as their sons. Because of price fluctuation in basic raw material of silver in practice these programs shows a promising result. All policies that has been issued by the government didn’t feel sufficient enough to build and support SME development because problems that SME’s are facing doesn’t only lies on limited capital fund, but it is more than that. If this problem is not instantly handled, without any doubt that gap and competitiveness between small/middle entrepreneurs with big entrepreneur will get wider. Therefore the role of venture capital fund companies in developing small and medium business enterprises need to be optimized so that small and medium business enterprises and cooperatives that received aid can give profit in interest, dividend, management fee, also an increase in stocks.

Training Center Besides capital problem, regeneration of high skilled silversmiths is also serious problems. What has happened in Kotogadang is one of the example of how really serious the regenerations problem. The government needs to reawaken silver industries in the area where the number of silversmith is in decrease and in the area where there are potential human resource is available. Jambi is one of the good example, through National Craft Council it arouse people awareness in doing silver business as a silversmith. If Training Centers (Balai Latihan Kerja) can actively trained people in silvercrafts, we still can preserve our heritage in silvercrafts made in Indonesia.

52 Indonesian Silver


Role of local government is very important to absorb workers from informal sector. So they also have a hope though they don’t have enough formal education background they still can be a successful person as a silversmith. Foreign entrepreneurs seem to hijack high-skilled silversmiths to work for them and left the locals. This attitude resulting local people as a worker or low class people compared to the foreigners as the boss. What we want is to create qualified local entrepreneurs that are able to do business internationally. The main business will be conquered by the foreigners if government does not do anything to prevent this thing from happenning.

Promotion Assistance The Government holds an important role in developing SMEs to preserve the national heritage through its representatives in the province. The institutions give assistances to arouse community awareness about the potential craft in the community and acts as the motivator. This institution also supports its networking and take the member go for promotion in and outside the country. In other words the local government open the way to introduce the product to the outsider. Such as follow International Jewelry exhibition in Hongkong and Las Vegas.

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List of Silver Exporters AL MUKHLIES SILVER Jl. Pramuka No. 5-D, Umbulharjo Yogyakarta 55161 Phone : (62-274) 385971 / (62-274) 385971 Web : www.almukhlies.com Contact : Ir. Muhibbin, MM

DIANA SILVER Jl. Nyi Pembayun No. 11, Kotagede Yogyakarta Phone : (62-274) 7111326 / (62-274) 383281 Email : dianasilvertrap@yahoo.co.id / www.dianasilver.net.tf

ALIA JEWELERY Jl. Kemang Raya 2H Hotel Kemang Jakarta Phone : (62-21) 7194121, 7201747 ext. 754 / 7265080, 7194131 email : alia.jac@yahoo.com Contact : Amaruddin Uma Ngali

EKA SILVER GOLD & JEWELRY, PT Jl. Kemayoran Baru No. 5 Surabaya Jawa Timur 60175 Phone : (62-31) 3553277, 3553278 / (62-31) 3526270 Email : sales@ekasilver.com, esgj_05@rad.net.id Web : www.ekasilver.com Contact : Abd. Mudjib

ANSOR`S SILVER Jl. Tegal Gendu No. 28 Kotagede Yogyakarta 55173 Phone : (62-274) 373266,371305,388317 / 382258, 388317 Web : ansor`s_silver@yahoo.com Contact : Eka Rusdiana ,Suryatin A. S. ANTING, CV Jl. Jati Padang III/36 Rt 06 Rw 03 Jati Padang Ps.Minggu JakSel Phone : (62-21) 7181763, 7193952 / (62-21) 7193951 Web : chicmart@cbn.net.id Contact : Indah Kurniasih, Vonny Hartono ARISTYA GOLD & SILVER Jl. Raya Celuk, Sukawati Gianyar Bali 80582 Phone : (62-361) 295233 / (62-361) 298174 Web : aristya@eksaplata.com Contact : I Ketut Sunarya, Ni Made Wartari ARTISTICA JEWELRY, PT Jl. Raya Tenggilis No. 54 Surabaya Jawa Timur 60292 Phone : (62-31) 8438391, 8438706 / (62-31) 8414875 Web : artistica@aratistica-indo.com / www.artisticaindo.com Contact : Cindy Linata BALI SILVER TREASURES Jl. Raya Batu Bulan No. 23, Gianyar Denpasar Bali Phone : (62-361) 297597 / (62-361) 297894 Email : balisilver@dps.centrin.net.id Web :www.balisilvertreasures.com Contact : Haryanto Halim BANDEM COMMUNITY OF SILVER SMITH Br. Sengguan, Ds Singapadu, Sukawati Gianyar Bali 80582 Phone : (62-361) 298688, 298693, 294176 / (62-361) 298688 Email : bandemsilver@dps.centrin.net.id / www.bandemsilver.com Contact : I Made Kardita Bandem BOROBUDUR SILVER Jl. Menteri Supeno No. 41 Yogyakarta 55162 Phone : (62-274) 374037, 374238 / (62-274) 375439 Email : sales@borobudur-silver.com, selly@yogya.wasantara.net.id Web : www.borobudur-silver.com Contact : Selly Sagita

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DALAS SILVER Alun-Alun Kg III/7 Kotagede Yogyakarta Phone : (62-274) 370678 / (62-274) 370678 Contact : Dalmono Budi S. DEDE`S SILVER Jl. Gianyar No. 18, Celuk, Sukawati Gianyar Bali 80582 Phone : (62-361) 298184 / (62-361) 298184 Email : sales@dedesgold.com / www.dedesgold.com Contact : I Putu Pande A. Saputra

FAJAR SURYA CIPTA, CV Jl. Pendawa 24 Menteng Dalam Jakarta Phone : (62-21) 8295937 / (62-21) 8295937 Email : fajar_surya_cipta@yahoo.co.id Contact : Faizah HASTA KARYA HANDYCRAFT Jl. Mardani Raya 13, RT 002/05, Kel. Johor Baru Jakarta Phone : (62-21) 4202864 Contact : Drs. M. Saleh ZA HS SILVER 800-925 Jl. Mondorakan No. 1 Rt 35/07, Prenggan, Kotagede Yogyakarta 55172 Phone : (62-274) 375107, 370725 / (62-274) 377872 Email : hs800-925@yogya.wasantara.net.id Web : www.hssilver.com Contact : H. Suryadi I WAYAN SUDIARTA GOLD & SILVER Br. Celuk Sukawati Gianyar Bali Phone : (62-361) 295165 / (62-361) 295166 Email : yannyer@hotmail.com Contact : I Wayan Sudiarta IDOLA PRIMA SILVER Jl. Imogiri Barat Km 4 No. 127, Bangunharjo, Sewo Bantul D. I. Yogjakarta Phone : (62-274) 419808 / (62-274) 419808 Contact : Mulya Dipakusuma INDARTI SILVER Jl Raya Celuk No. 3, Celuk Sukowati Gianyar Bali 80585 Phone : (62-361) 298172 / (62-361) 295427 Email : indarti@balisilvers.com / www.balisilvers.com Contact : Putu Gde Wiracita INTI GARMINDO PERSADA / RENY FEBY JEWELLERY, PT Jl. Pualam Raya No. 31, Sumur Batu, Kemayoran JakPus 10640 Phone : (62-21) 4247548 / (62-21) 4241540, (62) 816834111 Email : rfjewel@yahoo.com Contact : Okkeu Rachmat Solichin LED STUDIO, CV Jl. Bisma 9X, Legian Kaja Kuta Bali Phone : (62-361) 757702 / (62-361) 757701 Email : led22@indosat.net.id / www.ledstudioshop.com Contact : M. Teguh Roziadi


LEO SILVER Jl. Raya Batuyang No. 99 Gianyar Bali Phone : (62-361) 299129 / (62-361) 299129 Email : leosy@indosat.net.id / www.leosilver.com Contact : Ayu Oka MD MOELJODIHARDJO, CV Ds. Keboan Kotagede Yogyakarta 55173 Phone : (62-274) 375063, 370710 / (62-274) 375323 Email : mdsilver@plasa.com Contact : Moeljopratomo Md. MEGA INDAH INDONESIA PERKASA, PT Jl. Pasar Kebayoran Lama 31-D Jakarta Selatan Phone : (62-21) 72793348 / (62-21) 72793349 Email : indokasa@yahoo.com / www.indoka.com Contact : Benny Indra Kusuma MEGRANIA PUTRA NUSANTARA (ASTANA MEGRANIA) Jl. Srondol Asri C-17, Srondol Semarang Jawa Tengah 34654 Phone : (62-24) 3522516, 7471493 / (62-24) 3522517, 7471493 Email : astana@centrin.net.id Contact : Mieke Sahala Hutabarat MEL`S COLLECTION Jl. Wahid Hasyim Jakarta Pusat Phone : (62-21) 3906260, 3156559 / (62-21) 3906260 Contact : Melinda Kurniawan MIRZA SILVER Jl. H.O.S. Cokroaminoto No. 61 Mataram Lombok Phone : (62-370) 640839 / (62-370) 640839 Email : miza_silver@yahoo.com Contact : Syaiful Mizan MUTIARA GRAHA Banjar Seseh, Singapadu, Sukawati Gianyar Bali 80582 Phone : (62-361) 294392 / (62-361) 293938 Email : mutiaragraha@hotmail.com Contact : Anak Agung Gde Agung Mestra MUSEUM RUNA Jl. Lotundo, Banjar abian Semal, Ubud, Bali Phone : 0361 980710, 0811 214 185 Fax : 0361 981563 Email : runa_bali@hotmail.com Contact : Runi Palar MUTIARA TIMUR GLOBALINDO, PT Patra Office Tower 17th FL, Suite 1702 Jl. Gatot Subroto Kav. 32-34 Jakarta Pusat 12950 Phone : (62-21) 52900252 / (62-21) 52900252 Email : mutiaracollection@yahoo.com Contact : Suningsih NADYA SILVER, UD Jl. Imam Bonjol Gg. 100/I No. 7 Denpasar Bali 80238 Phone : (62-361) 484039 / (62-361) 483724 Email : nadya@dps.centrin.net.id www.ibdyellowpages.com/nadyasilver Contact : Thalib Tayeb NARTI`S SILVER Jl. Tegal Gendu 22, Kotagede Yogyakarta Phone : (62-274) 374890 Email : sales@narti-silver.com / www.narti-silver.com Contact : Pandit Pintoro

ONEN SURONO, CV Jl. Pakel Baru Selatan 58, Yogyakarta 55162 Phone : (62-274) 7474406 Fax : (62-274) 378327 Email : onen@ygy.centrin.net.id Contact : Onen Surono ORO ARGENTO INDONESIA, PT Jl. Soekarno Hatta Km 25,5 No. 8, Ungaran Semarang Jawa Tengah 50552 Phone : (62-298) 523888 / (62-298) 523338 Email : oroarg@yahoo.com Contact : Evin Julystin Lauw PATHA HANDICRAFT Br. Sapat - Tegallalang, Ubud Gianyar Bali 80582 Phone : (62-361) 973060, 973262 / (62-361) 973059 Email : info@pathahandicraft.com / www.pathahandicraft.com A. Contact : A. Puspa PATRA`S COLLECTION, UD Br. Cemenggaon, Celuk, Sukawati Gianyar Bali 80582 Phone : (62-361) 298758, 299310, 295994 / (62-361) 298121 Email : nympatra@into.net.id Contact : Ni Made Karmini PUSPA MEGA SILVER, CV Jl. Raya Celuk No. 925, Celuk, Sukawati Gianyar Bali 80582 Phone : (62-361) 299689 / (62-361) 298060 balimega@indo.net.id / www.puspamegasilver.com Contact : I Wayan Widjaya PUTERA SILVER Jl. Raya Celuk Sukawati Gianyar Bali 80582 Phone : (62-361) 298046 Mobile : +62816575511 Email : customer@puterasilver.com / www.puterasilver.com Contact : Wayan Gede Rudina Wiraputra RATNA SILVER (RATNA ASTNA CIPTA, PT) Jl. Tangkuban Perahu, Br. Padang Sumbu Denpasar Barat Bali Phone : (62-361) 734997, 733146 / (62-361) 734997, 759257 Email : ratnasilver@dps.centrin.net.id Contact : Ratna RUKIN`S SILVER, CV Jl. Raya Celuk, Sukawati Gianyar BALI 80582 Phone : (62-361) 298085, 7454554 / (62-361) 298085 Email : rukinsilver@dps.centrin.net.id Contact : I Wayan Karmana RUPADANA SILVER COLLECTION Br. Celuk, Sukawati Gianyar Bali Phone : (62-361) 298302 / (62-361) 291278 Email : rupadana@indo.net.id / www.rupadanasilver.com Contact : I Nyoman Rupadana SEA FINE JEWELRY Jl. Ir. H. Juanda No. 50 (Ciputat Raya) Tangerang 15412 Phone : (62-21) 7492850 / (62-21) 7492850 Email : dmulia@cbn.net.id Contact : Irwan Holmes SUMBERKREASI CIPTALOGAM Jl. I Gusti Ngurah Rai No. 1 Jakarta 13420 - Indonesia Phone : (62-21) 8199280, 8199403 Fax : (62-21) 8199223 - 8195452 Email : prandscl@cbn.net.id Contact : Johnny Salmon

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MINISTRY OF TRADE REPUBLIC OF INDONESIA JI. M.I. Ridwan Rais No.5 Main Building - 4th Floor Jakarta 10110 INDONESIA Phone. [62-21] 385 8171 (hunting) Fax. [62-21] 235 28691 E-mail. mendag@depdag.go.id

Directorate General of Domestic Trade M.I. Ridwan Rais No.5 Building I, 6th Floor Jakarta 10110 - INDONESIA Phone (62-21) 23524120, 2352 8620 Fax (62-21) 23524130 E-mail. dirJen-pdn@depdag.go.id

Secretary General JI. M.I. Ridwan Rais No.5 Main Building I, 7th Floor Jakarta Pusat Phone. (62-21) - 23522040 ext. 32040 Fax. (62-21) - 23522050 sesjen@depda9•90.id

Directorate General of Foreign Trade JI. M.I. Ridwan Rals No. 5 Main Buildin, 9th Floor Jakarta 10110 - INDONESIA Phone (62-21) 23525160 Fax (62-21) 23525170 E-mail djdaglu@depdag.go.id

Inspectorate General JI. M.I. Ridwan Rais No.5 Building I, 10th Floor Jakarta Pusat (62-21) - 384 8662, 3841961 Ext.1226 (62-21) - 384 8662 irjen@depdag.go.id

Directorate General of International Trade Cooperation JI. M.I. Rldwan Rais No. 5 Main Building, 8th Floor, Jakarta 10110 - INDONESIA Phone (62-21) 23526200, 23528600 Fax (62-21) 23526210 E-mail. djkpi@depdag.go.id

National Agency for Export Development JI. M.I. Rldwan Rais No. 5 Main Building, 4th Floor, Jakarta 10110 - INDONESIA Phone (62-21) 23527240 Fax (62-21) 23527250 E-mail. kabpen@depdag.go.id Commodity Future Trading Regulatory Agency (COFTRA) Gedung Bumi Daya Plaza 4th Floor JI. Imam Bonjol No. 61 Jakarta 10310 -INDONESIA Phone (62-21) 315 6315 Fax (62-21) 315 6135 E-mail. kabappebti@depdag.go.id Website www.bappebti.go.ld Trade Research and Development Agency (TREDA) JI. M.I. Ridwan Rais No. 5 Main Building 4th Floor, Jakarta 10110 - INDONESIA Phone (62-21)3858171 (hunting) Facx (62-21) 23528691 E-mail kabalitbang@depdag.go.id

INDONESIAN COMMERCIAL ATTACHE Australia Indonesian Embassy. 8, Darwin Avenue, Yarralumia Canberra A.c.T. 2600 Australia Phone : (6162) - 625 08654 Fax : (6162) - 62730757 E-mail : atdag-aus@depdag.go.id atperdag@ cyberone.com.au Website : www.kbri-canberra.org.au

Thailand Indonesian Embassy . 600 - 602 Petchburi Road Rajthevi PO BOX 1318 Bangkok 10400, Thailand Phone : (0066-2) - 2551264, 255 3135 ext.123 Fax : (0066-2) - 2551264, 2551267 E-mail : atdag-tha@depdag.go.id indagtha i@hotmail.com

Japan Indonesian Embassy .5-2-9, Higashi Gotanda Shinagawa-ku Tokyo 1410022, Japan Phone : (81-03) - 344 14201,344 70596 Fax : (81-03) - 344 71 697 E-mail : atdag-jpn@depdag.go.id hbagis17@yahoo.com

Philippines Indonesian Embassy . 185, Salcedo Street. Legaspi Village, Makati City Metro Manila Philippines Phone : (632) - 892 5061-68, 894 4561 Fax : (632) - 892 5878, 867 4192 E-mail : atdag-phl@depdag.go.id perdag@info.com.ph

South Korea Indonesian Embassy. 55, Yoido-dong Young deoung po-ku Seoul South Korea. Phone : (0082-2) - 782 7750, 783 5371 Fax : (0082-2) - 780 4280, 783 7750 E-mail : atdag-kor@depdag.go.id stpsdt@hotmail.com

Malaysia Indonesian Embassy Jalan Tun Razak No.233 Kuala Lumpur 50400, Malaysia Phone : (0060-03) - 214 52011 Or 21434835 ext. 308 Fax : (0060-30) - 214 7908, 214 48407 E-mail : atdag-mys@depdag.go.id indagkl@ pd.jaring.my

People’s Republic of China Indonesian Embassy . San Li Tun Diplomatic Office Building B, Beijing 100600, China Phone : (00861) 653 24748, 653 25400-3014 Indonesian FaxSilver : (00861) 653 25368 E-mail : atdag-chn@depdag.go.id indagbei@public3.bta.net.cn

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India Indonesian Embassy. 50-A Chanakyapuri New Delhi 110021 India Phone : (0091-11)-61141000,6886763 Fax : (0091-11) - 688 5460, 687 4402 E-mail : atdag-ind@depdag.go.id indoemb@nda.vsnl.net.in

Saudi Arabia Indonesian Embassy Riyadh Diplomatic Quarter PO. Box 94343 Riyadh 11693 Saudi Arabia Phone : (0966-1) - 488 2800, 488 2131 ext.120 Fax : (0966-1) - 488 2966 E-mail : atdag-sau@depdag.go.id atdagruhsa@awalnet.net.sa Egypt Indonesian Embassy. 3, Aisha EL Taimoira St. Garden City PO BOX 1661 Cairo 1661, Republic of Egypt Phone : (20-2) - 794 4698,794 7200-9 Fax : (20-2) - 796 2495 E-maii : atdag-egy@depdag.go.id hardaw j ndag@access.com.eg Austria Indonesian Embassy Gustav Tschermak Gasse 5-7 Wina A-1180 Austria Phone : (431) - 476 2341 Fax : (431) - 479 0557 E-mail : atdag-aut@depdag.go.id United Kingdom Indonesian Embassy 38 Grosvenor Square. London W1 k 2HW United Kingdom Phone : 44-20) - 772 909613, 749 97881 Fax : (44-20) - 7945 7022 E-mail : atdag-gbr@depdag.go.id atperdaglondon@aol.com


Netherlands Indonesian Embassy . 8, Tobias Asserlaan 2517 KC The Hague, The Netherlands Phone : (31) - 703108115 Fax : (31) -7036 43331 E-mail : atdag-nld@depdag.go.id atperdag@indonesia.nl

Russia Indonesia Embassy . Commercial Attache Office Korovy val7 Ent 3, FI. 8 Apt 76 Moscow 117049, Republic Russia Phone : (7-095) - 238 5281, 238 3014 Fax : (7-095) - 238 5281 E-mail : atdag-rus@depdag.go.id atdag@online.ru

Germany Lehter Strasse 16-17 0-10557 Berlin 53175 Germany Phone : (49-30) - 478 0700 Fax : (49-30) - 478 07209 E-mail : atdag-deu@depdag.go.id budseto@yahoo.com

United Arab Emirates Indonesia Trade Promotion Center (ITPC) Flat NoA03, ArbitTower, 4th Floor, Baniyas Street, Deira P.O. Box 41664 Dubai U.A.E Phone : (971 4) - 422 78544 Fax : (971 4) - 422 78545

Belgium Indonesian Mission to The European Communities Boulevard de la Woluwe 38 Brussels B-1200, Belgium Phone : (322) - 779 0915 Fax : (322) - 772 8190 E-maii: atdag-bxl@depdag.go.id atperi ndagbxl@ chello.be

Denmark Oerehoej Aile 1, 2900 Hellerup Copenhagen, Denmark Phone : (45-39) - 624 422, 624 883 (D) Fax : (45-39) - 624 483 E-mail : atdag-dnk@depdag.go.id atperindag-de@mail.dk

Italy Indonesian Embassy Via Nomentana, 55 00161 Rome Italy Phone : (0139-6) - 420 0911, 420 09168 Facsimiie : (0129-6) - 488 0280, 420 10428 E-mail: atdag-ita@depdag.go.id lovenatassa@yahoo. com

Canada Indonesian Embassy 55 Parkdale Avenue Ottawa Ontario KIY 1 ES Canada Phone : (613) -7241100 Fax : (613) - 724 7932 E-mail : atdag-can@depdag.go.id budh i@indonesia_ottawa.org Website : www.indonesia_ottawa.org

Spain Indonesian Embassy 65, Calle de Agastia Madrid 28043 Spain Phone : (34-91) - 413 0294 Fax : (34-91) - 415 7792 E-mail : atdag-esp@depdag.go.id atperdag@lander.es

France Indonesian Embassy 47-49 Rue Cortambert Paris 75116 France Phone : (33-1) - 450 302760, 450 44872 Fax : (33-1) - 450 45032 E-mail : atdag-fra@depdag.go.id serdagparis@magic.fr

Switzerland Indonesian Mission to The United Nations and Other International Organizations 16, Rue de Saint Jean Geneva 1203 Switzerland Phone : (0041-22) - 339 7010 Fax : (0041-22) - 339 7025 E-mail : atdag-che@depdag.go.id a Ifons_ptri@hotmail.com alfons-sa mosir@ties.itu.int Singapore 7 Chatsworth Road Singapore 249761 Phone : (65) - 6737 5420, 683 95458 Fax : (65) - 6737 5037, 6735 2027 E-mail : atdag-sgp@depdag.go.id depperindag@paclfic.net.sg Hong Kong Consulate General 127-129 Leighton Road Causeway Bay Hong Kong Phone : (852) - 289 02481, 289 04421 Fax : (852) - 289 50139 E-mail : kondag-hkg@depdag.go.id indaghk@hk.linkage.net hmunandar@hotmail.com United States of America 2020 Massachusetts Avenue, N. W. Washington DC ca 20036 United States of America Phone : (202) - 775 5350, 775 5200 ext. 350 Fax : (202) - 775 5354, 775 5365 E-mail : atdag-usa@depdag.go.id

Indonesian Trade Promotion Center (ITPC) Osaka ITM 4-J-8, Asia and Pacific Trade Center 2-1-10 Nanko Kita, Suminoe-ku, Osaka 559-0034, Japan Telp. (081-6) 66155350 Fax. (081-6) 66155351 Website: www.itpc.or.jp

Dubai Arbift Tower 4 Floor # 403, Baniyas street Deira PO.Box 41664, Dubai - UAE Telp. (971-4) 2278544 Fax. (971-4) 2278545 Hp. 971502088423, 97142215670 (Husin) E-mail: itpcdxb@emirates.net.ae, hbagis17@yahoo.com Website: www.itpcdxb.ae Los Angeles 3457, Wilshire Blvd, Suite 101 Los Angeles, Ca 90010, USA Telp. (213) 3877041 Fax. (213) 3877047 Hp. 21353633218 E-mail: itpcla@sbcglobal.net, dody_edward@yahoo.com Website www.itpcla.org

Budapest Bajcsy Zslinszky ut 12, 2nd floor No. 205 Budapest 1051 - Hungary Telp. (36-1) 3176382

Fax. (36-1) 2660572 E-mail: inatrade@itpc-bud.hu Website www.indonesia.hu/itpc

Johannesburg Suite 02/E4, 2ND Floor, Village Walk, Sandton Po Box 2146, RSA Johannesburg X9916 South Africa Telp. (27-11) 8846240 Fax. (27-11) 8846242 E-mail: alidepdag@yahoo.com Sao Paolo Edificio Park Lane Alameda Santos 1787 Conj III - 11 Andar Cerqueira Cesar, Sao Paulo, Brazil 01419-002 Telp. (55-11) 32630472, 35411413 Fax. (55-11) 32538126 Hp. 551184730986 E-mail: itpcsp@itpcsp.org, adisaopaulo@yahoo.com Sydney 60, Pitt Street Level 2nd, Sydney 2000, Australia Telp. (61-2) 92528783 Fax. (61-2) 92528784 Hp. 61447439900 (Fetna) E-mail: itpc-sydney@depdag.go.id fetnayeti@yahoo.com

Milan Via Vittor Pisani, 8, 20124 Milano (MI), Italy Telp. (39-02) 36598182 Fax. (39-02) 36598191 E-mail: mudo@itpc-milan.com, mudo_young@yahoo.com Hamburg Multi Buro Service, Glokengisserwall 17 20095 Hamburg - Germany Telp. (49-40) 33313-333 Fax. (49-40) 33313-377 E-mail: inatrade@itpc-hh.com, posman_fh@yahoo.com

Indonesian Economic and Trade Office Taiwan (a province of China)

Indonesian Economic and Trade Office to Taipei 6F, NO.550, Rui Guang Road, Nelhu District (Twin Head Building) Taipei 114 Taiwan Phone : (886-2) - 875 26170 Fax : (886-2) - 874 23706 E-mail : tukdei-twn@depdag.go.id

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Indonesian Silver

For your complete reference on the Republic of Indonesia representative offices world-wide, please kindly access: www.deplu.go.id


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Indonesian Silver  

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