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BREAKING MOXLEY NEWS | NEW NORTHGATE SUPERMARKET: A FOOD DISNEYLAND | A BUNCH OF ITALIAN REVIEWS, TOO! JANUARY 06-12, 2017 | VOLUME 22 | NUMBER 19

PIERCING THE PROBLEM

Orange County’s first needle exchange tries to bring hope to a wretched situation

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Best Buy Geek Squad informant use has FBI on defense in child-porn case

F

moxley

» .

based defense attorney. Riddet says agents conducted two additional searches of the computer without obtaining necessary warrants, lied to trick a federal magistrate judge into authorizing a search warrant, then tried to cover up their misdeeds by initially hiding records. To convict someone of child-pornography charges, the government must prove the suspect knowingly possessed the image. But in Rettenmaier’s case, the alleged “Jenny” image was found on unallocated “trash” space, meaning it could only be retrieved by “carving” with costly, highly sophisticated forensics tools. In other words, it’s arguable a computer’s owner wouldn’t know of its existence. (For example, malware can secretly implant files.) Worse for the FBI, a federal appellate court unequivocally declared in February 2011 (USA v. Andrew Flyer) that pictures found on unallocated space did not constitute knowing possession because it is impossible to determine when, why or who downloaded them. “The government concedes it presented no evidence that Flyer knew of the presence of the files on the unallocated space of his Gateway computer’s hard drive,” declared judges at the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit before overturning that conviction. “The government also concedes it presented no evidence that Flyer had the forensic software required to see or access the files. . . . Deletion of an image alone does not support a conviction for knowing possession of child pornography on or about a certain date within the meaning of [federal law]. No evidence indicated that Flyer could recover or view any of the

charged images in unallocated space or that he even knew of their presence there.” That ruling, made a year before the launch of the Rettenmaier case, left the FBI in a quandary. Agents noted among themselves in an email thread that “our [assistant United States attorney] won’t charge on carved images.” In hopes of overcoming this obstacle, they performed a sleight-of-hand maneuver, according to Riddet. The agents simply didn’t alert Judge Marc Goldman that the image in question had been buried in unallocated space and, thus, secured deceitful authorization for a February 2012 raid on Rettenmaier’s Laguna Niguel residence. “The omission was critical because the mere presence of child pornography in a computer’s unallocated space is insufficient to establish knowing possession as a matter of law,” Riddet wrote in a November 2016 brief. “And the unwitting possession of child porn will not support probable cause [for either a raid or charges].” But Assistant U.S. Attorney M. Anthony Brown, who specializes in sex-crime cases and is handling prosecution duties, claims the omission was not legally important or malicious. Brown believes the “Jenny” image shouldn’t be suppressed because it’s only “wild speculation” that the Geek Squad performed searches at FBI instigation. To him, the defense is pushing a “flawed” theory slyly shifting focus to innocent FBI agents; he maintains that Rettenmaier—who is smart enough to have taught medicine at USC and UCLA—was dumb enough to seek Best Buy recovery of all of his computer files after knowingly storing child porn there.

The case is presently so tenuous that Riddet, who has 47 years of court experience, suggests that federal officials sloppily pushed for an unnecessary arrest. He has demanded to know if agents showed the photo evidence to Assistant United States Attorney Anne Gannon before she initiated charges. The defense lawyer is suspicious because FBI records reviewed by OC Weekly contain discrepancies about the picture and offer conflicting narratives about the agency’s actions against his client. He also wants additional records, which he believes have been hidden. On Dec. 19, 2016, U.S. District Court Judge Cormac J. Carney highlighted the discrepancies, noted odd memory losses among agents, and called Brown’s arguments for blocking Riddet’s inquiries “unavailing” and “perplexing.” Carney ordered government officials to conduct a new, “diligent” search for evidence and compelled Gannon’s future testimony about whether she saw the “Jenny” image before approving the search warrant. But the biggest issue remains whether Geek Squad technicians acted as secret law-enforcement agents and, thus, violated Fourth Amendment prohibitions against warrantless government searches. Riddet claims records show “FBI and Best Buy made sure that during the period from 2007 to the present, there was always at least one supervisor who was an active informant.” He also said, “The FBI appears to be able to access data at [Best Buy’s main repair facility in Brooks, Kentucky] whenever they want.” Calling the relationship between the agency and the Geek Squad relevant to pretrial motions, Carney approved Riddet’s request to question agents under oath. The defense lawyer believes the case was built on a false premise that should frighten all Americans. “While it may be that ‘Jenny’ appears in other photos which are child pornography, none of those photos, if indeed they do exist, were observed on [Rettenmaier’s] hard drive,” Riddet observed. “The critical point here is that the image which was viewed and described in the search warrant is not an image of child pornography.” That assertion will be debated at future hearings. RSCOTTMOXLEY@OCWEEKLY.COM

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BI agents and prosecutors usually strut inside Santa Ana’s Ronald Reagan Federal Courthouse, knowing they’ve focused the wrath of the criminal-justice system on a particular criminal. But an unusual child-pornography-possession case has placed officials on the defensive confidential for nearly 26 months. Questions linger about law-enforcement honesty, unconstir scott tutional searches, moxley underhanded use of informants and twisted logic. Given that a judge recently ruled against government demands to derail a defense lawyer’s dogged inquiry into the mess, United States of America v. Mark A. Rettenmaier is likely to produce additional courthouse embarrassments in 2017. Rettenmaier is a prominent Orange County physician and surgeon who had no idea that a Nov. 1, 2011, trip to a Mission Viejo Best Buy would jeopardize his freedom and eventually raise concerns about, at a minimum, FBI competency or, at worst, corruption. Unable to boot his HP Pavilion desktop computer, he sought the assistance of the store’s Geek Squad. At the time, nobody knew the company’s repair technicians routinely searched customers’ devices for files that could earn them $500 windfalls as FBI informants. This case produced that national revelation. According to court records, Geek Squad technician John “Trey” Westphal, an FBI informant, claims he accidentally located on Rettenmaier’s computer an image of “a fully nude, white prepubescent female on her hands and knees on a bed, with a brown choker-type collar around her neck.” Westphal notified his boss, Justin Meade, also an FBI informant, who alerted colleague Randall Ratliff, another FBI informant at Best Buy, as well as the FBI. Claiming the image met the definition of child pornography and was tied to a series of illicit pictures known as the “Jenny” shots, agent Tracey Riley seized the hard drive. Setting aside the issue of whether the search of Rettenmaier’s computer constituted an illegal search by private individuals acting as government agents, the FBI undertook a series of dishonest measures in hopes of building a case, according to James D. Riddet, Rettenmaier’s San Clemente-

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DEAR MEXICAN: If USA and Mexico go to war, whose side will the Mexican people in the USA stand on? Alt-Asshole DEAR GABACHO: Ah, the ultimate Chicano parlor game, one brought closer to reality by our incoming president! It’s all about context. Mexicans here have fought the narcos south of the border for the past couple of years with arms shipments and even brigades, so you’d expect the same if Enrique Peña Nieto announced he’d use his cartel amigos to try to invade el Norte. If Trump decided to move on Mexico for not trying to build a wall, you’d see a lot of hilarious memes but no uprising, as much as yaktivists would want you to believe. But if Trump starts mass roundups, let’s just say raza won’t take it quietly. I’d say more, but then the FBI would show up at my doorstep and disappear me to some black site or other for further questioning with Señor Waterboard. DEAR MEXICAN: I’m wondering what your thoughts are on the use of Lotería cards as decorative elements, specifically when used by people without Mexican heritage. Lotería cards are beautiful and interesting, but is using an image from the cards without a connection to any specific history, culture or meaning (such as on a tote bag or the like) a disrespectful appropriation? Or is it just a fun game such as checkers that happens to include some interesting artwork? Not Columbusing, Just Asking DEAR GABACHA: While gabachos have appropriated Mexican everything ever since they took our cuitlaxochitl flowers and renamed them poinsettias after some pendejo

ambassador or other, I’m a bit more lax with Lotería. While this bingo-esque board game goes back to the 1700s, its most iconic pictograms—such as the bare-chested mermaid “La Sirena” or the derelict borracho called, fittingly enough, “El Borracho”—aren’t cultural patrimony so much as the intellectual property of Don Clemente Inc., a for-profit company. And while it’s easy to get mad at gabachos doing their own take on Lotería cards, it’s akin to doing the same with Monopoly figurines. We’re talking about a private, capitalist enterprise here, not la pinche Virgin of Guadalupe. Besides, Mexicans appropriate ourselves all the time—and if you don’t believe it, ask the tehuanas in Oaxaca how they feel when fresas from Guadalajara steal their steez. DEAR MEXICAN: I love ¿Qué Pasa, USA? Lots of Spanish, English and Spanglish. Do you know of any other TV shows like it? Netflix and Chillar DEAR POCHO: Nope. And this is how pathetic Hollywood is: Forty years ago, television was confident enough in a bilingual show about the Latino-immigrant experience that it made a sitcom about a Cuban family that aired nationwide on PBS. Today? They do entire films about Los Angeles, such as La La Land, and show a total of one Latino character in the film. Chris Rock put it best: “You’re in LA; you’ve got to try not to hire Mexicans.” I’d end on a funnier note, but trying to follow Chris Rock is like drinking Cazadores, then following up with Sauza—and I’m not even Sauza. ASK THE MEXICAN at themexican@askamexican.net, be his fan on Facebook, follow him on Twitter, or ask him a video question at youtube.com/askamexicano!

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Orange County’s first needle exchange tries to bring hope to a wretched situation By mary carreon

T

anner (not his real name) sat in the stairwell connecting the first and second floors of a parking structure near the Santa Ana Civic Center on a recent, cold Saturday afternoon. His rib cage was visible through a snug, faded red T-shirt; his long, dark hair exaggerated the thirtysomething’s jolty mannerisms. Snapping out of a trance, he glanced around, then grabbed something from a white paper bag between his legs. In one quick motion, Tanner rolled up his left sleeve, wrapped a rubber tourniquet around his upper bicep, then dropped his left arm to the cement. He cleaned off the soft, inner crease connecting his forearm and bicep with an antibacterial wipe before reaching back into the bag, looking around one last time to see if anyone was near. Bending his forearm into a 90-degree angle and forming a fist with his left hand, Tanner flicked the syringe in his right hand twice, inspecting the liquefied heroin inside for air bubbles— all good. The needle went into his arm, and the drug kicked in within seconds. Tanner swayed from side to side, his head in his hands. His arms then slowly fell to his sides while his body remained crouched. He stayed like this for nearly 30 minutes before getting up and slowly walking toward the Civic Center courtyard. In a complete daze, he sat down on the steps while about 50 people gathered in a line nearby. Everyone noticed Tanner’s state, but no one passed judgment (a woman sat next to him and silently rubbed his back as he kept swaying). They understood. They were there for the Orange County Needle Exchange Program (OCNEP), the first such experiment in county history. Started by five medical students at UC Irvine and operating every Saturday from noon to 3 p.m. in the Civic Center courtyard, the effort allows anyone who uses needles—from drug users to diabetics—to exchange dirty ones for new syringes. They also hand out tourniquets, antibacterial wipes, cotton balls, even heroin cookers. Plus, OCNEP lets its clients know where to go for treatment, refers them to rehab, and provides basic health care—no cost, no questions, no judgement.

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Piercing the Problem

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Piercing the Problem » FROM PAGE 9

OCNEP VOLUNTEERS READY FOR A SATURDAY OF HELPING

This comes at a time when Orange County faces a heroin epidemic. According to the coroner’s office, overdose fatalities spiked to 400 last year—a 6 percent increase from 2014, and 63 percent from 2006. It has affected all of OC, from South County to the homeless encampments of the Santa Ana River, and claimed everyone from the children of police officers and firefighters to third-generation addicts. And while the majority of deaths come from opioids, it’s the addicts who arrive every Saturday at the Civic Center who often need the most help—and haven’t gotten it until now. The needle-exchange program is a controversial effort, but one co-founder Kyle Barbour argues is nothing less than social justice. “The people who eventually became clients of the needle exchange told us how bad things were and that they needed a service,” says Barbour. “There are a number of services homeless people need, like health care and testing at the most basic level, but because of society’s oppression and stigma against them, they have no way to access these services.”

D

erek and Peter (not their real names), two admitted chronic drug users, haven’t missed a week since the OC needle exchange started last February. Both say they contracted HIV and hepatitis C from dirty needles. “I’ve been full-blown positive for 30 years, and I’ve been terrified of giving the virus to other people,” says Peter, who’s on a first-name basis with most of OCNEP’s volunteers. “We’ve become so spoiled that if we don’t have new syringes, we’ll go without using.” A smile forms across Derek’s face. “We might go without, or we’ll snort it or smoke it,” he cracks, provoking a belly laugh from Peter. “I have stage-four hepatitis C. I’ve been terminal for the past five years, but I used to go forever off [one needle]. Now I don’t use the same one twice, and neither of us loans out or uses anyone else’s needles. There’s just no way.” “Orange County has the fourth-highest number of HIV-positive patients in California—a number that’s doubled in less than 10 years—and has nearly 1,000 cases of hepatitis C,” says Barbour. “Providing clean equipment to injection-drug users can drastically reduce the risk of contracting these diseases because the need to share or use a needle more than once is essentially eliminated.” A report conducted by New York City government officials showed that between 2001 and 2013, the rate of new HIV infections plummeted from 5,684 to 2,832 after needle exchanges were implemented there. Barbour also cites a survey conducted in 2011 by the National Center for Biotechnology Information that compared neighborhoods in Miami (a city with no needle exchanges) to San Francisco, which has multiple such programs; Miami racked

PHOTOS BY ROCKOGRAPHY

up a total of 371 used needles on the ground, while San Francisco landed at 44. “We live in a society that’s extremely hierarchical, in which some people have access to power and wealth and influence and other people don’t,” Barbour says. “It’s wrong to have these massive inequalities. . . . Everyone should be treated with respect and dignity. Since I have a fair amount of relative privilege, I feel like it’s my duty to use it to try to even out the lack of balance in society and work on creating a pathway toward a better society.” He and his fellow UCI medical students got the idea for OCNEP in 2015 after asking the Civic Center Roundtable—a group that advocates for the rights of homeless people in the area—what health services were needed. The Roundtable told them about death or serious paralytic illness caused by botulism, a nerve toxin produced by bacterium, as a result of sharing needles. After learning about the issue, Barbour and others scoured the Civic Center for two days to get an idea of how many dirty syringes littered the area. They found nearly 200. “I was raised in an environment where the poor, people who live on the streets, the homeless or whomever are still a valuable part of our society and important,” says Miriam McQuade, Barbour’s girlfriend and an OCNEP co-founder. “My parents were physicians and raised me with the mindset that people are inherently good and their situations are situations, which doesn’t make them bad.” McQuade, Barbour and co-founder Jemma Alarcon, along with two other UCI med students, launched OCNEP with a small grant from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH), deciding to operate in an outdoor courtyard to

better reach their target audience. The CDPH provided needles and syringes, other harm-reduction supplies, and a waste-disposal service through the Syringe Exchange Supply Clearinghouse Program, which, Barbour explains, has totally “saved their bacon” on several occasions. “People are concerned about the fact we distribute a lot of syringes,” says Barbour, “but we collect about 70 percent of the syringes back that we give out . . . which is excellent in terms of syringe-exchange standards. Also, the remaining 30 percent of syringes don’t just go on the ground. They get thrown away at other needle exchanges outside of the county or get disposed of at pharmacies. So the reality is that a lot of our needles do get thrown away.” The Santa Ana Police Department (SAPD) claims otherwise. Chief Carlos Rojas says that since OCNEP has opened, syringes around the Civic Center and Santa Ana library have gone up, although he admits his conclusion is based on anecdotal evidence. “There have always been

MCQUADE AND BARBOUR

PHOTO PROVIDED BY KYLE BARBOUR


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COURTESY AIMEE DUNKLE

Piercing the Problem » FROM PAGE 10

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t the end of the needleexchange production line every Saturday stands Aimee Dunkle, a slender, blond woman originally from the U.K. The cofounder of the Solace Foundation—Solace being an acronym for Surviving Our Loss with Awareness, Compassion and

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people in the area who use heroin or who are heroin addicts,” explains Rojas, “but we have seen an increase in syringe waste around town, which is why we’ve been talking to the needle-exchange folks to see what can be done to mitigate that negative impact. Although I understand that there are health benefits to the program, it has been a challenge in terms of keeping the area needle-free.” “We found 200 needles over two days before we started,” counters Barbour. “So when I hear that someone found, like, five syringes, I can’t help but think we’re doing something right because of what a substantial decrease it is from what we saw.” That issue is one small facet of the complicated relationship between law enforcement and OCNEP. While California’s Health and Safety Code allows clients of legally authorized needleexchange programs certified by the CDPH to possess an unlimited number of syringes for personal use, Barbour claims his clients are cited all the time for items he gives them. In some cases, he says, the paraphernalia is used by police officers as justification to search clients or their car or to detain them for other reasons. “We’ve had reports of this happening from every police department in the area, from Santa Ana to Orange to Tustin—it happens all over the place, and it’s a huge issue,” says Barbour. “People get detained, and then we have to give them advice on how to fight it in court, when really it should get dismissed. It’s really unfortunate, and it stems from the idea that it’s okay to treat the homeless, poor or addicted like that.”

Empathy—her main task at OCNEP is distributing naloxone, an overdose-reversal medication, and training people how to use it. OCNEP claims to have already saved upward of 450 lives, including a man Dunkle found in late November seconds before he stopped breathing, bent over on a bench with saliva dripping from his mouth. “I told my co-worker to call 9-1-1 immediately,” says Dunkle. “It was a lifeor-death situation. . . . It took two shots of naloxone before he was up and walking around again. Most of our clients don’t dial for emergency because they’re afraid of what law enforcement will do, as many of them have warrants and other legal issues. I’m glad we were there to save him. That’s why we do this.” The Solace Foundation started after Dunkle’s son, Ben, passed away at age 20 from a heroin overdose. Since then, she has become Orange County’s go-to woman for naloxone. “It is one of the most important things to have if drug use is an issue that someone close to you faces,” says Dunkle. “My son didn’t have to die; naloxone could have saved him. But it’s my job now to help other people avoid the pain that I’ve gone through with the loss of my son.” OCNEP has offered naloxone at all but three exchanges—and those weren’t by choice. The medication isn’t cheap ($4,000 per dose), and OCNEP is severely underfunded. Besides CDPH, the group gets some funding from the Orange County Health Care Agency and HIV-prevention and medical-student leadership grants, but those aren’t reliable streams of income. Solace Foundation is donation-based. “When you consider we’ve been doing this for 10 months, to have only three weeks without [naloxone] is pretty extraordinary given how difficult it is to get,” says Dunkle. “We’ve just been lucky. We’ve had a lot of support from the harm-reduction community, which is an extraordinary group of people. We’ve also had some donations, but, I don’t know, somehow we’ve just managed to keep it going. “We’re lucky,” she repeats. “We’ve been able to save a lot of lives.”

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One man who OCNEP couldn’t save was Garry Valdez, a resident of the Courtyard, Orange County’s first permanent homeless shelter. He overdosed there on Dec. 5, 2016, according to group volunteers. As he slipped away, OCNEP client Elizabeth Wettlaufer, who resides in the Civic Center, rushed to find naloxone for him. “Someone had an auto-injector [of the drug] for us to use,” she recalls, “and after I administered it to him, he did start to breathe again. But he was still non-responsive.” Dunkle had taught Wettlaufer that in situations such as Valdez’s, a second dose is necessary. But just as she was going to administer another shot, Wettlaufer alleges, sheriff’s deputies walked into the terminal. “They asked me what I was doing and what was in the vial and syringe. I told them it was naloxone and that Garry needed a second dose. [The deputy] looked at me with such disgust in his eyes and said, ‘Let’s not overload him on that stuff,’ which isn’t even possible. You can’t overload on naloxone.” (A Sheriff’s Department spokesperson says deputies did not handle the incident.) As a result, Wettlaufer says, the second shot of naloxone was never administered to Valdez. “When the EMTs got there, they tried to resuscitate him, and blood came out,” she says. “It was already too late.” The OC coroner’s office has yet to release a cause of death, but Rojas claims his commander told him that OC’s homeless czar, Susan Price, said the death was due to “natural causes.” (Price also did not return a call for comment.) Wettlaufer scoffs at Price’s conclusion. “I know an overdose when I see one. I may be a heroin addict, but I’m not an idiot,” she says. “Perhaps [the second shot of naloxone] wouldn’t have saved his life, but there’s a chance it would have. We’ll never know now.” “This is such a disturbing thing to hear,” says Dunkle of Valdez’s passing.

ROCKOGRAPHY

“Due to the amount of injection-drug users in the area, every staff member who works in the shelter and law-enforcement officers need to be trained on how to administer naloxone. It’s unacceptable that this isn’t standard protocol.” While Valdez’s death cast a pall over the past couple of Saturdays, it has given OCNEP an added resolve. During a recent session, Dunkle assisted a young man in filling out a questionnaire. “When and where did the overdose occur?” she asked him. “Last Thursday in a hotel room in Santa Ana,” he replied, his eyes drooping sadly. “Who was the overdose victim, and how old was she?” “My girlfriend, Layla. She’s 26. It was one of the worst overdoses I’ve ever seen. She would have been dead if I didn’t have the naloxone you gave me.” Dunkle responded, “I’m so glad you took some home with you last week.” “Death is not an acceptable bottom [line], and we should not accept that people who use drugs should die,” says Barbour. “That’s why what we do will help more people than cause issues. We have the chance to help them heal.”

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ast month, shaken OCNEP volunteers packed white paper bags with clean equipment for clients. Just minutes earlier, officers patrolling the Civic Center asked them if they were handing out heroin with the syringes. “This is just another example proving the massive gap of comprehension [between] what the needle exchange actually does [and] how it works and affects the community,” says Barbour, a look of disbelief on his face. “There needs to be training and an increase of knowledge among enforcement. Lack of understanding doesn’t allow progression.” Barbour is used to skepticism. Critics—city council members, law enforcement from around the county and Orange County residents—insist OCNEP normalizes drug use, encouraging people to stay addicted instead of trying to get sober. “It’s like saying because condoms are available, people are going to turn


MCARREON@OCWEEKLY.COM

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police departments and do-gooders. “Such rhetoric is still heard far too often in law-enforcement circles,” Goldstein wrote in an essay for Substance.com, a website dedicated to understanding the relationships people have with drugs and addiction. “[It] ignores the proven efficacy of harm-reduction programs at protecting both people who use drugs and publicsafety professionals, while enhancing positive public health outcomes—including the reduction of crime.” Barbour says he wants his clients to get off drugs, which he knows is a goal for a lot of them. He gets inquiries about treat-

in the sex trade, whether they’re using drugs or not,” Muñoz says. “But by serving sex workers, you’re actually taking care of people who are being trafficked. You can’t tell the difference on the street. No one knows who’s who, which is why offering our services at OCNEP is so important.” “This is what a true harm-reduction program provides: multiple services to people who don’t have access to anything,” says Barbour. “It wouldn’t be possible without the other groups who work with us.” The gatherings are also starting to welcome people just released from the nearby Orange County Jail, many of whom were jailed on drug offenses or got hooked in the pen. “This, I believe, is key to their safety,” says Susan, an OCNEP volunteer who works specifically with the recently incarcerated. “Having access to sanitary supplies, condoms, naloxone, medical services, free treatment and access to basic survival needs . . . is critical to their health and well-being.” “I had a person last week tell me that [the volunteers at OCNEP] are the only people in his life who treat him like a person,” says McQuade. “Imagine if everyone in your life treated you like you weren’t a human and gave you no respect whatsoever. Giving these people respect and treating them with compassion is what gives them hope. It helps them heal and can help them see that life is possible without heroin.”

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ROCKOGRAPHY

into sex machines,” Barbour says with a laugh. “That’s obviously not true. It allows people to have sex responsibly, without getting or spreading STDs. That’s what the needle exchange does, too: It allows people to use drugs responsibly without spreading life-altering, devastating diseases.” Diane Goldstein, a retired captain of the Redondo Beach Police Department and board member of Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP), says the obsessive focus on reducing drug supply as opposed to reducing demand perpetuates a groupthink mentality among many

ment at every exchange, but, he admits, the resources in OC are “terrible.” “Abstinence-based treatment programs don’t work for a lot of people,” he says, but “it’s nearly impossible to get people on suboxone unless you have money,” referring to a drug that helps people transition off heroin without withdrawal. “Methadone is available through Medi-Cal, but if you’re homeless or don’t have a means of transportation, it’s going to be really hard to do it. You have to show up every day or every week to get the injection, you’re only given a limited supply, and there are rigid rules if you miss appointments.” OCNEP co-founder McQuade adds that injection-drug users are society’s most stigmatized addicts, which ultimately reinforces their lack of dignity and confidence, as well as their self-loathing mentality. OCNEP, however, operates with a nojudgment rule, accepting and treating with respect every client. That’s why the group works with other like-minded nonprofits. The Aids Foundation of Orange County donates HIV and hepatitis tests so examinations can happen onsite. Meg Muñoz, the founder of Abeni, a nonprofit aimed at providing a safe and confidential place for Orange County sex workers, shows up at every OCNEP gathering. She provides condoms for both men and women, lube, feminine-hygiene products, and pregnancy testing. “We serve sex workers, sex workers who are LGBTQ, people who are hustling. We serve females in the sex trade, males

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MIRACLE DRUG: $16,000 WORTH OF NALOXONE

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fri/01/06

CAROL ROSEGG

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[THEATER]

LOVE HEALS Rent

Currently the 10th-longest-running Broadway musical in history, Jonathan Larson’s Pulitzer Prize- andTony-winning masterpiece returns to the stage with a vibrant 20thanniversary touring production. Following the bohemian lifestyles of a colorful cast of NewYork City twentysomethings, Rent loosely merges Puccini’s opera La Boheme with modern rock songs, weaving together the stories of impoverished artists trying to carve out meaningful lives for themselves in a bleak world racked by AIDS. Don’t miss this chance to get your seasons of love back on. Rent at Segerstrom Center for the Arts, 600Town Center Dr., Costa Mesa, (714) 5562787; www.scfta.org. 7:30 p.m.; also Sat.-Sun. $29-$99. —SR DAVIES

fri/01/06 [ART]

Set Your Sights ‘Los Diez’

Five photographers and five illustrators are showcased at the Museum of Latin American Art’s latest exhibition, “Los Diez.” Selected from the Latin American Fotografia e Ilustración—a juried competition as part of the American Illustration and American Photography foundation, which aims to promote established and student artists working in the fields of editorial, advertising, graphic design, photography, illustration and fine art—they have been recognized as some of the best emerging Latin American artists of their time. Catch tonight’s opening reception, which will offer treats and refreshments, and, most important, get a glimpse at the 10 honorees and their unique artistic perspectives. “Los Diez” at the Museum of Latin American Art, 628 Alamitos Ave., Long Beach, (562) 437-1689; www. molaa.org. 7 p.m. Through Jan. 22. $7-$10; members, free. —AIMEE MURILLO

sat/01/07 [CONCERT]

Atomic Art

Mostly Indium Show It’s been a while since any major art/music/entertainment fusion event hit downtown SanTana, so it’s likely tonight’s Mostly Indium Show will be met with open arms. Here to help brush off those last stubborn icicles from the holiday season are bands Time and Energy, Lobo Incognito and Evan Geesman, among others, plus an art show featuring work by Alejoh Candelo, Michael Ziobrowski, Jouvon Michael Kingsby, Valerie Rodriguez and more. Bring your 21-and-older friends to the Yost Theater during the first downtown SanTana art walk of the year, and enjoy this immersive explosion of creativity in good company. Mostly Indium Show at Yost Theater, 307 N. Spurgeon St., Santa Ana, (888) 862-9573; www.yosttheater. com. 7 p.m. $15. 21+. —AIMEE MURILLO [ART]

Rebel Spirits

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‘Forms of Identity’

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The Orange County Museum of Art opens two exhibits today that couldn’t be more distinct or enticing: “Pop Art Design” brings all the hoopla, thanks to its Mad Men allure, but “Forms of Identity” gathers art created in the 1990s by 16 prolific female artists. They were chosen by curator Alyssa Cordova because their practice shifted from the political to the personal as the 20th century waned; rather than narrowing focus, they tackled identity in explosive ways. Eight of the 18 featured works— from artists including Alexis Smith, Helen Pashgian, Diane Gamboa and China Adams—are new acquisitions to the museum’s permanent collection. What could be more political than the personal from our current point of view—four years from roaring back in 2020? “Forms of Identity: Women Artists in the ’90s” at the Orange County Museum of Art, 850 San Clemente Dr., Newport Beach, (949) 759-1122; www.ocma.net. 11 a.m. Through April 2. $7.50-$10; every Fri., free. —LISA BLACK


[BENEFITS]

Good Hair Game!

Standing Rock Relief Benefit Hair-care professionals from throughout Southern California will be at Lotus Salon & Spa to work their magic on your locks while raising funds for the Sacred Stone Camp at Standing Rock. While stylists and barbers donate their time for cuts, scalp treatments, hair trimming and blow drying, masseuses and beauticians contribute massages, Reiki,

mon/01/09 [ART]

Tell Me a Story . . . ‘Storytellers’

A brushstroke renders a smile—or a grimace, a fold of fabric, or even some animal ears—illustrating a story about the artist. This month’s display at Las Lagunas features plenty of stories bursting from the canvas, and it’s up to your imagination to determine what they are. In “Storytellers,” a plethora of international painters reveal captivating yarns, personal anecdotes, narratives, and moral or spiritual messages and theories. Although some works—such as Beth Blake’s “Super Girl”—have embedded text, you can take in all the marvelous imagery as you would a human storyteller orating an escapist tale. “Storytellers” at Las Laguna Gallery, 577 S. Coast Hwy., Laguna Beach, (949) 6671803; www.laslagunagallery.com. 11 a.m. Through Jan. 27. Free. —AIMEE MURILLO

[FILM]

Timeless Cool

Rebel Without a Cause

—JOSH CHESLER

Hunger for Fun

‘Winter Awakening’ We know you’ve been waiting for the next installment of Geek Meet, and this month’s “Winter Awakening” theme won’t leave you out in the cold. Come dressed as either vampire or lycanthrope to honor the release of the latest Underworld film. Bare your fangs at one another as you partake in some lighthearted mischief via games such

as Cards Against Humanity and Dungeons and Dragons, a cosplay contest, a vendor village, and some nerd speed dating. Plus, there are live bands, refreshments and drinks galore, all to celebrate the love that dare not speak its name—between bloodsucking ghouls and fearsome werewolves, that is. Geek Meet: “Winter Awakenings” at the Slidebar Rock-N-Roll Kitchen, 122 E. Commonwealth Ave., Fullerton, (714) 871-2233; slidebarfullerton.com. 6 p.m. Free. 21+. —AIMEE MURILLO

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Innstead of whatever nonsensical explosion-laden action film your friends went to see last weekend, come see a classic at Directors Cut Cinema, which is helping to educate you on the great flicks from before you (and possibly your parents) were born with Flashback Tuesdays, and it doesn’t get any better than 1955’s legendary Rebel Without a Cause. James Dean has been the definition of cool for the past 60 years, and you’ve likely copied his look whether you know it or not. Why? Because you’re cool, but you’re not James Dean cool. Rebel Without a Cause at Director’s Cut Cinema at Rancho Niguel, 25471 Rancho Niguel Rd., Laguna Niguel, (949) 831-0446; www.regencymovies.com. 7:30 p.m. $8.

[SINGLES EVENTS]

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henna art, face painting and makeup. There’s also a raffle, with prizes such as beauty treats, gift cards for SanTana watering hole and restaurant Lola Gaspar, a half day of rock climbing with a guide at Joshua Tree courtesy of Cliffhanger Guides, and much more— with 100 percent of the day’s proceeds going to the camp. You’ll never look or feel better! Standing Rock Relief Benefit at Lotus Salon & Spa, 427 E. 17th St., Ste. A, Costa Mesa, (949) 646-2400; www.facebook.com/ ChristinaSanchezHairDesign. 9:30 a.m. RSVP required. —AIMEE MURILLO

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sun/01/08

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wed/01/11

thu/01/12

[lecture]

Living History

Bring Your Lunch and Learn For the Bring Your Lunch and Learn series at Muzeo, you can eat your pathetic sandwich during your workday lunch break while experiencing a historic impersonation by Andy Alison. Learn about the diseases of yesteryear and have a laugh or two, as Alison acts out the journals, diaries and daybooks of the esteemed Dr. James Hovey Bullard, M.D., Anaheim’s pioneer physician. It’s better than hearing your co-worker Jason discuss his unhealed boil for the 97th time, and—who knows?—it may just take the edge off the stress of the jammed copy machine that is sure to happen halfway through the printing process and 10 minutes before your meeting. Bring Your Lunch and Learn at Muzeo, 241 S. Anaheim Blvd., Anaheim, (714) 956-8936; muzeo.org. 11:30 a.m. Free. —AMANDA PARSONS

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[CONCERT]

EvErything Will BE All right

Jimmy Eat World It’s hard to believe it’s been nearly 18 years since the release of the band’s seminal Clarity, but Jimmy Eat World continue to put out great music. Known for their early-2000s hits and ushering in the emo movement, the Arizona-based foursome recently released Integrity Blues, showing that the quartet can still write some great tunes, as proved by “Get Right” and “Sure and Certain.” In support of that record, the band have played smaller clubs and theaters, harkening back to their pre-Clarity days. However, that doesn’t mean they’ve lightened up their live show. In fact, Jim Atkins and company are putting on their best performances to date, which is a testament to their longevity. Jimmy Eat World at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 9570600; www.observatoryoc.com. 8 p.m. $39.50. —DANIEL KOHN [lecture]

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[CONCERT]

DArk MAgic Brujería

Go ahead and call “God Only Knows” or “Stairway to Heaven” or all the Brandenburg concertos the greatest songs ever. But we know the real king is “Matando Güeros” (“Killing White People”) by Mexican death metal legends Brujería.The title is proof enough, but the lyric “Matando güeros/estilo Ricky Ramirez” (“Killing white people/Richard Ramirez-style”)? Bruh, that’s the modus operandi of the group: outrageously harsh lyrics done tongue-in-cheek, with beats that sound as if an Aztec is pulling out the heart of some lame-ass consquistador. Go to the Observatory, and don’t worry, gabachos: Jello Biafra used to be a member. Brujería with the Casualties and Piñata Protest at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; www.observatoryoc.com. 8 p.m. $18. —GUSTAVO ARELLANO

Commotion On the Ocean State of Our Ocean

Of all the possible ways the world can implode in the near future, environmental damage is inarguably hovering around the top of that list. The annual State of Our Ocean event, held tonight at the Aquarium of the Pacific, takes a very serious look at how the newly appointed political landscape will affect oceans and sea life. Though we’ve made some very promising steps forward (such as the recent plasticbag ban), there is still much work to do. Come join lecturers and special guests— including David Wilmot, Philippe Cousteau and Senator Mark Begich—as they discuss water conservation and new policy ideas, which are more important now than ever. State of Our Ocean at the Aquarium of the Pacific, 100 Aquarium Way, Long Beach, (562) 590-3100; www.aquariumofpacific. org. 7 p.m. $200. —ERIN DEWITT

amore » online OCWEEKLY.COM


PEPPERS FOR DAYS

HoleInTHeWall

» gustavo arellano

Drive-Thru Italian TUTTO FRESCO 808 N. Tustin Ave., Santa Ana, (714) 568-1035; also at 22332 El Paseo, Rancho Santa Margarita, (949) 858-3360; and 1333 N. Glassell St., Orange, (714) 771-15550; www.tuttofrescorestaurant.com.

F

BRIAN FEINZIMER

Mexican-Food Disneyland

The new Northgate González Market in Anaheim is a culinary theme park— and a bargain to boot!

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of all. All the flavors here were free for the tasting, each gulp somehow more refreshing than the fruit from whence it came. I’ve since decided the pineapple was immaculate and the best way to have it was in its largest size, poured into a huge plastic pitcher secured with a screwed-on lid, equipped with a flip-top spout and completely worth the $6 price. It would take another month to try all of the wonderful 69 cents-per-piece pan dulces from the self-serve bakery. And it would take at least a dozen more visits to explore the taquería beyond the al pastor burrito I had, or even to begin to touch the myriad of ceviches and cocteles from the seafood department. But I’m still dreaming of the chicharrones de panza I tried from the deli. They turned out to be whole deep-fried crispy lengths of pork belly that, when chopped up, tasted just like Filipino lechon kawali. I should also add that although this spiffy new Northgate González is a RitzCarlton compared to the one I usually frequent in SanTana, the prices between all the stores in the chain are comparable. In fact, I’ve not seen a lower price for the little-known tropical fruit called rambutan anywhere else, even in Little Saigon. And on average, I’ve found that my grocery bill here has hovered below a usual trip to Stater Bros.—try to do that at Whole Paycheck. NORTHGATE GONZÁLEZ MARKET 2030 E. Lincoln Ave., Anaheim, (714) 507-7640; www.northgatemarkets.com. Open daily, 6 a.m.11 p.m. Meal for two, $10-$20, food only.

GARELLANO@OCWEEKLY.COM

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cubes and mixed with diced onions and chiles. When I asked the counter person how I should prepare it, she smiled. “Just fry it in a pan with a little bit of oil!” she said in English, motioning as though she had a spatula in her hand. “No need to add anything. It’s already got everything in it!” Everyone at Northgate (which employs our Mexican-in-Chief’s dad as a truck driver) was as exceedingly helpful as she was. At the champurrado cart, a woman offered me a warm cup of not only the masa-based hot chocolate drink that’s more nourishing in cold weather than mother’s milk, but also ponche, a soothingly warm spiced cider with chunks of fruit floating in it. Then, at the hot foods counter, when I pointed at the bubblecrusted empanadas behind the glass, the attendant gave me not only a taste, but also almost half of an entire one to eat right there in front of her. “Do you like it?” she inquired, cocking her head as I devoured the beef-filled fried pastry pocket while its hot juices dribbled down my arm. “Yes! I’ll take that one and also the spinach!” Later, at a stand in the middle of the produce section, another woman gave me a heaping mound of fresh guacamole that she managed to fit onto a chip. When I asked for a tub, she mixed it to order with as few or as many chopped green chiles as I wanted. To pair with it, I picked up an unreasonably tall bag of the store’s tortilla chips, fried that same day. As I discovered later, they are impossible to resist, even when the guacamole’s gone. Then there was the section of agua frescas, perhaps my favorite Northgate “land”

Jan uary 2,x2 mo n th 0 x 6-1 x–x , 017 2 014

he easy comparison to make is that the new Northgate González Market in Anaheim is the Whole Foods of Mexican grocery stores. It’s certainly that. It’s shined to a polish, has a wonderful cheese department and features prepared foods sold by the pound from self-serve islands, including a steamy section filled with nothing but tamales. But in a city whose main attraction is a theme park, I’d argue that Northgate González is actually more of a Mexican-food Disneyland. The store’s departments are so fun to explore they may as well be Adventureland or Frontierland. I spent nearly a half-hour deciding what I wanted from the tortillería, a corner dedicated to producing stacks of tortillas so fresh the sweaty bags were still warm to the touch. The variety can’t be overstated; I had no idea there could be so many kinds. Some tortillas were tinted green with Hatch chiles; others had nopales embedded in them. But did I want the usual discs? Or should I get the thick ones reserved for gorditas? Or maybe the oblong ones for huaraches? I finally settled on a stack of yellow corn tortillas for less than $2. It made at least a dozen tacos and fed me for a week. For filling those tacos, I headed to the carnicería, a department that looked as though it were paved in red meat. There was chicken and pork, for sure, but beef was clearly the E-ticket attraction. There were slabs from every conceivable part of the cattle, some already marinated and ready for grilling. I took a pound of carne de res, preseasoned taco meat cut into tiny

By EDwin GoEi

or years, I’ve driven past the Tutto Fresco in SanTana and wondered: Drivethru Italian? Who the hell came up with that heresy? I figured it was a bad chain, à la Carrabba’s or the Olive Garden, and never bothered to visit. But over the holidays, I went to a dinner hosted by the Perriccone boys, makers of the best orange juice on the planet. They insisted I give Tutto Fresco a shot, agreed the concept seemed bizarre but swore it was legit—and who am I to disagree with Sicilians? I was only partly right about one thing: Tutto Fresco is a chain, but it’s a mini-one, with all locations in Orange County. All my other assumptions made a you-know-what out of me (definitely not ustedes, gentle readers). The drive-thru menu (available only at the Orange and SanTana branches) rivals an Alerto’s in its encyclopedic offerings: pastas, sandwiches, wraps, salads and combos galore, with no sacrifice in flavor. But a far better option is to dine in, as the portions become bigger and better and even more specials pop up. A lightly fried eggplant rotolo is so savory you’ll swear there’s meat inside (nope: it’s the gorgeous combination of pesto and tomato basil). The personal pizzas combine Neapolitan finesse with American heft; something as simple as a side caesar salad as part of the lunch special is perfect. All the sauces are wonderful: The Alfredo is creamy but not cloying; the marinara, bright and light. Even the olive oil and balsamic makes you pause to admire the quality here. The Rancho Santa Margarita Tutto Fresco is more upscale, with a bar and even more specials. And though the Orange and SanTana Tutto Frescos are technically fast-casual—you order from a counter and pay there—they still have the customer service of fine-dining establishments: If I order something as cheapskate as water, a waiter will nevertheless grab the cup and fill it from the soda machine without prompting. My apologies to Tutto Fresco for ignoring them all these years, and don’t worry: My panza is proof I’ve been making up for lost time.

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OC’s FINEST PERUVIAN CUISINE

food» THE MIRACLES OF FLASH

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DENISE DE LA CRUZ

A Fine La Habra Pie Pizza at Vinny’s Italian Restaurant

N

ext time you’re driving down Lambert Road in La Habra, look for Vinny’s Italian Restaurant in the industrial plaza across the street from the always-packed In-N-Out. Around dinnertime, the restaurant is almost as crowded as the burger joint’s drive-thru line. Stands holding fresh 12- to 16-inch pizzas lord over the tables at the family-owned eatery known for dishing out the best pies and traditional Italian food in town. What makes these pizzas superior to Vinny’s competitors is their freshness and heft. A Margherita pizza (misspelled as “margarita” on the menu, but who’s pay-

EatthisNow » denise de la cruz

ing attention?) has thick layers of marinara with fresh roma tomato slices and the perfect amount of garlic oil. Sweet basil and gooey mozzarella cheese top this decadence. You can customize your toppings or pick from a menu of 11 specialty pizzas. Try the pastrami-mustard pizza and revel in its tangy yet savory awesomeness. VINNY’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT 2101 E. Lambert Rd., La Habra, (562) 694-3400.

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JA NU A RY 06- 12 , 20 1 7

» gustavo arellano

18

Mezcales de Leyenda Guerrero

O

axaca gets the super-vast majority of all press for mezcal, but that’s a great disservice to the many other Mexican regions that produce the spirit. Zacatecas mezcal is, like its people, magical; mezcal in Michoacán is harsh yet beautiful. And then you get to Guerrero, one of Mexico’s most beautiful yet misunderstood states, a place that has sent tens of thousands of people to SanTana alone. I once had a Guerrero mezcal made with passion fruit, and it was as spectacular as it sounds. But you see almost no mezcal guerrerense in Southern California—in fact, I had never seen one sold commercially until finding Mezcales de Leyenda at the Mixing Glass.

THE MEXICAN

THE DRINK

The Leyenda line is committed to highlighting mezcal diversity (and sustainable practices), and its Guerrero choice is emblematic of the jungle state. It starts hot but ends with a fruitiness you don’t get from Oaxacan mezcales. Don’t waste this chingón on a cocktail—it’s a sipper. And if Mixing Glass owner Gabrielle Dion doesn’t have any in stock, buy something else—and put down a deposit on the next shipment. Available at the Mixing Glass, 3313 Hyland Ave., Costa Mesa, (714) 975-9952.


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La Parolaccia is more Italian than you

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LA PARO LACCIA 2945 E. Broadway, Long Beach, (562) 4381235; www.laparolacciausa.com.

Roxanne’s Cocktail Lounge & Latin Grill 1115 E Wardlow Rd, Long Beach, California 90807 (562) 426-4777 www.roxanneslounge.com Tickets avaliable at: www.eventbrite.com/e/so-cal-whisky-wonderland-tickets-24826951079

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bubbliest wood-fired pizzas in Long Beach. Though other immigrants originally helped Stefano launch La Parolaccia 13 years ago, many of the core dishes (his mother’s recipes, natch) come from his native central Italy, where made-daily pasta (such as the spaghetti nonna malvina) comes with lots of tomatoes, beef and pecorino cheese. Stefano travels back often and frequently rotates in new ideas, all of which fall into the “how the hell is this so cheap and so good” range. A beef risotto is sautéed with a Barbera wine and topped with veal ossobuco. Hand-formed gnocci come with ham, pancetta and spinach in a curry-like saffron cream sauce. And the recent special fettuccine giallorosse references the colors of the A.S. Roma soccer team with a mound of spinach, tomatoes, burrata and pine nuts. On my most recent visit, I found the menu had been rearranged to include a “Mozzarella Bar,” highlighting the housemade cheeses in such thoughtful appetizers as burricotta (ricotta-stuffed burrata) and scamorzetta (oven-baked mozzarella and prosciutto). I ordered one with our first bottle of wine. Somehow, even with the comfort of family and my great Uncle Joe’s famous clam sauce that defines my chaotic Christmas Eves, it was a dinner at La Parolaccia that proved the right solution to my year-end Italian-food cravings. With a glass of wine in hand and the servers tossing phrases and orders in Italian around me, in that cozy osteria in the middle of Long Beach, I’ve never felt more at home.

12 PM - 6 PM

J an ua ry 0 6- 1 2, 2 017

very year around the holidays, my cravings for a proper Italian dinner flare. And I don’t just mean a need for a box of pasta and some red sauce (I’m a basic enough of a home cook to deal with those needs). I’m talking about spending a few solid hours with some friends at a local ristorante downing an antipasti, then a primi, then a segundi, with a few bottles of dry Chianti and good conversation that lasts long after the last plates are cleared and the espresso is gone. Perhaps these December cravings are a Pavlovian response in anticipation of Christmas Eve, when four generations of my U.S.-born Sicilian clan cook more shrimp scampi and eggplant parmesan than we know what to do with and get extra loud over lots of wine until someone’s sleepy kid finally says, “Can we go home yet?” Usually, I’m so busy I just wait out the hankerings until Christmas Eve. This time, I went to La Parolaccia to get my fill. Most of the time, they are speaking (yelling?) to one another. Sometimes, they will talk to one another in Italian while standing next to your table, just moments after speaking to you in perfect English. When I disgrace my heritage and butcher the pronunciation of my favorite dishes— such as ravioli di astice e gamberetti (lobster and shrimp ravioli in a limoncello cream sauce) and timballo del legionario (baked rigatoni and short ribs)—they never make me feel stupid; they just repeat it back in perfect, proper Roman Italian. Most of the employees are either family members of Italian-immigrant owner/chef Stefano Procaccini or students studying the language and culture at Cal State Long Beach. Stefano’s son, Michael Procaccini, is the house piazzaiolo, sweating over the built-in pizza oven that presides over the corner dining room as he makes some of the

January 14th, LONG BEACH, CA.

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| classifieds | music | culture | film | food | calendar | feature | the county | contents | Ja nu a ry 06- 12 , 20 1 7

food»

Pescado Power!

Ten great fish tacos in Orange County By anne marie panoringan

F

ish, tortilla, sauce, salsa and citrus squeeze—traditionally, that’s what you’ll get out of a fish taco list. We’re including classic preparations, but we’re also pushing the definition of what goes into one. So go ahead and double-take our alphabetically listed 10.

BAJA FISH TACOS

714.739.1610 cabotacobajagrill.com 15294 Rosecrans Ave., La Mirada, CA 90601

Twenty years strong and growing (an Orange location opens soon near the 22 freeway), the original Baja Fish Tacos is on Bristol in Santa Ana. We like the choice between grilled, Ensenada-style and blackened. 3664 S. Bristol St., Santa Ana, (714) 641-4836; www.bajafishtacos.com.

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ANNE MARIE PANORINGAN

style, with a secret crema and an even more secret red salsa unmatched anywhere in the OC fish-taco universe. Our Mexican-in-Chief, however, prefers the fish burrito, which he describes as “crunchy, fluffy, tart, spicy perfection.” Can’t argue with that! 11951 Euclid St., Garden Grove, (714) 636-3944. THE PIKE RESTAURANT AND BAR

CABO TACO BAJA GRILL

A place need not specialize in tacos to cook a tasty fish version. Using both chipotle sauce and salsa fresca gives Cabo’s tacos subtle kick. And enjoy that sizable chunk of golden-fried seafood. 15294 Rosecrans Ave., La Mirada, (714) 739-1610; cabotacobajagrill.com. TACO MARIA

Whether Carlos Salgado is making fried fillets or sturgeon spiked with a Russian sauce, the James Beard-nominated chef knows his pescado. 3313 Hyland Ave., Costa Mesa, (714) 538-8444; www.tacomaria.com. DRIFTWOOD KITCHEN

This oceanfront property elevates the humble meal to resort status with yellowfin tuna tartare. Driftwood tucks its seafood into a sesame-and-miso shell, finishing it with cilantro, greens and a touch of guac. Refreshing without being heavy, you’ll have sufficient room for another drink after this small plate. 619 Sleepy Hollow Lane, Laguna Beach, (949) 715-7700; driftwoodkitchen.com. J FISH PREMIUM POKE & SUSHI

20

J FISH’S MARINE MADNESS

Covering its bases beyond the poke, J Fish offers this spicy, deep-fried salmon, with crema, cabbage, corn tortilla and lemon wedge in check. Salmon made it more indulgent . . . not that we have a problem with it. 13882 Newport Ave., Ste. A, Tustin, (714) 617-4891; www.jfishtustin.com. LOS COTIJAS

The choice for old-school Weeklings, this Garden Grove stand does it Ensenada-

Best known for its lively music scene and cheap-but-great drinks, the Pike might also be one of the most underrated seafood-taco spots in Long Beach and Orange County. Its Baja fish tacos are perfectly fried; its mahi mahi, luscious; and its lobster tacos, decadent. But perhaps the best is the grilled shrimp tacos: smoky, buttery, perfect. 1836 E. Fourth St., Long Beach, (562) 437-4453; www.pikelongbeach.com. SLAPFISH

Fellow Weeklings have waxed poetic about many aspects of this OC-based menu. Yet Slapfish’s tacos are just as legit. Sustainability may be the focus, but photogenic handheld meals are a bonus. With locations along a number of beach cities, rapid expansion begins next year. Various locations; www.slapfishrestaurant.com. SOL COCINA

Beer-battered, deep-fried goodness is right at home in Newport. Chef Deb’s extensive menu knows when to keep it simple and when to bring on the creativity. Her other version of fish is adobomarinated and served with a pineapplecucumber salsa. 251 Pacific Coast Hwy., Newport Beach, (949) 675-9800; www.solcocina.com. TACO ASYLUM

While the bulk of the menu is blasphemous for a taco purist, a classic cod can be ordered blackened or fried. Squeeze the lime, order a craft beer and contemplate some Asylum ghost chile hot sauce—you’d be crazy not to. 2937 S. Bristol St., Costa Mesa, (714) 922-6010; www.tacoasylum.com. LETTERS@OCWEEKLY.COM


FUKUSHIMA WHO?

COURTESY OF WGBH

No News Is Good Nukes

Open your eyes to Nova’s ‘The Nuclear Option’ By matt coker

W

the populace is justifiably spooked by the technology that used to be the source of 30 percent of the country’s energy. Since the disaster, Japan has suspended its civilian nuclear-power program and imported oil, coal and natural gas to fill the gap. But with 18,000 people having died in the earthquake that caused the tsunami that took out the nuclear plant, and with the evacuated residential areas within a 12-mile radius of the facility still rendered ghost towns, O’Brien reveals something surprising: There has not been one death attributed to radiation exposure, and no one has reported getting sick. Not yet, anyway. More to the point of the piece, despite Fukushima—and because of climate change—there is a renewed push for better, cleaner and safer nuclear power. Among those leading this charge is Bill Gates, who is shown announcing his own investment in the technology at a 2010 TED talk in Long Beach, as well as young entrepreneurs who have grown up without the stigma of the “No Nukes” rallies of the 1970s. “The Nuclear Option” exposes the reason for their optimism: far better ways of keeping reactors cool and safe with sodium as opposed to water, something the engineering fathers of nuclear power in America knew and proved for decades—only to

be stymied by the father of nuclear-powered naval submarines and Hillary Clinton’s husband. Those bully on new nukes concede that aging facilities are disasters waiting to happen, but they also argue that technological advances since the 1960s and ’70s still make the power source viable, critically so given climate change. My only knock against the Nova episode is no direct counter-argument to the sunny view is presented from, say, one of my pals at the NRDC. Environmentalists mostly pop up in archival footage and not on-screen interviews, although O’Brien does include a segment with a Columbia University medical expert who expects an eventual rise in cancer cases among those who used to live near Fukushima. A bit more balance would not have changed my own view about the need for a brave new nuclear future, however. One young nuclearpreneur puts it best when she says into the camera, “If you are concerned about climate change, you need to be open to nuclear power.” Stymied so far by U.S. regulators, she is currently getting her technology off the ground in China. NOVA’S ‘THE NUCLEAR OPTION’ airs on PBS SoCal KOCE. Wed., 9 p.m.

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months before my former fearless leader left the Weekly, came the Fukushima Daiichi accident in Japan. The following year, potentially disastrous cracks at San Onofre were revealed, eventually forcing Southern California Edison to announce the retirement of its last two working nuclear reactors there on June 7, 2013. All that left me wary of re-pitching my story to our current Mexican-in-Chief, despite my holding onto the personal belief that nukes were still going to have to be part of our near-term energy strategy, given the dichotomous phenomena of climate change and the massive amount of electricity we use now and will need in the future. For all its faults (and spent rods), nuclear power is relatively clean energy. Fortunately, Nova’s “The Nuclear Option,” which premieres locally Wednesday night, makes the argument far better than I could have. Credit the episode’s writer, director, producer, narrator and on-camera reporter, Miles O’Brien, who for years was CNN’s science, space, aviation technology and environment correspondent and is now an independent journalist who also serves as an aviation analyst for the network. He begins by taking viewers to Fukushima and elsewhere in Japan, where

Jan uary 6-1 2,x,2 017 mo nt h 0 xx–x 2 0 14

atching an upcoming episode of the PBS science series Nova, it occurred to me that the main theme was something I had wanted to explore as an OC Weekly cover story six or seven years ago. Before acquiring this infernal rag, our owners at the time had infamously run a two-part investigative story that detailed how the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and other groups convinced the American public that a proposed salt plant in Baja California would harm birthing gray whales—without any evidence that this was so. It was a very unalternative piece for an alternative newsweekly, so I figured my proposed cover story would be a natural. My planned topic: To arrive at the green-energy future this blue planet demands, we are going to have to rely on nuclear power. Alas, like so many of my other cover story pitches back then, it was immediately shot down. “No one wants to embrace nukes”—or words to that effect— is what I was told, and you really can’t blame the then-editor. There were serious concerns back then about a powerful earthquake possibly leading to a meltdown at San Onofre. Then, on March 11, 2011, or eight

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| classifieds | music | culture | film | food | calendar | feature | the county | contents | Jan ua ry 06 -12 , 2017

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film»special screenings

Write Drunk, Edit Sober Banksy Does New York. The eighth season of the city of Laguna Beach’s First Friday Flicks series, which runs monthly through March, opens with this documentary on Banksy, the elusive Scarlet Pimpernel of the international art scene for close to 20 years. How, in our CCTV/smartphone/digitally surveilled era, has he been able to do his hit-and-run stencil-street-art thing without getting caught or his identity revealed? Watch his now-famous 31-day “residency” in New York in October 2013 in search of clues. Director Chris Moukarbel’s 79-minute film is followed by a half-hour panel discussion. [seven-degrees] multimedia art center, 891 Laguna Canyon Rd., Laguna Beach, (949) 497-0722. Fri. Doors open, 6 p.m.; screening, 7 p.m. Free; food and drinks available for purchase. The Lost Boys. Do you want to feel old also? It’s already the 30th anniversary of director Joel Schumacher’s campy horror comedy set in the “Murder Capital of the World,” Santa Carla (a.k.a. the fictionalized Santa Cruz). Michael (Jason Patric) and Sam (Corey Haim) move to the sleepy beachfront town with their mom, Lucy (Dianne Weist). While she’s out looking for a job, Michael and Sam unknowingly befriend a gang of teen vampires led by the charasmatic David (Kiefer Sutherland). It’s up to Michael, Sam, beautiful Star (Jami Gertz) and the Frog brothers (Jamison Newlander and the Two Coreys bookend Corey Feldman) to fight off the bloodsuckers. This kicks off the 2017 OC Weekly Friday Night Freakouts series. The Frida Cinema, 305 E. Fourth St., Santa Ana; thefridacinema.org. Fri., 11 p.m. $7-$10. Nabucco. New York’s Metropolitan Opera presents Verdi’s early drama of ancient Babylon, with Placido Domingo making his debut in the title role for the Met. Liudmyla Monastyrska sings the tour-de-force role of Abigaille, Nabucco’s willful daughter, with Jamie Barton as Fenena, Russell Thomas as Ismaele and Dmitry Belosselskiy as the prophet Zaccaria, the role of his 2011 Met debut. Met Music Director James Levine conducts as high-definition footage is beamed into theaters live from NYC during the Fathom Events presentation that also includes interviews with cast, crew and the production team during intermission. The three-hour, five-minute opera is presented in Italian with English subtitles. AMC Marina Pacifica, 6346 E. Pacific Coast Hwy., Long Beach, (562) 430-8790; also at AMC Orange 30, 20 City Blvd. W., Orange, (714) 769-4288; AMC Tustin Legacy at the District, 2457 Park Ave., Tustin, (714) 258-7036; Cinemark

at the Pike Theaters, 99 S. Pine Ave., Long Beach, (800) 967-1932; Cinemark Century Stadium 25, 1701 W. Katella Ave., Orange, (714) 532-9558; Cinemark Century 20 Huntington Beach, 7777 Edinger Ave., Huntington Beach, (714) 373-4573; Edwards Aliso Viejo Stadium 20, 26701 Aliso Creek Rd., Aliso Viejo, (844) 462-7342; Edwards Irvine Spectrum 21, 65 Fortune Dr., Irvine, (844) 462-7342; and Edwards Long Beach Stadium 26, 7501 E. Carson, Long Beach, (844) 4627342; www.FathomEvents.com. Sat., 9:55 a.m. $17-$25; taped encore, Wed., 6:30 p.m. $16-$23. Carousel. Fathom Events and Twentieth Century Fox present a 60th-anniversary screening of the Rodgers & Hammerstein classic musical, plus an exclusive interview with star Shirley Jones. After tragedy strikes, Billy Bigelow (Gordon MacRae), a smooth-talking carny man, makes his way to heaven, then back to his wife (Jones) and daughter for one day of love, solace and redemption. Cinemark Century Stadium 25, (714) 5329558; also at Cinemark Century 20 Huntington Beach, (714) 373-4573; Edwards Aliso Viejo Stadium 20, (844) 462-7342; Edwards Irvine Spectrum 21, (844) 4627342; and Edwards Long Beach Stadium 26, (844) 462-7342; www.FathomEvents. com. Sun., 2 & 7 p.m. $6.25-$9.50; Wed., 2 & 7 p.m. $9.25-$9.50. The Bowden Dynasty: A Story of Faith, Family & Football. Veteran film and television producer John Corry, along with Rob Harvell and Brian Goodwin, the producers who created ESPN Films’ The Book of Manning and I Hate Christian Laettner, explore the life and career of Bobby Bowden, the coach with a team of loyal assistants, and players who fought against all odds and countless obstacles to forge one of the greatest achievements in the history of sports. From 1987 to 2000, the once-laughable Florida State Seminoles won the hearts of America and thrilled their fans with 14 consecutive seasons of 10 or more wins. Besides presenting this documentary, Fathom Events takes West Coast viewers to the tape-delayed world premiere in St. Petersburg, Florida, where red-carpet arrivals, a special introduction by Bowden and his family, and a special Q&A with the retired coach are included. AMC Orange 30, (714) 769-4288; also at Edwards Aliso Viejo Stadium 20, (844) 462-7342; Edwards Brea Stadium West 10, 255 W. Birch St., Brea, (714) 672-4136; Edwards Irvine Spectrum 21, (844) 462-7342; and Edwards Long Beach Stadium 26, (844) 462-7342; www.FathomEvents.com. Sun., 6 p.m. Call for ticket prices.

BY MATT COKER “YOU’RE TEARING ME APART”

NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE

Princess Mononoke. It’s an encore presentation, dubbed in English, of the 20th-anniversary screening of Hayao Miyazaki’s Studio Ghibli classic that has young warrior Ashitaka infected with a deadly curse that sends him looking for a cure in the forest. There, he meets Princess Mononoke, who was raised by wolves and will do everything in her power to prevent humans from destroying her home and the forest spirits and animal gods that live there. Fathom Events and GKIDS also beam into theaters Miyazaki’s 1995 music video for “On Your Mark” that was never before released in North America. AMC Orange 30, (714) 769-4288; also at Cinemark at the Pike Theaters, (800) 967-1932; Cinemark Century Stadium 25, (714) 532-9558; Cinemark Century 20 Huntington Beach, (714) 373-4573; Edwards Aliso Viejo Stadium 20, (844) 462-7342; Edwards Irvine Spectrum 21, (844) 462-7342; and Edwards Long Beach Stadium 26, (844) 462-7342; www.FathomEvents.com. Mon., 7 p.m. Call for ticket prices. Rebel Without a Cause. Jim Stark (James Dean) is the new kid in town in 1955. He has been in trouble elsewhere; that’s why his family has had to move before. Here, he hopes to find the love he doesn’t get from his middle-class family. Though he finds some of this in his relationship with Judy (Natalie Wood), as well as a form of it in both Plato’s (Sal Mineo) adulation and Ray’s (Edward Platt) real concern for him, Jim must still prove himself to his peers in switchblade knife fights and “chickie”

games in which cars race toward a seaside cliff. Speaking of cars, Dean died in a solo car crash the same year this influential movie was released. Regency Directors Cut Cinema at Rancho Niguel, 25471 Rancho Niguel Rd., Laguna Niguel, (949) 831-0446. Tues. Call for show time. $8. No Man’s Land. Broadcast in HD from London’s Wyndham’s Theatre, this National Theatre Live screening of Harold Pinter’s hit play stars Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart as two aging writers who meet in a pub and embark on a night of storytelling and drinking. But the evening takes an interesting and possibly sinister turn when two younger men join the party. Relationships are exposed, with menace and hilarity. Irvine Barclay Theatre, 4242 Campus Dr., Irvine, (949) 854-4646. Tues., 6:30 p.m. $17. One Piece Film: Gold. The Straw Hat pirates hit the big screen again in an all-new high-flying anime adventure

presented on three different dates by Fathom Events and Funimation Films. The glittering Gran Tesoro, a city of entertainment beyond the laws of the government, is a sanctuary for the world’s most infamous pirates, Marines and filthy-rich millionaires. Drawn by dreams of hitting the jackpot, Captain Luffy and his crew sail straight for the gold. But behind the gilded curtains lies a powerful king whose deep pockets and deeper ambitions spell disaster for the Straw Hats and the New World alike. AMC Orange 30, (714) 769-4288; also at AMC Tustin Legacy at the District, (714) 258-7036; Cinemark Century Stadium 25, (714) 532-9558; Edwards Aliso Viejo Stadium 20, (844) 462-7342; Edwards Irvine Spectrum 21, (844) 4627342; and Edwards Long Beach Stadium 26, (844) 462-7342; www.FathomEvents. com. Tues. & Thurs., Jan. 12, plus Jan. 17, 7:30 p.m. $10.50-$12.50. MCOKER@OCWEEKLY.COM


TrendZilla

The Performing Arts Festival That Can

» aimee murillo

Sew It to Me

Segerstrom’s Off Center free-for-all returns stronger than ever By Joel Beers

M

ost performing-arts festivals blow. All kinds of shows are crammed into all kinds of venues, with nary a rhyme nor reason for what is playing anywhere, leaving the poor fool who just wants to catch a decent play or two frantically scrambling to find something interesting. For living proof of that, check out the major fail that is the Hollywood Fringe Festival every summer. But not here in good old Orange County: The Off Center Festival at the Segerstrom Center spreads out for a leisurely 16 days over this month, with six solo or group artists performing 12 times at four venues. It’s all orderly and efficient, and while it may not have that used-syringe-needle or rats-scurrying-beneath-your-feet feel as some festivals in shitty neighborhoods in big cities, there’s no denying the range of eclectic work on tap for this year’s event. Expect everything from a cabaret artist acclaimed as the greatest of his generation to an underground theater company from Eastern Europe that is living all the big talk American artists like to reference when they’re all hopped up with “suffering for one’s art.” Here is your orderly, efficient guide to this years’ offerings:

JIM CARMODY

freedoms.” Studio Performance Space. Jan. 19-21, 7:30 p.m. $25. Choir! Choir! Choir! Apparently, this is some kind of community-choir deal in which performers interact with amateur singers, all of them busting out pop hits. It’s quite the international phenom, as some 1,200 people turned out to join Rufus Wainwright singing Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah” shortly after his death. It’s also based in Canada and raises money for 25 different charities, all of which means it’s better than being a sullen dick who might write this thing off as overwrought karaoke. Segerstrom Concert Hall. Jan. 25, 8 p.m. Free, but tickets are required. Justin Vivian Bond Shows Up. Singer/ writer/painter/performance artist/actor Bond has received a slew of awards, including an Obie in 2001 and Tony nomination in 2007. In 2011, The New Yorker called the 47-year-old Bond “the best cabaret artist of his generation,” and that is way better than being the 96th best. Samueli Theater. Jan. 27-28, 8 p.m. $25. OFF CENTER FESTIVAL at the Segerstrom Center for the Arts, 600 Town Center Dr., Costa Mesa, (714) 556-2787; www.scfta.org/offcenter. Jan. 12-28. Call or visit the website for more information.

AMURILLO@OCWEEKLY.COM DAIZY LEMONADE inside In Retrospect, 2122 E. Fourth St., Long Beach, (562) 4336600. Follow Daizy Lemonade on Instagram: @shopdaizylemonade.

Daizy Lemonade Brings Sartorial Girl Power to Long Beach’s Retro Row

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daughter of Willy Chevalier, an actor and composer in New York’s Latin vaudeville circuit who went from rags to riches and ended up singing in a Spanish restaurant while waiting tables. This is Gomez’s latest monologue addressing Chevalier’s life and legacy, juxtaposing stories about her father’s songs and her youth growing up in New York City with being a lesbian Latina drag queen during San Francisco’s gentrification turmoil. Judy Morr Theater. Jan. 19-21, 8 p.m. $20. Time of Women. A trio of performers from the underground Belarus Free Theatre is staging a Russian-language play (with English subtitles) about three women imprisoned in 2010 during the Eastern European country’s fraudulent elections. It’s about not cowing to the reigning political order and speaking out and dissenting. As if that’s not enough, this company, which has no physical space in its home country, is, according to American Theatre magazine, “a theatrical marvel. It is, arguably, a theater of firsts; the first contemporary company to survive, function and flourish both in exile and at home, despite repression; the first to rely on the internet to direct and create its art; the first to campaign globally for human rights, as well as basic human

f you’re in the market for an outfit that looks as if you borrowed it from Marcia Brady or Goldie Hawn circa Laugh-In, you’re in luck; Daizy Lemonade sells plenty of clothing from that era and beyond. Originally an online store opened by Caylen Leigh in 2014, it grew to a physical boutique inside In Retrospect, an antique mall on Long Beach’s Retro Row. A longtime thrifter, Leigh says she enjoys selling her clothes at an established vintage department store because “it [allows] me the freedom of having a physical place where all my customers could shop without me actually having to be there 24/7.” That way, Leigh could focus on her side projects, among them styling for films, commercials and editorial work. Not limited to simply ’60s wardrobes, the Orange-born Leigh includes in Daizy Lemonade’s collection whatever colorful clothing she’s drawn to, including ’60s mod and psychedelic, ’70s funk, ’80s new wave, kawaii, ’90s grunge, and Y2K pop-star vibes. Her finds are funky, playful and eclectic—and, for vintage clothing, strikingly affordable. There’s a wide variety of statement-y feminine pieces, such as miniskirts, babydoll dresses, bikinis, teddys, even classic peignoirs. Daizy Lemonade is a celebration of bold women’s fashions throughout the decades, a visual exclamation of “Girl Power” through fashion. The physical shop at In Retrospect is permanent, so stop by, rifle through the racks and check out the fun accessories and toys available. Leigh plans to expand her space and bring in more merchandise, and she’s crossing her fingers to someday open a booth at the Orange Circle Antique Mall. “I would also like to decorate [my shop] more,” she says, “so when my online customers come to the shop, they instantly know, ‘Oh, that’s Daizy Lemonade!’”

Jan uary 2,x2 mo n th 0 x 6-1 x–x , 017 2 014

The Bitter Game. This is emerging “actorvist” Keith A. Wallace’s one-man show set on a basketball court. It’s a “dark, searing play [that gives] mostly white audiences a one-hour glimpse of what it’s like to be a black man in America,” according to the San Diego Union-Tribune. Wallace was raised in Philadelphia and received his MFA from UC San Diego; Bitter Game was one of the highlights of the La Jolla Playhouse’s caffeinated 2015 festival, Without Walls (20 shows in three days—but not as bad as Los Angeles’ Fringe. Ugh redux). Samueli Theater. Jan. 12-13, 8 p.m. $20. Mariachi Flor de Toloache. Oh, the stuff one learns in this gig. The flower of the Toloache plant is Mexico’s flower of love and death, used as a principal ingredient in love potions, and the mariachi band that has taken its name is composed of women. The ensemble earned a Latin Grammy nomination in the Best Ranchera category for their self-titled 2014 debut album. And, yes, mariachi, like all musical and performing arts and lots of other stuff, is theatrical in its essence, so save it. Samueli Theater. Jan. 14, 8 p.m. $20. Latin Standards. Marga Gomez is the

KEITH A. WALLACE IN THE BITTER GAME

I

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music»artists|sounds|shows NEW-SCHOOL COOL

DIY Diamond In the Rough

@WHATS2STEAL

Da Dank revives Whittier’s wild local music scene BY DenIse De La CRuz

I

n a humble warehouse in West Whittier called Da Dank, you’ll find some of the craziest shows in town. An ordinary evening at this DIY space typically includes dancing, moshing, skanking, and plenty of head bobbing and foot tapping; if the epic dance sequence from Peanuts were real, it would’ve been held here. Since opening its doors to the public last year, Da Dank has garnered a steady following of young music junkies thanks to its well-curated shows and social-media buzz. ViceVersa, the Whittier-based band that operates the venue, personally welcome a plethora of talented musicians from surrounding cities every weekend. “We realized that we were sitting on this untapped vortex that was right in the middle of OC and downtown LA,” says Zeke Zeledon, lead singer and guitarist of ViceVersa. “The longer we played gigs, the more we found awesome bands that were right here in our hood—we knew the scene needed a spot like this.” After Penny Lane Records and Fenix 5-4 folded years ago, the live music scene has been lacking beyond the well-behaved lounge acts that play the restaurant and bar circuit in Uptown Whittier. A city that was once sprawling with hardcore gigs at local Christian churches, backyard rocka-

billy shows and jam-packed hip-hop beat showcases has been musically dormant lately. Thankfully, Da Dank is a welcoming place for Whittier’s young music-lovers to build a scene of their own. Located in a low-key industrial plaza off Washington Boulevard, Da Dank hosts an artist’s paradise. Upon passing through a metal door, you step into a hallway with lime-green walls and a beautiful cherryred velvet couch. A ticket window with either a member of ViceVersa or one of their homies charges folks around 5 bucks a pop for entry—which isn’t bad considering you’re likely to see at least five talented bands on any given night. And they’re the type of acts that will have you asking everyone around you where to find more of their music. After you get your hand stamped, an adjacent loft-like room with couches, a merch/art table, a projector, a sound board and a makeshift stage with a green spotlight greets you. The crowd is made up of teenagers and twentysomethings from Whittier and neighboring towns such as La Habra, La Mirada and Brea. Jammed into a corner of the room and surrounded by the floodlights and swaying bodies, is a stage area, where bands the likes of the Red Pears, Pity Party and Bloom Cycle whip crowds of diehard fans into a frenzy.

The founders of Brea’s Crystal Gallery, another popular DIY space that was shut down last year, frequent Da Dank as well to show their support. Even bands from as far away as Ohio and Seattle have passed through Da Dank to play in the millennial enclave. Genres ranging from punk, reggae, ska, cumbia, jazz, soul, hip-hop and everything in between are well-received and frequently met with chants of “¡Otra!” (“another one” in Spanish) from the multiracial, though mostly Latinx, crowd. Scenes are so surreal and filled with musical desmadre that many Dank-goers pull out their phones in an effort to capture all the chaos on their Snapchat and Instagram accounts. Just last month, the venue hosted its biggest night yet, which saw about 300 youthful souls dancing, moshing and singing in unison. While ViceVersa relish that Da Dank has become such a popular venue in Whittier, they also want to make sure they’re providing patrons with a safe space, and not just in societal terms. In light of a fatal fire that occurred at a similar creative space in Oakland last year, the members of ViceVersa say general safety is their top priority. “I feel bad for everyone who got hurt, but at the same time, you can do things to prevent things like that,” Zeledon says as he points to the

venue’s three neon emergency-exit signs and a plaque displaying a city permit. As more and more DIY venues both in LA and OC face being shut down, paying attention to city regulations and getting their space to measure up to the city’s strict standards is the only way Da Dank has a shot at long-term survival. “Ever since we opened this spot, we’ve been all about safety being up to code and following the rules. . . . As much as this is a DIY spot, we almost don’t want that label because a lot of spots like that don’t give a fuck about [safety].” And ViceVersa plan to further legitimatize Da Dank. “We’ve developed a good relationship,” Zeledon says of Whittier’s city officials who, according to him, are fully aware of the venue’s existence. If all goes well, ViceVersa hope Da Dank will generate money for the city while attracting non-locals similar to the way the town’s food scene does. For now, the current magic happening at Da Dank is, as Zeledon describes, “an actual musician’s sanctuary where kids can come and rock the fuck out, be safe and learn how to grow as artists. That’s pretty much our main goal . . . to have something that everyone feels they belong to and [where they] can be themselves.” DDELACRUZ@OCWEEKLY.COM


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Iron Hombres

Brown Sabbath funk up your favorite Black Sabbath songs By Alex DistefAno

A

ustin, Texas-based Latin funk nine-piece Brownout have created a special set of cover songs, reinterpreting the classics of Black Sabbath with their own twist. For this tribute, the group, who have released three critically acclaimed albums since forming in 2004, call themselves Brown Sabbath. Guitarist Beto Martinez recently took some time to talk about why the band chose to cover the English rock band famously fronted by Ozzy Osbourne, the diversity of fans at a Brownout show, whether members of Black Sabbath have reached out to them, and more.

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ences that go into the music of Brownout?

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Ja nu a ry 06- 12 , 20 1 7

BETO MARTINEZ: We’re big fans of all

26

COURTNEY CHAVANELL

kinds of music; there are tons of different influences we all have. Almost all of us in Brownout play in a group called Grupo Fantasma that we have been playing with for more than 15 years now; we play salsa and Latin music. And with Brownout, we play funk infused with Latin rhythms. With Brown Sabbath, we showcase an entirely different sound; we bring in all of our heavy metal and rock influences, and it’s a big mix—everything from jazz, Latin, funk and now metal. We work to bring that all together. Tell us about the various musicians and artists that Brownout has worked for as a backing band? We had a relationship and played as a backing band for Prince for a few years; we started playing out of his club in Vegas. We opened up for him and played as his backup band for several parties and events. We also got the chance to play with Sheila E, as well as Daniel Johnston and GZA from Wu-Tang Clan. It’s a pretty diverse list there.

Why did Brownout choose to cover Black Sabbath songs? What is the difference between imitation and interpretation, and how does this come across when you play their songs live? We did a residency in Austin in September 2014. It was four nights, and each night had a different theme: one was James Brown, one was all breakdancing music, then a hip-hop night. We did a night of Sabbath songs and called it Brown Sabbath. It was almost a joke, but when we decided to do it, we felt something special. The music of Sabbath is heavy, but it also has a funk to it, so it worked well. But we didn’t want to be just another cover band, so we added our own sounds and changed up some of the feel to make sure we were interpreting and not just imitating. Has anyone from Black Sabbath approached you guys about Brown Sabbath? Someone we know through a record label goes to the same hair stylist as [Black Sabbath guitarist] Tony Iommi, and they told him about our musical project. . . . From what we’ve heard, Iommi is open to checking us out, but so far, we haven’t heard anything else. Other than that, no one from Black Sabbath has contacted us. What is the reception like when you guys play live? It really all depends on where we’re playing, what city. The crowds are usually diverse. We have lots of younger and older fans, but now with Brown Sabbath, we’re getting an entirely different crowd. We’re getting metalheads who are only into Black Sabbath, and they end up being totally surprised in a good way, loving it. BROWN SA BBATH perform at the Wayfarer, 843 W. 19th St., Costa Mesa, (949) 764-0039; www.wayfarercm.com. Wed., 8 p.m. $12-$15. All ages.


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sense, as they had the most connections here. Hayden and Byrd had previously come to OC on tour, and Hopkins went to school in Hollywood. “Once we realized what was out here that wasn’t back in Missouri, we were eager to get back to something that was more open, more diverse, had more places to play, more miles to cover, and where the weather was nice,” says Byrd. What drives Byrd, Hopkins and Hayden to succeed is their desire to travel, to express themselves, and to not fall into working a 9-to-5 job and being unsatisfied with the lifestyle that comes with it. Their top priorities are to keep putting out music and playing as many shows as much as possible in order to maintain some sort of relevance. Since moving to the West Coast, the band have committed to playing anywhere between the Pike Restaurant & Bar in Long Beach and Red Barn in Palm Springs. “It’s all just part of the process of getting to the next big thing. It’s all steps,” says Byrd. “Making the move, we would’ve never gotten any of this shit we’ve gotten in the past five to six months— write-up-wise, experience-wise, gig-wise—if we would’ve stayed. We knew that.”

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o one would suspect that the three smalltown rockers in the Captain’s Son aren’t from sunny SoCal, with their long locks, frequent trips to the beach, and love for the Growlers and the Beach Boys. But these good ol’ Springfield, Missouri, boys have made themselves at home in OC. Front man/guitarist Paige Byrd and drummer Jarred Hayden met when they were 16 and 17 years old, respectively. They formed the band about three years later, adopting their name from Woody Guthrie’s “Muleskinner Blues” (“Good mornin’, captain; good mornin’, son”) and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. Growing up in a town with a population of about 160,000, people who shared similar interests were bound to bump into one another, which is how they encountered bassist Will Hopkins, who was playing in another local band at the time. The Captain’s Son are mainly influenced by rock & roll—specifically, classic and indie rock, as well as bands that reek attitude and have a groundbreaking presence. Remember how fucking cool and modern the Strokes and Arctic Monkeys were when they made their debuts? These influences are apparent when you hear the Captain’s Son’s sound. The Captain’s Son had a strong fan base, and when they realized they had reached their threshold of success in Springfield, as well as that the scene wasn’t going to flourish any time soon, the trio left Missouri. “We left an easy life behind in order to try to pursue what we were actually interested in doing,” Hopkins says. The band longed to relocate to where they could start from the bottom of the totem pole and work their way up. Out of all their potential choices, Southern California made the most

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mJan onua thry x x–x x, 2 06 -12 , 014 2017

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THIS WEEK

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FRIDAY, JAN. 6

DANNY LOVE: 8 p.m., free. Casa Costa Mesa, 820 W. 19th

St., Costa Mesa, (949) 877-4011; casacostamesa.com. GRAVES & THE BAD WEATHER: 7 p.m., $5. Doll Hut, 107 S. Adams St., Anaheim, (714) 533-1286. REVEREND HORTON HEAT: 6 p.m. The Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; observatoryoc.com. RIGHTEOUS & THE WICKED: RHCP tribute, 9 p.m., free. The Slidebar Rock-N-Roll Kitchen, 122 E. Commonwealth Ave., Fullerton, (714) 871-7469; slidebarfullerton.com. SEGA GENECIDE: 10 p.m. La Cave, 1695 Irvine Ave., Costa Mesa, (949) 646-7944; lacaverestaurant.com. THE SLY DIGS: 9 p.m., free. The Karman Bar, 26022 Cape Dr., Laguna Niguel, (949) 582-5909; thekarmanbar.com. VNSSA: 9 p.m., free before 10 p.m.; $10 after. The Wayfarer, 843 W. 19th St., Costa Mesa, (949) 764-0039; wayfarercm.com.

SATURDAY, JAN. 7

ANDREA MILLER: 7 p.m., free. Bayside Restaurant,

900 Bayside Dr., Newport Beach, (949) 721-1222; baysiderestaurant.com. BREWFISH: 8 p.m., free. The Slidebar Rock-N-Roll Kitchen, 122 E. Commonwealth Ave., Fullerton, (714) 871-7469; slidebarfullerton.com. CAITLIN LUCIA: 9 p.m., $5. The Wayfarer, 843 W. 19th St., Costa Mesa, (949) 764-0039; wayfarercm.com. FIVE SOUTH: 9 p.m., free. The Rush Bar & Grill, 23532 El Toro Rd., Ste. 24, Lake Forest, (949) 916-0200; rushgrill.com. GUS CONTRERAS: 8 p.m., free. Casa Costa Mesa, 820 W. 19th St., Costa Mesa, (949) 877-4011; casacostamesa.com. THE IRON MAIDENS: 3 p.m., free. The Slidebar RockN-Roll Kitchen, 122 E. Commonwealth Ave., Fullerton, (714) 871-7469; slidebarfullerton.com. MDC: 6 p.m., $10-$12. Doll Hut, 107 S. Adams St., Anaheim, (714) 533-1286. NEF THE PHARAOH: 9 p.m. Constellation Room at the Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; constellationroom.com. REVEREND HORTON HEAT: 6 p.m. The Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; observatoryoc.com. RON KOBAYASHI TRIO: 7 p.m., free. Moulin Bistro, 1000 N. Bristol St., Newport Beach, (844) 376-6243; moulinbistro.com. TIMOTHY B. SCHMIT OF THE EAGLES: 8 p.m. The Coach House, 33157 Camino Capistrano, Ste. C, San Juan Capistrano, (949) 496-8930; thecoachhouse.com. WARFEST 2017, FEATURING AGENT ORANGE AND D.I.: 5 p.m. Gaslamp Restaurant & Bar,

6251 E. Pacific Coast Hwy., Long Beach, (562) 5964718; thegaslamprestaurant.com.

SUNDAY, JAN. 8

COLA BOYY: 8:30 p.m., $5. OC DIY, 22651 Lambert St.,

Ste. 109, Lake Forest; orangecountydiy.org.

HANNAH MOROZ: 9 p.m., free. The Continental Room,

115 W. Santa Fe Ave., Fullerton, (714) 469-1879; facebook.com/ContinentalRoom. MISSILES OF OCTOBER: 4 p.m., free. The Whitehouse Restaurant & Nightclub, 340 S. Coast Hwy., Laguna Beach, (949) 494-8088; whitehouserestaurant.com. 94.7 THE WAVE BRUNCH: 11 a.m., $25. Spaghettini Rotisserie & Grill, 3005 Old Ranch Pkwy., Seal Beach, (562) 596-2199; spaghettini.com. RUSTY JOHNSON: 7 p.m., $15. Spaghettini Rotisserie & Grill, 3005 Old Ranch Pkwy., Seal Beach, (562) 5962199; spaghettini.com. SUNDAY BLUES: 4 p.m. Malarkey’s Grill & Irish Pub, 168 N. Marina Dr., Long Beach, (562) 598-9431.

MONDAY, JAN. 9

COUNTRY DANCIN’ WITH DJ PATRICK: 6:30 p.m.,

free. The Swallow’s Inn, 31786 Camino Capistrano, San Juan Capistrano, (949) 493-3188; swallowsinn.com. JOE BLANCHARD: 10 p.m., free. Auld Dubliner, 71 S.

Pine Ave., Long Beach, (562) 437-8300; aulddubliner.com.

KILLING THE MESSENGER: 8 p.m., $7. Blacklight

District Lounge, 2500 E. Anaheim St., Long Beach.

NIHILITY 0: 7 p.m., free. Doll Hut, 107 S. Adams St.,

Anaheim, (714) 533-1286.

SINATRA & DINO DINNER SHOW: 6 p.m. La Cave,

1695 Irvine Ave., Costa Mesa, (949) 646-7944; lacaverestaurant.com. SLEEP STATE: 9 p.m., free. The Wayfarer, 843 W. 19th St., Costa Mesa, (949) 764-0039; wayfarercm.com.

TUESDAY, JAN. 10

JAZZ NIGHT: 8:30 p.m., free. Envy Lounge, 4647

MacArthur Blvd., Newport Beach, (949) 287-8270; envyloungeoc.com. SKADONNA: 9 p.m., free. The Slidebar Rock-N-Roll Kitchen, 122 E. Commonwealth Ave., Fullerton, (714) 871-7469; slidebarfullerton.com. SLEAZY T’S SHIT SHOW: 9 p.m. Que Sera, 1923 E. Seventh St., Long Beach, (562) 599-6170; queseralb.wix.com. SONGWRITERS @ SUNSET: 8 p.m., $10. Schooner at Sunset, 16821 Pacific Coast Hwy., Huntington Beach, (562) 430-3495; schooneratsunset.com.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 11

BLUES WEDNESDAYS: 7:30 p.m., $5. Mozambique,

1740 S. Coast Hwy., Laguna Beach, (949) 715-7777; mozambiqueoc.com. BROWN SABBATH: 8 p.m., $12-$15. The Wayfarer, 843 W. 19th St., Costa Mesa, (949) 764-0039; wayfarercm.com.

BRUJERIA; THE CASUALTIES; PINATA PROTEST: 8 p.m. The Observatory, 3503 S. Harbor

Blvd., Santa Ana, (714) 957-0600; observatoryoc.com.

CREAM: 7:30 p.m., $40-$115. Segerstrom Hall, 600 Town

Center Dr., Costa Mesa, (714) 556-2787; scfta.org.

DEREK BORDEAUX BAND: 7 p.m., free. Original

Mike’s, 100 S. Main St., Santa Ana, (714) 550-7764; originalmikes.com. GARDENERS LOGIC: 8 p.m., $5. The Wayfarer, 843 W. 19th St., Costa Mesa, (949) 764-0039; wayfarercm.com. HIP-HOP WEDNESDAY: 9 p.m., free. The Karman Bar, 26022 Cape Dr., Laguna Niguel, (949) 582-5909; thekarmanbar.com. MODERN DISCO AMBASSADORS: 10 p.m. La Cave, 1695 Irvine Ave., Costa Mesa, (949) 646-7944; lacaverestaurant.com. RICK MARCEL: 7:30 p.m., $10. Spaghettini Rotisserie & Grill, 3005 Old Ranch Pkwy., Seal Beach, (562) 5962199; spaghettini.com. SHORT STORIES: 8 p.m., free. The Slidebar Rock-NRoll Kitchen, 122 E. Commonwealth Ave., Fullerton, (714) 871-7469; slidebarfullerton.com. TIMOTHY B. SCHMIT: 8 p.m., $39.50. The Coach House, 33157 Camino Capistrano, Ste. C, San Juan Capistrano, (949) 496-8930; thecoachhouse.com.

THURSDAY, JAN. 12

ANDREW BLOOM: 7:30 p.m., $5. Mozambique,

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The Intern

odd HSSW lie and move on. If you want your relationship to end, you do exactly what you’re doing. If your boyfriend hasn’t given you some other reason(s) to believe he’s cheating with his exintern or anyone else, AIC, drop the Tuesday night/ birthday drinks subject. I would also advise you to apologize to your boyfriend for having “looked at his phone” while he was in the shower, which is both an asshole move and, yes, a sign that you might be the crazy, paranoid and controlling one in this relationship. And for the sake of your relationship—for the sake of fuck—stop following the ex-intern on Instagram. Finally, AIC, you mention mismatched sex drives. As several commenters pointed out on my blog, where your letter appeared as the Savage Love Letter of the Day, mismatched sex drives are usually a bad sign. You talk about the libido issue in the past tense, so perhaps it’s not a problem anymore. But if the problem was resolved in a way that left you feeling neglected, insecure and frustrated, it wasn’t resolved and it constitutes a much bigger threat to your relationship than that ex-intern.

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You bring yourself to ask, FOMOOF, even if you have to drag your ass there. If your girlfriend is sex-positive—if she’s not just shoving her feet in your mouth to shut you up—initiate conversations about your kinks (and hers), your sexual history (and hers) and sexual adventures you might want to have with her in the future (and ones she might want to have with you). If she’s curious and interested and upbeat during these convos and about your kinks, suggest going to a foot-fetish party together—one where you can suck other women’s toes and other men can suck hers. I’m a man who is sexually attracted to trans women. I’ve been told that if I’m attracted to women, it shouldn’t matter what genitals they have. I’ve also been told that if I like penis, it shouldn’t matter if the owner presents as male or female. Am I unfairly fetishizing trans women? Gain Understanding Into Loving Trans You’re attracted to women, GUILT, some women have penises, and you find penis-having women particularly attractive. If you’re not attracted to men with penises and you’re not attracted to men like Buck Angel, i.e., trans men with vaginas, then you’re not attracted to men generally, cock or no cock. So long as you can state your preferences in a way that doesn’t dehumanize the people you are attracted to or denigrate the people you aren’t attracted to, GUILT, you have nothing to feel selfconscious or guilty about. Listen to the Savage Lovecast (savagelovecast. com) every Wednesday. Contact Dan via email at mail@savagelove.net, and follow him on Twitter: @fakedansavage.

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Sex months? Interesting typo. There’s another way to read your boyfriend’s ambiguity/obfuscation/dishonesty about Tuesday night: equal parts considerate and self-serving. Your boyfriend knew you had to study, he knew his ex-intern is a sore subject/weird tic, and by opting for ambiguity, he allowed you to focus on your studies. So that was maybekindasorta considerate of him. And since one person’s “mindful of my toxic feelings” and “handling it” is another person’s “freak-out” and “invasion of privacy,” AIC, your boyfriend opted for ambiguousness/ deceit-by-omission to avoid drama. And perhaps that was self-serving of him. Want to prove to your boyfriend that he didn’t need to lie to you about spending time with his ex-intern? Retroactively bestow your blessing on Tuesday night’s birthday drinks and stop raking him over the fucking coals for his thoroughly explicable actions. (They’re so explicable, I just explicked the shit out of them.) Yes, he lied to you. But unless you’re made of marshmallow fluff and unicorn farts, AIC, you’ve lied to him once or twice over the past year and a half. Even the “most honest” people on earth tell the odd harmless, selfserving white lie once in a while. If you want your relationship to last, AIC, you roll your eyes at the

» dan savage

Jan uary 0 6-1 2, 2 017

I’m having an issue with my boyfriend, and I don’t know if I am the crazy, paranoid, controlling party here. We have been together for more than a year and a half. We had troubles early on because he has a low sex drive. It made me very insecure, and I think that’s why, at the time, I became extremely jealous of his friendship with his very attractive intern. I fully owned up to my irrational jealousy and decided on my own that it was my responsibility to overcome that. She eventually stopped working with him, and they haven’t been in contact for over sex months. Fast-forward to the present. On Monday night, I asked my boyfriend what his plans were on Tuesday. (I am studying for law school exams, so I knew I wouldn’t have time to spend with him.) Around 8:30 that day, he texted me and asked how studying was going, and I asked him again what his plans were. He told me he was going to meet an “old co-worker” at a bar for birthday drinks. I didn’t think twice about it. Then, around 11:30, when I got in bed to relax, I saw on my Instagram feed that his old intern posted a photo of her birthday party at the bar. I became extremely upset because, instead of being upfront and saying he was meeting HER for her birthday, he was intentionally ambiguous. I confronted him when he got home, and he admitted to being ambiguous to avoid a “freak-out.” I told him that if he’d been upfront with me, I would have been jealous, but I would have also been mindful of my toxic feelings and not projected them onto him. I told him that as a result of how he handled it, I feel worse, I feel lied to, and I feel insecure. He acted like I was being ridiculous. He insisted it was a last-minute invite and he didn’t want to cause any drama. We went to sleep, and I woke up feeling pretty much over it. But when he got into the shower, I looked at his phone and saw that she had actually invited him on Monday afternoon. So he lied to me when I asked him what his plans were on Tuesday, and he lied to me again when he said it was a last-minute invite. I am not upset with him for getting drinks with her—most of his friends are female and I NEVER feel jealous about them. I have a weird tic about this girl, though, and I’ve owned up to it. I don’t want to control him, but I feel like I can’t trust him now. Up until now, I’ve never once suspected him of being dishonest. Am I Crazy?

SavageLove

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From The Earth: We are the largest dispensary in Orange County! 3023 South Orange Avenue, Santa Ana, CA 92707 Tel (657) 44-GREEN (47336) | www.FTEOC.com OCCC: FREE .5 Gram of Wax (FTP, not valid w/other offers) FREE Joint (w/min $20 don) | 8th's start at $15 | Grams start at $5 Concentrates .5 G start at $10 | 10 AM - 10 PM Daily 714.236.5988 | 10361 Magnolia Ave. Ste. B, Anaheim CA Hand N Hand: FREE Joint w/ any purchase | 20% OFF Any Edible (limit 1) | 20% OFF Wax Product 2400 Pullman St., Suite B, Santa Ana | 657.229.4464 SHOWGROW: Voted BEST DISPENSARY in OC 2016! 1625 E. St. Gertrude Pl. Santa Ana CA 92705 | 949.565.4769 | ShowGrow.com LA MIRADA HEALING CENTER: $35 CAP | FREE DAB WITH EVERY DONATION FTP'S: 4.5 G 1/8 | $10 OFF CONCENTRATES | $3 OFF EDIBLES 15902 IMPERIAL HIGHWAY LA MIRADA, CA, 90638 | 562-245-2083 Green Mile Collective: First Time Patients Receive a FREE Private Reserve 1/8th with order. The Only Superstore Delivery Service | Call 1-866-DELIVERY or Order Online at DeliveryGreens.com

DELIVERY OC COMPASSIONATE CARE: Compassionately and professionally delivering high quality, lab tested ORGANIC medical cannabis to OC. 949-751-9747 | occcdelivery@gmail.com Deliveries completed within 1 hr. Rite Greens Delivery: OC's Most Trusted Cannabis Source 9AM10PM Daily | 714.418.4877 | ritegreensdelivery.com PURE & NATURAL THERAPY: DELIVERING QUALITY PRODUCT TO LB, HB, SEAL BEACH & SURROUNDING CITIES | 7 GRAMS FOR $50 ON SELECT STRAINS | 3 FREE PRE-ROLLS WITH EVERY ORDER* | 714.330.0513 Dank City: FTP DEAL: FREE 4G (Any Strain) or Free 4G Paltinum OG Kief 949-558-3083 open 10 am to 9 pm Daily HIGHER PURPOSE DELIVERY: Long Beach's Premier Delivery FREE GRAM & FREE EDIBLE (FTP, w/min $40 don) We accept all major Credit & Debit cards! 562.552.0889

DR. EVALUATIONS Releaf Wellness: Renewals - $25 / New Patients- $35 657.251.8032 / 1540 E Edinger Ste. A Santa Ana Ca 92705 6833 Indiana Ste. #102, Riverside CA 92506 OC 420 Evaluations: New Patients - $29 | Renewals - $19 1490 E. Lincoln Ave., Anaheim 92805 - 714.215.0190 1671 W. Katella Ave, Suite #130 Anaheim - 855.665.3825

FREE ESTIMATES • SAME-DAY SERVICE

4th St Medical: Renewals $29 | New Patients $34 with ad. 2112 E. 4th St., #111, Santa Ana | 714-599-7970 | 4thStreetMedical.com

714-296-8281 or 714-987-8495 www.perezhauling1.com | Lic. #BUS2015-01820

Cali 420 Rx: PLEASE CALL FOR LATEST SPECIALS! Sundays Appointment only | 714-723-6769 | 2601 W Ball Road, unit 209, Anaheim CA 92804 | Hours: Monday - Saturday 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM

Small Jobs welcome.• All Estimates incl. labor & Dump fees.

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Pastor: Conduct religious worship & deliver sermons. Master’s in Divinity, Theology, or related field req’d. Choong Hyun Presbyterian Church of O.C. Send resume to: 11231 Chapman Ave., Garden Grove, CA 92840

9311 El Valle Avenue Fountain Valley Saturday, Jan. 7th 1:00pm-4:00pm Home Size: 2,025 sq ft Lot Size: 7,201 sq ft Year Built: 1965 5 Bedrooms/ 2 Bathrooms Lily Campbell (714) 717-5095 LilyCampbellTeam.com

RE-UP: FTP Specials: 3G's Private Reserve $30 | 3G's Gold Crumble | 7G's Top Shelf | FREE PreRoll w/ $10 Donation 8851 Garden Grove Blvd, Ste 105 Garden Grove, CA 92844 | 714.586.1565

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16919 Mount Citadel Fountain Valley Saturday, Jan. 7th 2pm-4:30pm Sunday, Jan. 8th 1pm-4pm Home Size: 2,340 sq ft Lot Size: 7,200 sq ft Year Built: 1976 4 Bedrooms/ 3 Bathrooms Lily Campbell (714) 717-5095 LilyCampbellTeam.com

Ease Canna: FTP- All 8th will be weighed out to 5GRAMS!! | 2435 E. Orangethorpe Ave., Fullerton, CA 92831 | 714-309-7772

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17232 Santa Barbara Street Fountain Valley Saturday, Jan. 7th 1pm-4pm Sunday, Jan. 8th 1pm-4pm Home Size: 1,831 sq ft Lot Size: 7,405 sq ft Year Built: 1964 4 Bedrooms/ 2 Bathrooms Lily Campbell (714) 717-5095 LilyCampbellTeam.com

Top Shelf Anaheim: $35 CAP | FTP: 4.5 Gram 8th OR $10 OFF Concentrates | Free DABS with Any Donation DOGO Deals & oz Specials 3124 W. Lincoln Ave. Anaheim | 714.385.7814

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OC Weekly is seeking an energetic and outgoing individual for a new digital sales position. In this role, you will help small, midsized and large businesses with an array of digital services and strategies designed to increase web and mobile presence, generate leads to expand their customer base, and deliver significant ROI & increased revenues. We use a consultative selling approach to develop customized digital marketing campaigns that achieve our clients’ marketing goals. Our portfolio of innovative advertising solutions are targeted and affordable. We offer a variety of digital products that are designed to get results such as SEO, PPC, Paid Media, Display Advertising, Social Media, Programmatic, Retargeting, IP Targeting, E-mail, Mobile Advertising, Web Design, Content Production and more. We are looking for a superstar who wants to be part of a dynamic sales team. Applicants should be motivated, smart on their feet, outgoing, personable, competitive, able to thrive in a fast-paced environment and posses a strong work ethic. Candidates must also have a clean driving record and must pass a background check. We provide: A portfolio of solutions for every clients’ needs with precision targeting · A fun and exciting work environment · Base salary + Commission + Bonus · Unlimited earning potential · Ongoing Sales Training · A career path in sales and management · Medical, dental, vision, life, disability insurance and 401(k). Expected earnings the first year is $45,000+. Interested candidates should submit a letter of interest and resume to smabry@ ocweekly.com

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South Coast Safe Access: FTP: Buy an 1/8, Get a FREE 1/8 | 1900 Warner Ave Ste. A, Santa Ana 92705 | 949.474.7272 | MonSat 10am-8pm Sun 11am-7pm

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Gram Kings: DAILY DEALS | Discounts for Military, Veterans, Disabled | 10189 Westminster Ave. Suite #217, Garden Grove 714.209.8187 | Hours: Monday-Sunday 10am-10pm

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CONDITIONS: All advertisements are published upon the representation by the advertiser and/or agency that the agency and advertiser are authorized to publish the entire contents and subject matter thereof, that the contents are not unlawful, and do not infringe on the rights of any person or entity and that the agency and advertiser have obtained all necessary permission and releases. Upon the OC Weekly’s request, the agent or advertiser will produce all necessary permission and releases. In consideration of the publication of advertisements, the advertiser and agency will indemnify and save the OC Weekly harmless from and against any loss or expenses arising out of publication of such advertisements. The publisher reserves the right to revise, reject or omit without notice any advertisement at any time. The OC Weekly accepts no liability for it’s failure, for any cause, to insert an advertisement. Publication and placement of advertisements are not guaranteed. Liability for any error appearing in an advertisement is limited to the cost of the space actually occupied. No allowance, however, will be granted for an error that does not materially affect the value of an advertisement. To qualify for an adjustment, any error must be reported within 15 days of publication date. Credit for errors is limited to first insertion. Drawings, artwork and articles for reproduction are accepted only at the advertiser’s risk and should be clearly marked to facilitate their return. The OC Weekly reserves the right to revise its advertising rates at any time. Announcements of an increase shall be made four weeks in advance to contract advertisers. No verbal agreement altering the rates and/or the terms of this rate card shall be recognized.

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2975 Red Hill Avenue, SuiteBandilier 150 | Costa Mesa, CAValley, 92626CA|92708 714.550.5940 | free online |ads & photos at oc.backpage.com 18475 Cir, Fountain | www.ocweekly.com 714.550.5900

SAFE ACCESS DIRECTORY

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1 ST LICENSED MEDICAL MARIJUANA DISPENSARY IN ORANGE COUNTY

SCSA

SOUTH COAST SAFE ACCESS

Largest Showroom & Biggest Selection in OC

FTP: Buy an 1/8, Get a FREE 1/8

Physician’s Recommendation Required for Treatment of: Anxiety | Chronic Pain | Diabetes | Insomnia | Arthritis | Glaucoma

25% VETERANS DISCOUNT 10% DISABILITY DISCOUNT All Products 10% SENIOR DISCOUNT Lab Tested

Now Hiring FULL/PART TIME 21 Years Union pay with and Over medical benefits EMAIL RESUME:

Info@southcoastsafeaccess.com

25% Veterans Discount

NEW

$35.00 1/8’s 10% Disability Discount CAP SHELF 10% Senior Discount see store for details

FTP 7 Gram 1/8th

HOURS: Monday-Saturday 10am-8pm • Sunday 11am-7pm *Physician's Recommendation Required for Treatment of: Anxiety | Chronic Pain | Diabetes | Insomnia | Arthritis | Glaucoma

1900 Warner Ave. Ste. A, Santa Ana 92705 (Conveniently Located Off the 55 Freeway) 949.474.7272 • Hours: Mon-Sat 10am-8pm Sun 11am-7pm


VOTED

Christopher Glew

BEST LAWYER

2016

Christopher Glew

DEFENSE ATTORNEY IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA Winning groundbreaking trials in the field of medical marijuana in the state of California. Called “The hottest criminal defense attorney in Orange County,” he has been recognized as one of the 2015 Top Lawyers in California by American Lawyer Media, and one of the Top 100 Criminal Trial Lawyers Southern California by the National Trial Lawyers Association.

Best Of winner • 2016 •

CANNABIS BUSINESS LICENSING CANNABIS REGULATORY PRACTICE CRIMINAL LAW All Drug Offenses, DUI, Felonies, Misdemeanors

LAW OFFICES OF GLEW & KIM MEMBERS: OC NORML

NORML Legal Committee

GLEWKIMLAW.COM • CALL FOR FREE CONSULTATION TOLL FREE (866) 648-0004

January 5, 2017 – OC Weekly