Page 1

HEALTH & SEX GUIDE 2011


VANGUARD HEALTH AND SEX GUIDE This editor is happy to present to you, dear reader, the 2011 Health and Sex Guide. These days, what with various flu bugs going around, misconceptions about contraception and certain aspects of sex still being fairly taboo, staying happy, healthy and getting the advice you need can be difficult. The goal of this issue, then, is to make your life a little bit easier. Our writers, designers and editors have worked hard to give you the informed scoop on the need-to-knows for staying healthy this year while also providing some expert (and perhaps not so expert) advice on keeping it fresh beneath the sheets. Within these beautifully designed pages, you’ll find some great content. Rundowns on the benefits of both the federal health care law passed last year and PSU’s Aetna insurance plan

S.X

will hopefully take some of the confusion out of health care coverage. Roundups of contraception—including an investigative piece on the withdrawal method and a couple of awesome infographics—aim to simplify the pregnancy prevention process. We’ve included a guide to purchasing the right sex toy (as told by a former porn shop clerk), as well as some interesting new positions to try. You’ll even find an exploration of dating in the digital age, and how social media and matchmaking sites have changed the definition of the relationship, for better or for worse. So I invite you to take a further gander into this guide. I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised.

SA R I A DY/ VA NGUA R D STA FF

H.X

Basic essentials for sports nutrition

ART DIRECTOR Justin Flood COPY CHIEF Kristin Pugmire PHOTO EDITOR Adam Wickham PRODUCTION MANAGER Bryan Morgan COPY EDITORS Noah Emmet, Andrea Vedder CONTRIBUTORS Allison Whited, Meghan Daniels, Peter Browning, Gretchen Sandau, Alexis Jewell, Rian Evans, Janieve Schnabel, Alison Barnwell, Erick Bengel, Rosemary Hanson COVER photo Saria Dy ILLUSTRATOR Lauren Donohue Graphic Designer Colby Brooks PHOTOGRAPHERS Saria Dy, Drew Martig, Adam Wickham ADVISER Judson Randall ADVERTISING ADVISER Ann Roman ADVERTISING MANAGER Iris Meyers ADVERTISING SALES Dominique Abrams, Sam Gresset, Rayna Martinez, Jay Specht

H.1 H.2 H.3 H.4

ADVERTISING DESIGNER Beth Hansen

4 Group X at PSU No more excuses not to work out

Junk food junkies

Eating healthy at Portland State

An often overlooked addiction

shape up!

Ways to stay active and healthy around Portland

time to show that bug who’s boss Ways to get over that nasty cold

DON’T STRESS OVER IT Simple methods to ease your daily stress

5 Health myths: Busted A counterpoint to health bogeyman

6 it’s complicated

H.8 H.9 H.10 S.1

sex is awesome An illustration by Lauren Donohue

9

H.5 H.6 H.7

8 contraception misconception

Learning about feminist sexuality

S.2 S.3 S.4

fertilization and its discontents Exploring the controversy surrounding the withdrawl method

What to know about safe sex

LOCAL RESOURCES Off-campus health care options

S.5 H.11 S.6 S.7

13

14

MIXING IT UP BENEATH THE SHEETS

New positions that might make things a bit more electric

10

The strange new world of romance and social networking

7 sex and feminism 101

An overview of the new health care law and how it benefits you

Easy tips to remain SAD free

EDITORS Robert Britt, Richard D. Oxley, Nicholas Kula, Corie Charnley

2011

The freshest choices around campus

YOU SAD, BRO?

SPECIAL EDITION EDITOR Sarah Esterman

Sarah Esterman Special Edition Editor

FUEL FOR THE COMMON ATHLETE

HEALTH CARE 101

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Virginia Vickery

One pill to rule them all Do male supplements really work?

H.12 S.8 H.13

Resolutions: Have you got what it takes? How to keep yourself in check

11

WALl TO WALL PLEASURE

How to buy the right sex toy from a former insider

12

YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR

A brief overview of what you get from your student health fee

15


4

The Vanguard | Health and Sex Guide 2011

D R E W M A RT I G /VA NGUA R D STA F F

FUEL FOR THE COMMON ATHLETE

PH OTO COU RT E S Y O F WI K I PE D I A COM M O NS

Ways to stay active and healthy around Portland

Basic essentials for sports nutrition Allison Whited | Vanguard staff As any athlete knows, fuel is an important part of any exercise regimen. Improper nutrition can lead to a host of problems, and anyone embarking on a fitness program, regardless of their level of fitness, is served well by a proper diet. Though getting started may be hard, there are some easy general guidelines to follow. Of course, it is always a good idea to consult a physician before changing your diet or beginning a rigorous exercise plan. Jordann Henkelman, R.D., L.D., of Student Health and Counseling, had several ideas about sports nutrition, but doesn’t believe that sports nutrition varies greatly from the diet of someone concerned about improving his or her overall health. A large part of it is balancing carbohydrates, proteins and fats. Ideally, says Henkelman, an athlete who fastidiously tracks his or her diet would get about 50 percent of their daily calories from carbs, 25 percent from protein and 25 percent from fat, not to mention plenty of fluids.  Henkelman says another important aspect is eating several small, frequent meals a day and not splurging on one large meal. She also says that these meals need to have particular carbohydrates, ones that come from whole grain foods. Right before and

The freshest choices around campus EATING HEALTHY AT PORTLAND STATE Peter Browning | Vanguard staff While Portland boasts an eclectic grouping of restaurants around its metro area, Portland States’ city blocks seem to have a more commercialized atmosphere. Many of the restaurants surveyed did not have any of their nutritional information available, so instead the restaurants were chosen for their fresh ingredients and mainly because they weren’t named McDonalds. Pizzicato 1708 SW 6th Ave. Located near the PSU bookstore

This pizza chain boasts an ‘everything made from scratch’ mantra of cooking, including the salad dressings. While Pizzicato may be known for their pizza, the salads may be what separates them from the rest of the pack. A Portland chain that began in 1989, Pizzicato offers gluten free crusts for their pizza, as well as vegan options such as the Pomodoro and Thai + Tofu pizza.

The Pita Pit 1811 SW 5th Ave Next to the UPS Store

Pita Pit is an international chain that introduces Lebanese style pitas in a large variety of ingredients. You really can make whatever you want here. The pita with the most calories is the 600 calorie Gyro, which is still less in total calories as well as total calories (as well as total fat) than McDonalds’ Big Mac, and certainly much better ingredients. Pita Pit offers six different veggie style pitas in addition to their meat pitas. Rice Junkies 506 SW Mill St. Next to the Seattle’s Best Coffee

Rice Junkies offers tasty bento and what they call “fat wraps”. The name is a misnomer however, and refers more to the size of the wraps rather than any nutritional downside. The food is prepared fresh, vegetables are steamed, and any bento dish can be

“For those of us choosing to eat healthy, it’s nice to know there are some tasty options nearby. It is always easy to grab the quick alternative, but there are always good alternatives to the dollar menu.” substituted with brown rice instead of white. In addition, you can substitute tofu for chicken in any of the wraps of bento. Rice Junkies boasts a “healthy addiction” to their food. Blue Fin Sushi 1988 SW Broadway Ave Near the Chipotle

Sushi is always a healthy alternative for a hungry appetite. Blue Fin Sushi’s biggest draw may be their price. At just 1.50 a plate (for some dishes) you can fill up your stomach and leave with a generally small bill. All sushi staples are here. Avocado rolls, asparagus rolls, and edamame are all offered as well as a salad roll. For those of us choosing to eat healthy, it’s nice to know there are some tasty options nearby. It is always easy to grab the quick alternative, but there are always good alternatives to the dollar menu.

SA R I A DY/ VA NGUA R D STA FF

Jordann Henkelman

5

The Vanguard | Health and Sex Guide 2011

right after you exercise are key times to take in carbs. “[Eat] few processed foods...that’s a big deal for living an active, healthy lifestyle. Not eating foods out of boxes, but foods that come from the ground,” Henkelman says. For those just starting out on a sports diet, Henkelman wants them to know that sports stimulates appetite and that exercising is not an excuse to eat garbage. “There’s that compensatory behavior of ‘Oh, I just went on a run so it doesn’t matter if I go to Starbucks and have a peppermint latte with whip and a muffin’... so you burn 200 calories, but you eat 400. You should just be aware that you are going to feel more hungry and that’s why it’s important to eat foods that are high-fiber, nutrient-rich foods to really help you feel satisfied,” Henkelman says.  She is also quick to point out that there are plenty of plant-based protein sources that should help ease those hunger pains, such as beans, lentils, quionoa and tofu. Henkelman currently works at SHAC two days a week and the rest of the time at Providence St. Vincent Medical center. She specializes in eating disorders and diets. 

Corie Charnley | Vanguard staff If you’re looking to get in shape, Portland is the perfect place to be. Few places boast as many recreational activities available to us than the Rose City—from skiing to rowing to hiking, we’ve literally got it all. So when you’re fed up with studying and homework, here are some fun recreational activities to help you stay happy and healthy in and around the city and outside of the gym: Go hiking Despite being a fairly large city, residents are lucky enough to have the outdoors right at their doorsteps. For instance, Multnomah Falls is only a 30-minute drive from the city, where hikers can gaze at the awe-inspiring 620-foot waterfall. There’s also Marquam Trail, located in southwest Portland. The trail curves through beautiful forest and peaks at an astonishing 1,110-foot elevation panorama, giving you a beautiful view of the city, Mount Hood and Mt. Rain-

ier that is, if you catch it on a sunny day. To customize your own hike, visit www.portlandhikersfieldguide.org.

Academic and Student Recreation Center members.

Bike Portland Portland is renowned for being bikefriendly, and so what better way to get in shape than to cycle? If riding in the city isn’t your thing, however, there are also several trails around Portland for the more adventurous. For a fairly easy scenic bike ride, head to Sauvie Island, which is a little over 10 miles outside the city. And for a close-in bike ride, Forest Park is just footsteps away.

Join PSU’s disc golf club Ten years ago, it would have been safe to say that no one had heard of disc golf. However, these days the sport is quickly gaining popularity. Essentially, it’s a more enjoyable form of golf instead of golf balls and country clubs, it’s frisbees. Fun, right? PSU’s disc golf club was started in 2008 and always welcomes new members. For more information, e-mail psudisc@pdx.edu.

Kayak the Willamette You know that great big river just blocks from Portland State? Well, the Willamette River is great for kayaking or canoeing. To make it even easier, the PSU’s Outdoor Program offers kayak rentals for only $30 to students. Campus Rec also offers free kayak pool sessions each Thursday from 6:30 to 8:20 p.m. for

Ice skate at the Lloyd Center Though Portland just can’t seem to get some snow, we should still get to reap its benefits. For this experience, look no further than your Lloyd Center, which boasts an impressive ice skating rink. It’s located on the first floor across from Macy’s, and is only $6, plus an additional $3 skate rental. Visit www. lloydcenterice.com for hours.

I M AG E COU RT E S Y O F WI K I M E D I A COM M O NS


6

The Vanguard | Health and Sex Guide 2011

DON’T STRESS OVER IT

SA R I A DY/VA NGUA R D STA F F

TIME TO SHOW THAT BUG WHO’S BOSS WAYS TO GET OVER THAT NASTY COLD

7

HEALTH CARE 101

Simple methods to ease your daily stress

Gretchen Sandau | Vanguard staff

One of the most common food suggestions for the cold-sufferers is chicken noodle soup. If that gets old, you might try foods that contain garlic. Garlic is a natural antibiotic (and antifungal) and is known to strengthen the immune system. Cooking with raw garlic is strongly encouraged. Garlic tea is also a good idea, which can be made by finely chopping garlic and letting it boil and steep in water, then drinking a cup or more of it everyday of your cold. Garlic is also available in supplement form. There are also plenty of medicinal herbs known for their cold-fighting power. Echinacea, for example, is known to boost the immune system and white blood cell production. Eucalyptus oil is a common ointment used to help relieve coughing and congestion. When rubbed on the chest, it can help loosen mucus and congestion. Adding eucalyptus oil to a pot of boiling water and inhaling the steam is also suggested. Ginger teas are also highly popular in fighting colds and elderberry is a known immunity booster, which can help with colds and coughs. And, of course, there is good old Vitamin C. Taking a daily supplement will greatly help you get over a cold. If cold symptoms end up lasting longer than a week, seek professional care. For any further questions about either conventional or natural remedies, asking your doctor, or primary health specialist is advised.

Alexis Jewell | Vanguard staff

‘What you eat when you’re sick is also important. Steer clear of processed and sugary foods and choose whole foods rich in vitamins and minerals.’

A LL P H OTOS BY A DA M WI CKH A M / VA NGUA R D STA FF

Feeling all stuffed up? Sore throat? Fever and headache, too? Chances are you probably have a cold. But fear not! There are various things you can do to fight that bug faster, whether you prefer conventional medicine or homeopathy. Regardless of which medicinal method you prefer, the number one thing you can do to get better is to get some sleep, and a lot of it. Letting the body rest promotes the healing process. Also, staying hydrated is key, consuming lots of liquids helps break up congestion. There are plenty of conventional medicines that may help ease your symptoms. Antihistamines will help with runny noses and other nasal problems, but it is not suggested to take them when the cold congestion is peaking. The medication might make the mucus thicker and tougher to get out of your system. Decongestants may also help, as they reduce swelling in the nasal passages and help breathing become easier, relieving pressure. For headaches and fevers, you might try an over-the-counter pain reliever like Tylenol or Advil. And if you’ve got a cough, there are plenty of items in the medicine aisle, ranging from drops to syrups, to help suppress it. What you eat when you’re sick is also important. Steer clear of processed and sugary foods and choose whole foods rich in vitamins and minerals.

The Vanguard | Health and Sex Guide 2011

GET REST EAT CHICKEN NOODLE SOUP

We all deal with stress in some form or another. Some of us manage with grace and humility, while others nearly collapse under the pressures of life. Everything from school and work responsibilities to breaking up with a partner or dealing with too much traffic can cause stress. However, many people may not realize that events that are commonly perceived as being good can also result in stress. Such events might include starting a new relationship or moving into a nicer apartment. According to Medical News Today, what we typically refer to as “stress” is simply the body’s way of reacting to a change in circumstances. Too much stress can cause all kinds of symptoms, including headaches, back pain, chest pain, heart palpitations, high blood pressure, sleep problems, anxiety, restlessness, depression, forgetfulness and crying spells. The important thing is to pay attention to your body and behaviors and take appropriate actions if you believe you’re experiencing too much stress. If you think that any symptoms you are experiencing are causing a health risk do seek professional medical attention.

‘When you meditate, you focus your attention on the present moment. Doing so helps to realign priorities and organize thought patterns so that things may not feel as stressful.’ Otherwise, if you’re merely hoping to get a handle on your stress here are some tried-andtrue techniques that you can try. Write Writing in a journal, or anywhere that you’re comfortable with, can reduce stress by allowing you to express your feelings in a safe way. Designating a specific stress journal might also be a good way to keep track of what causes stress, and what your reactions are to various stressors so you can find better coping strategies. Express your Feelings Talk with friends, family, a counselor or clergy member about what you’re feeling. Be honest in what you say, and about what you need. Activities you enjoy While it might seem ludicrous to add something else to your to-do list, taking time to do something you enjoy can help you relax and be more focused later on other projects. Meditate When you meditate, you focus your attention on the present moment. Doing so helps to realign priorities and organize thought patterns so that things may not feel as stressful. Exercise Regular exercise is one of the best ways to manage stress. This can include something as simple as taking a walk. Exercise will get your body to release endorphins, which basically make you feel happier. Prioritize and be organized Time management is a great way to keep stress in check. Make a realistic list of each day’s chores and errands, and stick to it. Eat healthy This is kind of obvious, but actually doing it is the key. Healthy foods can lead to a healthy mind. Laugh Some studies show that laughter may boost the immune system and lower stress levels.

An overview of the new health care law and how it benefits you Corie Charnley | Vanguard staff As students, staying healthy is impeccable to our academic performance. Winter not only brings us chilly weather, but also makes us most susceptible to colds or the flu. And we all know that showing up to sit in a cold classroom to listen your professor ramble on, all while fighting back a cough, is a miserable way to spend the day. Rather than tough it out, we should be aware of the rights we have under the new federal health care law, the Affordable Care Act. According to Oregon State Public Interest Research Group (OSPIRG), these are some of the provisions under the new health care law: As of Sep. 23, 2010 Young adults can remain on their parents’ insurance plans until the age of 26. When this provision went into effect in September, OSPIRG estimated that 15,000 Oregonians would benefit from it. Insurance companies cannot drop a client’s policy when they become sick. Additionally, clients have the right to appeal any denial of care.

For those under 19, the new law makes it illegal to deny consumers based on pre-existing conditions. Consumers now have the right to choose their own primary care doctor.

Additionally, consumers can receive a rebate if their insurer spends less than 80 percent of their premiums on care, according to OSPIRG’s “The Young Person’s Guide to Health Insurance.” The new health care law also created a federal website, www.healthcare.gov, where consumers can log on and compare different insurance plans. The website is managed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. As of Jan. 1, 2014 Insurance companies cannot deny anyone coverage or increase premiums because of a pre-existing condition, regardless of the consumer’s age.

Insurance companies will not be able to discriminate between men and women. Currently, women are often charged more than men for coverage. State “exchanges” will be made available. These exchanges will allow eligible consumers to essentially shop around and negotiate for better deals with insurance companies. Free preventive care will be available in any insurance policy.

Health insurance will be mandatory in 2014 to those that can afford it. If you’re under 30, however, a lower cost plan will be available.

For more information about your consumer rights, visit www.healthcare.gov for the timeline the provisions will take into effect.


8

The Vanguard | Health and Sex Guide 2011

Junk food junkies

SA R I A DY/VA NGUA R D STA F F

YOU SAD, BRO?

9

The Vanguard | Health and Sex Guide 2011

Easy tips to remain sad-free

An often overlooked addiction

Rian Evans | Vanguard staff

Group X at PSU

H.8

No more excuses not to work out

A DA M WI CK H A M / VA NGUA R D STA FF

substantial, although not as robust as light treatment.’” Lastly, there is the option of Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitor anti-depressants. For those that wish to self-medicate (which I am in no way endorsing), naturopaths also have some recommendations. Dr. Andrew Weil recommends daily exercise (which one should be getting anyway, regardless) and supplementing with 2000IU or more of vitamin D. Weil believes that vitamin D deficiency may be an underlying cause of SAD. Dietician Jim Gallagher recommends making sure intake of omega-3 fatty acids is adequate, though again that is something one should be paying attention to regardless of whether they are suffering from SAD or not. Gallagher recommends regularly eating fatty fish or supplementing with fish oil. Standard fish oil dosage is 2–3g (normally 2–3 gel caps) per day. There is also the option of St. John’s Wort, which has been touted as a natural anti-depressant since the 1990’s. As always though, it is important that the user separate manufacture claims from empirical evidence. For those thinking about using St. John’s Wort (or any supplement), be sure to talk to your doctor, especially as it may decrease the effectiveness of the birth control pill.

By Rian Evans | Vanguard staff

SA R I A DY/ VA NGUA R D STA FF

Seasonal Affective Disorder, more commonly known by its acronym SAD, is perhaps most easily (and literally) described as a form of seasonal depression. As the fall becomes winter, sunlight is seen less and less, and the days become shorter. As it turns out, that gloomy feeling some of us get through the fall and winter months may actually be due to the lack of natural sunlight. It may also have something to do with circadian rhythm mismatches that develop as the days become shorter. The serious medical community, that is, the guys and gals in white coats, suggest a few forms of treatment for those who have a doctorverified case of SAD. Treatments may be combined depending on how the patient responds and should be prescribed by a physician. The first treatment is light therapy, also known as phototherapy. This involves spending a specified amount of time in the presence of a special lamp. Sunlight is preferred, but in places like the northwest, sunlight may not be an option. The second type of treatment is the use of melatonin at specific times. In review of a study conducted by OHSU, the National Institute of Mental Health found, “While the study was not designed to test the efficacy of melatonin treatment, the researchers suggest that its clinical benefit ‘appears to be

Health myths: Busted

H.10 A counterpoint to health bogeymen Rian Evans | Vanguard staff

Janieve Schnabel | Vanguard staff We’ve all heard the excuses people give for not exercising. Admit it: You’ve used one or two of them yourself. There’s the “I don’t have time to exercise” excuse. There’s the “I can’t get to the gym” excuse. And there’s everyone’s old favorite: the “exercise is tedious and boring” excuse. Well, those excuses are invalid now. It’s time for Group X. Group X is an on-campus experience that fits with your schedule and changes every day. It is certified instruction in the exercise that interests you and it’s free for any red-blooded tuition paying PSU student—at least half-time. Sign a waiver at the front desk of the Rec Center, pick up a pass and you’re in. Then you simply make your way to your class (dressed appropriately, of course) and join a group of non-judgmental peers. At the front of the room stands your certified instructor who will collect your pass. For the next 45 minutes or so maybe you are kickboxing, or perhaps Zumba with its infectious energy, is more your style. Before you know it, the class is over. It’s back to the locker room and on to the rest of your day. It doesn’t seem like much, does it? Forty-five minutes to an hour of your week for a free workout with certified instructors seems very doable. And yet excuses still ring out.

All skill levels are welcome, from absolute novice to experienced veteran. And don’t worry about missing a few classes. In fact, the entire idea behind Group X seems to be “exercise on your own time.” Chances are, your “classmates” will change with every class. “They probably don’t have anything I’m interested in,” yet another cynic may suggest. Sure, you can’t please everybody, but chances are you will find at least one out of the many Group X classes you’ll enjoy. Classes range from Cycle, Yoga, Pilates, Bootcamp, Step, classes centered on abs, arms, circuit training and even a number of aquatic classes. Someone with a medical condition or normally restrictive disability has options under Group X as well. The adaptive classes are open to anyone who might have trouble with a regular class. And for all the excuses in the world, there aren’t a lot of reasons not to at least try Group X. There are no commitments or fees. You’ve got a wealth of options to choose from. You might make new friends. For all you know, you’ll love it. So toss out the excuses you’ve saved up. Check out the Group X schedule on the Rec Center website, read through the class descriptions, and march your butt down to the Rec Center for some healthy, fun activities.

Alright, it’s time to go after one nutrition myth and one exercise myth that have really been ticking me off. Myth It’s high-fructose corn syrup that’s making us fat! It’s artificial sweeteners! It’s...

CYCLE YOGA PILATES BOOTCAMP STEP

P H OTO COURTE S Y O F CO LOUR BLI N D / FLI CKR

Truth While there are some interesting bits of research on a variety of engineered foods, the best thing those bits of research can do is to offer us clues for future research. A single study isn’t worth much in the scientific community. Yes, there are some intriguing hypotheses put forth by naturopaths regarding possible physiological effects of these ingredients, but a hypothesis isn’t fact. As much as I encourage folks to eat as “natural” a diet as possible, the truth is that the body of research, as it stands now, does not support the scary claims made about these ingredients. What the data does show, however, is that as a population we are consuming too many calories. There is no clearly defined single cause. Until a body of research is provided, these claims are scapegoating at best and fear-mongering at worst. Conspiracy theorists will point out that much of the research one these ingredients is funded by the manufactures themselves; a valid point. However, in keeping with that mindset, don’t neglect the fact that competitors fund most of the cam-

paigns against these ingredients. For example, no one has a more to gain from the attack on artificial sweeteners or high-fructose corn syrup than the sugar industry. So, unless one wants to take the “X-Files” approach of “trust no one,” I’d recommend watching one’s overall caloric intake before worrying too much about any single ingredient. If you’re overweight, chances are the culprit is excess caloric intake when compared to caloric expenditure. Myth Weight training makes women bulky. Truth Weight training makes women hot! In all seriousness though, a drugfree female trainee will not look like Chyna of WWE fame. Women simply do not naturally possess adequate amounts of the hormones (mainly testosterone) necessary to facilitate anywhere near the level of muscle growth that a male does. Weight training generally makes women more shapely (in a good way) and provides a strength increase that will come in handy for day-to-day activities. Weight training will also help women fight off osteoporosis and muscle loss as they age. I firmly believe that every healthy woman should engage in both cardiovascular exercise and muscle strengthening activities, like weight training. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention just so happen to agree with me.

PH OTO COU RT E S Y O F A R E AO R I O N. BLO G S POT.COM

Binging on drugs or alcohol is a horrible thing. It can wreck lives and destroy families. Given these harsh realities, I conclude that substance abuse is far too heavy a topic for a guy like me to write about. On the flipside, just because I’ve managed to be a goody-goody when it comes to controlled-substances doesn’t mean I’ve always taken good care of myself. In fact, I’ve wrestled on and off with a less sinister substance: junk food. Now, I’m not trying to make light of drug abuse, because it’s no laughing matter. However, given the prevalence of chronic disease caused by eating habits and other lifestyle choices, junk food “abuse” has real consequences, too. Junk food abusers tend to engage in behavior that would potentially kill addicts of other substances. A junk food junkie tends to go on out-ofcontrol binges after eating fairly well for a period of time. I’m talking about meals consisting of a whole pizza with a carton of ice cream, perhaps washed down with some beer or soda. Sometimes this single binge turns into a weekend-long bender. If a drug user engaged in this type of excess, they’d most likely overdose and possible die. This behavior is very common among people who have set unrealistic goals for themselves. With the best of intentions, they swear off all junk food. They go on a strict diet for maximum results. Junk food has no place in their diets. The must adhere to their plan 100 percent or they are worthless. Of course, they’re human and so they slip up. Now, for a rational person this is no big deal. The rational person realizes that a couple hundred extra calories won’t bring their results to a halt. On the other hand, the binge eater is overcome by guilt. They then engage in the self-destructive behavior of eating more junk, often to the point of feeling physically ill. The solution, in my opinion, is to not set one’s self up for failure. Accept that humans make mistakes. Realize that turning one dietary slip-up into an all out binge is like slashing three of the tires on a car after finding out the first tire is flat. A better option is to allow one’s self a small amount of discretionary calories each day. As long as overall daily caloric intake is not excessive, there will minimal (if any) impact on one’s diet results. Tasty food is one of life’s greatest pleasures. Trying to completely avoid food one enjoys will only result in a variety of neuroses. As world-renowned nutritionist Alan Aragon says, “Avoid food avoidance.”


“Self-actualization” is a word many students (male and female) learn in Women’s Studies courses. One course last term, in particular, was devoted to the study of activist bell hooks (she prints her name with lowercase letters) regarding her feminist theory and cultural criticism. Self-love and self-acceptance are the necessary ingredients of self-actualization, which in hooks’ view is necessary to healthy relationships, especially when it comes to sexuality. Of course, we don’t all want a relationship, and thankfully, bell hooks provides a feminist sexual politic that allows for us to express sexual desire as the spirit moves us. In her book Feminism is for Everybody, hooks writes that liberated females not only get down and dirty wherever and whenever they choose, but also that it’s okay to choose not to be sexual or to focus on self-pleasuring. For those who want to take hooks’ ideas as a challenge, this writer recommends experimenting with celibacy and then discovering how to make masturbation better. She Bop, a female-friendly sex toy boutique owned by women in North Portland, can certainly help with that. It can be easier, though challenging, for some women to celebrate themselves through selfpleasuring than it is to imagine finding plea-

$0 breast feeding

sterilization

* one time cost

Erick Bengel | Vanguard staff

sure with a partner. As hooks writes, sexual liberation can’t exist when women “believe their sexual bodies must always stand in the service of something else.” It’s hard not to be bitter towards ex-lovers when all you’ve known is the sexual experience of helping your partner get off, but hooks’ feminism is not an angry movement. While hooks empowers women, she also celebrates men. Another work by hooks, The Will To Change: Men, Masculinity, and Love, is a celebration of men. Hooks asserts that the pressure to be manly and dominant in sex and in life hurts men. If you look around and listen, you’ll notice military recruitments displaying men with guns, advertisements for cologne that show guns of oiled muscle, and hear lyrics sung and rapped by angry men. Maybe, as hooks writes, “despair and rage” is what men bring to sex. In that case, men are victims of a patriarchal society, just as women are. Whatever we need individually, we’ll find it together. That ethos of mutual respect is the foundation of feminist sexuality. Let’s continue our progress towards self-actualization, inside the classroom and in the world.

It assumes many names: “the withdrawal method,” “the pull-out method,” “the exit strategy,” “the backup plan,” “the better-than-nothing plan,” and, less colloquially, “coitus interruptus.” But it assumes only one form: the withdrawal of a man’s unsheathed penis from a woman’s unprotected vagina immediately before he ejaculates in order to circumvent pregnancy. According to Gwyn Ashcom, a health educator at Portland State’s Student Health and Counseling (SHAC), although the withdraw method technically qualifies as a family planning strategy, it tends to be practiced more than she recommends. The American College Health Association’s 2008 survey lists withdrawal as the third most common method of birth control among college students (24.5 percent), falling behind birth control pills (62.6 percent) and male condoms (69.4 percent). Nevertheless, the effectiveness of withdrawal as a method of birth control is a recurring point of controversy in the medical community. Planned Parenthood endorses the withdraw method as a means of birth control. According to the organization’s website, if practiced correctly, the withdraw method is “safe, easy, and convenient,” and boasts a 96 percent effectiveness rate. To counteract risk, Planned Parenthood recommends that the man urinate before intercourse to clear any residual sperm from his urethra and to thoroughly wash any contaminated areas. Apart from the dangers posed by pre- and post-ejaculate, there is the issue of whether the man is actually capable of withdrawing in time to reduce the risk of pregnancy. “If done correctly, a guy would have to have

a lot of self-control to know exactly when he’s going to ejaculate, and to pull completely out,” Ashcom said. And once he pulls out, he must not ejaculate anywhere near the woman’s vulva, for any sperm that lands on or near the woman’s mucus membranes might just make the migration necessary to impregnate her. “It doesn’t really take a lot [of sperm],” she said. “And I think some people don’t realize that if they even have a little bit of ejaculation that that can potentially cause a pregnancy.”
 Planned Parenthood claims that, if practiced incorrectly, the effectiveness rate of the withdraw method drops considerably, down to approximately 78 percent. On top of the risk of pregnancy, the withdraw method does not protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs), for the obvious reason that is still entails an exchange of bodily fluids. People who have sex with multiple partners and use the withdrawal tend to be disaster-prone, according to Ashcom. Provided that a couple goes through all the right motions—a clean pre-ejaculate, a timely withdrawal, a vagina free of semen—there remains the inescapable emotional fallout of the withdraw method. For this reason, Ashcom does not herself advocate withdrawal unless it is bolstered by other tried-and-true birth control methods, including the usual candidates: condoms, birth control pills, and the rhythm method. “Education never hurts,” she said. “Getting as much information as you can about whatever is available to you, so you can make an informed decision, is the most important thing.”


less than 1 per 100

NUMBER OR PREGNANCIES PER HUNDRED WOMEN

$710-* 2866

$526 pill

$510

$71

$468

ring

male/female condom

shot

2-8 per 100

the ‘other half ’ (and perhaps her close friends) can see your r-status,” Gadd said. Whether or not Gadd’s advice that men hide relationship statuses is within the parameters of good etiquette remains to be seen. In an article published by TIME last year, “Your Facebook Relationship Status: It’s Complicated,” Claire Suddath described the absence of established social expectations on Facebook and other social media. “A Jane Austen of Facebook has yet to emerge, let alone a Miss Manners, and no one seems to have a grip on what the social norms ought to be,” Suddath wrote. The “Casual Encounters” section on Craigslist accounts for two percent of all ads posted on Craigslist today. Devoted to no-stringsattached rendezvous, Casual Encounters is a popular space for young users. But popular opinion still deems relationships that begin outside of Facebook and other social media sites to be somehow more legitimate. The domain manager of the Facebook discussion board that hosted a back-and-forth comment chain about the proper time to expect a partner to change his or her relationship status from “single” to “in a relationship” commented, “I’ve come to decide that I dont (sic) think it matters that much about your Facebook status unless Facebook is your lone source for getting dates.”

Exploring the controversy surrounding the “withdrawal” method

Mirena/Copper IUD

patch

$152 diphragm

$150 cervical cap

15-25 per 100

Alison Barnwell | Vanguard staff

$50– 68

$554

$193 sponge

$0

withdrawl

COST VERSUS EFFECTIVENESS IN BIRTH CONTROL METHODS

$0

fertility awareness

about 30 per 100

Alison Barnwell | Vanguard staff

implant

MORE EFFECTIVE

Learning about feminist sexuality

$128

S.3

S.2

The strange new world of romance and social networking

Brian, who asked that his real name be omitted from print, is a 19-year-old soldier who recently moved to Alaska and is required to live in the barracks there. He recently posted an ad on Craigslist titled “Seeking marriage.” “Usually I would never use Craigslist,” he said. “I only tried it because…I’m not going to meet a girl up here,” he said. Millions of college-aged students like Brian use Craigslist, Facebook and other websites for as many romantic purposes as the human mind can invent. Social media has re-invented dating, making the idea of meeting somebody online, flirting over the Internet, and even breaking up to the tune of intense social-networking drama, more and more common. The personals section on Craigslist offers nine categories, from “strictly platonic” to “casual encounters,” and on Facebook six relationship status options include “it’s complicated” and “in an open relationship.” “I’ve been seeing a guy for a few weeks and he often refers to me as his girlfriend…but refuses to change his Facebook status from being single,” read a posting that started a thread of comments on the a discussion board on Facebook. A reply by Facebook user Ian Gadd advised that the guy in the few-weeks-old relationship should manipulate Facebook’s privacy settings. “Set up the new privacy settings so that *only*

Fertilization and its discontents

MORE EXPENSIVE

$86 spermicide

COST PER YEAR $1000-3,000 I N F O G R A PH I C BY L AU R E N D O NO H U E

$500-1,000

$100-500

$0 - 100


13

The Vanguard | Health and Sex Guide 2011

CONTRACEPTION MISCONCEPTION

S.4

A FLOW CHART DESIGNED TO HELP YOU CHOOSE THE BEST CONTRACEPTIVE FOR YOUR LIFESTYLE

SEX SEX IS IS AWESOME AWESOME

So, how do you feel about having kids?

WHAT TO KNOW ABOUT SAFE SEX

$86

IF IF IT IT HAPPENS, HAPPENS, IT’D IT’D BE BE OKAY OKAY

spermicide

CONSIDER

$0

withdrawl

$0

NO THANKS.

fertility awareness

CONSIDER

&

II CAN’T CAN’T WAIT WAIT TO TO GET GET PREGNANT PREGNANT

$0

$0

withdrawl & fertility awareness

breast feeding

How do you feel about using spermicide?

$152 NO PROBLEM WITH IT.

CONSIDER

$71

diphragm

male/female condom

$193

$150

sponge

cervical cap

$526

CONSIDER

SOUNDS GREAT!

15-25 per 100

some STIs including herpes and the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) can be transmitted merely by contact of genitals, intercourse or no. Barram said that because of the potential dangers that sex can bring it should not be a taboo subject, communication with partners if imperative. “I really encourage the type of relationships where they can have that type of communication [about sexual history]. I don’t see it all the time, but I encourage honesty and being able to dialogue about these issues.” Barram suggests couples be screened for STIs before becoming intimate. Barram said that although she hopes people will be honest with each other, that is not always the case, and being screened is never a bad thing. Women and men alike should always remember that whether it is the first time, third or thirtieth time with someone, there are always risks. Barram said the most important reality she hopes students always remember is this: “Do not take sex lightly, and make a well-informed decision. With all our cultural and social expectations, people do not always think through everything, and they should be involved in their health.”

about 30 per 100

A LL I NF O GR A PH I CS BY L AUR EN D O NO H U E

The media culture in today’s times tells us one thing: Sex is everywhere. Despite all the coverage, it seems that there isn’t a lot of clarity when it comes to contraceptives. The only 100 percent effective way to prevent pregnancy is abstinence, but since most aren’t satisfied with this option, safe sex is imperative. Registered nurse Ashley Barram sat down to explain some of the confusion about contraceptives. Her first piece of insight: There are more than just a couple of options. The side effects of the pill seem to linger in women’s mind (potential weight gain, breakouts, mood swings, etc.). Barram said, “Because there are a lot of different forms of birth control, students should come in and the doctors will do a consultation, they can track your reactions to certain birth controls, and adjust things as needed.” At SHAC, Barram said they offer not only the traditional birth control pill but other nonhormonal options such as diaphragms, and IUDs. She also said that even with these options students should remember to also use a condom, because such options do not protect against Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs). The transmission of STIs is another sex myth that seems to persist. Barram explained that

NUMBER OF PREGNANCIES PER YEAR

COST PER YEAR

Rosemary Hanson | Vanguard staff

pill

NO PROBLEM WITH THEM.

How do you feel about taking a pill everyday?

$510 ring

NOPE. CAN’T DO IT.

NOT NOT RIGHT RIGHT NOW, NOW, BUT BUT MAYBE MAYBE SOMEDAY SOMEDAY

$50– 68 Mirena IUD

How do you feel about hormones?

$0

$128

breast feeding

NO THANKS.

implant

$50– 68 Mirena IUD

CONSIDER

2-8 per 100

CONSIDER

$554 patch

& $71

$468

fertility awareness & condoms

CONSIDER

MALE

one time cost

WHAT SEX ARE YOU?

FEMALE

REMEMBER:CONDOMS ARE THE ONLY PROTECTION AGAINST SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES. I N FO GR A P H I C BY L AUR E N D O NO HUE

$7102866

$128 implant

CONSIDER

$50– 68

Mirena/Copper IUD

less than 1 per 100

NOPE. NOPE. FOR FOR SURE. SURE. NEVER. NEVER.

shot


14

The Vanguard | Health and Sex Guide 2011

H.11

S.7 H.12

One pill to rule Resolutions: them all Have you got Do male supplements really work? what it takes?

A DA M WI CK H A M /VA NGUA R D STA F F

LOCAL RESOURCES

OFF-CAMPUS HEALTH CARE OPTIONS

Planned Parenthood is a place that supplies birth control and check ups to people who need it, sometimes for little money and even for free. With locations in Northeast, Southeast, Beaverton, Gresham and Clackamas, it is easily accessible for most people. They provide general health care and will even help people quit smoking. The Portland Clinic 800 SW 13th Avenue Portland, Oregon 97205 (Downtown Location)

The Portland Clinic offers a wide range of services including gynecology, nutrition, orthopedics and more. They also have urgent care services at their Tigard location (for all ages) and their Downtown location (16 and up), which is beneficial to college students because it is often cheaper than going to the emergency room. The Portland Clinic treats a wide array of ailments including minor burns, fractures, sprains, cuts, flu symptoms, cold symptoms, etc.

Coalition of Community Health Clinics 619 SW 11th Ave. Ste 225, Portland, OR 97205 (Downtown Location)

The Coalition of Community Health Clinics is a network of thirteen private, non-profit clinics throughout Multnomah County. They provide services to the uninsured and underinsured people. Multnomah County Health Department 426 SW Stark Street, Portland, OR 97204-2347

The Multnomah County Health Department provides services such as chronic disease treatment (asthma, heart disease, blood pressure etc.), preventative services (birth control, STD tests or treatment, physical exam etc.), mental health services, etc. The National College of Natural Medicine

Student Health and Counseling Center

Enzyte: Whether the stuff works or not, I’m simply thankful that the manufacturer blessed us with such a funny series of commercials. (Don’t know what I’m talking about? Get on YouTube). Memorable ads aside, Enzyte didn’t live up to its original claims of permanent increases in size. The manufacturer wound up paying out $2.5 million for deceptive sales practices. Stay away from Enzyte. The current consensus with in the medical community is that it is impossible to permanently increase penis size without surgery. The only thing it will increase is your credit card bill.

3025 SW Corbett Ave., Portland, OR 97201

The National College of Natural Medicine offers natural healthcare to low-income, as well as under-insured people at different health clinics throughout the Portland metro area. This clinic focuses on naturopathic and classical Chinese medicine while providing care to those with acute and chronic diseases. They also have a full-service lab.

Tribulus: Tribulus Terrestris is a plant regularly sold in supplement form. The theory is that certain naturally occurring compounds found in the plant increase

testosterone in users by stimulating production luteinizing hormone. More testosterone equals better sex drive and more muscle mass. Unfortunately, Tribulus has only anecdotal evidence on its side. The body of research available does not support the claims of manufacturers. DHEA: This stuff is actually a steroid hormone, but it’s available over the counter. As best as I can understand, the research is a bit conflicting. DHEA may be useful for older men in small amounts, but in younger men is much more likely to convert to estrogen, the exact opposite of what someone looking to increase his performance wants. Unless explicitly recommend by a physician, I’d stay away from the stuff. Yohimbine HCL: Another plant, or another plant extract more accurately. According to the National Institutes of Health, this stuff might actually be helpful. Yohimbine can increase the blood flow and nerve impulses of the penis (or the vagina). It may also be useful for those who have difficulty reaching climax. One has to be cautious with this stuff though, as it can cause irregular heartbeat, increased blood pressure and anxiety. Make sure to seek a physician’s advice before starting a Yohimbine regimen.

MIXING IT UP BENEATH THE SHEETS

S.6

With every tuition payment, students are also paying a fee that supports the Student Health and Counseling Center, which provides access to a number of health services right here on campus, and some beyond. To be more precise, the fee is only charged to students taking five or more credits. It covers basic health insurance and dental care. It also grants you—the student—access to SHAC. Students should be aware that unlike in years past, SHAC no longer takes walk-ins now. To schedule an appointment for any services, you will need to call 503-725-2800. So what exactly do you get with your student health fee?

Electric Slide The girl lies on her stomach, with a pillow under her pelvis with her support on her elbows. The guy then sits right behind the girl with his legs out in front of him, on either side of the girl, and hands to the side and enters at a 45-degree angle. (Ladies, as he is doing his part, bring your legs in for a tighter fit.) Wanton Wheelbarrow To get into this position it is best stand in front of a chair or a bed and have the lady lean her head and arms

down, until they are resting on the edge of the surface. Then man comes in behind and grabs one ankle and lifts it off of the ground, and brings it to a comfortable position, around his hips, and then enters. Lap Limbo This position adds a little bit of spice to the better-known position of doing it in a chair. Instead of having the girl place her legs on either side of the chair, have her lift her legs up and lean them against her partner’s shoulders, or have them rest on the back of the chair. Torrid Tug-of-War Start off by having the guy sit cross-legged on the floor. Then the girl straddles him, lowering herself down onto him. She then wraps her legs around his back. Next both grab their partner’s elbows and start to lean against one another’s weight. Then as you start to lean back, do a tug-of-war like motion. The key is to try to stay as still as possible and to concentrate on each other’s pleasure. These positions were provided courtesy of cosmopolitan.com, which has many more adventurous positions for people to try.

Problem 1: Unrealistic goals. Losing massive amounts of fat or gaining noticeable muscle mass in just a few weeks isn’t doable. Solution: Set small, achievable goals. Realize that losing 1–2 pounds of fat or adding a few pounds to your weighted exercises is a big deal. There is nothing wrong with dreaming big, but realize that you aren’t Superman. Also, eating habits are crucial. It is damn near impossible to out-exercise a bad diet. Problem 2: Having no goals at all. It is hard to achieve anything without any sort of focus. How can one stay motivated if they don’t even know what they are trying to accomplish? Solution: Again, set small goals. Use a journal to record workouts and observe progress. This makes it much easier to remain motivated. Problem 3: Laziness! New trainees find excuses and rationalization to skip their workouts. Solution: This can be approached two ways. One either has to visualize and connect with how good they will feel after achieving their fitness goals or they need scare themselves into action. Reading about the obesity “epidemic” or reading about the pains of chronic preventable disease can be great motivators.

Richard D. Oxley | Vanguard staff

Veronica Newton | Vanguard staff

Passion Propeller The woman lies on her back and her partner enters her missionary-style. The twist—quite literally—is that her partner starts moves his body in a 360-degree spin. (Remember, fellahs, not to kick your partner in the head when you move past her head.)

It happens every single year without fail: Gyms across the country are overwhelmed with New Year’s resolutionists, beginning their “I’m really going to do it this time” workout routines bright and early January 1. To a year-round gym-goer like myself, the difference is quite stark. Just a few days before, I could get on a piece of cardio equipment or use a bench without delay. Now I have to stand around and wait for equipment to become available. Does it annoy me? Sure, but the softie in me is also feeling warm and fuzzy about all these people who have decided to improve their health and quality of life. Unless I’m in a really crummy mood, I don’t mind being inconvenienced if it means others have also finally decided to invest some time and effort into their health. Unfortunately, a large portion of these newly motivated individuals is gone by the end of the month. Despite the huge spike in sales of about 30 percent at the start of the year, by the end of the December only 40 percent of gym members will still have (and actually use) their gym membership. What the hell happened to all those driven individuals? I’m not a psychologist, so take my observations and suggestions with a grain of salt, but over the past several years I’ve witnessed a few common reasons new trainees lose steam.

H.13

New positions that might make things a bit more electric When it comes down to business time, it can be a lot of fun to mix up the normal routine with some new and exciting positions that will help recreate and recapture the fun and adventurous side of sex. (For those of you that don’t find this article applicable: You probably don’t need any help with your sex life.)

Rian Evans | Vanguard staff

YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR

D R E W M A RTI G/ VA NGUA R D STA FF

3727 NE Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Portland, OR 97212 (Closest to Campus)

What man wouldn’t want more stamina, girth, rigidity and just more all-around sexual prowess? Hell, most partners wouldn’t mind their man having some improvements in these areas as well. Even for the guy that’s already dynamite between the sheets, there is always a natural curiosity about what the “next level” would be like. Catering to the wants of the consumer, our old friend the dietary supplement industry has churned out numerous “male enhancement” pills and potions. Let’s look at a few of the most popular products currently on the market. SA R I A DY/ VA NGUA R D STA FF

Planned Parenthood

HOW TO KEEP YOURSELF IN CHECK

Rian Evans | Vanguard staff

Meaghan Daniels | Vanguard staff Student Health and Counseling is a great resource to Portland State students. However, sometimes students want to get off campus for their health needs. For those students, there are a plethora of resources out in the Portland metro area.

15

The Vanguard | Health and Sex Guide 2011

Mark Bajorek I LLUSTR ATI O N COURTE S Y H IS.COM

Counseling Social workers, psychologists and psychiatrists are available at no charge through SHAC. Individual counseling to prescription refills are just a couple of benefits offered at SHAC’s counseling center. It should be noted that prescription refills are not included in the basic insurance plan that comes with the basic student health fee. Students can purchase a supplemental plan for such services. Physical health Health Services at SHAC offer quite a lot to PSU students including: Medical care Urgent Care Contraceptive counseling, including prescriptions Immunizations Lab and X-rays

Dental Students can enjoy dental services right here on campus at PSU’s dental clinic. The health fee doesn’t cover insurance for these dental services, but fees at the clinic are far below what you will find elsewhere. For example, a basic teeth cleaning currently cost just $50. An office visit fee runs just $25 and covers a number of services such as routine and emergency exams to periodontal screening. Health insurance Students receive basic insurance through Aetna. This provides partial payments for hospitalization, surgeries, ambulance costs, pregnancy costs and more. Those enrolled with Aenta should receive an insurance card to keep with them—this comes in handy for billing purposes at emergency rooms, etc. Further information Call 503-725-2800 to schedule an appointment with SHAC. SHAC 503-725-2800 1880 SW 6th Ave Open Monday – Thursday 8:00am to 7:00pm Friday 9:00pm to 5:00pm

Dental clinic 503-725-2611 Open Monday to Saturday 8:00am to 5:00pm More information about SHAC can be found online at www.pdx.edu/shac/

WALL TO WALL PLEASURE

S.8 How to buy the right sex toy from a former insider

Nicholas Kula | Vanguard staff

There are few places on Earth less comfortable than a porn shop. When one is in “the mood,” so to speak, the discomfort climbs to dentist’s office levels. Luckily, the Vanguard is here to help you with everything, and I, a former porn clerk, am on the payroll. Since there are many toys aimed at various kink levels, I’d rather focus on the three main types of accoutrements you’ll encounter: dildos, vibrators and lube. I’m excluding everything else, because if you’re in the market for a sex swing or some industrial handcuffs, you likely don’t need a buyer’s guide. Dildos The same rules apply for both men and women when choosing a dildo: Start with what you’re accustomed to. If the partner you’ve been with and are used to is six inches long and four in circumference, choose something close to that, if not a bit bigger or smaller. If you return home and use it and it wont fit, you’re out some cash. For the lesbians out there, get your partner’s input on the subject; they know your body best. Guys: Make sure to choose a toy with a flared base so you don’t...lose it. Vibrators Besides the clitoris, the area on the human body with the highest concentration of nerve endings is found on both genders. What is it? The tip of your nose. If you’re looking to purchase a vibrator, ask the clerk to remove the toy from its box and let you handle it. In doing so, place the piece to your nose and let ‘er rip. Most toys run on two batteries—three volts. Some other toys run on four, which is twice the voltage at six volts. Higher-end toys use higher-end motors and this is where voltage matters. Pay attention! If you’re self-conscious about putting a vibrator to your nose, remember you’re in a porn shop and the clerk has seen it a hundred times before. Lube There are three types of lube: water based, oil based and silicone based. Here’s the rundown: Water based: The best all-around. It tends to become sticky much less than oil, and it can be used for all types of sex. If you’re unsure of how the night is going to play out, get the water based. Oil based: This is typically used for masturbation only. Oil can heat a condom and break it, and it will stay inside a vagina and cause an infection if used that way. Use at your own risk. Silicone based: The best lube for anal sex, bar none. Silicone molecules are bigger than those of water and thus they cause a slick feeling on the skin. The problem? It works TOO well. If silicone lube gets inside a vagina, good luck getting it out. Some couples I’ve spoken with have had great results with vaginal use of silicone. Note: this stuff is expensive. Also, never use it on a silicone toy—it will gum it up and render it worthless.


Vanguard Health & Sex Guide 2011  

Vanguard Health & Sex Guide 2011