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The Class of 2020 walks the Lawn in the first of UVA’s back-to-back graduations

VOL. 30 NO. 20 n MAY 19 - 25, 2021 A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T WWW.CAAR.COM HE CHARLOTTESVILL E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

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MAY 19 – 25, 2021 CHARLOTTESVILLE’S NEWS AND ARTS WEEKLY C-VILLE.COM FREE

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Start your engines: Charlottesville races to the pumps PAGE 9

Rising star: Chef Robert Anglin gets cookin’ PAGE 21

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE

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V.33, No. 20

Charlottesville’s News & Arts Weekly CIRCULATION: 20,000 WEEKLY

P.O. Box 119 308 E. Main St. Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 434-817-2749 www.c-ville.com Facebook: facebook.com/cville.weekly Twitter: @cville_weekly, @cville_culture Instagram: @cvilleweekly

SANJAY SUCHAK

EDITORIAL

11 NEWS 9 10 Local restaurants struggle to attract workers. 11 Reflections on a postponed graduation ceremony. 13 Descendants weigh in on slave auction block site. 15 UVA’s pandemic year by the numbers.

CULTURE 17

May 19 – 25, 2021 c-ville.com

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Eat up! BAKERS! stars Three rising ish making del fresh bread

rything.

Taste is eve

TAKERS! Club C-Ville Supper to brings dinner your door

ICE CREAM MAKERS! ble A customiza hot-day treat

19 The Works: New play draws from voices of Black activists. 20 Review: Art exhibit launches in downtown shop windows.

21 All You Can Eat: The Ridley’s Robert Anglin on his comfort food with a twist. 26 Sudoku 27 Crossword 28 Free Will Astrology

Q&A 29 What are your plans for UVA graduation weekend?

CLASSIFIED 30

Real Estate Weekly Page 33

EDITOR Ben Hitchcock (x40) news@c-ville.com NEWS REPORTER Brielle Entzminger (x14) reporter@c-ville.com CULTURE EDITOR Tami Keaveny (x18) tami@c-ville.com COPY EDITOR Susan Sorensen CONTRIBUTORS Rob Brezsny, Alana Bittner, Deirdre Crimmins, Jedd Farris, Jenny Gardiner, Shea Gibbs, Erika Howsare, Meg Irvin, Madison McNamee, Cortney Meriwether, Desiré Moses, Sarah Sargent, Jen Sorensen, Paul Ting, Mary Shea Valliant, David Levinson Wilk

DESIGN AND PRODUCTION ART DIRECTOR Max March (x16) GRAPHIC DESIGNER Tracy Federico

ADVERTISING CORRECTION

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In “Lightening Up: Jeff Dobrow’s Brighter Together celebrates art and community at UVA” (May 12-18) we connected local duo Red Flower Lake to an audio engineering project for Dave Matthews. This is factually incorrect.

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THIS WEEK I graduated from UVA two years ago this week. I have such warm memories of that day (and not just because it was 1,000 degrees and sunny). Students, teachers, families—everyone around me was happy and proud. Of course, I had no idea what I was in for. The real world hits like a truck after four years sequestered on Grounds. Then, just as I felt like I was starting to figure it all out, the pandemic arrived, reshaping everything yet again. My classmates and I were the lucky ones—we got out just in time, completely spared the curtailed dreams of Zoom U. This year, the virus made its presence felt on Grounds in serious ways (p.11). But, knock on wood, the area seems to be through the worst of it, with more vaccinations occurring every day. My heart was full as I watched my friends in the Class of 2020 take their longawaited walk down the Lawn, and I really admire the Class of 2021, which has endured an exhausting three-semester run. In the spirit of graduation ceremonies everywhere, I’ll end this little reflection with an earnest-but-mawkish cliché: Graduations are turning points, opportunities to look back, take stock, and charge ahead with new energy. I think the classes of 2020 and 2021—and, heck, anyone who’s made it through the pandemic—have earned a turning point.—Ben Hitchcock

5.19.21

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SUNSET ON 7TH: HACKENSAW BOYS

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IN THE LIGHT OF LED ZEPPELIN

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RUBEN STUDDARD SINGS LUTHER VANDROSS

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Rocky will be at the Eternal Attic on Friday, June 4th 10 – 4

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GALLISON HALL ◆ circa 1931-1933

Excellent potential in this classic Georgian Revival-style residence sited on 43 private acres in Farmington. A complete renovation has begun, offering a unique opportunity for the new owner to customize and finish the project with a real dream home being the ultimate reward. Dramatic Blue Ridge Mountain views, 3 miles west of UVA! Steve McLean | 434.981.1863 | smclean@mcleanfaulconer.com 503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131

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May 19 – 25, 2021 c-ville.com

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The Brick Cellar

Charlottesville's New Event Space Downtown in the Dairy Market dairymarketcville.com/brickcellar


“There is so much ransomware going on under the surface ...It can be an existential threat when you see the kind of damage that can be done.”

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—Senator Mark Warner, chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee, on the cyber attack that disrupted the Colonial Pipeline

NEWS

Rad grads PAGE 11

IN BRIEF Vaxes approved for kids

Last week the FDA approved the Pfizer vaccine for kids ages 12 and up. Locally, the Blue Ridge Health District is now vaccinating children, though a parent or guardian must be present. As of Monday, 44 percent of Charlottesville residents have been fully vaccinated.

Masks off, says Gov

Gas guzzlers

DAN ADDISON / UVA COMMUNICATIONS

How about this for karma: Former Rockingham County Regional Jail superintendent John Marshall Higgins will spend four years behind bars for various crimes committed while he was in charge of the central Virginia detention center. In 2020, Higgins was found guilty of denying medical care to certain inmates, failing to protect two inmates from physical abuse, and committing mail fraud.

AMY AND JACKSON SMITH

Jailer jailed

Eight thousand dollar plane tickets to Paris. Eleven grand for a week in a hotel in Las Vegas. A $2,300 steakhouse dinner for four. You might not be surprised to hear that some big-shot CEO was cutting those kinds of checks...but the CEO of a regional public transportation system? That’s a new one. According to reporting from Charlottesville Tomorrow, these are a handful of the expenses CEO Brad Sheffield incurred during his last year as the head of JAUNT, central Virginia’s 85-bus public fleet. Sheffield was ousted from the board late last year, and has since created a website to defend himself. On the site’s opening page, he compares himself to Billy Beane, the 2002 Oakland A’s manager who was immortalized in the movie Moneyball for his ability to find success on a shoestring budget. You’re right on the money there, Brad.

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Sheffield’s wild ride

Allen Groves

@cville_weekly

Area drivers raced to the pumps last week after word spread that a cybersecurity attack had shut down the Colonial Pipeline, a massive fossil fuel artery that runs from Texas to New Jersey. The supply chain disruption, combined with a wave of panic buying, left the pumps dry at stations across the Southeast. By midday Tuesday, cars were lined up around the block at gas stations across Charlottesville. On Thursday evening, 72 percent of Charlottesville gas stations were without product— the highest proportion of empty stations anywhere in the state at the time, according to fuel market analysis site GasBuddy. (The rush on gas—and information about gas—was severe enough that GasBuddy itself experienced outages last week.) The worst seems to have passed, however, as the pipeline has resumed normal operations. At 8am on Monday, 70 percent of stations in Virginia were back to full service— though prices had gone up, with an average increase of 18 cents per gallon, according to GasBuddy.

May 19 – 25, 2021 c-ville.com

Longtime UVA Dean of Students Allen Groves is leaving this summer for a job at Syracuse University, the school announced on Monday. Since joining the admin in 2006, the bow-tied, silver-haired dean became one of the more recognizable public figures at the university. Groves earned praise for charging into the crowd to help students during the August 11, 2017, torchlit rally on Grounds. He “balanced humor, deep intellect and empathy as he navigated difficult issues and changing times in higher education,” colleague Pat Lampkin told UVA Today.

TAMI KEAVENY

Groves says goodbye

FILE PHOTO

Governor Ralph Northam says vaccinated individuals are no longer required to wear masks indoors, to align with new CDC guidance. (Businesses are still allowed to require masking if they choose.) Northam also says all gathering restrictions will be lifted on May 28, two weeks earlier than previously planned.


NEWS

10

Now hiring Local businesses try to lure workers back

Quirk Hotel encourages curiosity for the unique, inspiring and beautiful. A momentous tribute to the art, culture and history that makes each stay everything but usual. Quirk Hotel is the first boutique art hotel to be established in Charlottesville’s historic downtown.

SANJAY SUCHAK

499 WEST MAIN STREET, CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA, 22903 434-729-1234 | QUIRKHOTELCVA

Restaurateur Will Richey says he’s offered a $500 signing bonus to attract new employees.

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By Brielle Entzminger reporter@c-ville.com

May 19 – 25, 2021 c-ville.com

@cvillenews_desk

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Little Buckets Farm Sanctuary is a nonprofit 501c3 vegan sanctuary. Little Buckets shows the public how farm animals have loving, fun, sweet personalities, have strong family bonds and friendships, and that they feel the same emotions as your domestic pets. We show there is no difference and that we should love all animals by living compassionately.

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or nearly a year, a “now hiring” sign hung at the entrance to Baggby’s on the Downtown Mall. With the arrival of the coronavirus vaccine, owners Jon and Erin LaPanta hoped that applicants would start rolling in—but none came. “Now that business is coming back, we’ve had to turn business away,” says Jon LaPanta, who has operated the sandwich shop with his wife entirely on their own throughout the pandemic. “We’ve had 15- to 20-minute waits...and I’ve had to turn down catering, because I just don’t have the staff.” Across the country, many businesses, particularly in the service industry, are also struggling to find workers. Though around 10 million Americans are currently unemployed, massive numbers of jobs at restaurants and retail stores remain unfilled, sparking debate over the impact of expanded unemployment benefits. Thanks to the American Rescue Plan, qualifying workers can receive $300 per week on top of state unemployment insurance through September 6, adding up to $600 per week—or nearly $16 an hour. In Virginia,

the minimum wage for restaurant workers is $2.13 an hour before tips. At his array of local eateries, restaurateur Will Richey says it’s been “astonishingly hard” to bring in new employees as the economy has opened back up. “Just nobody was looking for work [and] replying to the ads at all,” says Richey, who manages The Bebedero, Brasserie Saison, Revolutionary Soup, and other Charlottesville restaurants. “I’ve heard rumors that it’s just people sitting and still collecting unemployment, but I don’t know what it is. It almost seems like there aren’t people to take the jobs.” Some business owners blame this staffing crisis on the extra unemployment benefits. “We have employees who refuse to go back to work because they are getting more money collecting unemployment, but I don’t think they realize some of those jobs are going to disappear,” says Rebecca Haydock, director of the Central Virginia Small Business Development Center. “We have seen businesses that have had to close their doors because employees won’t come back to work.” But according to University of Virginia economist Leora Friedberg, “there are

“The applicant pool is getting a little bit better now…especially as vaccines are kind of penetrating.” SCOTT SMITH, BODO’S


NEWS

At last

SANJAY SUCHAK

Reflections on a long-awaited graduation ceremony

The Class of 2020 sits in Scott Stadium during Sunday’s ceremony.

By Sydney Halleman

M

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dents surreptitiously nudged socially distanced chairs closer to their friends. My friend Tori spotted her dad, whose grin threatened to split his face as he raised his camera to get a picture of her. Though everyone sat far apart, the quiet of the sparsely populated space gave the ceremony a certain intimacy. Families didn’t scream. There was no need. They leaned over banister railings, and waved from their seats. “I’m so proud of you,” I overheard one parent say to a passing graduate. I spotted my own parents on the upper level. They jumped up and down. The collected speakers were reluctant to address the full seriousness of the pandemic and what it had done to us. We were sitting here, after all, because of an unprecedented worldwide tragedy, and I couldn’t help thinking of patients dying alone on ventilators in hospital rooms, and dead bodies piled in refrigerator trucks in New York as Jim Ryan joked about apocalyptic cicadas and gas shortages. Some of the usual graduation clichés predictably rang hollow. Unexpectedly, the most resonant speech came from Rector James Murray Jr., who graduated from college in 1968 during the peak of the Vietnam War and the aftermath of Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination. “Life throws many curves,” he said. “Time goes quick, quicker than ever.” When the ceremony ended and we streamed out of the stadium, it felt like a chapter had finally been closed. Not because I got to put on my gown, or because I walked down the Rotunda steps, but because I had a chance to say goodbye to my friends on my terms—and because we cared enough to come back together, and try again.

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y redo graduation got off to a less-than-graceful start. The day before walking, I found my black gown not in my closet, but crumpled in the trunk of my car, where I dumped it a year ago after declaring my 2020 graduation a total loss. My cap was nowhere to be found, and I ran to the bookstore 10 minutes before the ceremony began. My student identity, like the gown, didn’t fit quite as well as it had a year ago. I never left Charlottesville, even after “officially” graduating as part of the Class of 2020. In March of last year, after UVA moved all classes online, my friends left their apartments for hometowns across the country. It was a slow trickle of loss, a kind of bizarre un-reality that would come to characterize the entire pandemic. The brain, being the amazing adaptive muscle that it is, weaved different stories for me. My friends weren’t gone, they were just leaving for a few weeks. Classes weren’t stalled, it was just a nice spring break extension. This surreal feeling persisted through my class’ virtual graduation last May, when YoYo Ma played the cello and Jim Ryan congratulated some 4,000 of us undergraduates for finishing college. The feeling lasted through the winter, when the U.S. announced 500,000 deaths from COVID-19. This new world, steeped in a pervading feeling of existential loss and crushing anxiety, could not have been the same world where I was once a carefree college undergraduate. This spring, UVA announced it would hold a distanced graduation for us in May, a year after I had officially graduated from

college. (The Class of 2021 will have its regularly scheduled ceremony this weekend.) I wasn’t sure about returning. I felt too old now to walk the Lawn, too jaded to buy balloons. I had, after all, started a full-time reporting job, survived a round of harrowing job cuts, watched rioters besiege the U.S. Capitol, and saw a virus rip through the world. My entire graduating class had witnessed these things too, while also being expected to put on its new adult shoes, abandon the naiveté of young adulthood, and face the grim facts. What would we say to each other when we finally came face to face? The year in near-isolation left me unprepared for the shock of friendship and love that I felt when I saw old friends emerge from the crowd of students in Mad Bowl last Sunday morning. The shared grief and responsibility that I feared would divide us, instead brought us nearer to each other. We joked about virtual work, the pressures of graduate school, this bizarre late graduation. The empty Lawn, which in a normal year would have been packed full on all sides, was funnier with my friends there. Had we ever really aspired to that suffocating old graduation ritual? Instead of desperately looking over the lines to spot familiar faces, we turned to each other and laughed at the ridiculousness of it all. When it started to rain, we noted that the rotten weather was appropriate for our class’ luck, and we smiled. If friends made the more-lonely walk from the Lawn to Scott Stadium fun, the parents and loved ones waiting in the stadium made our day. Each student was allowed two guests. Parents waved from around the stadium, desperate to get a look at their children. Stu-

May 19 – 25, 2021 c-ville.com

many factors” contributing to the current situation. Friedberg points to the range of health risks service workers must consider before taking on a job. “Some of it is related to government payments, but that part of it is largely going to be temporary,” she says. Friedberg also says childcare is a big factor keeping people from returning to work. Though schools in Charlottesville and Albemarle County currently offer in-person learning, students still learn from home at least once a week. And next month, schools will be closing again for summer break. To bring back employees, businesses must guarantee safe working conditions and offer incentives that make it worth working there, including a living wage, flexible schedule, and competitive benefits, explains Friedberg. “Wages are going to go up, and that means prices will have to go up also. The restaurants and stores...can’t just take the money out of pocket,” she says. “Ultimately consumers, who to some extent do have extra cash right now, are going to end up paying for all of that.” In a Monday press conference, President Biden pushed back on the narrative that unemployment benefits were keeping people from working. “My expectation is that as the economy comes back, these companies will provide fair wages and safe work environments, and if they do, they’ll find plenty of workers,” said Biden. “We’re not going to turn our backs on our fellow Americans.” Some area businesses have tried attracting employees with increased wages. Bodo’s coowner Scott Smith says the restaurant had trouble finding workers this year. The bagel chain raised its starting salary to $13 an hour, and by keeping its dining room closed, Bodo’s has aimed to keep staff safe from infectious customers, says Smith. (Since the pandemic started, two Bodo’s employees have tested positive for COVID, but Smith says they did not catch the virus while at work.) “The applicant pool is getting a little bit better now…especially as vaccines are kind of penetrating,” he says. “But boy in January and February, it was just really hard to find people.” To attract applicants for his latest venture, the steakhouse South and Central, Richey realized he would have to sweeten the deal. Last month, he offered a signing bonus— those who kept the job for three months would receive an extra $500. But that only brought in a few more applications. Through social media, Richey was able to find a demographic willing to take the job: high schoolers. This week, South and Central will open at Dairy Market with a “very large team of teenagers,” he says. Across his restaurants, Richey says he has also upped the pay to encourage people to apply and stay on the team. A lot more positions are making at least $15 per hour, plus tips. “We’re not [at $15] across the board, and still rely very heavily on the tip situation,” Richey says. “A 16-year-old coming on to take a job with us, we may start them at $10 or $12 an hour...but they’re getting closer to $14 or $15 an hour with tips.” “The best thing that businesses can do is to create support and safety for people,” says Smith.

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NEWS

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Slow and steady Historic Resources Committee kicks off descendant outreach for Court Square memorial By Brielle Entzminger reporter@c-ville.com

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“It seems to be that we should be prioritizing those who can trace their ancestry to Albemarle County, especially since this is the county courthouse.” JALANE SCHMIDT, HISTORIC RESOURCES COMMITTEE MEMBER

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➢ Programs in high-demand career fields The city continues to work on creating a memorial to replace the Court Square slave auction block plaque, which was stolen last year.

May 19 – 25, 2021 c-ville.com

fter over a year of debate surrounding Charlottesville’s stolen slave auction marker, the Historic Resources Committee began meeting with descendants of enslaved laborers, seeking their input on how to best pay tribute to the thousands of enslaved people bought and sold in Court Square. The memorial’s story serves as an example of the process of creating new public monuments. And as Charlottesville continues to reevaluate its physical public spaces, stories like this will become more and more common. At the beginning of the month, committee member and UVA history professor Jalane Schmidt, joined by city planner Robert Watkins, met virtually with nine descendants, including DeTeasa Gathers, Myra Anderson, Calvin Jefferson, Bertha French, and Diane Brown Townes. While most attendees have recent connections to the Charlottesville area, several live outside of Virginia. During a May 14 committee meeting, Schmidt shared that the descendants urged them to be patient and not rush the descendant engagement process. “The process itself is just as important as what any eventual memorial might look like,” she said. City Councilor Heather Hill asked if the descendants wanted the city to erect a temporary marker while the committee works on a permanent memorial, referencing the city residents who have placed homemade markers in Court Square since the plaque was stolen last year. “We have heard from some facets of the community that would like to see something done sooner versus later,” Hill said. Watkins and Schmidt explained that the descendants did not provide a definite answer, but were not anxious to put up something temporary. “The thing I kept hearing was don’t feel pressured to move too fast, and to be listening to people into the process,” said Schmidt. “I did not hear from them, ‘yeah get something up there right away, that needs to be in place.’”

Committee co-chair Phil Varner questioned which descendants should have the most say in the creation of the memorial. “It’s this huge spectrum of voices in this conversation,” he said. “How do we determine who we should listen to the most?” “It seems to be that we should be prioritizing those who can trace their ancestry to Albemarle County, especially since this is the county courthouse,” responded Schmidt, pointing out that before emancipation, over half of the county’s populaR E T A I L E tion was enslaved. Moving forward, Schmidt said she will meet again with the leaders of Descendants of Enslaved Communities at UVA, and ask them to help get more descendants involved. CS_SALE-ADS.indd 3 “Fortunately, there’s been some really important work done by [genealogist] Shelley Murphy in tracking down people,” she said. “They’ve steadily built a database of names of descendants.” Committee member Kay Slaughter also suggested reaching out to the Central Virginia History Researchers, which has engaged with descendants from the area. Before next month’s committee meeting, Schmidt and Watkins plan to do one or two more virtual descendant engagement sessions. And as more people get vaccinated, the group hopes to host in-person meetings with descendants at Washington Park over the summer.


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1 2 0 2 E L L I V C f o t s e B

It’s true what they say: Absence does make the heart grow fonder. After taking last year off (hosting a competition just wouldn't have felt right when so many were struggling to keep their doors open), we're extra ready to get back to celebrating what makes Charlottesville great. This year's Best of C-VILLE boasts 191 categories—almost 100 more than in years past!—which means nearly 100 new opportunities to recognize the best people, places, and things in our city. We're excited to be back, and to share with you what we love about our home—now more than ever.

T NMEN I A T R ENTE

K & DRIN FOOD

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May 19 – 25, 2021 c-ville.com

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Nominations Happening Now-May 24th!

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Interested in promoting your business on the Best of C-VILLE ballot? Email boc@c-ville.com to purchase ballot advertising and sponsorships.


NEWS

15

UVA’s pandemic year, by the numbers Around the country, universities scrambled to conduct classes and host students while keeping COVID under control. The graphs and illustrations below provide a snapshot of UVA’s efforts to limit viral transmission among its students over the last year. All statistics are as of May 13.

Spit take

Student spread

The school reports 2,824 COVID cases among students since the beginning of the fall semester. This year’s enrollment was 25,642, meaning roughly 1 in 9 students have contracted COVID at some point during this academic year. Nationally, 27 million cases have been confirmed since August, meaning around 1 in 12 U.S. residents have contracted COVID during the same timeframe.

May 19 – 25, 2021 c-ville.com

School rivalries The chart below compares the spread on Grounds this spring to a handful of peer institutions.

Confirmed cases per 1,000 students, Spring 2021 semester 70 60 50 40 30 20 10

Returning to Grounds after a summer away brought a spike in cases. Fiftyseven UVA community members tested positive on September 17, the highest point in the fall semester.

The school averaged under 10 new cases per day from mid-October through January.

UVA experienced its biggest spike in early February, as students returned to school for the spring semester. The spike coincided with fraternity and sorority rush, when Greek houses traditionally hold large social events to attract new members. On February 16, 229 students tested positive.

UVA COVID TRACKER

Like in the fall, an early semester spike gave way to a relatively steady case count for the rest of the year.

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New cases

Peaks and valleys

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UVA administered 343,466 COVID tests this year, to students and employees and also through outreach programs at local churches and community centers. The majority of those were saliva tests. Each saliva screening requires 5 milliliters of spit. That’s 1,717 liters of saliva in total—enough to fill 11.3 medium-sized (40 gallon) bathtubs.


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The local authority Spring fever Q&A

Who’s your pick for Virginia’s next governor? Send your answers to question @c-ville.com, or respond via Twitter @cville_weekly (#cvillequestion), Instagram

We’re looking for a freelance graphic designer who can step in and help out with newspaper production in times of need. Must be ready to learn on the job and generate and execute creative ideas on the go! See the full job listing at c-ville.com/work-at-c-ville.

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Seeking designer

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In the April/May issue of Abode, we take you inside a former writer’s retreat that’s been transformed into a luxurious English cottage for gathering, relaxing, and enjoying the surrounding Waterperry gardens. We also tour a Frank Lloyd Wright-inspired home in Batesville; check out Mudhouse’s newest space on 10th Street; and show you how high-end fixtures dictated the direction of a local kitchen renovation. On stands now!

Inside. Outside. Home. APRIL/MAY 2021

A view of South River prompts a Stanardsville family to add a pool

English influences At Waterperry Farm, a former writer’s retreat becomes a garden oasis

Online all the time Make c-ville.com your go-to website for breaking news and trending topics. It’s where you’ll find all of our stories from the newspaper and magazines, as well as web-only exclusives—videos, photo galleries, playlists and more. C-VILLE Weekly, the alternative voice for everything happening in our city, is your source for news that affects your life. We cover the arts, music, food and community topics you need to know. We’ll tell you where to go, what to see, what to do, what to eat. This is our town—live it up.

Social scene Connect with us on social media to stay up-to-date on news and events as they happen in real time. Facebook: facebook.com/cville.weekly Twitter: Community news: @cville_weekly Arts and living: @cville_culture Instagram: @cvilleweekly

BUZZWORTHY Mudhouse’s latest space has a modern twist OUTSIDE THE BOX An eye-catching passive house in Batesville IN THE ROUND Eleven30 condos utilize the courtyard concept

What you were reading The top five stories on our website last week: 1 Bagels, bridges, and Dave?: You know you’re from Charlottesville if… 2. Not so fancy feast: New high-profile White Spot owners marshal the Gus Burger into the future 3. Fine specimens: Get to know Charlottesville’s six newly protected trees 4. Going green: Albemarle farm hopes to open natural burial ground 5. Heating up: Community peacemakers speak about recent gun violence

For your complete guide to can’tmiss events (and to submit your own!), visit events.c-ville.com.

This is our town.

.com


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SATURDAY 5/22 SATURDAY 5/22

ABOUT BLOOMING TIME

PUBLICITY PHOTO

MIXING IT UP A band built during quarantine, The Wilson Springs Hotel typically finds Victor Mcmanus on electric guitar, Jacob Ritter on acoustic guitar, and Jacob Korona on upright bass, but since each musician plays multiple instruments, they may switch it up on you. Folksy, rootsy, and positively energetic, WSH draws from the musical traditions of bluegrass, country, and folk, while occasionally adding their own twist to keep it interesting. No cover, 6pm. Pro Re Nata, 6135 Rockfish Gap Tpke., 823-4878.

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During the day, Mermay offers underwater fun for all ages, from street performers and food trucks to beachthemed crafts and photo booths. But as evening falls, the two-part, mini festival gives way to Lore…home to selkies, sirens, and all that lurks in the deep sea. Float to music from Bro-X’s retro electronica and let Ships in the Night’s “ethereal ambient lullabies” wash over you like a wave. $10, doors at 7pm, show at 8pm. Ix Art Park, 522 Second St SE. 207-2355.

THURSDAY 5/20

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All those April showers brought plenty of May flowers to the gardens at Monticello. Peggy Cornett, the estate’s curator of plants, leads the annual Spring Wildflower Walk at TJ’s place. And if the rigorous five-mile hike gave you pause in the past, you’re in luck: This year’s event is virtual, which means you can enjoy the beauty of the grounds from the comfort of home during a 35-minute tour that features Cornett’s extensive knowledge of spring botanicals, and a live Q&A. $10, 1pm. monticello.org.

SEA IT TO BELIEVE IT

May 19 – 25, 2021 c-ville.com

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OUR GUIDE TO YOUR WEEK


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By blood and by love Mariela Edwards acts on activism in new play at Live Arts By Julia Stumbaugh

in the Life of a Slave Girl, struck fellow mother Edwards to the core and inspired her to return to her activist roots. “Even if you were taught to dislike people and hate people based on the color of their skin...sexism, racism, colorism, that was taught,” says Edwards. “We were made with an innate desire to be loved; we were not made with the innate desire to hate.” Edwards hopes to remind audience members of their own inherent tendency to love other humans with her stories of joyful triumph over horrific adversity, all set to a drumheavy score of stirring Ghanaian music. The final activist represented in the production is Heather Heyer, who was killed just blocks away from the Live Arts theater while protesting the 2017 Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville. Although Heyer’s story is tragic, Edwards hopes that viewers leave not with a feeling of despair but rather one of hope and courage. “I wanted some of these things to be an affirmation for [the audience],” she says. “Like the fact that you are loved, that there’s a groundedness that lives inside of you... our ancestors are always looking over you. They’re always connected to you, and these

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T

Holding Rad rugs from a new vibe Forth stir up

FEB / MARCH

CENTER SPO

T

gathering A revamped edere place in Belv

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Mariela Edwards’ We Are The Ones We’ve Been Waiting For: Our Ancestors Breathing is an original play inspired by stories of determination in the face of horrific trauma and adversity.

says. “I felt like I wasn’t talking for me, but for Black women in general.” One of the most powerful women Edwards read about before the production’s debut in 2019 was Harriet Ann Jacobs, who Edwards herself represents in the production.

To escape sexual abuse and protect her children from her enslaver, Jacobs hid in an attic so small she couldn’t stand up for seven years before she managed to escape and begin founding schools for people freed from enslavement. Her autobiography, Incidents

ancestors are connected to you by blood and by love.” Our Ancestors Breathing, the latest of the Literary Collective of Black Women’s efforts to educate community members on racism in Charlottesville, is “not just performing for performance’s sake, it’s not just performing for a check,” Edwards says. “This production is a mission.”

T ART OF CRAF

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A SPRUCE UP

“We were made with an innate desire to be loved; we were not made with the innate desire to hate.”

r house Potter’s cide past embraces its

2021

Inside. Outside. Home.

Retaining the best of an unfinished Bundoran property, new owners craft their forever home

s e n li e h t e id s n I

There’s no place like

home. Inside. Outside. Home.

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A WW II-era home—and its modern-day kitchen redo

May 19 – 25, 2021 c-ville.com

he majority of Charlottesville and Albemarle County’s adult population have received at least one shot of the COVID-19 vaccine—and we may have an enslaved Black man from modern-day Libya to thank. Onesimus, who helped introduce the idea of inoculation to the West, is one of many enslaved Africans and descendants whose societal contributions are often whitewashed by American history. That’s one reason Live Arts partnered with Literary Collective of Black Women founder Vivian Feggans and playwright Mariela Edwards to put together We Are The Ones We’ve Been Waiting For: Our Ancestors Breathing, a pay-what-you-can virtual play that opens May 20 at Live Arts. The production draws from the voices and experiences of Black activists in America. From Nannie Helen Burroughs, a woman inspired by her formerly enslaved parents to open a school for girls and campaign for Black women’s suffrage, to Anna Murray Douglass, an abolitionist who helped her husband, Frederick Douglass, escape captivity by providing him with a sailor’s suit disguise, Our Ancestors Breathing draws on the stories of people who became activists through unimaginable trauma. “That’s what they all have in common,” says writer and director Edwards. “They’re not broken down. When you can stand against adversity, and make something of yourself and contribute to the world and society, that’s what I call power.” Edwards spent a year doing research for the play, which was written in hopes of inspiring others—especially other Black women—to recognize that same power within themselves. “I found that I constantly share a lot about myself, because subconsciously, or even consciously, I wanted people to see how bright and beautiful and brilliant we are,” Edwards


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CULTURE REVIEW

Support local journalism.

Spring emergence ‘Persephone Ascending’ views resilience through the female lens By Sarah Sargent arts@c-ville.com

A

ccording Greek mythology, Hades, lord of the underwold, fell in love with Persephone, the daughter of Demeter, the goddess of the harvest. Hades kidnapped Persephone and pulled her down to his subterranean kingdom, until Zeus intervened and freed her. During her time in the underworld, however, Persephone ate a handful of pomegranate seeds. Because she’d tasted the food of the dead, she was forced to return for a few months every year. During those months, Demeter became sad, leaving the earth barren and causing winter. Persephone’s annual ascent would cheer her mother up again, bringing spring. “Persephone Ascending: A Multi-site Group Show of Virginia Women Artists” at Chroma Projects/Vault Virginia, Studio IX, and a number of storefront windows along the Downtown Mall and off Harris Street, presents different voices, viewpoints, and interpretations of the myth. (A full list of artists in the show can be found at chromaprojects.com.) “When I started planning this, the Downtown Mall was full of empty storefronts,” says Chroma Projects Director Deborah McLeod. “Walking along and seeing all that sadness and dearth, it just pulled you down.” Expanding the exhibition into those vacant places seemed like the perfect antidote, but managers of the unleased spaces were hesitant to display work that might turn off potential lessors. So McLeod turned to businesses to display the work. These include Water Street Stu-

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Undulating lines dotted with white seed-like shapes pulse away from the pomegranate, suggesting the ripple effect of Persephone’s consumption.

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dios (Renee Balfour), C-VILLE Weekly (Bolanle Adeboye), Silverchair (Barbara MacCallum), 2nd Act Books (Rose Guterbock), My Dance Shoppe (Megan Hillary), Uplift Thrift (Nina Burke), and Rethreads (Dawn Hansen and Ann Ray). Naturally, pomegranates figure largely in the show. Susanne Arnold uses an actual one to form her figure’s body in “Persephone Rising.” Linda Wachtmeister’s halved pomegranate (“Consequential”) references Persephone’s bifurcated existence. A reduced palette of hot pinks and grays and a graphic style make the images pop. Undulating lines dotted with white seed-like shapes pulse away from the pomegranate, suggesting the ripple effect of Persephone’s consumption. Alexandria Searls’ stunning photo collage, “The Face of Persephone,” has an appealing hard-candy lusciousness. The composition depicts a dangling plastic baggie containing two pomegranates. As if emanating from it, a miasma of fleeting images, including Persephone’s face, hovers above. The blurry collage contrasts elegantly with the crystalline quality of the shiny, red pomegranates sheathed in translucent plastic.

Mary Michaela Murray’s “Emancipation.”


CULTURE ALL YOU CAN EAT

Opening eyes A young chef forges a new concept for community good By Tami Keaveny living@c-ville.com

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PHOTOS: EZE AMOS

Chef Robert Anglin says cooking appealed to him because it brings people together, and it’s important that customers have a good time at The Ridley. Blackened snapper (below) is featured on an upscale Southern menu filled with seafood and comfort classics with a twist.

“A lot of our dishes have a little twist. I would ask people to come here and be open minded. Look for a lot of flavor in the food. There’s a lot of infused spices.” CHEF ROBERT ANGLIN

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A dishwashing gig at Pippin Hill Farm & Vineyards put him firmly on the culinary path. Pippin’s executive chef at the time, Amalia Scatena, nurtured Anglin’s curiosity about food and pushed him into the kitchen. “It was the black truffles that got me,” he says. “It clicked in my head and I wanted to learn more.” His commitment was so impressive that Scatena helped pay for Anglin’s formal culinary training. Local chefs Ian and Allie Redshaw were also mentors. “Robert had all of the makings for a good chef; attention to detail, ability to do production,” says Ian. “Allie and I spoke with Robert a lot about food and the ideas behind it. From there he has used his work ethic to move up the ladder. A true showing of where self worth can take you.” Anglin’s food education came through observation—and exploring. Counting

eating as a hobby, along with rollerblading and going muddin’ in his Jeep, Anglin often crisscrosses the region to find great restaurants. He’s into sushi, Asian spices, and has tried lots of squid. He’s also tasted cicadas, but alligator was the “weirdest.” “Maybe it was the preparation,” says Anglin. What Anglin gleans from his dining findings is that simplicity and quality ingredients are the essentials. The Ridley dish he feels best represents his style is the pork chop. “I get a local pork chop from Madison County’s Papa Weaver, brine it for eight to 12 hours with vinegar and herbs. It’s served with kale, mixed fingerling potatoes...add white wine with garlic and a splash of butter. That’s me,” says Anglin. “Plain and simple. Earthy.” Thompson, who has served for eight years on both the Darden Foundation’s Board of Trustees and the Board of Visitors at UVA, was a financial supporter of the university’s Memorial to Enslaved Laborers, which is within walking distance of The Ridley. He says he wants to replicate the connection between food and history that happens in other places, such as the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C., and its connection to Sweet Home Cafe. Almost two months in, the COVID pandemic is easing up, and the restaurant is beginning to make its mark. “The Ridley is about bringing people together and nothing does that better than good food,” says Thompson. As for his take on the restaurant’s fledgling chef? “The shrimp and grits is more than a meal, it’s an experience,” says Thompson. “And if you’ve never had a fried lobster tail, you are missing out on one of my favorites.”

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ate afternoon light pours into The Ridley’s stylish dining room through tall street-facing glass walls, warming a dark-wood interior accented by copper features and splashes of UVA orange. Sitting in a booth, chef Robert Anglin is shy, and calm, even though service starts in just two hours. The upscale restaurant opened its doors on April 1 in The Draftsman hotel on West Main Street, and it’s Anglin’s first executive chef position. “Patience,” says Anglin. “With food you have to be patient. What I took from my culinary school experience is patience.” That demeanor likely serves Anglin well. Opening a new restaurant is tough under normal circumstances. When you’re developing a concept that honors an important legacy, in the middle of a global pandemic, in a food-fussy town, the pressure is on. Fortunately, the 28-year-old has been working toward this moment for years. In November 2020, hospitality partners Warren Thompson and Ron Jordan announced their restaurant, which is named for Dr. Walter N. Ridley, the first Black University of Virginia graduate and the first Black student to receive an academic doctoral degree from a traditional Southern white college or university. It was up to Anglin to shape a dining experience to complement the restaurant’s historical significance (a percentage of the Black-owned restaurant’s profits are donated to The Ridley Foundation). His opening menu is a celebration of familiar Southern comfort foods, elevated by lots of fresh seafood and a few flavorful surprises. “A lot of our dishes have a little twist,” says Anglin. “I would ask people to come here and be open minded. Look for a lot of flavor in the food. There’s a lot of infused spices.” Perfectly crusted fried green tomatoes show up in the Caprese salad and on an ample share plate piled with crab ravigote. The pork belly starter is an indulgent combo of sweetness and heat, and oysters can be enjoyed in a variety of dishes. The blackened snapper with andouille sausage, blistered tomato, and fried leeks over spicy grits stands out as an example of Anglin’s modern finesse. Anglin leans forward with a determined look as he passionately recounts the kitchen experiences that brought him to this point in his career. His first cooking job was as a teenager at Domino’s, where he says he loved tossing pizzas. “It’s like a piece of art, watching how it comes out,” he says.

May 19 – 25, 2021 c-ville.com

How do you point out the entrenched racism and subjugation of women that exists within the world of classical ballet? With adorable little ballerina apples dancing across a stage. Megan Hillary’s “Of Pomegranates and Freshly Peeled Apples” alludes to a George Balanchine quote that describes how a dancer’s skin should be as pale as the flesh of an unskinned apple, i.e. never exposed to sun. While excluding dancers of color altogether, the quote also sets up parallels between Balanchine’s sun-deprived dancers and Persephone, who is also kept away from the sun by a powerful, controlling male. Hillary likens the rising of Persephone to the strides that have been made in ballet, as evidenced by toe shoes on the periphery of the piece that hail the (shockingly recent) introduction of different skin tone-hued ballet slippers. Chuxin Zhang’s poignant “Emergence” uses a found piece of driftwood with silver and white clay to depict Persephone’s/ spring’s return. The snow that has encased the figure is melting and breaking apart, leaving little drifts that trail behind her. You can see wings tightly folded at her side as within a chrysalis—a suggestion that she will soon fly away and soar. Other works less literally tied to Persephone’s story include the breaking laces of the corset, which represent the casting off of the trammels of female confinement, in Michelle Gagliano and Beatrix Ost’s “The Persimmon Burst.” Rosamond Casey’s “The Something Else that Had Been Lurking All Along Beneath the Thing that Was” exudes a distinct malevolence that dovetails with our idea of the underworld. There’s a decidedly corporal quality to the rent and moist looking “ductwork” that runs up through the center of the piece. One thinks of an esophageal tunnel, a discarded chrysalis, the interior of a stem, or perhaps Persephone’s route back from Hades ripped open by her flight. Polly Breckenridge and Allyson Mellberg-Taylor attack the prompt through the aesthetic of vintage commercial art. It is quiet, but it packs a punch. Breckenridge’s “Qui Tacet Consentire Videtur” (they who are silent, appear to consent) pairs drawings of girls in different poses, possibly taken from some kind of manual on the human figure or pattern book, together with a variety of the patronizing things men (mostly) say to women and girls. Breckenridge uses glitter, a childish pencil scrawl, and smudged erasures to drive home the point that this indoctrination starts early. Mellberg-Taylor’s message may be more oblique, but we see in the contemptuous gaze of the woman in “The Radish Cycle” someone who’s not going to take any shit from anybody despite what you might think of her overabundant collar of leaves. Mellberg-Taylor’s women seem to maintain their equanimity (and power) in spite of the strange circumstances they find themselves in. Persephone ascending back into the world is a celebration of the return of spring. It takes on enhanced significance this year as we emerge from the winter of COVID-19 into a vernal season full of promise, thanks to vaccines. And of course, as these artists have shown us, Persephone is a potent allegory of female empowerment whose relevance continues today.

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CULTURE ALL YOU CAN EAT

Order up! These local establishments are open and waiting to take your order. (Keep in mind that some information is subject to change, and descriptions may not apply, due to current circumstances.) Email living@c-ville.com to add your restaurant to the list. Asian Cuisine Afghan Kabob Palace Authentic Afghan cuisine. 400 Emmet St. N. 245-0095. $$. Asian Express Chinese and Japanese with healthy options. 909 W. Main St. 979-1888. $. Bamboo House Korean and Chinese options. 4831 Seminole Trail. 973-9211. $$. Chimm Thai Thai street food. 5th Street Station. 288-1122. $$. Doma Korean Kitchen Korean-style barbecue, kimchi, and more. 701 W. Main St. 202-1956. $. Kanak Indian Kitchen Offering traditional homemade Indian food, plus cocktails to go. 385 Merchant Walk Sq. Ste. 400. 328-2775. $. Lemongrass Vietnam meets Thailand. Veggie options and delivery, too. 104 14th St. NW. 244THAI. $$. Lime Leaf Thai A tad more upscale than the average Thai place. Rio Hill Shopping Center. 245-8884. $$. Maru Korean BBQ & Grill Traditional Korean food with modern additions. 412 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 956-4110. $.

Milan Indian Cuisine Authentic Indian cuisine with all the standards; beer and wine available to go. 1817 Emmet St. 984-2828. $$.

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Mochiko Good Hawaiian eats (and suggested Hawaiian beer pairings, too). The Yard at 5th Street Station. $. Monsoon Siam Delicious, unpretentious favorites like pad Thai, tom yum noodle soup, and vegetarian dishes. 113 W. Market St. $$. Now & Zen Gourmet Japanese and sushi spot. 202 Second St. NW. 971-1177. $$. Pad Thai Homestyle Thai cooking from an experienced chef. 156 Carlton Rd. 293-4032. $$. Peter Chang China Grill Authentic Sichuan cuisine by a renowned chef. Barracks Road Shopping Center North Wing. 244-9818. $$. Red Lantern Chinese cuisine by the pint or the quart. 221 Carlton Rd. 979-9968. $. Silk Thai Fresh, authentic Thai, plus specials like marinated wings. 2210 Fontaine Ave. 977-8424. $$. Tara Thai Affordable Thai faves, with multiple meat, fish, and veggie options. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 984-9998. $$. Taste of China Chinese favorites on 29N. Albemarle Square Shopping Center. 975-6688. $$. Taste of India Indian fare favorites on the mall. 310 E. Main St, Downtown Mall. 984-9944. $$. Ten Upscale second-floor spot serving modern Japanese and offering its popular cocktails for carry-out. 120B E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 295-6691. $$$. Thai ’99 II Thai noodle and rice dishes, curries, and stir frys in an inspired interior. Gardens Shopping Center. 964-1212. $. Thai Cuisine & Noodle House Traditional Thai food, noodle dishes, and vegetarian specials. 2005 Commonwealth Dr. 974-1326. $$. VuNoodles Fresh, vegetarian Vietnamese noodles, pho, bahn mi, and more. 111 E. Water St. 465-1267. $.

Bakeries Albemarle Baking Company Get your ABCs of baked goods. 418 W. Main St., in the Main Street Market. 293-6456. $.

Bowerbird Bakeshop Pastries, breads, and cookies using locally sourced ingredients, delivered right to your doorstep. 120 10th St. NW, bowerbirdbakeshop.com. $ Gearharts Fine Chocolates Freshly baked pastries, cakes, cookies, and brownies—plus chocolates! 243 Ridge McIntire Rd. 972-9100. $. Great Harvest Bread Company Sandwiches, sweets, and bread baked from scratch every day. McIntire Plaza. 202-7813. $. MarieBette Café & Bakery French pastries for breakfast, more pastries for lunch. 700 Rose Hill Dr. 529-6118. $. Paradox Pastry Known for the biscuits, European pastry, and the legendary DMB cookies and brownies. 313 Second St. SE #103. 245-2453. $.

Petite MarieBette MarieBette’s little sister. 105 E. Water St. 284-8903. $. The Pie Chest Homemade breakfast and hand pies, plus by-the-slice options (for those who can’t decide). 119 Fourth St. NE., 977-0443; 1518 E. High St., 984-0555. $. Quality Pie In the former Spudnuts spot, ex-Mas tapas chef Tomas Rahal serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner. 309 Avon St. 284-5120. $$. Sliced. cake bar Mobile bakery offering whole cakes, cake flights, cake pops, and buttercream shots, for delivery or curbside pickup. 242-5501. $.

Bars and Grills

Whistlestop Grill Southern comfort foods in Crozet. 1200 Crozet Ave. 823-9000. $.

Breakfast Joints Cavalier Diner Breakfast all day, traditional diner fare, and Greek food. 1403 N. Emmet St. 977-1619. $ Farm Bell Kitchen New-Southern cuisine with local farm-to-table ingredients. 1209 W. Main St. 205-1538. $$. First Watch Breakfast, brunch, and lunch chain with locally grown ingredients. 1114B Emmet St. N. 202-5383. $$. Villa Diner Mainstay with housemade pancakes, biscuits, roast turkey, soups, and sides. 1250 Emmet St. N. 296-9977. $. Murphy’s Coffee & Bagel House Breakfast spot serves delicious coffee and freshly baked New York bagels. 26 Buck Dr. 939-6033. $$.

Blue Moon Diner Beloved local diner serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner options like pancakes, breakfast burritos, burgers, and BLTs. 600 W. Main St. 980-6666. $$

Fardowners Restaurant Local ingredients liven up pub fare like sliders and sandwiches. 5773 The Square, Crozet. 823-1300. $$.

Fox’s Café Daily specials, burgers, dogs, and dinners. 403 Avon St. 293-2844. $.

Selvedge Brewing New brewery in The Wool Factory serves elevated bar fare from Chef Tucker Yoder. 1837 Broadway St. 270-0555. $$. TCO 2go Specialty sandwiches like pulled pork and fried fish from The Catering Outfit in a drive-thru. 221 Carlton Rd. 951-4699. $$. Texas Roadhouse Steaks, ribs, and fromscratch sides. Albemarle Square. 973-4700. $$. Timberwood Grill All-American eatery and after-work watering hole. 3311 Worth Crossing, 975-3311. $$. Three Notch’d Craft Kitchen & Brewery Locally sourced, beer-infused dishes including Southern classics and a kids menu. 520 Second St. SE. 956-3141. $$. The Whiskey Jar Saloon-style Southern spot with, naturally, more than 90 varieties of whiskey. 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 2021549. $$.

Belle Coffee & Wine Breakfast and lunch sandwiches. Free kids meals with adult meals. 9964919. $$. C’ville Coffee & Wine Full menu of coffee, sandwiches, and wines. 1301 Harris St. 817-2633. $. Greenberry’s Java and specialty drinks, fresh baked goods. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 984-0200. $.

The Workshop A coffee and wine shop featuring Grit Coffee and pastries from Cou Cou Rachou, located in The Wool Factory. 1837 Broadway St. 270-0555. $.

Five Guys Two locations for local carnivores. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 975-GUYS; Hollymead Town Center, 963-GUYS. $.

Sedona Taphouse Lots of craft beers and an all-American menu. 1035 Millmont St. 2962337. $$.

Baine’s Books & Coffee Wide selection of coffee, tea, pastries, and paninis. 485 Valley St., Scottsville. 286-3577. $.

Ace Biscuit & Barbecue Breakfast and lunch spot with BBQ and soul food by the biscuit. 600 Concord Ave. 202-1403. $.

Beer Run Massive tap and packaged beer offerings, killer nachos, three meals daily. 156 Carlton Rd., 984-2337. $$.

Peloton Station Cycle-centric tavern and bike shop. 114 10th St. NW. 284-7786. $$.

Coffee Places with Kitchens

Milli Coffee Roasters Espresso drinks, chai, hot chocolate, light fare, and wine. 400 Preston Ave, Suite 150. 270-9706. $.

Burger Bach New Zealand-inspired gastropub. The Shops at Stonefield. 328-2812. $$.

Matchbox Restaurant Wood-fired pizzas, salads, salmon and steak dinners, and gourmet burgers. 2055 Bond St., 284-8874. $$.

Wild Wing Café Classic wings and beer. 820 W. Main St. 979-WING. $$.

Burgers, BBQ, Dogs and Diners

Alamo Drafthouse Burgers, pizzas, salads, snacks and desserts prepared fresh from locally sourced ingredients. Served in the café or while you watch a movie. 5th Street Station. 326-5056. $.

Firefly Craft beer, burgers, salads, vegetarianfriendly menu. 1304 E. Market St. 202-1050. $.

Wayside Takeout & Catering Famous Ole Virginia fried chicken and barbecue sandwiches. 2203 Jefferson Park Ave. 977-5000. $.

Doodle’s Diner Country cookin’ from breakfast to burgers. 1305 Long St. 295-7550. $.

Lazy Parrot Backyard BBQ The Lazy Parrot Grill’s sister restaurant. Pantops Shopping Center. 244-0723. $$.

Family-Friendly Ann’s Family Restaurant Good old country cooking. 1170 Thomas Nelson Hwy. (Rte. 29, south of Lovingston). 263-8110. $. The Light Well Coffee-kitchen-tavern serves healthy ingredients in original recipes. 110 E. Main St., Orange. (540) 661-0004. $. Michie Tavern Traditional Southern lunch from an 18th-century tavern. 683 Thomas Jefferson Pkwy. 977-1234. $$.

Frozen Treats

Luv’n Oven Gizzards, livers, fries, and shakes. 162 Village Sq., Scottsville. 286-3828. $.

Chaps More than 20 years of gourmet homemade ice cream. Diner fare including breakfast and burgers. 223 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-4139. $.

Martin’s Grill Delicious hamburgers, veggie burgers, and fries. 3449 Seminole Trail. 974-9955. $.

Corner Juice UVA alum-owned juice spot with cold-pressed options. 1509 University Ave. $.

Mel’s Café Southern soul-soothing food. A longtime favorite on West Main. 719 W. Main St. 971-8819. $.

Kirt’s Homemade Ice Cream Ice cream made fresh in the store. Albemarle Square Shopping Center. 202-0306. $.

Mission BBQ Pulled turkey, pork, and chicken, plus racks by the bone. The Shops at Stonefield. 260-7740. $.

La Flor Michoacana Homemade paletas (popsicles), ice cream, and ice cream cakes, plus other sweet treats. 601A Cherry Ave. 984-1603 $.

Moe’s Original BBQ Alabama-style pulled pork smoked in-house. 2119 Ivy Rd., 244-7427; 200 W. Water St., 202-2288. $.

Smoothie King Chain features smoothies, supplements, and healthy snacks. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 295-8502; Rivanna Ridge Shopping Center, 975-5464. $.

Moose’s by the Creek American favorites, plus mounted moose antlers for photo ops. 1710 Monticello Rd. 977-4150. $. Riverside Lunch Popular joint known for smashburgers. 1429 Hazel St. 971-3546. $. Riverside North Notable burgers and fries on 29 North. 1770 Timberwood Blvd. 979-1000. $. Royalty Eats Soul food goodness including chicken and waffles, ribs, and specialties like teriyaki salmon. 820 Cherry Ave. $ Vision BBQ Meats smoked the old-fashioned way with wood and a match. 249 Ridge McIntire Rd. 443-4352. $

Gourmet Groceries and Gas Stations Batesville Market Sandwiches to order, salads, and baked goods plus cheeses, produce, and packaged goods. 6624 Plank Rd., Batesville. 823-2001. $. Bellair Market Gourmet sandwich spot on Ivy Road. 2401 Ivy Rd. 971-6608. $. Blue Ridge Bottle Shop Craft beer store with both bottles and growlers available—plus sam-


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ple before you buy! 2025 Library Ave, Crozet. 602-2337. $.

Lampo Authentic Neapolitan pizzeria in Belmont. 205 Monticello Rd. 282-0607. $.

Mediterranean

Brownsville Market Breakfast starting at 5am, plus burgers, sides, and famous fried chicken. 5995 Rockfish Gap Tpke., Crozet. 823-5251. $.

Luce Literal hole in the wall serving fresh, handmade pasta to go. 110 Second St. NW. $$.

Aromas Café Mediterranean and Middle Eastern fare. Sandwiches, salads, and famous falafel. 900 Natural Resources Dr. 244-2486. $.

Feast! Nationally noted cheese, wine, and specialty food shop. 416 W. Main St., in the Main Street Market. 244-7800. $$.

Mellow Mushroom Trippy-themed franchise, with great pizza and even better beer selection. 1321 W. Main St. 972-9366. $.

Basil Mediterranean Bistro Mediterranean fare from grape leaves to tapas, plus wine. 109 14th St., 977-5700; 5th Street Station, 202-7594. $.

Foods of All Nations Sandwiches, deli, and salads at this gourmet grocery. 2121 Ivy Rd. 296-6131. $.

Red Pump Kitchen Tuscan-inspired restaurant. 401 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 2026040. $$.

Cava Fast-casual Mediterranean with lots of vegetarian options. 1200 Emmet St. N, #110. 227-4800. $.

Greenwood Gourmet Grocery Made-to-order sandwiches, fresh soup, and a deli with mac-n-cheese, bread pudding, and rotating dishes. 6701 Rockfish Gap Tpke., Crozet. (540) 456-6431. $.

Tavola Rustic Italian with housemade pastas, craft cocktails, and a Wine Spectator awardwinning list. 826 Hinton Ave. 972-9463. $$.

Orzo Kitchen & Wine Bar Dishes from Spain to Greece and wines of the world. 416 W. Main St., in the Main Street Market. 975-6796. $$.

Vita Nova Creative ingredients on hearty pizza by the slice. 310 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-0162. $.

Otto Turkish Street Food Go for the doner kebabs and stay for the rosemary fries. 111 W. Water St. 328-8786. $

Vinny’s Italian Grill & Pizzeria This regional chain has pies plus a slew of subs, pastas, and stromboli. Hollymead Town Center. 973-4055. $$.

Sticks Kebob Shop Everything tastes better on a stick! 917 Preston Ave. 295-5262; 1820 Abbey Rd. 295-5212. $.

Hunt Country Market A rotating menu for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, plus wine offerings. Call to order. 2048 Garth Rd. 296-1648. $. Integral Yoga Natural Foods All-natural food, organic produce, supplements, plus a deli and juice/ smoothie bar. 923 Preston Ave. 293-4111. $. J.M. Stock Provisions Whole-animal butcher shop with sandwiches to go, great craft beer selection, and nicely curated wine selection. 709 W. Main St. 244-2480. $$. Keevil & Keevil Grocery and Kitchen Belmont grocery with breakfast and lunch sammies, plus takeaway dinners. 703 Hinton Ave. 989-7648. $. Market Street Café Gourmet breakfast, rotisserie chicken, and deli meats. 1111 E. Rio Rd. 964-1185. $. Market Street Market Deli in the downtown grocery serves sandwiches and prepared foods. 400 E. Market St. 293-3478. $. Market Street Wine An expertly curated selection. 305 Rivanna Plaza Dr., Suite 102, 9649463; 311 E. Market St., 979-9463. $$. Mill Creek Market The Southern sister of Bellair Market. Avon Street, across from the Southside Shopping Center. 817-1570. $. Trader Joe’s This grocery chain boasts top quality at low cost, including “Two Buck Chuck” wine. The Shops at Stonefield. 974-1466. $$.

Wyant’s Store Country-store fare like coffee and donuts, with daily specials and a great (cheap!) cheeseburger. 4696 Garth Rd., Crozet. 823-7299. $.

Italian and Pizza Anna’s Pizza No. 5 In the family for 35 years. 115 Maury Ave. 295-7500. $. Belmont Pizza and Pub Fresh, stone-baked pizza on hand-tossed pies. Beer, too! 211 Carlton Rd., Suite 10. 977-1970. $.

College Inn Late-night goodness. Pizza, gyros, subs, and its delivery can’t be beat. Breakfast items, too. 1511 University Ave. 977-2710. $.

Dr. Ho’s Humble Pie Pizza joint in the Crossroads mini-mall. 4916 Plank Rd., on 29S at North Garden. 245-0000. $$. Fabio’s New York Pizza Pizza, subs, salads, and calzones made by natives of Naples. Get your pie the Sicilian way. 1551 E. High St. 8720070. $. Fellini’s #9 A local landmark featuring Italian favorites plus some inventive new takes. 200 W. Market St. 979-4279. $$.

Al Carbon Chicken prepared in an Indigenous Mexican coal-fire, flame-roasted rotisserie manner, plus sides like fried yucca and fried plantains. 1875 Seminole Trail. 964-1052. $. Brazos Tacos Austin, Texas-style breakfast, lunch, early dinner, and brunch tacos. 925 Second St. SE. 984-1163. $. The Bebedero Upscale authentic Mexican, plus cocktails and made-to-order guac. Order from sister restaurants Revolutionary Soup and The Whiskey Jar and pick up food from all three, at once. 225 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 234-3763. $$. Chipotle Simple menu of made-to-order burritos and tacos. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 872-0212; 2040 Abbey Rd. Suite 101, 9841512. $. Continental Divide Charlottesville’s favorite hole-in-the-wall spot has delicious tacos and enchiladas. 811 W. Main St. 984-0143. $$. Fuzzy’s Taco Shop Fresh, handmade, Bajastyle Mexican food. 435 Merchant Walk Sq., Suite 600. 214-0500. $. Guadalajara Family-run Mexican food celebrating 30 years. 805 E. Market St., 977-2676; 395 Greenbrier Dr., 978-4313; 2206 Fontaine Ave., 979-2424; 108 Town Country Ln., 2933538; 3450 Seminole Trail, 977-2677. $. Guajiros Miami Eatery Food inspired by the everyday meals of Miami, with strong Cuban influence as well as Central and Southern American dishes. 1871 Seminole Trail. 4652108. $ Junction Innovative Southwestern cuisine with locally sourced ingredients in Belmont. 421 Monticello Rd. 465-6131. $$. La Michoacana Mexican deli serves budgetfriendly burritos, tacos, and enchiladas. 1138 E. High St., 409-9941; 2291 Seminole Ln., 956-4299. $. Little Star Spanish- and Mexican-inspired food expertly prepared in a wood-fired oven. Great craft cocktails, too. 420 W. Main St. 252-2502. $$. Mas Spanish tapas and wines in the heart of Belmont. 904 Monticello Rd. 979-0990. $$. Morsel Compass Popular food truck’s brickand-mortar spot. 2025 Library Ave., Crozet. 989-1569. $$. Qdoba Mexican Grill Spicy burritos, quesadillas, and Mexican salads made before your eyes. 3918 Lenox Ave. 244-5641. $. Sombrero’s Mexican Cuisine & Café Healthy, authentic Mexican cuisine. 112 W. Main St., Suite 6. 979-0212. $.

Miscellaneous Nationalities

Panera Bread Co. Ubiquitous chain with casual fare. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 2456192; Fifth Street Station, 973-5264. $. Revolutionary Soup Choose from a slew of enticing soups made daily. 108 Second St., Downtown Mall. 979-9988. $. Roots Natural Kitchen Fast-casual salad and grain bowls. 1329 W. Main St. 529-6229. $. Which Wich Superior Sandwiches Create your own sandwiches by marking up the pre-printed brown bags. Hollymead Town Center. 977-9424. $.

Steaks and Seafood Bonefish Grill Sister to mega-popular Outback Steakhouse featuring seafood, grilled non-fish specialties. Hollymead Town Center. 975-3474. $$.

Bang! Tapas Asian fusion cuisine served tapasstyle. 213 Second St. SW. 984-2264 $$.

Outback Steakhouse Bloomin’ onions and giant steaks. 1101 Seminole Trail. 975-4329. $$.

Bizou Playful French-American bistro with a beloved meatloaf dish. 119 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-1818. $$.

Public Fish & Oyster Simply prepared, responsibly sourced seafood. 513 W. Main St., 995-5542. $$.

Mahana Fresh Tropical themed, fun flavored ingredients in bowls and sweets. 2142 Barracks Rd. 284-5846 $.

Upscale Casual

Pearl Island Caribbean-inspired lunch spot in the Jefferson School City Center. 233 Fourth St. NW. 466-0092. $. The Shebeen Pub and Braai Conjures the South African veldt. Vinegar Hill Shopping Center. 296-3185. $$. Sticks A fast-food alternative: kebobs (veggie options available), sides, salads, desserts. Preston Plaza, 295-5262; Rivanna Ridge Shopping Center. 295-5212. $.

Soups, Salads, Sandwiches

C&O Serving up a three-course $68 prix fixe menu. 515 E. Water St. 971-7044. $$$. Café Frank French-influenced café dining and takeout with special attention to its wine and cocktail lists. 317 E. Main St. 825-9496. $$ Fig Bistro & Bar Mediterranean and New Orleans-inspired dishes with housemade ingredients. 1331 W. Main St. 995-5047. $. Hamiltons’ at First & Main Contemporary American cuisine in the heart of downtown C’ville. 110 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 2956649. $$$. Ivy Inn Offering Fine dining in a charming tollhouse. 2244 Old Ivy Rd. 977-1222. $$$.

Baggby’s Gourmet Sandwiches Satisfying sandwiches, salads, soups, and super-friendly service. 512 E Main St. Downtown Mall. 984-1862 $.

The Local Belmont neighborhood spot featuring comfort favorites. 824 Hinton Ave. 9849749. $$.

Bodo’s Bagels Still the king of bagels. Drivethru available at 1418 N. Emmet St., 977-9598; 505 Preston Ave., 293-5224; and outside service at 1609 University Ave., 293-6021. $.

Maya Upscale Southern cuisine. 633 W. Main St. 979-6292. $$.

Chopt Creative salad chain with ingredients from local purveyors. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 328-8092. $.

The Mill Room AAA, four-diamond eatery at The Boar’s Head, 200 Ednam Dr. 972-2230. $$$.

Citizen Bowl Shop Specialty salads with gluten-free, vegetarian, and paleo-friendly options. Also now selling groceries like yeast, flour, and brownie mix, plus gloves and toilet paper. 223 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 234-3662. $.

Oakhart Social Seasonal, creative modern American food for sharing. 511 W. Main St. 995-5449. $$.

Durty Nelly’s Down-home pub and deli now offering five subs (except the Dagwood) for $35. 2200 Jefferson Park Ave. 295-1278. $. HotCakes Fancy sandwiches, housemade entrées, and desserts. Delivery available. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 295-6037. $. Iron Paffles & Coffee Pastry dough + waffle iron + savory or sweet insides. 214 W. Water St. 806-3800. $. Ivy Provisions Local deli and retail food shop offering fresh, housemade breakfast and lunch all day, plus wine and craft beer by the bottle and on draft. 2206 Ivy Rd. 202-1308. $. Jack’s Shop Kitchen Farm-to-table brunch, lunch, and supper spot with elevated classics. 14843 Spotswood Trail, Ruckersville. 939-9239. $$.

The Melting Pot Fondue fun for all. 501 E. Water St. 244-3463. $$$.

Oakhurst Inn Coffee & Café Southern style breakfast and lunch. 1616 Jefferson Park Ave. 872-0100. $. Restoration Great views and delicious food, ranging from fried green tomatoes and burgers to crab cakes and pasta. 5494 Golf Dr., Crozet. 823-1841. $$. Southern Crescent Cajun and Creole fare in Belmont. 814 Hinton Ave. 284-5101. $$. Tonic Seasonal, local café fare with craft cocktails and curated wine list. 609 E. Market St. 226-4270. $$ Wayland’s Crossing Tavern Pub food, vegetarian plates, and kid-friendly fare. 1015 Heathercroft Cir., Crozet. 205-4669. $$. Zocalo Flavorful, high-end, Latin-inspired cuisine. 201 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-4944. $$.

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Crozet Pizza Unpretentious, family-owned pizza parlor with nationally recognized pies. 5794 Three Notch’d Rd., Crozet, 823-2132; 20 Elliewood Ave. 202-1046. $.

Latin American

Thyme & Co. Traditional Lebanese flatbreads and salads. 104 14th St. NW, Suite 2. 282-2436. $.

Kitchenette Sandwich Shop From meatloaf with cheddar and jalapeños to tofu Reubens, these sammies satisfy. 920 91/2 St. NE. 2607687. $

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Christian’s Pizza The place to get fresh pies, by-the-slice or the whole darn thing. 118 W. Main St., Downtown Mall, 977-9688; 100 14th St. NW, 872-0436; 3440 Seminole Trail, 9737280. $.

Vocelli Pizza Pizza, pasta, panini, salads, and stromboli plus antipasti. Woodbrook Shopping Center. 977-4992. $.

Sultan Kebab Authentic Turkish cuisine with plenty of meat and vegetarian options, and notable appetizers, too. 333 Second St. SE, 981-0090. $.

Jimmy John’s Low-cost sandwiches on 29N. “Freaky fast” delivery. 1650 E. Rio Rd. 9752100. $.

May 19 – 25, 2021 c-ville.com

Whole Foods Market Fresh, all-natural sandwiches ranging from classic favorites to vegan delights. 1797 Hydraulic Rd. 973-4900. $$.

Vivace Every kind of pasta imaginable, plus seafood. 2244 Ivy Rd. 979-0994. $$.

Jersey Mike’s Subs Subs from Jersey. 2040 Abbey Rd. #104, 529-6278; 5th Street Station, 328-8694. $.


24

THE

WINE

DOWN

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WHAT’S DELISH AT LOCAL WINERIES?

WINERY

HARRISONBURG

MADISON

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STANARDSVILLE

KILAURWEN WINERY 81

May 19 – 25, 2021 c-ville.com

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33

ORANGE

HORTON VINEYARDS

340 29

GORDONSVILLE

33 CROZET AFTON

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KESWICK VINEYARDS EASTWOOD FARM & WINERY

PIPPIN HILL FARM & VINEYARDS

LOUISA

CHARLOTTESVILLE ZION CROSSROADS

53RD WINERY & VINEYARD 64

DUCARD VINEYARDS

2020 Rosé Trio

2020 Shenandoah Black Bear

In the month of May, we’re releasing our trio of rosés: the Quintessential, Gentle Press, and Barrel Aged. The Quintessential rosé is a blend of Cabernet Franc and Merlot, and is done in a traditional style of Provencal rosés with light notes of strawberry and lavender. The Gentle press and Barrel Aged rosés are both comprised of Chambourcin, but are fermented and aged very differently. The Gentle press has a pale pink color, with tart notes of watermelon candy. The Barrel Aged rosé has a deep rich rose pink tone, and warming spices accompanied by raspberry on the palate.

As the Shenandoah National park reopens, we are releasing our specialty Shenandoah park themed wines! The Black Bear is made from 100% Cabernet Franc, this wine showcases aromas of blackberry and black pepper with an herbal background. Welcoming tannins offer a good structure with a spinning acidity. Perfect for your outdoor BBQ and grilling dinners filled with beef, pork, mushrooms, and peppers! A portion of the proceeds is donated to the National Trust for the park.

We are open 7 days a week 11am to 5pm, offering curbside pickup and for those visiting we have bottle sales only Monday through Thursday and Friday through Sunday offer wine by the bottle, glass and tasting flights (four 2 oz pours). The following areas are available for customers: outside tables, deck off tasting room and well-spaced seating inside our Pavilion. Groups greater than 10 not permitted. We ask that customers refrain from moving inside and outside tables. Children and Pets are welcome but pets must remain outside of buildings. Customers are welcome to bring their own picnic baskets, chairs, blankets and glassware. Please note that we cannot pour into glassware brought from home. Please follow entrance and exit signs when coming into the tasting room to purchase wine. Restrooms are available in tasting room and pavilion, one patron at a time. Visit our website, www.53rdwinery.com on our Covid operating procedures.

DUCARD VINEYARD

Guide Map

53RD WINERY AND VINEYARD

May 22nd- Live music by Randy Johnston (12:30 pm) May 30th- Vic & Dave’s Grilled Cheese Food Truck Open 7 days a week, 11 am – 5 pm

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13372 Shannon Hill Rd • Louisa, VA 23093 (540) 894-5474 • 53rdwinery.com.

Our uncrowded rural Madison County area has mountains, streams and lots of beautiful views along scenic back roads. The tasting room is nearby many hiking and biking trails along the Shenandoah National Forrest and is a perfect respite after your day out! Enjoy some peace and quiet relaxation in this challenging environment. Sit on our lawns or pick up a bottle or three of our award-winning wines to take home. Reservations available and recommended (especially for Saturdays). No reservation fee or minimum purchase. Walk-ups accommodated on a space-available basis. To order wine for local delivery or UPS shipping, visit our website! Open daily – Mon-Thurs. 3-6 PM , Fri-Sun 12-6 PM NEW: Offering tasting flights daily. Table service, well-spaced, led by DuCard staff host, crystal glassware, red, white or mixed flights. An elegant way to get to know our wines. Fridays- Friday Night out at Ducard (5:30 - 8:30 pm) come out and kick off the weekend with dinner and live music at DuCard. Saturdays- Music on the Patio (2:30 – 5:30 pm) enjoy a wide variety of artists each Saturday May 23rd- Chocolate and Wine pairing (2-5 pm) with Master Chocolatier Ann Czaja from Lindt chocolates. Advanced reservation required via our website May 31st- Memorial Day music on


Our season opening will be the weekend of April 17 & 18. Hours will be from noon - 6 pm. First come, first serve at outdoor umbrella tables in our Boxwood Garden. Enjoy the mountain views while sipping your favorite Kilaurwen wines which are available by the bottle, the glass and DIY tasting flights. You’re welcome to bring your own picnic or snacks to enjoy with our wine!

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COVID regulations still in effect require 6 foot spacing, mask wearing except when seated at tables, and group size limited to 6 people. Special orders are available any day of the week to those preferring to arrange gate-side pick up at a date and time of your choosing. Place order by calling 434-985-2535.

KESWICK VINEYARDS

the Patio with The Ronnie Johnson Band (2:30 – 5:30pm) 40 Gibson Hollow Ln • Etlan, VA 22719 (540) 923-4206 www.ducardvineyards.com

EASTWOOD FARM AND WINERY Apple Pear Cider Made from estate-grown and handpicked apples and pears, this cider is fruit forward and refreshing with balanced sweetness and acidity. Honeyed apples and pears are detected on the nose while flavors of fig, spice, and a hint of sage characterize the palate. Available as a sparkling & still cider.

The Barn, home to our indoor Tasting Room, is open on a reservation-basis with a few new menu items including the Red Reserve and Virginia Classics Tastings as well as an assortment of snacks including cheese and crackers, crackers and bars from Good Phyte, fine chocolates from Gearharts, and mixed nuts and clementines. Please make reservations on our website. Our drink offerings also include non-alcoholic options.

May 28th- Live music by Jason Burke (4 – 8 pm) May Hours: Thursdays (4-8PM), Fridays (4-8PM), Saturdays (12-8PM), Sunday (12-5PM)

2531 Scottsville Rd. (5 mi from Downtown Charlottesville) Charlottesville, VA 22902 (434) 264-6727 www.eastwoodfarmandwinery.com

In 1989, Dennis Horton and longtime business partner Joan Bieda acquired 55 acres for the beginning of Horton Vineyards. The task of establishing the vineyard was given to Dennis’ wife Sharon, a nurse by trade, whose meticulous nature was reflected in the manicuring of the East Coast’s most unique vineyard. 1993 saw the first crush at the new Horton Cellars and in 1994 additional acreage came into production with plantings of Bordeaux, Portuguese, South African, Georgian and Spanish varietals with Pinotage and Rkatsitelli. Horton Vineyards continues to explore with new varietals and techniques to achieve the best that Virginia viticulture can produce. While we have a wide variety of wines to pick from, we offer different themed flights each month to highlight our wine throughout the year! Wine flights, glasses and bottles are available. To ensure time for a tasting please arrive at least 15 minutes prior to closing. Open Daily from 10 am – 5 pm Wednesdays- Wine Wednesday (77:30 pm) Join Horton Vineyards live on Facebook every Wednesday at 7pm to learn about a different wine each week! 6399 Spotswood Trail, Gordonsville, Virginia (540) 832-7440 www.hortonwine.com

Tasting Room Hours We welcome guests daily from 10am5pm. No reservations are required for open air, first-come, first served seating at our courtyard tables. Guests may also bring their own blankets and lawn chairs and spread out on the lower hillside. Please remember face masks are required for all guests ages 5+ when not seated. Wine is available by the flight, glass and bottle, and only our outdoor areas can be accessed at this time. A selection of pre-packaged meats, cheeses, crackers, and spreads are available for purchase. May 22nd- Laughter and Wine outdoor comedy night, with Hidden Acres Food Truck from 6:30-8pm, show begins at 8 pm May 25th- Tasting Tuesday 2017 Cabernet Sauvignon Estate Reserve Block 7 (7 - 8pm) June 1st – Tasting Tuesday 2017 Heritage Estate Reserve (7 – 8pm) 1575 Keswick Winery Drive Keswick, VA 22947 keswickvineyards.com • (434) 244-3341

KILAURWEN WINERY Kilaurwen Red A non-vintaged wine comprised of Touriga Nacionale, Cabernet Franc, and Cabernet Sauvignon, it has a deep garnet flavor and the aromas of cigar and leather. Rich black cherries and spice warm the palate with a touch of tobacco and licorice. This is a great wine to enjoy with Sunday roasts, venison steaks, or while sitting around a late night fire pit!

Pippin Hill is a culinary vineyard in the heart of Virginia’s wine country. Reservations are highly encouraged and can be made via Resy for indoor and Veranda seating. We do have walkin availability for Grab-and-Go Lawn Seating as well. Please note our staff diligently checks IDs as part of our ABC licensure compliance as well as guest safety. If your party has a guest who is under age 21, we do require you to have a reservation at a table. Walk-ins are welcome based on availability. Reservations via Resy are recommended for indoor and Veranda seating. Hours: Tuesday – Thursday: 11 am – 5 pm; Friday – Sunday: 11am to 4:30pm Sundays- Live music on the hill! Each Sunday from 1-4 PM, Pippin Hill welcomes local musicians to perform on our Veranda. Check our website for varying artists. May 21st- Featured Farmer FridayErik of The French German with his locally made BBQ, Pies, cakes, jams, jerky, & preserves 5022 Plank Rd., North Garden, VA 22959 (434).202.8063 www.pippinhillfarm.com

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The Barn & Veranda and Outdoor Tasting Room are open every Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. Indoor & outdoor tables are available on a first come basis. Couch reservations may be made on our website.

This wine was created in the traditional Methode Champenoise. It is 100% Touriga National. Erotes has beautiful summer berry aromas with raspberry and red currants. Crisp and dry for a sparkling rosé! It pairs wonderfully with fresh burrata, roasted red peppers, oysters, and s’mores.

2020 Rosé Our Rosé is both floral and fruity in the aromatics, like a basket of cranberries and watermelon with a few rose petals thrown in for fun. The plush palate of grapefruit gives way to tart raspberry, with a touch of meyer lemon. While this wine is not sweet, the fruit qualities balance out the dry wine, and that makes it perfect for the spring and summer months, chilled and close enough to refill your glass without having to get out of the hammock.

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May 21st- Live music by Sue Harlow (4 – 8 pm)

Erotes Sparkling Rosé

PIPPIN HILL FARM & VINEYARDS

May 19 – 25, 2021 c-ville.com

Eastwood is a women-owned business created by a group of wine lovers and agriculture enthusiasts producing awardwinning Virginia wines. We embrace the power of storytelling and the vision that there is no ceiling you can’t break, and look forward to toasting you in one of our tasting rooms soon!

HORTON VINEYARDS

2019 LVA Rose 100% Touriga Nacionale. This is a dry Provencal style wine has amplified aromas of freshly cut red berries, citrus fruit and a hint of green apple. The palate is light and vibrant with lovely acidity, good palate weight and length. Flavors of cherry, strawberry and raspberries are dominant before warmth shows a touch more of the citrus tones and slight spiciness on the finish. Perfect on its own during the warmer months or paired with shellfish and oysters on the half shell.

1543 Evergreen Church Rd Stanardsville, VA 22973 (434) 985-2535 www.kilaurwenwinery.com


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CULTURE PUZZLES SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

#2

#4

#5

May 19 – 25, 2021 c-ville.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly

#1

#1 solution

#2 solution

#3 solution

#4 solution


27

CROSSWORD

Skip a generation BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK ACROSS 1. ____ Ababa, Ethiopia 6. “The disease of kings” 10. Crosswalk user, briefly 13. Nutritious breakfast cereal 15. Mrs. Krabappel on “The Simpsons” 16. Cheer for Real Madrid 17. 1939, to cinephiles? 19. Part of w.p.m.: Abbr. 20. The bus stops here: Abbr. 21. Carson’s predecessor on “The Tonight Show” 22. Vichyssoise vegetable 23. Two short of six dozen tailors? 28. “Slow Churned” ice cream brand 29. They’re found among the reeds 31. Latin 101 word 34. ____ surgeon 35. 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup champs 36. Advice on how to solve 17-, 23-, 49- and 58-Across 41. Objective 42. Fizzless, as a Coke 43. ____ Reader (quarterly magazine) 44. Stay-at-home workers? 46. Newswoman Paula 49. Makes casual comments like “Hey youse, I like dat sand castle”? 53. The stuff of legends 54. E pluribus ____ 55. Quick turnaround? 57. “____ been thinking ...”

#3

1

2

3

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58. Music shop that only sells works by singersongwriter Scaggs? 62. Part of w.p.m. 63. Kaffiyeh wearer 64. December birthstone 65. Places where people wear masks, for short 66. Like child’s play 67. Superbright colors

DOWN 1. Schumer and Poehler 2. Airs from pairs 3. Silas of the Continental Congress 4. Leb. neighbor 5. Like a mansard roof 6. Architect Frank 7. Dedicatory lines 8. Game with a spinoff called DOS 9. Looney Tunes devil, for short 10. ‘80s work wear with shoulder pads 11. Primogeniture beneficiary 12. Classroom fixture 14. “... assuming there’s even one” 18. Ink 22. Aloha State souvenir 24. HBO comedy series with the tagline “This land is her land” 25. Needing a massage 26. Vowel-shaped beam 27. Émile who wrote “J’accuse” 30. Compos mentis 31. Red-haired biblical twin 32. Reviews hastily 33. Ones with coy smiles

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ANSWERS 5/12/21

May 19 – 25, 2021 c-ville.com

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34. Province west of Que. 37. ____-Cuban (music genre) 38. Campbell who sang “By the Time I Get to Phoenix” 39. Three o’clock, so to speak 40. Hobbes’s favorite food in “Calvin and Hobbes” 45. Suffix with winter 46. Greek philosopher of paradox fame 47. Like hives 48. Confines 50. One of a hitched pair 51. Kaley of “The Big Bang Theory” 52. “Great blue” bird 53. Start to suction? 56. Urges 58. Main squeeze, in modern lingo 59. Lyricist Gershwin 60. Laughing matter? 61. Numero di colori on the Italian flag


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By Rob Brezsny

Gemini (May 21-June 20): Here’s a public service announcement for you Geminis from the planet and god Mercury: You’re under no obligation to be the same person you were three years ago, or six months ago, or last week—or even five minutes ago, for that matter. Mercury furthermore wants you to know that you have been authorized to begin a period of improvisation and experimentation, hopefully guided by a single overriding directive: what feels most fun and interesting to you. In the coming weeks it will be more important to create yourself anew than to know precisely who you are.

Cancer (June 21-July 22): As a Zen Buddhist priest for 47 years, Kosho Uchiyama was knowledgeable about the power that illusions can wield over our imaginations. “If we’re not careful,” he said, “we are apt to grant ultimate value to something we’ve just made up in our heads.” I won’t tell you the examples from my own life that prove his point, because they’re too embarrassing. And I’m happy to report that I don’t think you’re anywhere near granting ultimate value to something you’ve just made up in your head. But I do advise you to be on the lookout for milder versions of that phenomenon.

Leo

May 19 – 25, 2021 c-ville.com

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(July 23-Aug. 22): Leo-born professor Sibelan Forrester is an expert on charms, spells, and incantations in Russian folklore. She wrote, “An empty place where no one can see or hear what one says is the proper locus for working magic.” Spells often start with these words, she added: “I rise up, saying a blessing. I go out, crossing myself, and I go to an open field.” Whether or not you have Russian heritage, Leo, I see the immediate future as being a good time for you to perform magic in an open field with no one else around. What might be the intention of your magic? How about something like this: “I ask my guides and ancestors to help me offer my most inspired largesse so as to serve the health and inspiration and liberation of the people whose lives I touch.”

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Spiritual author Stephen Russell wrote, “Don’t mask or deny your vulnerability: It is your greatest asset.” That’s an exaggeration, in my opinion. Vulnerabil-

HERE COME THE BRIDES

CULTURE FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

Taurus (April 20-May 20): As you enter a phase when gradual, incremental progress is the best progress possible, I offer you the concluding lines of Taurus poet Adrienne Rich’s poem “From a Survivor”: “not as a leap, but a succession of brief, amazing movements, each one making possible the next.” I especially want to call your attention to the fact that the small steps can be brief, amazing movements. Don’t underestimate the power of minor, subtle, regular breakthroughs. ity is a greater asset than your intelligence, compassion, and creativity? Not in my view. But I do recognize the high value of vulnerability, especially for you Virgos during the next three weeks. “Be vulnerable,” Russell continues. “Quake and shake in your boots with it. The new bounty and beauty that are coming to you, in the form of people, situations, and things, can only come to you when you are vulnerable—open.”

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct.22): My friend Jenny’s Swedish grandmother used to say to her on a semi-regular basis, “Åh tänk om vi vore korkade, vi skulle vara så lyckliga,” meaning, “If only we were stupid, we would be so happy.” In the coming weeks, I am asking you to disprove that folk wisdom. According to my analysis of the astrological potentials, now is a favorable time for you to explore ways in which your intelligence might enhance and deepen your enjoyment of life. Your motto should be: The smarter we are, the happier we will be.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Sometime soon I invite you to speak a message similar to what poet Kenneth Rexroth once delivered to a special person in his life. He wrote, “Your tongue thrums and moves / Into me, and I become / Hollow and blaze with / Whirling light, like the inside / Of a vast expanding pearl.” Do you know anyone who might be receptive to hearing such lyrical praise? If not, create a fantasy character in your imagination to whom you can say it. On the other hand, maybe you do know a real person who would appreciate an earthier, less poetical tribute. If so, please convey it; something akin to this: “Your influence on me amplifies my ability to be my best self.” Now is a perfect time to honor and extol and reward those who move you and excite you.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Author Aldous Huxley said, “I can sympathize with people’s pains, but not with their pleasures. There is something curiously boring about somebody else’s happiness.” To that I reply, “Other people’s pleasure and happiness bored you? Maybe you were suffering from raging narcissism and an addiction to cynicism.” In any case, Sagittarius, I hope you won’t be like Huxley in the next few weeks. I believe you could glean useful insights and derive personal benefits from knowing about and appreciating the joys of others.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn businessman Howard Hughes had great success early in his life. Working as a film director and aviation pioneer, he became a wealthy philanthropist. But as he aged, he became increasingly eccentric and reclusive. For the last 10 years of his life, he lived in expensive hotels, where he placed strict and often absurd demands on the hotel staff. For example, if he called on room service to bring him a meal that included peas, he would measure the peas with a ruler, and send back any he deemed too big. I do hope that you Capricorns will also have an intense focus on mastering the details in the coming weeks—but not as intense or misguided as that nonsensical obsession.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Aquarian author Charles Dickens was famous and popular. Audiences packed the halls where he did public lectures and readings. His favorite way to prepare for these evening events was to spend the day drinking a pint of champagne, as well as generous servings of rum, cream, and sherry with eggs beaten into the mix. I don’t have a problem with that—whatever works, right?—but I suggest a different approach

for your upcoming appointments with greater visibility and prominence. Like what? How about sexy meditations on the gratitude you feel for your expanding possibilities? How about fun fantasies focusing on how you’ll use your increased clout?

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20): In his upcoming book The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows, John Koenig proposes that we begin using “monachopsis,” a word he coined. He defines it as follows: “the feeling of being out of place, as maladapted to your surroundings as a seal on a beach—lumbering, clumsy, easily distracted, huddled in the company of other misfits, unable to recognize the ambient roar of your intended habitat, in which you’d be fluidly, brilliantly, effortlessly at home.” Even if you have spent too much time lately experiencing monachopsis, my dear, I predict this malaise will soon dissipate and give way to an extended phase of being fluidly, brilliantly, effortlessly at home.

Aries (March 21-April 19): Aries playwright Samuel Beckett wrote Waiting for Godot, and at one point in the tale, Estragon suggests it might be possible, even desirable, to “dance first and think afterwards.” In response, Pozzo says, “By all means, nothing simpler. It’s the natural order.” With that in mind, and in accordance with astrological omens, I am going to encourage you to dance first and think afterwards as much as possible in the coming weeks. In my opinion, your ability to analyze and reason will thrive to the degree that you encourage your body to engage in enjoyable free-form play. Your power to make good decisions will grow as you take really good care of your physical organism and give it an abundance of pleasure and release. Expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes: Real Astrology.com, (877) 873-4888.

Small packages

A planner advises: how to hold a microwedding

A guide to vintage

Charlottesville's best spots for your 'something old'

Cheek to cheek

A two-person dance floor (what a romantic idea!)

SP R I N G 2 02 1

On a love train

We're on board for this Staunto n wedding PAGE 62

Love is

patient, love is kind Six couples (finally) get their big day

O N

S T A N D S

N O W !


Q&A

29

All about town.

What are your plans for UVA graduation weekend?

SPRING 2021

PROLYFYCK RUN CREW | ON-THE-STREET STYLE | COMMUNITY BIKES' MISSION

Avoiding town. @BARNHAIRDONTCARE/INSTAGRAM

Avoid Bodo’s.

Staying away from all the people who suddenly think it’s okay to go maskless.

PORTRAITS ARTISTS OF THE

SEAN DUNCAN/FACEBOOK

@OOOOB1/INSTAGRAM

Celebrating with our graduate @ev_chapman!!

Stay home and don’t go near Charlottesville. @MELISSASHIRLEYMILLER/ INSTAGRAM

@JPEABODY75/INSTAGRAM

Stay away from Charlottesville and leave it to the graduates and their families. Congratulations to the Class of 2021. KATYA SHOEMAKER SPICUZZA/ FACEBOOK

Plan for graduation weekend is to check in and play Tarzan on “Jungle Zoo” at unfinished disaster project Dewberry Living (hotel)...more trees coming soon...C’ville shame! @LUFFAKLEIN/TWITTER

Next week’s question: Who’s your pick for Virginia’s next governor?

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This is the 434, and we’re all about town.

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the grounds located on the Piedmont Virginia Community College Campus. Duties shall include, but are not limited to, basic carpentry, plumbing, painting, lock repair, snow/ice removal and general maintenance to ensure the appropriate appearance and maintenance of the buildings and the grounds located on the Piedmont Virginia Community College Campus. Job designated as ‘essential personnel’ to perform ‘on call’ duties for emergency situations beyond normal working hours. Considerable knowledge of maintenance techniques/practices and equipment; related safety practices; shall have ability to prioritize work activities; must have experience in the operation and safe/proper use of power tools, vehicles and tractors with various attachments. Must have the ability to read, write, understand and follow instructions. A high school diploma or equivalent is a requirement of this position. The successful candidate must have the ability to work well with others and work as a member of a maintenance team. Ability to lift heavy objects as required. Basic computer skills are a requirement of this position. Valid VA Driver’s license. Prefer two years of relevant work experience. Link to Apply: https://jobs.vccs.edu/ postings/32462

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CONTRACTORS BATHROOM RENOVATIONS. EASY, ONE DAY updates! We specialize in safe bathing. Beautiful new walk-in showers with no slip flooring. Also, grab bars and seated showers available. Call for a free in-home consultation: 844-242-1100. (AAN CAN) GRAVEL DRIVEWAY REPAIR. grading, reshaping, ditching, and gravel installed. Drainage corrections and general driveway repair. 434-960-8994

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uvaclinicaltrials.com

Advancing Healthcare Through

CLINICAL TRIALS Exercise Training and Drug Study

Study for Type 2 Diabetics

Non-smoking, inactive adults aged 21-50 needed for study on the effect of exercise and the drug liraglutide on blood vessels. You must have 3 of the 4 characteristics: overweight, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, high fasting blood sugar. Study requires three 1-hour and two 9-hour visits over 5 months in UVA’s Clinical Research Unit. Participants are randomized to one of 4 groups: control, exercise training, study drug, or exercise + study drug. Compensation is $1,500. Principal Investigator: Zhenqi Liu, MD.

Men and women with type 2 diabetes aged 18-60 needed for study on the effect of the drug empagliflozin (used to control blood sugar) on blood vessels. Study requires two 1-hour outpatient visits and two 7-hour admissions in UVA’s Clinical Research Unit. The study drug is taken for 12 weeks. You must have Type 2 diabetes, be a non-smoker, and not taking insulin. Compensation is $800, paid in installments. Principal Investigator: Eugene Barrett, MD, PhD.

UVA Endocrinology & Metabolism Lee Hartline CRC 434.924.5247 | lmh9d@virginia.edu HSR #200065

UVA Endocrinology & Metabolism Lee Hartline CRC 434.924.5247 | lmh9d@virginia.edu IRB-HSR# 21403

How clinical trials benefit you. At UVA, clinical trials are taking place every day. Because of this, UVA is an environment of care where learning, discovery and innovation flourish. And it is our patients — today and in the future — who reap the rewards, whether or not they participate in a trial. Please call the trial coordinator to enroll confidentially or for additional information.

Are you passionate about applying your skills to ensure the greatest quality of life possible for our fellow community members in need? If so The Arc urges you to consider opportunities within our organization. Our mission is to ensure full community inclusion and participation of people with developmental disabilities through the provision of high quality services and advocacy. Our vision is to remain the leading provider of services and advocacy for this deserving population. If you share these values we urge you to consider the following career opportunities: Program Manager- Day Support, Louisa County. Part-time 20 hours per week. Senior Direct Support Professionals (2 openings, pay range of $15-$17/hr.) Direct Support Professional- Floater (overnights, $16/hr.) Direct Support Professionals - Residential Services (FT and PT, $13-$15/hr.)

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In addition to offering a challenging and rewarding experience The Arc also offers competitive compensation, paid training, and- for full time staff- an attractive benefits package which includes paid leave, health, dental and vision insurance, as well as life and long-term disability insurance, among other offerings. The Arc of the Piedmont is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Specialty Gardener - Vineyard (Full-Time) The Thomas Jefferson Foundation seeks a Specialty Gardener to maintain our 3-acre Vineyard on Montalto. This position requires horticultural knowledge including all aspects of viticulture, experience with pesticides and fertilizers, as well as pruning and planting techniques. This candidate will be expected to work with a high horticultural standard and will act as the caretaker for all aspects of the Montalto Vineyard including pesticide application, weed control, mowing, pruning, and organizing harvest. Applicant must be able to obtain and maintain a Virginia pesticide license within 6 months of hire. The typical schedule is 7:00 AM to 3:30 PM, Monday- Friday, flexibility may be required for weather-dependent work or pesticide application. This position is considered essential personnel and is required to report to work during inclement weather. The candidate should possess an Associate’s degree in Horticulture or a related field. Bachelor’s degree preferred. This is a full-time, benefit-eligible position. Open until filled. The Thomas Jefferson Foundation is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Diverse candidates encouraged to apply. Please apply here: https://monticello.applicantpro.com/jobs/

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VOL. 30 NO. 20 n MAY 19 - 25, 2021

FREE

MAY 19 - 24, 2021 ISSUE 3020

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®

Hot

Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange, Augusta

Housing Market

Calls for

BY CARLA HUCKABEE

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Smart Financing


NOW IS THE TIME TO SELL!

MAY 19 - 24, 2021 ISSUE 3020

34

3 DAYS SOLD IN ASKING E V O AB PRICE!

UNDER T C CONTRA

UNDER T, C CONTRATHER

O BUT AN WAY! HE T N O IS

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3940 GILMERS MILL LANE

316 STARCREST ROAD

Beautifully upgraded home in desirable Avinity. Country living just 20 minutes from CharlottesWonderful home in the sought after Mill Creek Quality & upgrades exceed newer construction ville! The 11+ acres has it all. Enjoy the two South neighborhood. First floor living is showoptions. Your new home welcomes you into the acre stocked pond, walk through the woods, cased with the open concept connecting the foyerthen head down the hall to a large room & use the pasture for your horses, goats, other kitchen,dining area, and living room. Enjoy custom with brick focus wall & attached bath. livestock, or as a large fenced yard. Three stall cooking in your updated kitchen with huge isThis room is a perfect guest suite, rec room, or barn & run-in shed waiting for you. Walk into land. The large master suite has a walk-in closet home office. The garage hasplenty of space for the main floor of the house to find your beautiful and attached bath. The laundry caps off the a car & storage in front. The main level with an kitchen with tons of cabinets & counter space first floor. Head upstairs to find three additional open concept allows natural light & real hardto entertain. On that level, you’ll also find your bedrooms and full bath. Head downstairs to wood floors to flow throughout. Your kitchen is large master suite. Upstairs is a second bedthe finished, walkout basement which is a rare madefor a chef with gas range, upgraded cabroom, full bath, & loft looking down onto the livfind in the neighborhood. The large combinainets, granite countertops, & tile backsplash. ing room. Head to the downstairs to appreciate tion room has plenty of room to create several Pull up a stool to the big island. The living the flexibility of the house. Currently used as a living spaces like a home office, rec room, and room is large with gas fireplace. Don’tmiss separate two bedroom apartment with full kitcheven a guest suite with the full bath. The view the wine bar which is perfect for entertaining. en or you can use the terrace level as an adfrom the back deck is the wonderful fencedSunday 1-3 pm Step outside to your private back patio. Plenty ditional family room, bedroom, & office. There in lawn and a wooded common area to give of room to grill & enjoy the mountain1544 views. are tons ofCt options to enjoy the peace & quiet Loop more privacy than expected in a neighborhood. 2808 Magnolia Dr 2142 Avinity Sawgrass MLS# 616143 $415,000 $475,000 615586 $420,000 Peace & tranquility less than 15 minutes from Beautifully upgraded 4 BR townhouseMLS# w/mountain Complete 1st floor living,MLS# lg MBR 615511 & BA w/laundry.

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35

Thinking of selling your house this year, call me.

MAY 19 - 24, 2021 ISSUE 3020

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers

BURNLEY STATION ROAD

A serene setting with peace and quiet, yet only 10 minutes to Hollymead Town Center. Set on a knoll in northern Albemarle, this French Country home offers one floor living. Beautiful rear terrace with large boxwoods. A split bedroom plan features a large master bedroom with 2 full baths. Detached garage with room for storage as well as a large attic. $545,000

UNIVERSITY CIRCLE

Unique opportunity in the best University location. Over a half acre lot. Bright clean residence with 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, hardwood floors, great room, dining room and eat-in kitchen. Property also offers 2, one bedroom apartments on the terrace level. Large deck. Lots of off street parking! $850,000

REDBUD LANE

Unique, contemporary tri-level home. Set on 2 acres with beautiful trees and mature landscaping. Home features; 3 bedrooms, 2 full bathrooms, dining room, 2 decks, paved driveway and a 500 sq. ft. carport. $435,000

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CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

503 Faulconer Drive Charlottesville ∙ VA ∙ 22903 p: 434.295.1131 f: 434293.7377 e: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com


MAY 19 - 24, 2021 ISSUE 3020

36

YOUR PLACE. OUR PURPOSE.

Lovingston Winery | Nelson County

105 Finders Way | Charlottesville

Nestled into 65 acres of rolling hills in central Nelson Co, this successful vineyard has a proven track record of producing award-winning and highly rated wines. With 11 acres of vines, a 4000 square foot production facility, and 3 renovated homes, the property has limitless possibilities.

Occupying an idyllic wooded hillside setting just outside Charlottesville, this 4 BR, 3.5 BA home has a new kitchen and wet bar, new cedar shake roof, updated screened porch, new whole-house generator, and extensive landscaping. Farmington location, western Albemarle schools, minutes to Barracks Rd. $1,095,000 | montaguemiller.com/616588

$2,490,000 | cartermontague.com/607769 Carter Montague | 434.962.3419

838 Village Rd | Charlottesville

lot 11 Langdon Woods Dr | Albemarle

Black Angus Farm | Scottsville

Prime location, just moments from UVA & downtown, this pristine Arts & Crafts style home offers a wonderful balance of location, style, and space. 5 BR, 4.5 BA home w/fenced back yard with plenty of space for play and outdoor living.

Proposed custom home to be built by European Homes of Albemarle on this beautiful lot in northern Albemarle County. Superior quality finishes including gleaming hardwood floor, custom Cabinetry, 9 ft ceiling and much more.

Enjoy total peace and privacy at Black Angus Farm in southern Albemarle overlooking the James River. Located at the end of a quiet country lane, the 66 acres includes elevated pasture and mature forest.4BR, 3.5 BA farmhouse.

$797,000 | montaguemiller.com/616583 Anita Dunbar | 434.981.1421

$850,000 | montaguemiller.com/617300 Anita Dunbar | 434.981.1421

630 Windrift Dr | Earlysville Desirable neighborhood of Windrift in Earlysville. Home sits atop a knoll with mountain views. Large backyard with fenced tennis court, deck & storage shed. 4 BR, 3 BA. Large bedroom and full bath in walk out basement. CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Carter Montague | 434.962.3419

$364,900 | montaguemiller.com/616129 Douglas Burke | 434.951.7122

$725,000 | montaguemiller.com/612597 Carter Montague | 434.962.3419

3848 Zion Rd | T roy

2389 N Boston Rd | Troy

Calling Investors, Three Houses sold together. 3830 Zion Rd, 3848 Zion Rd & 3864 Zion Rd, Troy VA. All homes are currently tenant occupied. Each home has 2 BRs, 1 BA, kitchen and living room, each on 1.09 acre lot.

One level living on 2 acres with no HOA fees! This charming home offers a cozy sitting room with hardwood floors & large picture window. Updates include new floors in kitchen & new doors to freshly painted deck.

$419,000 | montaguemiller.com/616760 Kyle Olson | 540.649.4131

$229,900 | montaguemiller.com/616095 New Leaf Team | 434.962.4740

Whether you're buying or selling a home, locally or globally, searching for investment opportunities or just have questions, we're here to help. At Montague, Miller & Co., we take pride in our ability to educate and guide our clients to successful outcomes through professionalism and honest counsel. MONTAGUEMILLER.COM | 800.793.5393 | CHARLOTTESVILLE | MADISON | CULPEPER | ORANGE | AMHERST/NELSON

As a three generation family company, we’ve been serving Central Virginia’s real estate needs for over seventy years!


37

Listing Solution

Viewer

List your home with me and receive property photos, a 3D immersive tour and accurate floor plans, using the newest technology.

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY

NEWS & VIEWS Habitat for Humanity Celebrates Four New Homeowners on Nassau Street

WTJU 91.1 FM to Receive $20,000 Grant from the National Endowment for the Arts

Habitat for Humanity of greater Charlottesville recently celebrated four families purchasing affordable homes on Nassau Street. The dedication ceremony, at Rives Park, honored these homebuyers who contributed over one thousand hours of sweat equity and completed Habitat’s homebuyer education and financial counseling curriculum to prepare for the purchase of their new Habitat homes. Consisting of both long-time residents of Charlottesville and families who immigrated to Charlottesville, these new neighbors are united in their shared pursuit of something safer and more stable for themselves, and their children. For the six adults and 14 children moving in, their home on Nassau Street is a dream come true. Kizzy Walker, a single mom of three purchasing one of the Nassau Street homes shares, “Charlottesville is my home, this is where I grew up. I want to stay… and the best way to guarantee that is if we have a safe, stable and affordable place to call our own.” Habitat began construction on the Nassau duplexes in the Belmont/Carlton neighborhood of Charlottesville in 2019. Despite construction setbacks amidst the Covid-19 pandemic, the homebuyers, Habitat staff, and volunteers were determined to get the job done. “The commitment and perseverance of these four families is inspiring,” says Dan Rosensweig, President and CEO of Habitat. “Amidst many of the most unforeseen circumstances to date, they remained committed to these homes and, more so, to each other. They truly embodied what it means to be in partnership with Habitat, and with the Habitat families they call their neighbors.”

WTJU 91.1 FM has been approved for a $20,000 Arts Education grant to support the development of an online jazz history curriculum. Adapted from WTJU’s Jazz at 100 radio series, this project will creatively engage students around the unique story and passion of jazz music. WTJU’s project is among the more than 1,100 projects across America totaling nearly $27 million that were selected during this second round of Grants for Arts Projects fiscal year 2021 funding. “As the country and the arts sector begin to imagine returning to a postpandemic world, the National Endowment for the Arts is proud to announce funding that will help arts organizations such as WTJU engage fully with partners and audiences,” said NEA Acting Chairman Ann Eilers. WTJU’s program Jazz at 100, hosted by Rus Perry, has traced the history of recorded jazz through 100 one-hour episodes that have aired on dozens of public and community radio stations. Both this show and its successor program Jazz at 100 Today are available for syndication through the Public Radio Exchange (PRX) and WTJU.net/jazz100. This project will adapt the Jazz at 100 research and audio recordings into a dynamic and engaging online curriculum primarily targeted toward high school and first-year college students. “While many other resources exist for jazz history and online videos of jazz recordings proliferate, there is no freely available, comprehensive, online jazz history course specifically designed to meet the educational needs of America’s schools,” said Nathan Moore, General Manager of WTJU. “We’re going to design this to be far more interesting and creative than a typical textbook with companion recordings.” For more information on the projects included in the Arts Endowment, visit arts.gov/news. WTJU 91.1 FM has been part of the University of Virginia since its first broadcast in 1957. WTJU is a community radio station that enriches the culture of Virginia, extends the educational mission of UVA, and brings people together through excellent music and conversation.

Whether you’re buying or selling a home, locally or globally, searching for investment opportunities or just have questions, I’m here to help.

Peter McFarren REALTOR®

202.341.4422 petermcfarren@gmail.com

PeterMcFarrenRealtor.com

500 Westfield Rd. Charlottesville, VA

Annie Gould Gallery

A unique art gallery located in the heart of historic Gordonsville. 109 S. Main Street, Gordonsville, VA • (540) 832-6352 anniegouldgallery

Got News? Send your newsworthy submisssions to editor@caarrew.com No PDFs please only text files will be considered.

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

What’s Happening Around Town?

NEWS & VIEWS

Local Real Estate News

MAY 19 - 24, 2021 ISSUE 3020

Your Home will look its Best with the


Hot

MAY 19 - 24, 2021 ISSUE 3020

38

Housing Market Calls for

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

FEATURE

Smart Financing

A

fish out of water. Up a creek without a paddle. A buyer in a seller’s market. All of these can end badly. But to be successful in a seller’s market, a buyer needs to be prepared, nimble and smart. Anything short of that will lead to angst and frustration. An unpleasant consequence of a seller’s market, at least for the buyer, is that home prices are rising. The numbers in Central Virginia are holding true to the law of supply and demand. According to the Virginia Association of REALTORS® every county in the CAAR footprint experienced price increases from 2020 to 2021. County-wide year-to-date median price increases range from 7.5 percent in Albemarle County to over 45 percent in Nelson County. About the only thing going for buyers in this market is that mortgage rates are staying low. Rates sitting at or below 3.5 percent give buyers leeway to pay higher asking prices. But the downside of lower rates is that nobody wants to miss them. And this draws more buyers into an already overloaded and competitive field.

BY CARLA HUCKABEE

available. “Typically, when demand and prices get this advantageous, sellers will start to come into the market and that helps with lack of inventory. “A couple of things are preventing that from happening this time around. First, a lot of homeowners refinanced within the past year to take advantage of these incredibly low mortgage interest rates. Once they made that investment, if they are comfortable in the home they have, they’re not going to move, even if they can get top dollar by selling. Secondly, unless they already have somewhere to land, sellers are afraid they will have the same trouble buying a house once they sell theirs. It’s too risky to sell.” Given those pressure points, it may take a different dynamic to reset this seller’s market. Or it may be with us for the long term, or until new construc-

tion can make a significant shift in the market. As Michael Guthrie, Broker/CEO with Howard Hanna/Roy Wheeler Realty Company, says, “The one obvious way out of this seller’s market is an economic downturn. And nobody wants that.”

Mortgage Rates Staying Low Anyone who has paid attention to mortgage rates for several decades is ecstatic about today’s situation. But if you’re a Millennial just starting to be aware of mortgage rates in the past 10 years or less, it may be hard not to panic if the rate goes from 3.2 to 3.3 percent. Perhaps a walk down memory lane with someone who’s been through the ups and downs of rates can help. Like a Baby Boomer. They’ll remember 2008 during the housing finance crisis when annual average rates were above 6 percent.

And at the turn of this century when rates went above 8 percent. A decade earlier, in 1990, they were above 10 percent. Many Boomers bought their first house in the early 1980s when the annual average rate was above 16 percent. Imagine what that rate does to your monthly house payments. The fear and panic to get into a house before rates move up again, when they are less than 3.5 percent, seems rather dramatic to anyone with a long history of financing their home. Especially when all indicators point to the rate staying below 4 percent for quite a while. Domenic reports “After historical lows under 3 percent, the rates started moving up and then trickled back a little bit. I fully expect that there will be rates in the threes for the rest of 2021 and well into 2022.” Anyone expecting a sudden increase in mortgage rates to shift the balance from a seller’s to a buyer’s market will have to be patient. Julia Morris-Roberts, Mortgage Loan Officer with Fulton Mortgage Company, serves all the counties in the CAAR footprint. She is equally optimistic that rates are going to stay low. “I’m not looking for a significant jump in the mortgage interest rate for the next 18 months.”

How Low Can Inventory Go?

Down Payment Assistance

“I’ve seen seller’s markets before, but I’ve never seen it like this.” So says Jay Domenic, Mortgage Loan Officer with Towne Mortgage. Not only are there not many homes to buy, but there are more and more buyers chasing the few that are

Now that you’re feeling confident that your mortgage rate will be friendly for more than the next year, you can focus on the other part of the buying equation—how much money do you need to put down?


verse Mortgages for Senior Citizens Reverse Mortgages for Senior Citizen Reverse Mortgages tact John for John a no pressure meeting.meeting. Contact for a no pressure 39

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MAY 19 - 24, 2021 ISSUE 3020

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privacy your home. All meetings are absolutely no-obligation and confidential. your home. Allofmeetings are absolutely no-obligation and confidential. privacy of your home. All meetings are absolutely no-obligation and confidential. Please feel free to contact me to discuss anytime or schedule to meet in my office or in the privacy of your home. All meetings are absolutely no-obligation and confidential.

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FEATURE

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“One of my clients put in six solid offers before she was successful. She had to work her way through a learning curve until she felt comfortable making an initial offer over the asking price, with an escalation clause.”

the Mortgage Credit Certificate, which can provide a tax credit over the life of the mortgage. Keys to success with these programs are to use a VHDA-approved lending partner listed on their website at vhda.com. Piedmont Housing Alliance (PHA) and Skyline Community Action Program (Skyline CAP) are two local resources for down payment assistance. PHA serves Charlottesville and the counties of Albemarle, Greene, Fluvanna, Louisa, and Nelson. Skyline CAP serves Greene, Madison, and Orange Counties. These and other local organizations offer down payment assistance and other home buyer resources, counseling, and education. In some cases, you may be able get into a house with as little as 1 percent of the purchase price saved. USDA Rural Housing has similar programs to VHDA and Piedmont Housing but targets more rural areas. Their programs cannot be used in the City of Charlottesville and other urban designated areas. Many of the down payment assistance programs cannot be used for new construction homes. Morris-Roberts says “Construction loans have an inherently higher risk associated with them. Down payment assistance is not quite as common, but it’s always worth checking to see if something is available.”

can have saved. So, it’s critical to get all the information long before you start your house hunt.

The alphabet soup of down payment assistance in Central Virginia can be accessed mainly through VHDA, PHA, and USDA. Virginia Housing Development Authority (VHDA) has a variety of programs to help buyers assemble money for their down payment. Some can only be used with a VHDA mortgage. One of the most popular is the VHDA Loan Combo. This brings together a down payment assistance grant, a low-rate mortgage, and

Each of these programs have slightly different rules regarding buyer eligibility and home price and location. Some require that a buyer’s income is below 80 percent of the Area Median Income. Many are only available for first time homebuyers. Most have maximum purchase prices for the homes. Others, particularly the USDA Rural Housing programs, have geographic limits on where the home can be located. Some even have maximum amounts that you

In a seller’s market, the best chance for success is to submit an attractive offer quickly. The number of days on market for houses is often single digits. If you wait, you lose. The advice of your REALTOR® is key to knowing what that offer should be. And pre-qualification for a loan will put you in position to make the offer. “One of my clients put in six solid offers before she was successful. She had to work her way through a learning curve until she

Use Your Team Matching a buyer’s attributes with every possible program is like solving a Rubik’s cube. “It’s almost impossible to figure this stuff out alone and Google just doesn’t cut it anymore,” says MorrisRoberts. “It’s gotten too complicated. The best thing you can do is give yourself time and make sure you have the right people working with you. “Many buyers don’t understand all the factors that go into qualifying for a mortgage or an assistance program. Your credit score, income, budget, closing costs, specific program requirements all must come together. To make sure not to miss something, you need to build a team of professionals. Find someone you feel comfortable with talking things through and that you trust. The two key people on your team to enlist as early as possible are your REALTOR® and lender.” Once they are in place, you can focus on drawing up a plan to achieve your goals. You can work on specific targets for your credit score, debt, and savings. Then as you reach those target numbers, you can implement the strategy you laid out with your team.

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

FEATURE

MAY 19 - 24, 2021 ISSUE 3020

40

felt comfortable making an initial offer over the asking price, with an escalation clause,” says Domenic. Getting in that mindset and making sure you have the financial capacity to do so takes time. Another strategy may have you rethinking the kinds of houses and locations you consider. “A client pre-qualified for an FHA/VHDA loan. His was one of 30 offers on the house he wanted. In that scenario, he didn’t have much of a chance. He eventually had success by moving a little further out, buying a house that wasn’t such a hot commodity, putting the initial offer in as soon as the house came on the market at $10,000 over ask with a 24-hour expiration on the offer. “A buyer can still protect herself from overpaying by placing a floor on an acceptable appraisal value. That way, they can make an offer quickly at or above the ask and have options if the house doesn’t appraise high enough.” Alex Tiscornia, REALTOR® with Howard Hanna/Roy Wheeler Realty Company, understands the need to be nimble. “Because everything is so accelerated, a buyer usually only has one chance to get it right. A low mortgage interest rate and zero down isn’t enough. When things are happening fast, you have to rely on your lender and agent. It’s critical to have people you trust.” Sometimes waiting can be the best strategy. Knowing mortgage rates are likely to stay below 4 percent, it might be worth it to see if more houses come on the market. “I’ve actually seen a bit of a slowdown in the past 30 days. I think it’s because some buyers want to wait it out to see if the seller’s market neutralizes a bit. They can use this time to save and get in a better position to come back in the market later this year or next. “In one situation a homeowner decided the seller’s market was too good to pass up. She sold her home and is renting for a year. Then she’ll see if she wants to buy next year. She is willing to take the chance that mortgage interest rates will still be reasonably low when her lease expires.” Buyers shopping for a second home may need some new strategies as well. The Federal Reserve imposed a limit on the percentage of second home mortgages they are willing to buy. This may make it more difficult to qualify for a loan on a second home or investment property. The lender and buyer may be able to increase the down payment to overcome this barrier. “These are great times to buy a house,” Domenic says. “The difficulty is not in the interest rate and the financing. We have that covered. It’s in finding the house.” Morris-Roberts advises buyers not to panic. “Don’t rush into a hasty decision because you’re afraid of missing low interest rates. Work with your team to come up with some creative financing that takes full advantage of low mortgage interest rates and meets your needs. That’s what works in this market.” The smart money says when you’re ready, low interest rates will still be here for you. Carla Huckabee writes about high performing real estate.


41

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers

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MAY 19 - 24, 2021 ISSUE 3020

Do you have a 6 - 14-year old who likes horses & donkeys?

PORTERS ROAD

Charming bungalow in Southern Albemarle. Home offers 2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, covered front porch and a detached garage. Over an acre of beautiful, flat land with a winding path through the woods. $235,000

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Over 25 years of Real Estate experience. email: callsharon.today@yahoo.com cell: 434.981.7200 FEATURE

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

Semi-Custom Detached Villa Homes Surrounding aBelvedere Pocketand Park! From $524,900 Tour our Newest Model Homes and Old Trail Village Tour Tour our our Newest Newest Model Model Homes Homes inin Belvedere inBelvedere and Old Old Trail Trail Village Village Be One of the First to Pick Your Homesite!

Currituck Model in Belvedere | 905 Belvedere Blvd, Charlottesville, 22901 Currituck Currituck Model Model in Belvedere in Belvedere | 905 |Belvedere 905 Belvedere Blvd, Blvd, Charlottesville, Charlottesville, VAVA 22901 VA 22901 OPEN DAILY 12-5 Villa Model in |Old Trail Village | 406 Astel Crozet, 22932 Villa Model Villa Model in Old in434-987-6522 Trail Old Village Trail Village | 406 |Astel 406 Astel St, St, Crozet, St, Crozet, VAVA 22932 VA 22932 NorthPointe@craigbuilders.com | craigbuilders.com/northpointe MODEL HOMES OPEN DAILY | 434-973-3362 | craigbuilders.com MODEL MODEL HOMES HOMES OPEN OPEN DAILY DAILY 12-512-5 | 12-5 434-973-3362 | 434-973-3362 | craigbuilders.com | craigbuilders.com

Conceptual images shown. Pricing and design subject to change

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Sales Center Now Open on-site off Rt 29 North!


MAY 19 - 24, 2021 ISSUE 3020

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EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers RIVANDALE FARM

KESWICK

Enjoy mountain views of the historic Southwest Mountains from this livable 4-bedroom residence on 6 private acres. Convenient and quick to Pantops, Historic Downtown Mall, and UVA. Within steps of all the amenities at Keswick Hall. $989,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

KESWICK ESTATES

Exquisite English Country home on 2.5 acres. Very private with lovely views of the golf course and distant mountains. The architecturally designed, 7,000+ sf. residence offers LR, DR, gourmet kitchen, library, office, media room, and 5 BR. MLS#611738 $1,695,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

WOODLANDS

Beautifully restored 1780s Colonial on 293 acres in Northampton County. This historic home has 4 BR, 3 full & 2 half BA. Property has access to the Machipongo River which flows into the Atlantic. Rare offering. MLS#614051 $1,495,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863 WoodlandsFarmVa.com

An oasis of tranquility and fine country living within 20 miles of Charlottesville. MAGNIFICENT 177 acres privately situated in Somerset Estate Region, featuring c.1901 classic Virginia farmhouse, completely remodeled and updated to create a comfortable & elegant, 4-BR & 4.5-BA home. Covered & screened porches, open terraces, large gunite pool, and expertly landscaped gardens. Improvements include 12-stall stable, 2 detached garages, barn & sheds, all land fenced and 3 ponds. MLS#609244 $3,795,000 Jim Faulconer,434.981.0076 www.rivandaleva.com

KESWICK COUNTRY CLUB

Bordering (Full Cry)Pete Dye golf course and lake, within grounds of Keswick Hall, 5-star luxury resort, is this magnificent 5-bedroom residence constructed of the finest materials with attention to every detail. MLS#603398 $4,200,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.FairwayDriveAtKeswick.com

SUNNYSIDE

Remarkably large parcel located convenient to Charlottesville and UVA. Exceptional Blue Ridge views, charming farm house (in need of restoration). Under VOF easement but with divisions into already predetermined parcels. MLS#585228 $4,400,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

FAIRVIEW

Circa 1880, 4-bedroom, 2.5-bath, home on 2.34 acres, surrounded by a 288-acre farm protected with a conservation easement. Located near several vineyards and breweries in the Western Albemarle School District only 15 miles to Charlottesville. MLS#616135 $978,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

TOTIER HILLS FARM

Exquisite brick mansion, superb quality construction and features in over 9,000 finished square feet. On 98 gently rolling acres with total privacy, a stream, and pond. Only 5 minutes to shops, 15 miles to UVA. MLS#600284 $2,700,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.TotierHillsFarm.com

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

FARMINGTON

Exceptional 1954 Milton Grigg 8-BR residence carefully sited on over 2.5 manicured acres. Beautifully maintained, the original brick home has been enlarged, creating an elegant yet livable floor plan with open living and entertaining spaces, kitchen, and master suite on the main level. Pool, 2-story pool house, and 3-bay garage with fully equipped 1-BR apartment above. Fronting the 17th fairway in Farmington, gorgeous setting, and prime location only minutes to UVA and Downtown. MLS#606911 $4,950,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863 www.320FarmingtonDrive.com

MERIDIEN

Private, peaceful, and perfect—a sophisticated country estate offering stunning Blue Ridge views from just over 40 rolling acres, 9 miles NW of Charlottesville. C.1840, modernized home, 5 BR & 3.5 BA. Under conservation easement. MLS#613521 $3,685,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863 www.MeridienFarmVa.com

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM


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GLENDOWER ROAD

PRICED UNDER COUNTY ASSESSED VALUE! Classic, well-built 4-bedroom home, privately situated on 5 private acres only 15 miles south of Charlottesville and UVA, and only 5 miles from historic Scottsville. MLS#604475 $599,000 Will Faulconer, 434.987.9455

BELLAIR

Rare opportunity to purchase a building lot of just under 1 acre in sought-after Bellair. Lush, mature landscaping, partly wooded, stream/creek. Minutes from UVA, shopping, dining, and entertainment. Murray/Henley/Western Albemarle school district. MLS#614627 $375,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

WESLEY CHAPEL ROAD

Nice, mostly wooded residential building lot in Meriwether Lewis School District! Great privacy, 1.72± acres, beautiful rural setting in an area of large farm and estate properties. Located approximately 15 miles NW of Charlottesville. MLS#613685 $125,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

NORTH DOWNTOWN

Colonial Revival style circa 1913 residence restored to perfection. Flexible and updated floor plan with 2,970 finished square feet. Coveted private backyard and off-street parking. Walk to the amenities of the Historic Downtown Mall and UVA. MLS#608794 $1,449,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

RUSTLING OAKS

Attractive, well-built residence on 4.09+/- mostly wooded acres, end of cul-de-sac location, 3 BR, 3.5 BA, high ceilings, beautiful hardwood flooring, large well-proportioned rooms, fin. bonus room above 2-car garage, full unfin. walk-out basement. MLS #614704 $1,385,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

BUFFALO RIVER ROAD

Elevated 21-acre tract, mostly mature hardwood forest and road frontage in northwest Albemarle. Elevated homesite offers potential panoramic Blue Ridge Mountain views with some clearing. Adjacent 21 acres also for sale. MLS#614424 $227,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

VERULAM FARM

Landmark estate just west of University of Virginia on 500 acres. Classic home of the highest standards with elegant spaces, 5 bedroom suites, formal gardens, pool, cottage, event barn, and bold mountain views creating a one-of-a-kind offering. MLS#597954 Andrew Middleditch, 434.981.1410

OLD VIRGINIA

Beautiful, mostly open rolling Albemarle County parcel offering 51.8 acres, sweeping panoramic mountain views, bold stream, pond, & old unrestored log cabin. Has division rights & potential for conservation easement. 16.2 miles west of Charlottesville. MLS#615504 $780,000 Tim Michel, 434.960.1124

LONESOME MOUNTAIN ROAD

5-acre lot with road frontage only 4 miles from Charlottesville. This country but close-to-town location is conveniently located with quick access to Historic Downtown Mall, Martha Jefferson Hospital, UVA, NGIC, airport, and North Fork Business Park. MLS#593160 $250,000 C. Dammann, 434.981.1250

GILBERT STATION ROAD

Wonderfully private, 67-acre tract of land approximately 11 miles north of Charlottesville in Barboursville. Mostly wooded with a creek and road frontage. Tremendous views. MLS#552156 $565,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

EDNAM FOREST

Wonderfully large 1.5+ acre building lot in Ednam Forest. Build your dream home on this elevated, wooded lot located in a single family community, minutes from the University of Virginia and within walking distance to Boar’s Head Resort.MLS#598537 $289,500 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

FRAYS MILL

4.15 acre lot offers privacy, great location in small subdivision, state maintained road, high speed internet available, just 3.5 miles to Rivanna Station, NGIC, 6 miles to Hollymead Center and the CHO Airport. (Owner/Agent) MLS#608508 $189,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

MAY 19 - 24, 2021 ISSUE 3020

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers


44

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

MAY 19 - 24, 2021 ISSUE 3020

RECENT SOLDS

• Free Union • 131 Acres • $2,375,000 • Sold before coming on market

• Keswick, Va • 31.64 Acres • $319,500

• 5445 Hilltop St • Parkside Village • $384,000 • Under contract in 6 days

• 2162 Saranac Ct • Pavillions at Pantops • $365,000 • Under contract in 2 days

• Cnoc Tirim • 25.35 Acres • $1,185,000 • Sold $65,000 above list price

• Sweet Hollow Ln • Close to 64 • $105,000

• Somerset • 15 Acre Estate Parcel • $279,000

• 2866 Valentine Mill Rd • $669,500 • Under Contract in 71 days

• Dick Woods Rd • 6.4 Acres • $188,000

• Sunny Banks 1888 • 50 Acres with South Anna River Frontage • $749,500

• Dickwoods Rd • 73.94 dividable Acres • $1,115,000 • Under Contract in 34 days

• Somerset • 20 Acre Elevated Parcel $245,000

Steve White (434) 242-8355 info@stevewhiterealtor.com

stevewhiterealtor.com 28 Years of Specializing in Buyer & Seller Representation for Residential, Farms & Estates

1100 Dryden Lane Charlottesville


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MAY 19 - 24, 2021 ISSUE 3020

SPRING LISTINGS

BROOK HOLLOW

HOMESTEAD FARM RD

• Private setting with English Cottage main home • 38 acres, 3 separate parcels • Spectacular westward mountain views and sunsets • Charming guest cottage • MLS #614593 • $1,795,000

• Custom built elegance • 10’ ceilings • Main floor master suite • Lovely mature landscaping • MLS# 611677 • $1,475,000

WINDSOR FARM

LAKE ANNA • 82.91 acres • 3500 linear feet on Lake Anna • Rolling pasture and hardwoods • MLS #610245 • $2,499,000

• 40.70 dividable acres • South River frontage • Blue Ridge Mountain views • MLS #600761 • $595,000

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• 88 acres in Free Union • Stunning Blue Ridge Mountain views • 5 BR/3 BA residence with 2996 fin.sq.ft. • MLS #616104 • $2,350,000

SOUTH RIVER MEADOWS

SCOTTSVILLE

• Private setting with mature hardwoods • Elevated building site • Situated on a cul-de-sac • MLS #615730 • $294,500

Steve White (434) 242-8355 info@stevewhiterealtor.com

stevewhiterealtor.com 28 Years of Specializing in Buyer & Seller Representation for Residential, Farms & Estates

1100 Dryden Lane Charlottesville

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

• Renovated Cape Cod • 4 BR/3 BA, 2795 fin.sq.ft. • Basement apartment (private entrance) • MLS #608408 • $395,000

KESWICK ESTATE


MAY 19 - 24, 2021 ISSUE 3020

46

Live It Up

HOME SALES STATS ENDING THE WEEK OF MAY 16, 2021

THERE WERE 128 SALES IN THE 11 COUNTY AND CITY AREAS n 42 were in Albemarle with an average price of $670,121 n 14 were in Charlottesville with an average price of $539,850 n 6 were in Fluvanna with an average price of $394,622 n 8 were in Greene with an average price of $372,250 n 17 were in Louisa with an average price of $389,746 n 3 were in Madison with an average price of $1,009,834 n 12 were in Nelson with an average price of $389,892 n 17 were in Orange with an average price of $547,087 n 5 were in Staunton with an average price of $298,120 n 4 were in Waynesboro with an average price of $249,982

HOMES SOLD

Fine Properties VOLUME 27, ISSUE 1

A Publication of The Charlottesville Area Association of REALTORS®

www.caar.com

The Residences at 218 The RESIDENCES at 218 define luxury in Downtown Charlottesville. These lavish condos are offered both meticulously designed or finished to your particular taste. This premium location boasts the best in dining, shopping, and entertainment. Featuring awe-inspiring views of Charlottesville and the surrounding mountainscape, with floor to ceiling windows and expansive outdoor terraces.

John E. Neal (434) 906-3141 jneal@gemc.com

www.RESIDENCESat218.com

Homes of Distinction in Central Virginia Look for our latest issue where you pick up C-VILLE Weekly

THE 3564 RICHMOND ROAD ROYAL ACRES

119 PORTER AVENUE OAKLAWN

67 MISTLAND TRAIL RUCKERSVILLE

Staff:

EDITORIAL COORDINATOR

Celeste Smucker • editor@caarrew.com

MARKETING SERVICES Beth Wood beth@caarrew.com • 434.817.9330

154 LABOR LANE GORDONSVILLE

10396 LIBERTY MILLS RD MONTPELIER STATION

1310 N AUGUSTA STREET STAUNTON

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

LOCAL GOVERNMENT (Note: Real estate tax information gathered from local government Web sites and is believed but not guaranteed to be accurate as of publication date. Towns may assess real estate taxes in addition to those charged by each county.)

CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

GREENE COUNTY

CITY OF STAUNTON

LOUISA COUNTY

www.charlottesville.org Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100 www.staunton.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100

CITY OF WAYNESBORO

www.waynesboro.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.90 per $100

ALBEMARLE COUNTY

www.albemarle.org Real estate tax rate: $.854 per $100

FLUVANNA COUNTY

www.co.fluvanna.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.925 per $100

www.gcva.us Real estate tax rate: $.775 per $100 www.louisacounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

MADISON COUNTY

www.madisonco.virginia.gov Real estate tax rate: $.68 per $100

NELSON COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

Faith Gibson ads@c-ville.com • 434.817.2749 xt. 25

DESIGNER

CAAR

Tracy Federico designer@c-ville.com

The REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is published weekly by the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. Copyright All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited. All advertising published in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is believed to be truthful and accurate. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for, the accuracy or truthfulness of the advertising placed within this publication. Neither the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., nor its corporate parent, the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc., assume any responsibility and shall have no liability whatsoever for errors, including without limitation, typographical errors or omissions in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. Any reference made to the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. is not to be construed as making any representation, warranty, or guarantee by the corporations concerning the information on properties advertised in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. The content of all ads contained herein are solely the responsibility of the advertiser. The opinions and statements contained in advertising or elsewhere in this publication are those of the authors of such opinions and are not necessarily those of the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®. the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. reserves the right to edit or refuse any advertising it deems inappropriate or misleading. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful. Every effort has been made to assure accuracy, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for the advertising placed within this publication. This publication will not accept advertising that refers to or attempts to establish fees or rates of commissions charged for services rendered. Information on advertising placement may be obtained by calling 434-817-9330. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” Virginia Fair Housing Law also makes it illegal to discriminate because of elderliness (age 55 and over). We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. CAAR Real Estate Weekly Is printed on 100% recycled paper

ORANGE COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.61 per $100

308 E. East Main Street • Charlottesville, VA 22902 Tel.: 434-817-9330 • e-mail: ads@caar.com Send your news and/or press releases to editorREW@gmail.com


47

At Buy and Sell Cville a home is ienjoyment nclusive of , entertainment & relaxation .

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MAY 19 - 24, 2021 ISSUE 3020

BUY AND SELL CVILLE

Selling? CONTACT US TODAY!

At Buy and Sell Cville a home is ienjoyment nclusive of , entertainment & relaxation .

Westaging have the & marketing you are for home when sellooki lingngyour

At Buy and Sell Cville a home is ienjoyment nclusive of , entertainment & relaxation .

Westaging have the & marketing you are for home when sellooki lingngyour

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434-337-3216

Keller Williams Realty 3510 Remson Ct # 301 Charlottesville VA 22901, 434-220-2200. If you have a relationship with another Realtor, this is not considered a solicitation. Fair Housing Compliant. Licensed to sell real estate in Commonwealth of VA. Each office independently owned & operated.

MLS : 616939

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

5 bed, 3.5 baths 3686 fin. sf


KEEPING VIRGINIA

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C-VILLE Weekly | May 19 - 25, 2021  

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