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volume 104 issue 9 • october 31, 2012 • santa monica college

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corsairs round up vaqueros

Eat Street drops card fee after Corsair investigation Elizabeth moss & Andy riesmeyer Staff Writer & News Editor

Sam Herron Corsair Santa Monica College football players run through a sign made by their cheerleaders before SMC’s homecoming game on Saturday at Corsair Field. After a slow start, the Corsairs rallied to defeat the Santa Barbara Vaqueros 41-27. photostory PG. 6 • homecoming game PG. 12

Fans survive 13-hour “Horrorthon”

David J. Hawkins Corsair Six horror movies were presented at the Seventh Annual Dusk-To-Dawn Horrorthon at The Aero Theater in Santa Monica. The movies that played were “Hellraiser,” “Motel Hell,” “The Devil’s Rain,” “Christine,” “The Living Dead of Manchester Morgue,” and “The Manitou.”

alex vejar Staff Writer Newly crowned Mr. Horrorthon Steven Wong made his way up to the stage of the Aero Theater to receive his prize: A wearable cardboard box covered in Funyun chip bags, a DVD of 1997’s “Dangerous Ground,” a soda cup and an ear of corn on a string. A first dance with the Corn Gorn was in order. This bizarre scene was the epitome of the Aero Theatre’s 7th Annual Dusk-To-Dawn Horrorthon. The event attracted everyone from die-hard horror movie fans to people who just want to do something unique for Halloween. The movie line-up for the night had something for everyone. If you like inanimate objects coming to life and killing people, 1983’s “Christine” is for you. If it makes you giddy to watch the undead use blood of the innocent to regenerate, 1987’s “Hellraiser” is a good choice. Ancient Indian medicine men being birthed out of a woman’s back catch your fancy? You needn’t look any further than 1978’s “The Manitou.” Grant Moninger, creator and organizer of Horrorthon since 2006, is a programmer

for the American Cinematheque, which owns the Aero Theater. He decides what movies are going to be played during the marathon every year. “It takes me hundreds of different lineups until I find the right balance of spooks and scares, laughs, freak-outs, gore, chills and magic,” Moninger wrote in an email. He also made sure the films were available in their release print. Even though the movies are the main event of Horrorthon, Newt Calkins gives a different reason why he likes coming back every year. “The crowd is very vocal. They’re chatty, they’re really hyped up and by the end of the night, it’s like we’re all friends,” he said. Short films comprised of various clips from movies, commercials and other sources are shown before each feature. Horrorfest veterans yell out certain lines from shorts they were familiar with, including an old Red Roof Inn commercial and a video of a gopher that repeats the name “Alan.” Moninger collaborated with his brother David to program the short films. “We find odd bits from movies we see, things we discover online, things we remember from our past--we find them all over,” Moninger said. “We don’t edit it

together until the evening before.” To introduce the short films and rile up the crowd, Moninger came out and yelled “Who wants candy?!” and tossed various types of treats out into the crowd. Other giveaways consisted of movies on DVD and Blu-Ray, books and costumes. Costumed volunteers from the Aero also helped to keep the crowd awake during the 13-hour movie marathon. Randy Wyatt, who was in charge of candy distribution, heard enthusiastic “candy from Randy” calls from the crowd. Another volunteer was dressed as a Gorn- a creature from the Star Trek television series--who’s job was to hand out candy corn and edible ears of corn. He was aptly nicknamed “The Corn Gorn,” a new addition to this year’s Horrorthon, Moninger said. Horrorthon first-timer Chris Johnson stayed awake through all six movies, saying he maintained good energy throughout and didn’t nod off once. “It was awesome,” said Johnson. “I’d do it again.” When the final film ended, half of the original audience was still in attendance, proving how far true horror fans will extend themselves for their love of the genre.

A small purple sign next to the cash registers at the Santa Monica College cafeteria’s Eat Street restaurant notified patrons of the $0.20 surcharge added to credit card purchases under $3. The fee—raised earlier this semester from the $0.10 charge implemented earlier this year—was said to cover the processing fees imposed on the business for the card. As of Friday morning, that sign has been removed and the fees are gone, after a Corsair investigation found that Eat Street was in violation of a California Civil Code and unlawfully collecting fees from customers. California Civil Code 1748.1 states, “no retailer in any sales, service, or lease transaction with a consumer may impose a surcharge on a cardholder who elects to use a credit card in lieu of payment by cash, check, or similar means.” Management at An Catering, the group that operates Eat Street, was notified of the violation and at first dismissed the accusation. Management proceeded to phone legal council who confirmed that they were in violation of the civil code, according to Victor Cardet, Director of Operations for An Catering. They then elected to remove the fee. The service charge, which applied to purchases made under $3, was meant to balance out the cost of processing credit card transactions, which is 16 cents through their processor First Data. “I think it’s a mistake,” said Hannah An, owner of An Catering. “The goal of that is not to take advantage.” She says that Eat Street does not know as of yet what it will do to make up for costs. According to Cardet, in lieu of the service charge, Eat Street could place a general price hike, or add an extra fee to all purchases, whether credit or cash. The fee could be anywhere from $.05 to $2, he said. An Catering wouldn’t release how much money was made off of these unlawful sales. But here’s the math: If a student purchased a drink at Eat Street once a day, four days a week, it would amount to $25 in fee surcharges per school year, per student. “I’d be asking for my money back,” said Harto Hizkia, an SMC student. According to the civil code, a retailer in violation is liable to refund any cardholder who makes a written request for the amount and “shall be liable to the cardholder for three times the amount at which actual damages are assessed. The cardholder shall also be entitled to recover reasonable attorney’s fees and costs incurred in the action.” California is one of 10 states including Florida, New York, and Texas to adopt a policy prohibiting retailers from adding credit card surcharges. “I don’t really mind,” said student Ryan Sassonnian, adding he would be willing to pay up to $2 extra for a meal. “It’s not the end of the world,” he said.

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2 contents

volume 104 issue 9 • october 31, 2012 • santa monica college

E D I T O R I A L S TA F F Nathan Gawronsky······ Editor-in-Chief c o rs a i r. e d i t o r i n c h i e f @ g m a i l . c o m Amber Antonopoulos···Managing Editor c o rs a i r. m a n a g i n g @ g m a i l . c o m Amber Antonopoulos·· Health & Lifestyle c o rs a i r. l i f e s t y l e p a g e @ g m a i l . c o m Andy Riesmeyer·············· News Editor c o rs a i r. n e w s p a g e @ g m a i l . c o m Samantha Perez··· Arts & Entertainment c o rs a i r. c a l e n d a r p a g e @ g m a i l . c o m Muna Cosic················Opinion Editor c o rs a i r. o p i n i o n p a g e @ g m a i l . c o m David Yapkowitz············ Sports Editor c o rs a i r. s p o r t s p a g e @ g m a i l . c o m Ian Kagihara··········Multimedia Editor c o rs a i r. m u l t i m e d i a @ g m a i l . c o m Paul Alvarez··················Photo Editor Marine Gaste················ Photo Editor c o rs a i r p h o t o e d i t o r @ g m a i l . c o m Nathalyd Meza··············Design Editor c o rs a i r. d e s i g n t e a m @ g m a i l . c o m c o r s a i r s ta f f Fernando Baltazar, Nathan Berookhim, Kristine Bettencourt, Tiffany Bingham, Peter Cheng, Kou Collins, Samantha Conn, Henry Crumblish, Natalie Delfino, William Duggan, Rachel Duron, Tina Eady, Skya Eiland, Alberto Fernandez, Harrison Garcia, Amy Gaskin, Ryonn Gloster, Jennifer Gomez, Deandre Hamilton, David J. Hawkins, Sam Herron, Annjelicia Houston, Zach Johnson, Eugene Jones, Richard Lewis, David Madrid, Juan C. Martinez, Ariana Masters, Ruth Mavangira, Raphael Mawrence, LeAura McClain, Manuel Mejia, Elizabeth Moss, Wayne Neal, Mikaela Oesterlund, Daniella Palm, Molly Philbin, Syney Pitcher, Shawnee Potts, Scott Roush, Allie Silvas, Rachel Spurr, Alex Vejar, Anilec Vita, Merissa Weiland, Livia Wippich, Michael Yanow, Arezou Zakaria FA C U LT Y A D V I S O R S S a u l Ru b i n & Gerard Burkhart A d I n q uiries : c o rsai r. admana g e r@g m ai l . co m (3 1 0 ) 4 3 4 - 4 0 3 3

Michael Yanow Corsair Masked wrestler Mexican Warrior is seen during the main event of Lucha VaVoom’s Aztec Horror at the Mayan Theater on Friday in downtown Los Angeles. Lucha VaVoom is a variety show of Mexican masked wrestlers and burlesque dancers.

CORRECTIONs:

>An article in last week’s issue, a preview on Global Motion, provided incorrect performance dates. Global Motion will perform Nov. 8 and 10 at 7:30 p.m. In the same article, Judith Douglas is referred to as the Dance Department Director. She is the Dance Department Chair.

> An article in last week’s issue, titled “Campus sets record straight on campaigning,” contained two errors of clarification. Teri Bernstein is quoted saying that complaints made by students about teachers have been made for years, and that classified employees counted as uniformed employees. Neither of these statements should have been attributed to her.

letter from the editor

Waiting out in the cold nathan gawrosnky Editor-In-Chief

As you peruse through the pages of this paper, you might come across some stories that surprise you—enlighten you—they may even outrage you. One story in particular strikes me with particular resonance: The article on page three about winter classes being provided to international students. As a student of Santa Monica College, and as a tax-paying citizen, doesn’t this strike you as somewhat bothersome? According to the story, of the nearly 3,300 international students enrolled here in Santa Monica, about 20 percent of them will find a classroom open and waiting for them this winter. The rest of us will have to unfortunately wait out in the cold.

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To write that this is unfair is not exactly—well—fair. International students pay about seven times more than American students do. They don’t have the privilege of getting state-subsidized course fees, so perhaps it’s not completely unjust for SMC to provide them a modest education during winter. When I heard this, I wasn’t sure whether I should be happy for our international friends, or outraged at the austerity measures imposed upon myself and the rest of SMC’s homegrown students. In the end, after considering all sides of this issue, it’s only right for the college to offer some measure of an education, rather than offering none at all. I know some of these students; when the news of the intersession’s

cancellation came out, some of them were deeply concerned about what would happen in their future. Would they have to go home? What would they do here in the States without a way to learn, and without a way to earn work? Have you ever tried getting work with a student visa? Have you ever tried getting work as a U.S. citizen? It’s not exactly easy for anyone involved. My only great disappointment is that if the school could pull its resources together and figure out a way to offer classes to students, then why couldn’t they offer some solution to American students? Oh wait. Wasn’t that proposed in the form of Contract Ed? What was that all about again?

It’s interesting—that idea, which would have added an additional 50 courses at a cost less than UCLA extension, was met with vociferous opposition. It was astounding to see the vehemence against a decision that wouldn’t have been imposed on anyone unwilling or unable to pay for it. But now, with winter cancelled, where is that acidic opposition, that venomous outrage, that was so openly displayed last semester? What happened? Well, I suppose the wishes of the noisy few were realized, and now all of us are paying for it. Well, to say we’re all paying for it— that’s not exactly accurate. Most of us aren’t paying at all. And what a shame that is.

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news 3

volume 104 issue 9 • october 31, 2012 • santa monica college

Politics take center stage at Club Row william duggan Staff Writer   Club Row at Santa Monica College is usually a time for student groups to gather on the quad to pitch their programs to prospective students. From religious groups, to international student clubs to honor societies, the organizations all emphasize campus and community involvement. But on Thursday, the elaborate booths and giveaways at Club Row were pushing a different kind of community action – voting. With the election now less than a week away, the effort by both campaigns and by student groups on campus to appeal to young voters has kicked into high gear. Nadia Deen was helping to man the Honor Society table, handing out pins and pamphlets urging “yes on 30.”  Deen said the Honor society’s efforts were aimed at getting the word out about ballot propositions that could have a major impact on education in the state.   “This election is being more emphasized,” she said.  “It’s one of those elections that will affect everything.” Another “yes on 30” banner hung in the International Students booth.   Jay Park explained that international students can’t vote, but that the organization was advocating a yes vote on Prop. 30 to try and avoid further cuts to education.  “We are also SMC students,” he said. New citizen Giorgio Rouzaud, originally from Italy, voiced his dislike for Republican candidate Romney as he handed out fliers at the UNICEF booth.  “I hope Romney doesn’t win,” said Rouzaud, adding that he “didn’t like Romney’s attitude toward Latinos.”   Victor Batch, who was born in Bulgaria and was enthusiastically recruiting for the German club, voiced strong support for Prop. 30, as did many student organizations.   Batch, however, lamented what he saw as the rigidity of a two-party system, “If I vote, if I don’t vote, it’s the same.  It’s sad.” School clubs at SMC receive some of their

funding from the Associated Students via the Inter Club Council. Jasmine Jafari, former vice chair of the ICC, said that clubs are permitted to promote any candidate or ballot initiative as long as they don’t use club funding to do so. “A lot of people have asked me personally if AS is spending money pushing campaigns, when in reality we get all of our promotional material from the campaigns,” she said. “If clubs would want to promote ‘No-on-30’ we would not stop them,” she said. “As long as what they’re promoting isn’t hateful or harmful to students.” Melony Cohen, who was working the political discussion club table, warned of apathy among young voters she speaks with regularly.   Cohen, a Democrat, admits that she’s “not a big Obama fan,” and doubts whether her vote will mean anything in a state that is all but certain to break for the President. “You live in California, it’s not going to make a difference,” she said. “It’s just a bunch of big corporations campaigning.” Sam Azimtash made his way over to the Political Discussion table to echo Cohen’s sentiment; “Obama took California. It doesn’t matter what I vote now.” Amidst the clamor of hundreds of students pitching their clubs and vying for attention with free candy and food at Club Row on Thursday, one man stood out.   He gave his name as Paul Mitchell, and described himself as a “warner,” eager to “illuminate them [students] as to what God sees as wrong,” so they might avoid, as Mitchell said, going to “H-E- double hockey sticks.” Around him stood members of the GayStraight Alliance. Member Isabella Sanchez expressed frustration and confusion; “I don’t understand why he has so much hate toward us when we didn’t do anything to him.” At that moment Zakhar Shteynberg jumped in; “I feel like he’s violating peoples decisions. Trying to confuse—close people’s eyes to a situation that’s very real.”

SMC to offer winter classes for international students marine gaste Staff Writer Though the cutting of the winter session will keep most students off campus for more than a month, some 3,300 international students have the opportunity to enroll into winter courses offered by the AC College at Santa Monica College. But less than 600 of them will be guaranteed a seat. Teresita Rodriguez, Vice President of Enrollment Development, says, “Our mission is to provide opportunities for international students studying in the United States, which is why the AC College has limited enrollment to the international students.” A total of 20 classes will be taught on campus, with students able to take courses in math, English, English as a second language, communication, biology, psychology, and economics. According to the SMC International Education’s newsletter, the special classes “are the same price as other SMC academic classes and are transferable to the UCs, Cal States, and other colleges and universities.” Although winter intersession is not mandatory to international students, new ones whose winter will be their first term at SMC will have to be enrolled in at least four units in order to maintain their student visa status. “The maximum that we have allowed in the past have been eight units. The last couple of terms, we have limited [the maximum] to five, and this winter we will go back to eight units because there is not going to be any competition with domestic students,” Rodriguez says. Limited services will be available to the very few students present on campus, says Rodriguez. There will be a small counselor offering at the international education center, and the bookstore will only be open to provide books to students enrolled. Additionally, the cafeteria will be remain closed. The college’s annual contract with the Big Blue Bus allows its students to ride it for free in the winter as well, and students that are enrolled and paid for their insurance in the fall will also be covered during winter as they both go together, according to Rodriguez. Like in the past years, enrolling in winter classes will not compromise time off as the term starts on Jan. 3, 2013 and leaves two weeks to international students who want to spend the holidays wandering around the city, or going back home to celebrate with their families.

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4 news

volume 104 issue 9 • october 31, 2012 • santa monica college

CRIME & SAFETY UPDATES

We’re continuing to monitor these incidents that occurred earlier this month on the campus of Santa Monica College.

FIRE:

Firefighters extinguished a small fire the morning of Oct. 27, on Santa Monica College’s main campus. A ride-on pressure washer caught fire after it was left unattended by a grounds worker near Drescher hall, according to the college. As of Tuesday, the cause of the blaze was still unknown, though the college said it would be meeting with the manufacturer. The loss is estimated at several hundred dollars and one other model of the power washer is owned by SMC, according to the college. No one was injured, according to SMFD.

CRIME:

- STRONG ARM ROBBERY Odel Shaw, 36, and Auturo Viray, 40, suspects arrested following a strong-arm robbery on the main campus Oct. 17, will appear in court November 2 for a preliminary hearing on charges associated with the incident. Charges for Shaw include possession for sale of controlled substances, and accessory after the fact. Charges for Viray include possession for sale of controlled substances according to the District Attorney’s office. - SEXUAL ASSAULT Samuel Davis, 43, who was arrested after allegedly assaulting a female student on the morning of Oct. 18 following an incident in a women’s bathroom at the HSS building, was released early last week. Davis, who was identified by the victim, was released under penal code 846(b)(1) which states “there are insufficient grounds for making a criminal complaint against the person arrested,” according to Sergeant Richard Lewis of the Santa Monica Police Department. No charges have been filed as of Tuesday, according to the DA’s office. The investigation is ongoing.

Amy Gaskin Corsair Parking Enforcement Officer Joel Williams watches students walking from late night classes on SMC’s main campus last Thursday. Williams, a 27-year veteran of the Sheriff’s Department and former corrections officer, helps SMCPD patrol the campus at night.

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opinion 5

volume 104 issue 9 • october 31, 2012 • santa monica college

California student debt among the lowest william duggan Staff Writer

Fee increases and higher tuition costs have California college students constantly protesting and shouting at the state government for the unjust rulings. However, what excuse can a student have when it is proven that by the time they graduate from a California college they are with the least college debt in the nation? A new study by the Oakland based Institute for College Access and Success found that the debt burden carried by graduates of California’s public and private not-for-profit colleges is among the lowest in the nation. Despite recent outcry over rising tuition costs, only 51 percent of graduates took on debt, totaling on average $18,879—which is below the national average. Only Utah and Hawaii have lower average debt totals than Californian students. This report throws into stark perspective the nature of the student debt crisis in the country. Make no mistake, $19,000 is still a substantial amount to be in debt with, but living in a state with access to relatively affordable higher education is an invaluable asset. According to the U.S. Department of National Education Statistics, “young adults with a bachelor’s degree earned more than twice as much as those without a high school diploma or its equivalent in 2010 (i.e., 114 percent more).” Median income for a male with a bachelor’s degree was $49,800. His peer with a high school diploma or equivalent made $32,800 on average. Those with post graduate degrees only increased their salaries as well; the report also states “earnings for young adults with a master’s degree or higher was $54,700, some 21 percent more than the median for young adults with a bachelor’s degree.” So, getting a higher education degree will likely secure a California college student in being able to pay their debt off after graduation. The value of a college education cannot be overstated. It not only enriches the mind, but the wallet as well, even if getting it means getting into debt. Some might agree and point out that with such low rates, California students, like those who protested the addition of more sections at increased cost last semester here at Santa Monica College, should pause for a moment, and consider being grateful for their relatively fortunate circumstances. However college costs continue to increase in California, and the fear as to how far it will increase is creating anxiety for students. According to the California Post-Secondary Education Commission, “these increases come after many years of rising costs. Between 1990 and 2009, costs for a University of California student living on campus rose by 70 percent. Costs for a California State University student living with their family rose by over 80 percent in the 10-year time frame. In this period, however, median family income in California grew by only 16 percent.” Given the importance of a degree, and the quality of life that a higher education can provide, it is imperative our governments at the local, state, and federal level, do everything they can to protect and enhance public institutions of higher learning. It is an accepted fact that a degree can grant you a far better opportunity to make a decent living, and if colleges are too expensive to attend, then that’s like taking a potentially good life away from students. If government claims to truly protect our interests, why is education spending a low priority for politicians confronted with astounding budget deficits? It stands to reason that something that so clearly and so easily improves an individual’s chances to lead a quality middle class life should be unassailable. Education funding must be protected, so that we can continue to provide affordable higher education to students. It should be the primary aim of the public and their representatives in Sacramento and Washington to guarantee that our schools have the resources they need to provide a quality education at little or no cost to all students in this country. Californians should be proud that students have the opportunity here to improve their lives at relatively low costs. Imagine what we might accomplish if we decided to make educating our children and young adults a high priority. Let’s make sure a college education is something that everyone can attain.

Global citizenship lacks citizens annjelicia houston Staff Writer

One of the most treasured things about Santa Monica College is the many different cultures, backgrounds, ethnicities and religions that students from all over the world bring to our school. It’s a mix of globalization and because of that, SMC has put forth an effort to make its students and faculty more globally aware for the past four years. A major part of that effort is for professors to integrate the concepts of global citizenship into their everyday curriculum, but most students don’t know about this effort. The implementation of this concept of being a global citizen at SMC seems to be completely passive; it looks good on paper and on the SMC website, but what about on campus and in the classroom? Oxfam, an international confederation that works to end poverty and injustice, defines being a global citizen as one who has a sense of their role as a world citizen, respects and values diversity, participates in the community (both locally and globally), takes responsibility for their actions, and takes up an ethical responsibility to those around the world. This is the idea that SMC wants to bring forth to its students through Global Citizenship. Most organizations that support global citizenship, including the United Nations, are in agreement with how Oxfam defines being a global citizen and agree that it starts with education. SMC has also agreed that being a citizen of the globe is important, but why is there such a lack of knowledge about the subject amongst students? If SMC has made the commitment to bring global awareness to our school, then why does it feel like a secret club that no one knows about? For instance, since its inception, the global citizenship effort at SMC has a theme each year that they focus on and bring awareness to. This theme is

voted on by students, staff and faculty. The first theme was water; then food, then health, wellness and the pursuit of happiness, and this year’s theme is poverty and wealth, want and waste. With over 30,000 students in attendance at SMC, this year’s theme was chosen through only 765 votes. So, we had 765 students and faculty vote for this year’s theme out of tens of thousands of students. This isn’t very impressive. When asked what a global citizen was, SMC student Kouran Lockheart said that it was a person well versed in the cultures of the world. However, he did not hear that from any of the professors or faculty at SMC. Lockheart claimed to have never heard the terms ‘global citizen’ or ‘global citizenship’ until being interviewed. “I did not learn that anywhere, it’s how I feel,” Lockheart said. But not all students are left in the dark about the term ‘global citizen’ or its meaning. There are some members of SMC’s faculty who make it a point to instill the concepts of global citizenship into their classroom. Santa Monica College professor Amber Katherine, who developed Greening Philosophy—a philosophy course taught around the themes of sustainability and being a global citizen—finds it important to implement global citizenship into her classrooms.  “I strive to engage my students as members of an educational community committed to a pluralist ethic of “global citizenship.” In practice, in my classroom, debates and discussions give students from vastly different “worlds” and even conflicting values systems a forum to achieve common ground,” said Katherine. “Every single student, whether they are seeking to be stretched intellectually or resisting the disadvantages of poverty, racism, homophobia, or suffering the setbacks of war, abuse, addiction or disability, has something to contribute,” said Katherine. “Walking

the talk of “global citizenship” as a teacher means providing opportunities that help them develop the wisdom and courage they will need to meet their challenges, shine, and make a difference in the world.” With the incredible exception of professor Katherine, I have yet to be introduced to this concept by any of my other SMC professors, and after attending SMC for two years and taking classes with 20 different professors, professor Katherine is the only one that has introduced me to the term last spring semester. Considering that the global citizenship effort at SMC has been in existence for four years now, I find that a bit discerning. However, that doesn’t mean that other professors aren’t doing the same, but why aren’t there more activities surrounding this integrated learning system? While SMC does have an event calendar for global citizenship, this October there were only three events listed, two of which were lectures, the other, a dance performance. This isn’t something that will excite students and make them want to be a part of Global Citizenship. There have to be more events to really bring everyone’s attention on the global theme. The last thing that students want is to be lectured on why they should care about other people, or the earth. Instead, SMC should take its focus away from lectures and put global citizenship themes into action; make them more relevant to the students and not just slip pieces of the concept into the curriculum that we hardly take note of. SMC should not tell us how to be better, more responsible, environmentally friendly, culturally aware people, but show us so that we can participate in doing something and learning from it at the same time. Action gets students going. According to the Oxfam website, “for those willing to take up the challenge, all you need is courage, commitment, and a sense of humor.”

Time is on your side as a college student investor

ruth mavangira Staff Writer

Time is the most important resource that all students have during their college years. It is one of the key components to making successful investment choices— and unfortunately, students usually squander time in respect to making good financial investments. According to Gerber Kawasaki Wealth, the co-founder, president and CEO of Investment Management, the best thing for students to do is to save and invest money. “Time is the best asset you have.” College students do face very demanding academic agendas, and making the right investment choices has little to do with luck and more to do with careful planning. ”Learning how to invest might not be easy for everyone, but it’s good to challenge yourself,” said Mai Hoang, president of the SMC Business Club. Indeed, students who rise to the challenge and invest while still in college will likely get to enjoy a far brighter financial future compared to those who do not; this is because those who start early fully capitalize on the asset of time. Student investors must also cultivate the discipline of saving money. “Just think of it as another bill,” said Manuel Napoles-Ramirez, secretary of the SMC Business Club. The average cup of coffee at

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Starbucks costs $3. If you drink one cup a day for five days a week, in a month you’ll have spent money on 20 cups of coffee, which equals to a monthly spending of $60 just for coffee. Hypothetically speaking, for as little as drinking home brewed coffee instead of Starbucks, you could take that money and put it into your saving’s plan. When it comes to what you will forgo to save money to make investments with, your personality and lifestyle will once again determine your choices. You are either a conservative or an adventurous investor. That in conjunction to a set of variables, such as lifestyle, will dictate how you will relate to different types of investments. Don’t let the fact that you don’t have the ability to take a big monetary risk prevent you from making investments. The investment strategy recommended by Mr. Ross Gerber for college students making a first investment is to invest in mutual funds. These investments are not as risky, and give first time investors a chance to make extra money. For a minimum of $50 a month, students can begin a Roth IRA account with a mutual fund investment. “It is tax free and you can also access it for emergencies, or to make big purchases such as buying a house,” said Gerber. According to Gerber, all gainfully employed students, even parttime ones, are eligible for a Roth IRA

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account. If a student lost her jobs, it would not be affected it as long as she eventually got back to making an income. It certainly doesn’t take a genius to figure out investments, and to be bold enough to make their first investment while still in college. “I don’t want to lose all my money at stocks. I’m not a business major,” said Mina Oh, SMC Student and Spanish major. Your college years are for learning, so why wouldn’t you want to take the time to learn how to invest in your financial future? As a student thinking about making your first investment in stocks, you are thinking about a serious relationship. The key to any successful relationship such as, between investor and investee, is compatibility. There is no point in buying energetic stocks that change from moment to moment if you are a laid back conservative person. The same is true for high energy aggressive personalities. It would be pointless to buy stocks that move slowly over a long period of time when you can play a fast game of trading. Whatever your personality type is, there is a huge world of money out there—and it’s possible to make some serious money without having to clock in and out. Look into paper trading so you can learn the basics of trading without taking any real risks. And once you feel confident enough to invest real money, hopefully you’ll see how amazing it is to make money while you sleep.

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6 photostory

volume 104 issue 9 • october 31, 2012 • santa monica college

Livia Wippich Corsair Larae Ransom, the winner of the Homecoming Idol competetion, sings the National Anthem at the SMC homecoming game.

Jassi Patayon (L) and Hanibal Carnise demonstrate moves from the Mart Club Row on the SMC quad on Thursday.

M The Crenshaw High School marching band performs at the Santa Monica College homecoming game against Santa Barbara City College on Saturday. SMC won 41-27, impro 7-1 on the season.

Homecoming

Hoopla!

Paul Alvarez Jr. Corsair Domonique Bierria catches a ball for a touchdown at Corsair Field on Saturday against Santa Barbara City College.

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photostory 7

volume 104 issue 9 • october 31, 2012 • santa monica college

Marine Gaste Corsair tial Arts Society during

Paul Alvarez Jr. Corsair Ralph Gordon II’s (otherwise known as “RG2”) family and friends cheer him on as he makes a big play at Corsair Field on Saturday.

Michael Yanow Corsair The Crenshaw High School marching band performs at the Santa Monica College homecoming game.

Michael Yanow Corsair oving SMC’s record to

Marine Gaste Corsair SMC student Steven Johnson (R) watches physical science professor Dr. James Murphy (L) demonstrating the effect of oxidation of gummy bears in potassium chlorate at the Chemistry Club booth during Club Row on SMC’s quad last Thursday. Murphy’s attempt to heat the mixture was stymied when the Bunsen burner failed to ignite, spoiling the anticipated effect of a flame shooting from the tube.

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+ lifestyle 8 health

volume 104 issue 9 • october 31, 2012 • santa monica college

UCLA professor addresses issues behind bullying

Ruth Manangira Staff Writer A teenage girl approached UCLA psychology professor Jaana Juvonen after her lecture on bullying last Tuesday at Santa Monica College. Andy Kear, a 16-year-old SMC student, said that she had been bullied all her life, and reached out to the professor for help. Kear said that she was so depressed that, although she had never hurt herself, she sometimes had thoughts of suicide. “When a victim feels a loss of power to effect a change, and blames themselves for the bullying, this leads to feeling isolated, which, in turn, can lead to suicide,” Juvonen said. Juvonen said that it is crucial for parents to be aware of early indications of a problem. “The first signs that I had that something was wrong with Andy was the change in her attitude, and her lack of excitement for school,” Andy’s mother Tara Wright said in a phone interview. “She stopped communicating about what she was learning at school.” Wright immediately communicated with her daughter, and their honest dialogue revealed that she was a target of bullying. Juvonen debunked the theory that being bullied makes targets stronger. “Victims become withdrawn,” Juvonen said. “If bullying continues, this leads to more isolation. Victims, in turn, become more quiet and withdrawn, and do not tell anyone what is going on.” Intimidation, humiliation, physical aggression, name-calling, and online harassment are some of the examples that Juvonen gave to illustrate the imbalance of power typified by bullying. Kear, who said that she has experienced all of these forms except cyber-bullying, recalled the first time she was harassed at school. “I remember some kid pushing me; I tripped and broke my arm,” she said. At the lecture, Juvonen showed a clip of a schoolyard bully pushing down another student who grimaced in pain. Juvonen froze the screen and pointed to the bully. “He has a rewarded expression,” she said, indicating the boy’s smirk that seemed to display a sense of satisfaction. “If the victim shows hurt or blows up, the bully often feels a sense of gratification.” Wright gave her daughter similar advice. “I told my daughter not to react and not to engage the bully,” Wright said. “She understood that the behavior of the bullies

Amy Gaskin Corsair Jaana Juvonen, professor of developmental psychology at UCLA, lectures at Santa Monica College last Tuesday about the causes and effects of bullying in schools.

had nothing to do with her, but was a projection of their own issues.” In Kear’s timeline of being bullied, there were isolating factors that made her a target. “In elementary school, my feet were too big,” Kear said. “At a new school, everyone had already picked a clique. In Mammoth Lakes, it was all about snow sports, and I couldn’t snowboard or ski. In my performing arts school, I was getting speaking roles where older, more experienced actors were not.” Juvonen argued against some common stereotypes, and noted a link between bullying and intelligence. “Bullies have inflated egos, not low selfesteem,” Juvonen said. “In many cases, bullies are found to have very high emotional and social IQs because they understand exactly how to hurt their victims, and to manipulate their peers and those in authority to win them over to their side.” Another perception about bullies that Juvonen countered is the idea that they are

socially isolated. “In most instances, bullies are very ‘cool,’ and bullying is how they establish the pecking order among themselves in middle school,” Juvonen said. The professor said that technology is a contributor to the culture of bullying in schools because it makes victims easily accessible. “Cyber-bullying allows for the bully to remain anonymous,” Juvonen said. At the lecture, an SMC psychology student inquired whether parental influence is responsible for shaping bullies. “Not necessarily,” Juvonen said. But former SMC student Mistee Miles had a different experience. “I was a bully because I watched my dad beat my mom up every day,” Miles said. “I didn’t have any power at home, but when I bullied someone else I felt in control.” Juvonen said that bullies can be reformed, “if their feelings of a lack of power—and the social need that they lack—is met in other ways.”

“I stopped being a bully when I had to change my father’s diapers because he was sick, and I watched him die,” Miles said. “This is when I realized that you can’t bully death.” Juvonen listed ineffective methods of eradicating bullying in schools. “Punishing a bully by withdrawing them from school is not a good solution,” Juvonen said. “In cases where the victim identifies a bully, the bullying just becomes more intense.” Kear and her mother identified with the professor’s observations. “My mom and I have moved eight times because of the bullying,” Kear said. “I did not want to be a tattletale, so I would tell what happened, but not who did it.” Juvonen said that students with mentors and skills that build self-esteem and confidence are less likely to be bullied. “I am very proud of Andy, because she is very strong, and she handled herself with such grace during a very difficult time in her life,” Wright said.

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volume 104 issue 9 • october 31, 2012 • santa monica college

health + lifestyle 9

Addiction, prescribed Tina eady Staff Writer Misha Hollins, 41, went to a Palmdale doctor’s office bleeding excessively during her menstrual cycle and doubled over in pain. The doctor gave her morphine, and prescribed her Vicodin and codeine to take at home for the remainder of her cycle. She felt relief, and would return to the doctor every month for more medication. She soon found herself needing to take higher doses of medicine to relieve the pain. “At one point, the doctor just wouldn’t give me any more,” Hollins said. She began to seek alternative methods to obtain the pills to feed her growing habit, such as buying drugs from people she knew, and going to hospital emergency rooms. She also started taking over-the-counter drugs to ward off the preliminary effects of her menstrual cycle. She eventually began to write her own prescriptions, calling various pharmacies to have them filled. About a year and a half later, Hollins entered a pharmacy near her home in Palmdale to pick up her forged prescription, when she was arrested for felony drug possession. She remained in jail for 30 days, where she suffered symptoms of opiate withdrawal. “I had diarrhea, I was throwing up, I had a runny nose, and my bones ached,” Hollins said. The court ordered her to complete a six-month outpatient drug program. She was required to submit to random drug tests, and show proof to the court that she attended Narcotics Anonymous meetings. She did not use any prescription drugs during that time, but once she completed the court order, she quickly resumed taking high doses of Vicodin and codeine. Hollins soon returned to the pattern of abuse, but she eventually grew tired of the cycle. “I got tired of using—of the quality of life,” she said. “I wasn’t ambitious, I was isolated, I didn’t want to spend any time with my family. I wanted to live.” Hollins has been sober since she sought treatment in 2006, and she now works at a recovery center. Hollins was able to overcome her opiate addiction—a struggle she deals with every day. But many other people are not as fortunate. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that approximately 15,000 people die each year from overdosing on prescription painkillers, amounting to more deaths than heroin and cocaine overdoses combined. This number has almost tripled since 1999. “The problem of prescription painkiller overdoses has reached epidemic proportions,” according to the CDC. Opiates such as morphine, codeine, oxycodone, and hydrocodone—the narcotic component of Vicodin— are among the most widely abused prescription drugs. These medications are prescribed for the management of pain, and work by reducing the intensity of brain signals that control pain sensation and

emotional responses, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. “The symptoms of the pain are being treated, instead of the cause of the pain,” said Marvin Friedman, a pharmacology professor at Santa Monica College. The need for increased drug doses that Hollins experienced commonly occurs with prolonged treatment that can develop into drug addiction. Friedman said that once addiction develops, withdrawal symptoms occur when medications are abruptly discontinued. Improving the way medicine is prescribed can reduce the number of people that abuse these drugs, according to the CDC. “They’re beginning to put CURES in place,” Friedman said, speaking of the California Prescription Drug Monitoring Program, a database that monitors individuals who may abuse prescription drugs, run by the California Department of Justice. “There’s a lot of deception,” Friedman said. “After needing more, they go to different doctors and emergency rooms.” The NIDA reported that 16 million people used prescription drugs for nonmedical reasons in 2010. Opiate painkillers are not the only prescription drugs that prompt the potential for abuse. Often prescribed to treat anxiety and sleep disorders, central nervous system depressants—such as sedatives and tranquilizers that slow brain activity— can be addictive, according to the NIDA. Benzodiazepines, including Valium and Xanax, are often used to treat anxiety, panic attacks, insomnia, and alcohol withdrawals. “Usually, benzodiazepines are not prescribed for long-term use because of the risk for developing tolerance, dependence, or addiction,” according to the NIDA. Barbiturates are used less often because of the higher risk of overdose, according to the NIDA. Health practitioners use stimulant prescription drugs to treat symptoms of asthma, obesity, attention deficit disorder, narcolepsy and neurological disorders. Stimulants such as Adderall and Ritalin heighten aletness and energy, and raise breathing rate, pulse and blood pressure. The NIDA reported that these drugs also carry the risk of addiction and abuse. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, mental health professionals recognize certain prescription medications not as cures for mental illnesses, but as methods to alleviate uncomfortable effects and to help foster recovery. Elizabeth Waterman, a clinical psychologist at Morningside Recovery in Newport Beach, said that medications do not necessarily treat underlying issues. . “As long as [patients] have doctors who use medication as a treatment approach, it’s effective in the shortterm, but in the long run, it’s a huge problem because they’re not learning to use alternative skills to deal with the problems,” Waterman said.

for extended coverage visit us at thecorsaironline.com •

Juan C. Martinez Corsair The most commonly abused types of prescription medications include opiates, stimulants, and central nervous system depressants, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

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+ entertainment 10 Arts

volume 104 issue 9 • october 31, 2012 • santa monica college

Michael Yanow Corsair Marvin Farber, 91, shares stories about his life in his home last Thursday in Santa Monica. Farber graduated from Santa Monica College in 2000 with an associate degree in journalism at the age of 79.

An afternoon with Marvin Farber

Michael Yanow Corsair Marvin Farber has kept his Corsair press pass from his time as a writer in the late ‘90s in his office at his home in Santa Monica.

for extended coverage visit us at thecorsaironline.com •

elizabeth moss Staff Writer It’s the Great Depression, and a 16-yearold Martin Farber dances a jaunty jitterbug on the dance floor of downtown Chicago’s Panther Room. Farber’s nights in the Panther Room marked the beginning of a rebellious streak, eventually pushing Farber to leave his native Chicago and move to Los Angeles Born Jan. 9, 1921, 91-year-old Farber grew up in Chicago, where he attended Sullivan High School. At 20, against his parent’s wishes, Farber was on his way to Los Angeles. Seventy-five years later, in his Santa Monica home, comfortable in a blue checkered button-down under a faded orange sweater, Farber leaned back in his grey swivel chair to discuss his new book of poetry, “I’ve Always Been a Dancer.” Twelve years ago, Farber graduated from Santa Monica College, a proud moment in his illustrious career. During his time at SMC, he was an active writer for The Corsair. Written in what Farber calls his “octogenarian years,” “I’ve Always Been a Dancer” sheds light on his feelings towards growing old and his philosophies on life. Enriched with memories from his youthful past and departed friends, Farber writes to engage all ages. “I left Chicago because I was going to Northwestern University which was just a couple of miles from my house, and I didn’t like it,” Farber said. Under pressure from his father, he was studied business administration. “I wasn’t at all interested. I wanted to go to journalism school.” But it wasn’t growing up in the Great Depression, seeing jazz legends play, or traveling 2000 miles alone for the first time that inspired him to write poetry. That inspiration came half a century later. “After I graduated from SMC, I enrolled

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in some classes at Emeritus college,” Farber said. “A friend of mine took me to a class that she felt I would like--it was a class in poetry.” His interest in creative writing burgeoned. Written over a nine year span, his poetry almost exclusively deals with his twilight years, but this collection is sweetly contrasted by a section dedicated to his wife, Ruth, and Anne, his young niece, who has a featured poem in her namesake section. The tension between father and son presents itself in “I’ve Always Been a Dancer.” As a young man, Farber dreamed of being a tap dancer, but his sports-oriented father would not allow it. In the poem, Farber reasons, “No shame, Papa, hardly pathetic/ I’ve always been a dancer.” Perhaps most telling is “An Octogenarian’s Write of Passion.” Farber composes straightforward poetry that speaks to overcoming an old man’s fear of growing old, comparing it to a “Herculean task.” He cites this poem as the most emotionally revealing, in which he tells himself to “embrace the riches of time on hold/ enhance the wealth of growing old.” These days Farber attends an autobiographical writing class on Saturdays, as well as Green Poets on Tuesdays, a spinoff of the Emeritus poetry class he took. “My philosophy is, as we get older, our bodies don’t function as well, and it’s very hard for me to walk, but it’s very important to adjust your life,” he said. “And by so doing, you go at a different pace, because you continue everything you’re interested in doing.” Farber’s collection of poems, I’ve Always Been a Dancer, is available on Amazon.com for $12.95.

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Arts + entertainment 11

volume 104 issue 9 • october 31, 2012 • santa monica college

$10 Tuesday:

Pico Fall Festival lackluster for businesses and artists henry crumblish Staff Writer Orchestrated by the Pico Improvement Organization, the Seventh Annual Pico Fall Festival celebrates autumn, and gives local artists an opportunity to showcase their art and gain exposure. Buy Local Santa Monica, a group that stresses the importance of supporting local businesses, handed out bags made of recycled military parachutes with the completion of a quick survey. “Supporting local businesses has many benefits. Buying local reduces your carbon footprint, and is good for keeping money in communities,” said Jennifer Taylor, Chair of the Buy Local Committee. The festival managed to entertain children and families, but did a poor job of taking care of local artists present at the festival. Many artists came with hopes of displaying their pieces and having a chance to sell their artwork. Although it was the seventh annual festival, it was the first time it took place in the Civic auditorium, much to the artists’ disappontment. Originally the festival blocked off Pico Boulevard and ran from 34th Street to Ocean Avenue. “We couldn’t shut Pico down because it’s such a thoroughfare,” said organizer Randy Ball. “The last three years we’ve focused it on one location, and that’s been better. We had a bus that would take people all the way down, but we found they would just

get off at Virginia Park,” said Ball. Photographer A.Y. Ohashi feels there is not enough opportunity for local artists. “I don’t think anyone makes a lot of money at these festivals. I’ve said that every year,” she said. “Santa Monica is a big location. I think they could advertise all over Los Angeles County” she said. The Santa Monica College Art Department was in full force, complete with glass roses, starfish, and pumpkins. The art on display was beautiful in its striking aesthetics, but unfortunately not much of it sold. So while the mood at the rock-climbing wall was all fun and games, for the Art Department the festival was a stark necessity. The Art Department relies on money from sales such as these to fund curriculum and offset budget cuts. “Let’s get this straight, there have been cuts already, and we’re afraid the art department will disappear,” said Mike Aparicio, a second year art major. “30 percent of the proceeds go to the Art Department which helps the school, and we really want to do that,” said Aparicio. For patrons, the Pico Fall Festival is a fun way to get your family out of the house and enjoy a lazy Sunday. However, for artists looking to supplement their incomes, the Pico Fall Festival struggles to deliver. The festival will be back next year, hopefully with more publicity for the artists and local businesses beforehand.

Samosa House Skya Eiland Staff Writer

As an avid bicyclist who commutes from Culver City to Santa Monica College everyday, I always smell delicious foods and fresh roasted coffee in the mornings but I never stop for quick bite. For some time, I’ve wanted to try the food at the Samosa House, an Indian restaurant for vegans and vegetarians with two locations on Washington Boulevard in Culver City. Finally, this Tuesday, I went to the location on 10700 Washington Blvd. near Sony Studios. I smelled garlic, curry, samosas and naan bread--the aromas of the east--coming from this burgundy building on the corner of Washington Boulevard and Overland. As I walked in, the mural on the wall immediately captivated me. Bursting with bright orange and red colors, figures of Ganesh and other Hindu gods in between were spread out across the restaurant An award for “Reader’s Choice 2012: Food and Restaurants” and various other articles from the Los Angeles Times hang on the walls inside the restaurant. There’s also an information panel about the Samosa House making their national debut on Food Network’s, “The Best Thing I Ever Ate” near the cash register. Ivy-covered walls surround Samosa’s outdoor seating area, which makes for a mesmerizing setting whether you’re chatting with friends or spending the afternoon studying. The customer service, similar to the efficient Panda Express buffet style system, goes above and beyond to deliver their delicious, healthy vegetarian/vegan Indian food quickly. As I stood in line, I noticed everyone ordered the popular garlic naan bread along with the

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combination plate. The combination plate includes three entrees from the buffet, basmati rice (brown or white), naan bread (garlic, plain or whole wheat) and raita (a sweet yogurt sauce). Thanks to the offering of delicious samples, I ended up ordering the combination plate. I chose the Aloo Curry, which is just “potato curry” in translation, dal lentils and charcoal smoked cauliflower. The cauliflower is anything but ordinary. It has a creamy after taste to it, and each bite is filled with flavor. The Aloo Curry sits in spicy, aromatic gravy, and is their most popular entrée. Each bite paired with the basmati rice is simply amazing. The naan bread is hot and puffy, and smells divine¾like a fresh pizza crust. With large portions it’s no wonder this place is so popular. You will never find yourself asking an employee for more potato curry because for just $8.50 they fill your plate. The amount was more than enough for lunch. When you go to Samosa House don’t forget to order their signature item: a samosa. This $1.50 house staple is stuffed with potatoes and peas, and is delicious. There are two Samosa House locations, commonly referred to as Samosa House East and Samosa House West. Samosa House West includes a complete variety of Indian, Middle Eastern and Mediterranean grocery items, exotic produce, and beauty products. Samosa House East is a hip, trendy spot with traditional East Indian décor. Come to Samosa House with an open mind and an empty stomach. Pros: Indoor and outdoor seating and large amounts of food. Cons: There’s an extra 50-cent charge if you want brown rice.

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12 sports

Pink October kou collins Staff Writer

Traditionally, black and orange have been the colors that symbolize the month of October. However a new color has emerged this month: Pink. While Halloween, revolves around tricks and treats and being scared, the month as a whole focuses on something scarier than goblins and ghosts, and that’s breast cancer. The Santa Monica College Athletics Department has been very active this month in raising awareness on campus. “So many people in this department have been directly affected by breast

volume 104 issue 9 • october 31, 2012 • santa monica college cancer,” said Joe Cascio, SMC’s athletic director. “My assistant, Francine Duran actually came to me and asked if she could spearhead something in the department and I was more than happy to oblige. She took the ball and ran with it. It’s better than I could have ever anticipated.” Some things that have been done include door decorating contests and sporting events geared toward showing support to those who fight the battle of breast cancer. The color pink could be seen on the uniforms of the football team when they played LA Southwest on Oct. 13. Cascio explained that pink eye patches and bracelets were given away to the attendees at the game, and donations were accepted. The football team also had a table on SMC’s main quad, where they sold lollipops to students and faculty. The proceeds went to the Susan G. Komen Foundation, which

is one of the nation’s leading organizations in fighting breast cancer. Duran, the assistant athletic director, explained that in total the athletic department raised over $800 through bake sales, the breast cancer football game, and donations. “I’ve had people walking in here that had no connection to Santa Monica College, but they found out that we were having a breast cancer fundraiser, and they gave cash donations.” As you walk down the hall of the second floor of the athletic department, a flurry of pink hits you from every direction. The doors of coaches are decorated with elaborate ways to help spread awareness of breast cancer. “One of the things I suggested was something we call ‘Battle of the Doors,’ where we see who could decorate their door the most creatively,” said Duran. “I

Bright future for Corsairs’ Medina

Homecoming win sets stage for conference showdown david yapkowitz Sports Editor

rachel duron Staff Writer

After teammate Kevin Alonso went down with an elbow injury, Danny Medina knew that his time had come. Medina started out the season as a second string goalkeeper for the Santa Monica College men’s soccer team. Ever since Alonso suffered a dislocated elbow a few weeks ago, Medina has had to step up to the plate. “My coaches keep telling me it’s my time,” said Medina. “They always told me if you work hard, your time will come, and it finally has.” Medina’s hard work in practice has been reflected in his recent games, with many team victories ending in shutouts. Medina, a sophomore at SMC, suffered an injury to his MCL while warming up before a game against the Santa Barbara City College Gauchos. While still not up to full strength, he still takes his place on the field. “My knee is better. I still feel some pain, but I take some ibuprofen before the game and play through it.” Head coach Tim Pierce has been impressed by Medina’s play. “He’s been great in practice,” said Pierce. “He’s working hard and doing much better. He’s also been training hard with our goalkeeping coach. I think he’s gotten much better throughout the season.” “Every practice I watch the defenders. They’re always talking to each other, training hard, and improving. It really motivates me to be better. My defense being there for me is why we had our shutouts; it’s not just me,” said Medina. Alonso, the original starting goalie, is returning to the team this week. Alonso and Medina will both have to prove they are deserving of the starting spot to their coaches and teammates. “I don’t know if I’ll be starting goalie,” said

David J. Hawkins Corsair Danny Medina, goalkeeper for Santa Monica College men’s soccer team.

Alonso. “The coaches want me to play forward, but I could be switched back to keeper throughout the game. While I was out, Danny really stepped up to the plate and played well. When he tries, he does really well.”  Medina wishes to pursue soccer after leaving SMC. He has high hopes of either transferring to UCLA, or perhaps moving to Mexico to play soccer at the professional level. This past November, he was invited to go to Brazil to play soccer, but since SMC will be in playoffs at that time, so he couldn’tant attend. He has one more year at SMC to impress the scouts. Medina is hopeful that a future in professional soccer awaits him.

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did not expect this to turn out as wonderful as it has.” The women’s softball team won this contest. Their door was covered in softballs with messages written on them from players and coaches. “We are all affected by breast cancer,” softball coach Stephanie Spychaj said. “I think it [breast cancer awareness month] should be a year round event, I don’t think just one month should be dedicated towards this disease, because the women that have it fight all year round and they fight the rest of their lives.” The softball team plans to have a breast cancer game in the spring, but no date has been set yet. Duran, a breast cancer survivor, explains, “Early detection is the key to survival. Women in the past have died of breast cancer, and now we’re surviving. That’s the message I want to get out. I tell my story because I can; I am a survivor.”

In the end, it was just too much Alfonso Medina, too much Myles Johnson, too much of Santa Monica College. Despite getting off to a slow start, the Corsairs battled back and grinded their way to a 41-27 victory over the visiting Santa Barbara City College Vaqueros in SMC's annual homecoming game. Adding to the already emotionally charged atmosphere was the fact that it was Medina's birthday. The Vaqueros striked early, taking a 14-7 lead by the midway point of the second quarter, dampering the mood of the home crowd. "We got off to a sluggish start," said head coach Gifford Lindheim. "We just needed to settle down, play with emotion, and play our brand of football." The spark came late in the second quarter when Medina found sophomore running back Myles Johnson for a touchdown. Johnson scored again near the end of the half, giving SMC the lead at 21-14. Johnson rushed for a total of 65 yards. At that point, it would seem that the Corsairs became an unstoppable force. Prior to the game, Lindheim was apprehensive about his team's mindset and the possibility of a slow start after a few relatively easy wins, which included a drubbing of L.A. Southwest 68-0. "I was worried after

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the Southwest win. It came too easy," said Lindheim. He added that he was pleased with the team's refocused effort coming out of halftime. "Football is a game of desire and physicality—whoever wants it more. We made some big plays, and we feed off that." In the second half, the Corsairs continued to bombard the Vaqueros; Medina finding his wide receivers, sophomores Ralph Gordon II and Reggie Mitchell each scored touchdowns. Medina completed 14 of his 24 attempted passes for a total of 257 yards. Lindheim also had praise for Gordon, stating, "Ralph is really good on offense. He made some dynamic plays." Gordon had five receptions with a total of 118 yards. "We feed off each other's energy, we know someone will step up and we all follow that," said Medina. The big win puts SMC in a tie for first place along with L.A. Pierce in the Pacific Conference. L.A. Pierce defeated Antelope Valley on Saturday night, who were also vying for the conference crown. The Corsairs next opponent is L.A. Pierce. Both teams sport 7-1 records, and show fierce determination for a conference championship. "We're getting ready for the big showdown," said Lindheim. "We're just taking it one game at a time," added Medina. The Corsairs will take to the field against their top rival on Saturday, Nov. 2 at 1 p.m.

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Volume 104 Issue 09