CSPFD 2021 Annual Report

Page 1

ANNUAL REPORT FISCAL YEAR 2021


CITY OF CORAL SPRINGS OFFICIALS

CITY OF PARKLAND OFFICIALS

Scott J. Brook

Richard Walker

Mayor

Mayor

Joshua Simmons

Bob Mayersohn

Vice Mayor

Vice Mayor

Joy Carter

Ken Cutler

Commissioner

Commissioner

Shawn Cerra

Simeon Brier

Commissioner

Commissioner

Nancy Metayer

Jordan Isrow

Commissioner

Commissioner

Frank Babinec

Nancy Morando

City Manager

City Manager

John Hearn

Anthony C. Soroka

City Attorney

City Attorney

In 2021, the COVID-19 pandemic continued.

This global health crisis has affected each of us and our

prayers and heartfelt sympathy go out to everyone who has faced COVID-19 or lost a loved one to it. The pictures in this report represent times when mask mandates were in place, and also when they were lifted.


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department Annual Report represents the fiscal year from October 1, 2020 through September 30, 2021.

Table of Contents MESSAGE FROM THE FIRE CHIEF .................................................................................................................................. 5 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ................................................................................................................................................... 7 STRATEGIC PLAN ........................................................................................................................................................... 8 OUR COMMUNITES ........................................................................................................................................................ 9 BUDGET AND FINANCIAL DATA ................................................................................................................................. 10 ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE ................................................................................................................................... 11 PERFORMANCE MEASURES......................................................................................................................................... 12 COMPONENTS OF RESPONSE TIME ............................................................................................................................ 16 OPERATIONS ................................................................................................................................................................ 28 EMS ............................................................................................................................................................................... 31 Overview of the EMS Division ................................................................................................................................ 32 MEDICAL DIRECTOR................................................................................................................................................ 34 EMS CONTINUOUS QUALITY IMPROVEMENT GROUP (CQI) ............................................................................... 36 COMMUNITY PARAMEDIC ..................................................................................................................................... 37 MAP – EMS INCIDENTS ............................................................................................................................................ 38 COVID-19 PREVENTION AND RESPONSE .................................................................................................................. 39 IN-SERVICE TRAINING ................................................................................................................................................. 40 ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT SERVICES .............................................................................................................. 47 FIRE ADMINISTRATION ................................................................................................................................................ 49 SUPPORT SERVICES DIVISION ..................................................................................................................................... 50 COMMUNITY RISK REDUCTION .................................................................................................................................. 52 COMMUNITY EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM (CERT) ................................................................................................ 56 FIRE STATIONS .............................................................................................................................................................. 58 CORAL SPRINGS FIRE STATIONS ................................................................................................................................ 58 STATION 43 - 4550 Rock Island Road ................................................................................................................... 59 STATION 64 – 500 Ramblewood Drive .................................................................................................................. 61 STATION 71 – 11800 NW 41st Street ........................................................................................................................ 63 STATION 80 – 2825 Coral Springs Drive ................................................................................................................. 65 STATION 95 – 300 Coral Ridge Drive ..................................................................................................................... 67 PARKLAND FIRE STATIONS .......................................................................................................................................... 69 3


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT STATION 42 – 6500 Parkside Drive.......................................................................................................................... 69 STATION 97 – 6650 N. University Drive ................................................................................................................... 71 STATION 109 – 11601 Hillsboro Blvd ....................................................................................................................... 73 CORAL SPRINGS REGIONAL INSTITUTE OF PUBLIC SAFETY ...................................................................................... 75 SAFETY, HEALTH AND WELLNESS................................................................................................................................. 79 COMMUNICATIONS .................................................................................................................................................... 82 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT ..................................................................................................................................... 84 COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT ...................................................................................................................................... 85 RETIREMENTS, PROMOTIONS AND DEPARTMENT NEWS ........................................................................................... 91 SOUTH FLORIDA URBAN SEARCH AND RESCUE ........................................................................................................ 94 DISASTER MEDICAL ASSISTANCE TEAM (DMAT) ....................................................................................................... 96 SPECIAL OPS - SWAT/TACTICAL PARAMEDICS......................................................................................................... 97 HONOR GUARD ........................................................................................................................................................... 99 PIPES AND DRUMS ..................................................................................................................................................... 100 CORAL SPRINGS PROFESSIONAL FIREFIGHTERS BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION ..................................................... 101 METRO-BROWARD PROFESSIONAL FIREFIGHTERS

LOCAL 3080 ....................................................................... 102

FIRE EXPLORER PROGRAM........................................................................................................................................ 103 AWARDS AND ACHIEVEMENTS ................................................................................................................................ 105 IN MEMORIAM........................................................................................................................................................... 107

4


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

MESSAGE FROM THE FIRE CHIEF Michael McNally On behalf of the men and women of the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department, I proudly present the department’s Fiscal Year 2021 Annual Report as a reflection of the dedication, professionalism, and commitment to the safety of our citizens, visitors, and firefighters. The Fire Department has a clear vision, “United in Service, Committed to Excellence.” As we started this fiscal year, we had already been working safely through the COVID-19 Pandemic for well over six months. The men and women of the Fire Department have adapted to all of the changes throughout the pandemic with the clear objective of maintaining a safe workforce and providing the highest level of care to our residents and visitors. The pandemic forced us to reimagine how we can continue to connect with our communities. 2020 was a big milestone for the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department as we celebrated our 50th Anniversary. We had multiple events planned prior to Covid-19 and had to make adjustments so that we could still share this milestone with the community. We maintained contact with our adult living facilities, nursing homes, and senior living centers through emergency orders and partnerships to make sure they had all the necessary resources to protect through residents through the pandemic. On October 10th we hosted the City’s first drive-in movie event at Sportsplex. Prior to the movie, those in attendance viewed a short video showcasing some of the history of the Fire Department. The feature movie was Playing with Fire and one of the main characters was John Cena. During the introduction of the movie, we were all surprised to receive a video message from John Cena congratulating us on our anniversary. Knowing that our community was facing many challenges associated with the pandemic, we assisted with multiple food distribution drive-through events at the Coral Square Mall and a Thanksgiving food distribution event at City Hall. Another innovative change was to our Santa’s express event. In order to maintain a safe environment and to maximize the impact to the community, we conducted a driving route through Coral Springs and Parkland over two nights and covering over 140 miles to bring holiday cheer to families. Through amazing teamwork from Communications and Marketing and other departments, their was a planned out online route map along with real-time tracking of Santa so residents would know where he was at any time. Throughout December, we worked with our Medical Director Dr. Peter Antevy to obtain approvals to be able to provide COVID-19 vaccines to the public. Through the pandemic, the city adopted a slogan, “One Team, One Mission”, and this was never more evident with establishing a vaccine site. Through collaboration with the Florida Department of Emergency Management, Florida Department of Health, Dr. Peter Antevy, Memorial Regional Hospital, Cleveland Clinic, Simon Mall, and so many different departments within the city, our public vaccine site opened up on January 12th, 2021. The first vaccine administered in Florida was December 15th, 2020, and during the first phase rollout was only available to healthcare workers with specific criteria. To plan and execute a fully functional vaccine site twenty-eight days later truly emphasized, “One Team, One Mission.” Through the following weeks and months, thousands of doses of Covid-19 vaccines were administered and the feedback from the community was incredible. To hear the stories from families who have not seen their grandkids in months express how we are providing them with the vaccine so they can see them again and 5


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT the gratitude on their faces with stay with me forever. Within two weeks we started the next initiative which was to bring the vaccine to our vulnerable population and senior living centers. Through collaboration with FORTS USA, Cleveland Clinic, and multiple city departments we provided a pop-up vaccine site at four different locations in the city to enhance access to those with limited mobility. We also deployed teams in the field paired up with nurses to provide homebound residents with the vaccine. We are so proud of all those involved in this initiative as we know lives were saved as a result. As you will see in the following pages, there were many accomplishments and achievements that occurred in each division last year, despite the challenges we faced due to COVID-19. Our mission statement is, “The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department assists the public in the protection of life and property. The department preserves life and property through emergency medical services, fire suppression, risk reduction, public education, and community partnerships.” I am so proud of how each member of the department has worked together to achieve that mission. We are also on the forefront of Safety, Health and Wellness initiatives designed to keep our personnel physically and mentally at their best throughout their career and into retirement. We have developed numerous resources to make the environment as healthy and safe as possible, and to provide our members with ongoing support. The Fire Department’s Behavioral Health Access Program includes peer support, clinician response team, chaplaincy, critical incident stress management, and employee assistance program to name a few. When City Manager Frank Babinec was our Fire Chief, this program was developed, and knowing how important the program is, he has expanded it to include every City employee. I am extraordinarily proud of each member of our organization. Our primary duty is to respond to emergency

and

non-emergency

calls

for

service, striving always to provide our residents, businesses, and visitors with the level of service they expect and deserve, and that we promise

Alexander Falcone, Chief McNally at Vaccine Site

to provide. It is both our responsibility and our honor to provide outstanding service to our communities, and we remain committed to this mission. Please stay safe, look out for each other, and seek help if you need it. Please visit our website for more information, www.CoralSprings.org/fire, follow us on Twitter @CoralSpringsFD, Instagram @CoralSpringsFD, and Facebook.com/CoralSpringsFireDepartment.

Michael McNally Fire Chief 6


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department provides vital services to the community. From the collective efforts of our firefighters and administrative staff working with city management, other city departments, neighboring fire departments, Metro Broward Professional Firefighters Local 3080 and the Coral Springs Professional Firefighters Benevolent Association, and the citizens of the communities we serve, we will continue to ensure that our department meets the challenges that are a part of sustaining a first-rate organization. Throughout the year, we responded to over 16,000 incidents which is a 7.4% increase from 2020. We conducted over 6,300 fire inspections, over 8,800 re-inspections, and participated in public education events, either in the community or at one of our fire stations. We’ve trained our own personnel, as well as those of other agencies via contract with our Coral Springs Regional Institute of Public Safety. We’ve developed personnel to take on higher ranked positions, and trained high school students through our Fire Explorer post. We’ve volunteered at City events and donated to families in need. We prepared for and continue to respond to the ever changing COVID-19 pandemic. To celebrate our 50th anniversary which occurred in 2020, we held a drive in movie event at the Sportsplex. The data on the following pages will show you in great detail all the incidents to which we’ve responded, for Fire, EMS, Community Risk Reduction, and others, as well as give you a breakdown by response zone and when incidents occurred, and indicate what we feel is the most important statistic: response times. How quickly we get to you when you call us, will always be our most crucial goal. In 2015, we produced a Strategic Plan for the department, shown on the next page, and we will continue to strive to meet the goals and objectives we created. Due to COVID-19, this plan was extended by one year and is currently being redeveloped for the next three years.

Celebrating our 50th anniversary with a Drive In Movie Event at the Sportsplex

7


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

STRATEGIC PLAN The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department, together with both external and internal stakeholders, developed a Strategic Plan for the years 2015 thorugh 2020. While the diagram below will give you a brief overview, the entire Strategic Plan can be viewed on our website at CoralSprings.org/fire.

8


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

OUR COMMUNITES The City of Coral Springs was incorporated in July 1963 and encompasses a total land area of 23.97 square miles. We are the 15th largest city in the state of Florida by population, and the 5th largest in Broward County. According to data from the BEBR (Bureau of Economic and Business Research), the City of Coral Springs is home to 134,394 residents as of 2020 and has an estimated population of 134,558 as of April 2021. Just to the north of Coral Springs, the City of Parkland has an estimated population of 35,440, as of April 2021, within 14.32 square miles. Of the 24 mile long Sawgrass Expressway, 11.2 miles run through the cities of Coral Springs and Parkland.

City of Coral Springs and City Of Parkland Population from 2017 to 2021

32,742

31,476

2017

2018

35,438

2019 Coral Springs

134,558

134,394

129,263

128,757

127,381

35,440

34,670

2020 Parkland

2021

City of Coral Springs and City Of Parkland Population Projections to 2036 154,860

144,864

134,558

2021 Estimated

2026

50,708

45,780

40,852

35,440

164,855

2031

Projected Coral Springs Parkland

9

2036


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

BUDGET AND FINANCIAL DATA

10


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

11


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

PERFORMANCE MEASURES October 2020 to September 2021

TOTAL INCIDENTS FY 2013 - FY 2021 91.0%

92.0%

95.1%

96.6%

97.0%

96.9%

97.6%

14,762

15,137

15,367

15,415

15,021

16,000

Total Number Of Incidents

13,947

14,688

98.0%

100%

16,134

13,800

12,000

50% 8,000

4,000

-

0% FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

FY2016

FY2017

# Of Incidents

FY2018

FY2019

FY2020

% Response Time Within 8 minutes

Year

Total Incidents % Change

FY 2012

13,731 2

36.5%

FY 2013

13,947

1.6%

FY 2014

13,800

-1.1%

FY 2015

14,688

6.4%

FY 2016

14,762

0.5%

FY 2017

15,137

2.5%

FY 2018

15,367

1.5%

FY 2019

15,415

0.3%

FY 2020

15,021

-2.6%

FY 2021

16,134

7.4%

12

FY2021

% Within 8 Minutes

91.0%


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

TOTAL CALLS PER MONTH FY 2021

1623 1469

1288

1344

1278

1166

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

1326

1384

1361

Apr

May

1381

1303

1211

Feb

Mar

2020

2021

13

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

TYPES OF FIRES

TOTALS

PERCENTAGE

Structure Fires

48

34%

Mobile Property (Vehicle) fire

33

23%

Outside Rubbish Fire

24

17%

Natural Vegetation Fire

22

15%

Fire, Other

12

8%

Special Outside Fire

3

2%

Fire in Mobile Property

1

1%

TOTAL

143

100%

TOTAL TYPES OF FIRES IN FY2021

Outside Rubbish Fire 17%

Mobile Property (Vehicle) fire 23%

Natural Vegetation Fire 15%

Fire, Other 8%

Structure Fires 34%

Special Outside Fire 2% Fire in Mobile Property 1%

14


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

EMS •

Emergency Medical Calls accounted for 69.5% of all incidents.

EMS calls increased 9.5% from 10,239 (FY2020) to 11,213 (FY2021).

Average response time: 4 mins 51 seconds.

FIRE •

Fire related calls accounted for 0.9% of all incidents.

Fire calls decreased 11.7% from 162 (FY2020) to 143 (FY2021).

Average response time: 5 minutes 2 seconds.

STRUCTURE FIRES •

Of the 143 fires CSPFD responded to, (48) 33.6% were Structure fires.

Average response time: 5 minutes 29 seconds.

OTHER •

This category includes calls which do not fall under Fire or EMS. These accounted for 29.6% of all incidents.

Other calls increased 3.4% from 4,620 (FY2020) to 4,778 (FY2021).

Average response time: 5 minutes 13 seconds.

Top 5 types of calls are: •

False alarm or false call, other (13.8%)

Dispatched and canceled enroute. Incident cleared or cancelled prior to arrival (9.4%)

Alarm system activation (no fire), unintentional (8.7%)

Good intent call, other (8.4%)

Alarm system activation due to malfunction (8.3%)

15


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

COMPONENTS OF RESPONSE TIME For the purpose of this report, the response time components will include the following times: Call Processing, Turnout, Travel, and Response.

Process Time (mm: ss) Total Incidents EMS Fire Other

50% 00:29 00:29 00:32 00:29

80% 00:43 00:43 00:45 00:43

90% 00:51 00:51 00:53 00:51

Call Processing Time The interval between receipt of the emergency alarm at the public safety answering point, and the moment when the dispatcher knows sufficient information and applicable units are notified of the emergency, defined in NFPA 1221. NFPA 1221 specifies that 95% of alarms shall be answered within 30 seconds, and in no case shall the initial call taker’s response to an alarm exceed 60 seconds.

Turnout Time (mm: ss) Turnout Time Total Incidents EMS Fire Other

The turnout time begins when units acknowledge notification of the emergency to the beginning point of response time.

Travel Time (mm: ss) Total Incidents EMS Fire Other

50% 03:31 03:25 03:26 03:57

80% 04:50 04:35 04:59 05:38

90% 05:40 05:19 05:51 06:48

50% 01:24 01:22 01:32 01:28

80% 01:49 01:47 02:03 01:54

90% 2:04 02:01 02:12 02:07

Travel time The time interval that begins when a unit is enroute to the emergency incident and ends when the unit arrives at the scene.

Response Time

Response Time (mm: ss)

The time that begins when responding units are en-route to the emergency incident and ends when responding units arrive on scene. The objective of eight minutes (480 seconds) or less, within the 90th percentile of the time is the established response time.

50% 04:51 04:51 05:02 05:12

16

Total Incidents EMS Fire Other

80% 06:22 06:04 06:57 07:19

90% 07:15 06:50 07:44 08:26


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

MAP- NUMBER OF ALL INCIDENTS IN EACH SECTOR

Legend indicates which sectors have the most and least number of incidents by color

17


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

TOTAL INCIDENTS BY CALL TYPE CALL TYPE DESCRIPTION

TOTAL

CALL TYPE DESCRIPTION

TOTAL

CALL TYPE DESCRIPTION

TOTAL

321 EMS Call

9946

323 Motor vehicle/pedestrian accident (MV Ped).

54

715 Local alarm system, malicious false alarm.

15

611 Dispatched and canceled en route.

1128

542 Animal rescue.

53

424 Carbon monoxide incident. Excludes incidents with nothing found (736 or 746).

15

322 Motor vehicle accident with injuries.

507

740 Unintentional transmission of alarm, other.

52

411 Gasoline or other flammable liquid spill

14

554 Assist invalid. Includes incidents where the invalid calls the FD for routine help

502

510 Person in distress, other.

49

442 Overheated motor or wiring.

13

700 False alarm or false call, other.

387

353 Removal of victim(s) from stalled elevator.

49

736 Carbon monoxide detector activation due to malfunction.

13

600 Good Intent

331

511 Lock-out. Includes efforts to remove keys from locked vehicles. Excludes lock-ins (331).

49

561 Unauthorized burning

12

324 Motor vehicle accident with no injuries.

266

440 Electrical wiring/equipment problem, other.

49

154 Dumpster or other outside trash receptacle fire

12

745 Alarm system activation (no fire), unintentional.

236

445 Arcing, shorted electrical equipment.

47

142 Brush or brush-and-grass mixture fire.

12

735 Alarm system activation due to malfunction.

226

730 System or detector malfunction, other.

46

113 Cooking fire involving the contents of a cooking vessel

12

550 Public service assistance, other.

210

520 Water problem, other.

35

100 Fire, other

12

743 Smoke detector activation (no fire), unintentional.

155

463 Vehicle accident, general cleanup. Includes incidents where FD is dispatched after the accident to clear away debris

31

441 Heat from short circuit (wiring), defective or worn insulation.

9

500 Service call, others

154

111 Building fire. Excludes confined fires.

31

741 Sprinkler activation (no fire), unintentional.

9

381 Rescue or EMS standby for hazardous conditions

144

552 Police matter.

29

311 Medical assist

9

300 Rescue, emergency medical call (EMS) call, other

132

541 Animal problem. Includes persons trapped by an animal or an animal on the loose.

26

540 Animal problem or rescue, other.

9

522 Water or steam leak. Includes open hydrant

121

412 Gas leak (natural gas or LPG). Excludes gas odors with no source found (671).

25

251 Excessive heat, overheat scorch burns with no ignition.

8

622 No incident found on arrival at dispatch address.

117

331 Lock-in.

24

151 Outside rubbish, trash, or waste fire not included in 152–155

7

733 Smoke detector activation due to malfunction.

78

131 Passenger vehicle fire.

23

422 Chemical spill or leak

6

320 Emergency medical service incident, other

71

710 Malicious, mischievous false alarm, other.

21

140 Natural vegetation fire, other.

6

551 Assist police or other governmental agency. Includes forcible entry and the provision of lighting.

70

746 Carbon monoxide detector activation (no carbon monoxide detected)

20

734 Heat detector activation due to malfunction.

6

744 Detector activation (no fire), unintentional.

67

671 Hazardous material release investigation with no hazardous condition found

20

571 Cover assignment, assist other fire agency

5

651 Smoke scare, odor of smoke, not steam (652). Excludes gas scares or odors of gas (671).

58

555 Defective elevator, no occupants.

18

451 Biological hazard, confirmed or suspected.

5

553 Public service. Excludes service to governmental agencies (551 or 552).

57

444 Power line down. Excludes people trapped by downed power lines (372).

17

130 Mobile property (vehicle) fire, other.

5

531 Smoke or odor removal. Excludes the removal of any hazardous materials.

56

711 Municipal alarm system, malicious false alarm

16

714 Central station, malicious false alarm.

5

18


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

TOTAL INCIDENTS BY CALL TYPE, CONTINUED CALL TYPE DESCRIPTION

TOTAL

CALL TYPE DESCRIPTION

TOTAL

CALL TYPE DESCRIPTION

TOTAL

650 Steam, other gas mistaken for smoke, other.

5

443 Breakdown of light ballast.

3

481 Attempt to burn. Includes situations in which incendiary devices fail to function.

1

400 Hazardous condition (no fire), other.

5

413 Oil or other combustible liquid spill (flash point at or above 100 degrees F at standard temperature and pressure (Class II or III)).

3

361 Swimming/Recreational water areas rescue.

1

900 Special type of incident, other.

5

352 Extrication of victim(s) from vehicle

3

482 Threat to burn. Includes verbal threats and persons threatening to set themselves on fire.

1

421 Chemical hazard (no spill or leak). Includes the potential for spills or leaks.

4

731 Sprinkler activated due to the failure or malfunction of the sprinkler system.

3

340 Search for lost person, other.

1

911 Citizen’s complaint. Includes reports of code or ordinance violation.

4

200 Overpressure rupture, explosion, overheat, other.

3

115 Incinerator overload or malfunction, fire contained.

1

150 Outside rubbish fire, other.

4

631 Authorized controlled burning. Includes fires that are agricultural in nature and managed by the property owner

2

360 Water and ice-related rescue, other.

1

512 Ring or jewelry removal, without transport to hospital. Excludes persons injured (321).

4

462 Aircraft standby. Includes routine standby for takeoff and landing as well as emergency alerts at airports.

2

365 Watercraft rescue. Excludes rescues near the shore and in swimming/recreational area

1

480 Attempted burning, illegal action, other.

4

162 Outside equipment fire

2

410 Combustible and flammable gas or liquid spills or leaks, other.

1

143 Grass fire. Includes fire confined to area characterized by grass ground cover, with little or no involvement

4

341 Search for person on land.

2

112 Fire in structure, other than in a building.

1

460 Accident, potential accident, other.

4

420 Toxic chemical condition, other.

2

423 Refrigeration leak. Includes ammonia.

1

118 Trash or rubbish fire in a structure, with no flame damage to structure or its contents.

3

721 Bomb scare (no bomb).

2

161 Outside Storage Fire

1

461 Building or structure weakened or collapsed

3

661 EMS call where injured party has been transported by a non-fire service agency or left the scene prior to arrival.

2

742 Extinguishing system activation. Includes testing the extinguishing system without fire department notification.

1

653 Smoke from barbecue or tar kettle (no hostile fire).

3

132 Road freight or transport vehicle fire.

2

121 Fire in mobile home used as a fixed residence.

1

134 Water vehicle fire.

3

814 Lightning strike (no fire). Includes investigation.

2

342 Search for person in water.

1

240 Explosion (no fire), other.

3

370 Electrical rescue, other.

1

713 Telephone, malicious false alarm

1

521 Water (not people) evacuation. Includes the removal of water from basements

3

212 Overpressure rupture of steam boiler.

1

155 Outside stationary compactor/compacted trash fire.

1

19


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

ALL INCIDENTS BY HOUR (In a 24-HOUR span) The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department responds to all types of incidents every day, 24 hours a day. The demand for services varies according to the day of the week, and the time of the day or night. Another factor that determines demand is the type of call (Emergency Medical Services, Fire, or Other call types).

ALL INCIDENTS BY HOUR (In a 24 Hour Span) 3

6 2

# OF INCIDENTS

7

6

15

7

5

11

257 247 279 280 248 267 299 282

294

3

8

258 1 1

4

5 13 265

13 213

205

173

10 181

153

121 703 685 666 663 651 651 640 611 620 131 589 538 109 111 541 482 95 466 422 80 92 373 353 287 249 221 178 192 193 239

0

4

5

138

1

2

0

5

0

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

AM

18

19

20

21

22

PM

EMS

Other

Fire

The demand for EMS (medical calls) is relatively lower in the early hours between one and five, when people are sleeping. The busiest time begins during the morning rush hour around six, and it increases throughout the day, and into the early evening.

EMS INCIDENTS BY HOUR

# OF EMS INCIDENTS

9

651 482 287 249 221 178 192 193 239 0

1

2

3

4

5

6

541

703 685 666 663 651 640 611 620 589

538

373

7

8

9

10

11

12

AM

13

14

15

16

17

18

PM

20

19

20

466

21

422

22

353

23

23


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT Incidents related to the “other” category include calls for public service assistance, persons in distress, and animal rescues to name a few. The busiest time for these types of calls is between eight in the morning and eight at night.

# OF OTHER INCIDENTS

OTHER INCIDENTS BY HOUR

294 258

257 247

279 280

248

267

299

282

265 213

205 138 131

0

1

153 111

2

92

80

95

109

3

4

5

6

7

173 181 121

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

AM

18

19

20

21

22

13

13

23

PM

Fire calls increase between lunch and dinnertime.

# OF FIRE INCIDENTS

FIRE INCIDENTS BY HOUR (In a 24 Hour Span)

15 11 8 4

5

6

5

4

1 0

3 1

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

7

6

5

5

3

2 9

7

10

10

11

AM

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

PM

21

19

20

21

22

23


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

PRIMARY RESPONSES BY STATION AND UNIT Summary of Incidents by Station (Primary Unit) 0

500

1000

Station 80

1500

2000

2500

3000

2343

Station 43

1242

1962

Station 71

620

1709

Station 95 Station 97

947

Station 42

568

19

11

70 3

668

Station 109

458

23

28

758

1217

4000

37

912

1799

Station 64

3500

427 291

11

11

EMS

Station 109 568

Station 42 668

Station 97 947

Station 95 1217

Station 64 1709

Station 71 1799

Station 43 1962

Station 80 2343

Other

291

427

70

458

758

620

912

1242

Fire

11

11

3

11

19

28

37

23

Once vaccines were commonplace and COVID cases began to drop, mask restrictions were eased for a short time, before the Delta variant spread rapidly. During this small window, we were honored to receive a visit from the first Fire Chief of Coral Springs, Bob Fuller, shown here with current Fire Chief Michael McNally.

22


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

PRIMARY RESPONSES BY STATION/UNIT (All Shifts)

# of Primary Responses by Station 0

500

1000

1500

2000

2500

3000

Station 80

3500

4000

3608

Station 43

2911

Station 64

2486

Station 71

2447

Station 95

1686

Station 42

1106

Station 97

1020

Station 109

870

# of Primary Responses by Unit 0

500

1000

1500

2000

R80

2529

R43

2062

R64

1810

R71

1801

R95

1265

R97

1020

R42

741

EN43

728

EN64

672

EN71

644

R109

575

LD80

512

EN95

421

OTHER

384

EN42

365

EN109 PL80 FM443

2500

295 191 119

23

3000


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

% of Shift Spent Committed (On Primary Calls) Unit

% of Shift Committed

R80

15.42%

R43

14.62%

R64

13.70%

R71

13.02%

R95

10.27%

R97

7.86%

R109

5.54%

EN43

2.36%

FM443

2.25%

EN64

2.17%

EN71

2.11%

LD80

1.62%

EN42

1.20%

EN95

1.18%

EN109

1.05%

PL80

0.60%

AC43

0.26%

ENQ80

0.24%

BT80

0.21%

FI443

0.16%

FI643

0.13%

1CP43

0.12%

FI343

0.12%

FI543

0.05%

BT43

0.04%

FM243

0.02%

FI43

0.01%

FC43

0.01%

FI243

0.00%

FM343

0.00%

FC443

0.00%

Committed = Dispatch to Time Available

Deputy Fire Chief John Whalen with State Representative Dan Daley who visited us in December 2020 with holiday cookies for our staff

Firefighter Paramedic Talia Hunter, Deputy Fire Chief Michael Moser, and Captain Sophia Moser

24


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

MAP – FIRE INCIDENTS

25


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department extinguished a total of 143 fires between October 2020 and September 2021

26


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

MAP – OTHER INCIDENTS

27


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

OPERATIONS Deputy Fire Chief John Whalen The CSPFD operations division is comprised of multiple disciplines of the department including fire suppression, emergency medical services (EMS), and in-service training. The operations division is headed by Deputy Chief of Operations John Whalen, three District Fire Chiefs, and two Division Chiefs. This division constitutes the bulk of the fire department resources including personnel and is responsible for all emergency responses in the cities of Coral Springs and Parkland. Chief Whalen also serves as the Chair of the Florida Fire Chiefs Association State Section for Safety and Health as well as the co-chair of the Fire Chiefs Association of Broward County’s Safety and Health subcommittee. Each discipline under operations also includes multiple special operations units that perform specific duties and responsibilities outside of our normal operational responses. These specialty teams include Special Operations (Dive Team, Quality Assurance teams, Field Training Officers (FTO), SWAT-Medic team, and Advanced Life Support competition teams). The operations division works in conjunction with all of the divisions of the Fire Department including, Community Risk Reduction (CRR), Administration, and Training, to provide a comprehensive service to our community. All aspects of the Fire Department are intermingled and work as a team to provide the very best service possible and often interact between divisions on special projects to meet our strategic longand short-term goals. Our most important function is to provide the very best broad spectrum of services to the communities we serve and provide a level of excellence that is unmatched in the industry. The men and women of the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department are of the highest caliber and receive the very best training and equipment in order to perform the functions required of our service. We are very proud of our members and their accomplishments, and as always, we seek to find better ways

to

provide

these through

services innovation,

new equipment, and the strengths of our members

collective

intelligence.

We

have made several advancements

to

our services over the past year including 28


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT new technologies for unit tracking and on scene accountability, as well as many other great innovations all while remaining fiscally responsible before, during and hopefully post pandemic circumstances. Chief Whalen is also the commander of our Underwater Search and Rescue Dive Team, a public safety diving organization. To be a member of the dive team on dive status, candidates must demonstrate their abilities in a pool environment and be certified as either a nationally recognized Open Water diving organization or Public Safety Diver and all team members must be a certified Dive Rescue Specialist through a recognized Public Safety Diving organization. Candidates must also demonstrate they are comfortable in zero visibility and black water environments. Once selected, divers are provided additional training in search and rescue diving, equipment maintenance, dry suit diving, and underwater communications. Dive team operations include initiating search and rescue operations in underwater environments including underwater extrication of victims from vehicles and machinery. The team also provides assistance to local

law enforcement when requested. The dive team conducts both land and open water-based operations in a variety of challenging bodies of water. The dive team’s primary focus on any operation is safety. Public safety diving is an exciting, challenging, and rewarding field. It is also considered to be one of the most hazardous that requires a strong commitment to training and awareness. Members of the dive team are highly motivated and professional and are committed to safety. The dive team is considered an elite group within the Fire Department and membership is highly competitive. In the past year, the team has conducted multiple training events, tested new equipment, and added several new members to the team. The team is constantly looking for ways to be more efficient and safer when conducting these dangerous operations.

During fiscal year 2021, specialized training conducted with the Dive Rescue Team that included: 29


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT •

• •

Quarterly training conducted on black water operations for all members Annual Watermanship and Skills Assessment test completed in accordance with National Fire Protection Association requirements Integration of safety modifications for secondary breathing emergencies Mutual aid training with area departments Training of new team members as Public Safety Diver and Dive Rescue Specialists

Some Dive Team training scenarios take place at the Coral Springs Aquatic Complex

30


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

EMS Division Chief Juan Cardona Division Chief of EMS Juan Cardona serves as the administrative director of the EMS division, managing those functions that support the ability of our department to deliver the highest quality of medical/trauma patient care possible. His primary responsibility is to ensure that every fire department member has the tools necessary, in terms of resources, equipment, apparatus, training, support, etc. to ensure the wellbeing of our community. He ensures department compliance with county, state and federal EMS requirements and regulations. Chief Cardona is responsible for incident emergency response including supervision of onscene personnel, as well as command, control, and operational decision making when required. He assists in strategic planning, organizing, coordinating, and administering fire suppression, emergency medical treatment, hazardous materials, community paramedic program, and other activities of the fire department, such as the paramedic internship program and standby EMS Details at high school football games, and local events. Chief Cardona speaks at many EMS related conferences and workshops throughout the world. The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department EMS Division’s goal is to preserve the health, safety, and welfare, as well as enhance the quality of life of the residents and visitors of Coral Springs and Parkland. We will strive to provide the highest level of pre-hospital emergency medical care possible, thereby improving the outcomes of catastrophic illness and significant injury, while staying on the forefront of medical advancements through innovation, training, and technology in a workplace built on trust, opportunity, and teamwork. We accomplish these objectives in a caring environment with an emphasis on the safety and professional development of all employees, and by maintaining positive relationships with our healthcare partners in the community. The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department EMS Division remains strong, despite the impact caused by the horrific events at Marjory Stoneman Douglas over three years ago, and more recent challenges as well such as the COVID-19 pandemic. The 2018 tragedy caused a great impact in the lives not only of our community, but our emergency responders as well. The strong measures we had put in place for several years in terms of establishing clear protocols, procuring the necessary equipment and supplies, training with law enforcement agencies, and establishing clear communications with the area hospitals were all important factors which helped us take care of our community at such a difficult time. We continue to work on updating our medical protocols in ways that allow us to treat patients more efficiently. During late 2020 and into 2021, as the world dealt with the COVID-19 pandemic we continued to take all the necessary precautions designed to prevent infections, not only to our patients, but to our employees as well. We acquired all the necessary equipment and supplies and established clear protocols to take care of patients possibly infected with COVID. Regularly scheduled testing of our employees helped us keep a constant hold of how the infection rates progressed. Our Quality Assurance and Quality Improvement Program has become one of the most successful initiatives in the EMS Division and continues to help our firefighters sharpen their medical skills and find ways to improve our EMS protocols through documentation review done by our own team of EMS experts. This translates into better results in the way we care for our patients. The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department continues to be recognized as a model agency for 31


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT many throughout the state and the country. We fulfill many requests for assistance and collaboration with others who seek to achieve the same level of excellence.

Overview of the EMS Division The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department EMS Division responded to 11,213 calls for service this past year. 72.1% of these calls resulted in transport to a healthcare facility.

The following are some of the types of calls that the EMS Division responded to this past year: • • • • • • • • •

Car, motorcycle, bicycle accidents: 772 Cardiac arrest: 98 Drownings: 8 Strokes: 134 Falls: 91 Overdose related incidents: 169 Diabetic emergencies: 168 Shortness of breath: 437 COVID-19: 350 possible cases o COVID-19 - Confirmed by testing: 211 (60.3%) o COVID-19 - Suspected - no known exposure: 101 (28.9%) o COVID-19 - Exposure to confirmed patient: 38 (10.9%) o Transported Incidents: 304 (86.9%) o Refused Transportation: 46 (13.1%)

32


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

TOTAL TRANSPORTS: 8,269 TOTAL TRANSPORTS FY 2021 831 735 643

640

687

Nov

Dec

Jan

572

Oct

702

780 710

Feb

Mar

695

638

636

Apr

2020

May 2021

33

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

MEDICAL DIRECTOR Dr. Peter Antevy The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department is extremely fortunate to have the highly acclaimed and skilled physician Dr. Peter Antevy as our Medical Director. The Medical Director is responsible for establishing protocols, reviewing the latest research and evidence-based medicine findings to put in place new programs to improve medical care for the community. He is the liaison between the fire department and all partner health agencies. He advocates for EMS and the importance of proper prehospital care. Dr. Antevy continues to provide excellent medical direction to our crews. He works closely with the rest of the medical directors and with the EMS leadership team throughout the State of Florida. Dr. Antevy has been instrumental in the establishment of several new protocols and training programs for all our crews. He is a sought-after speaker and presenter at many conferences, and in the last several years, Dr. Antevy has traveled with department personnel to present on our initiatives and programs related to trauma management, mental health, and more. Dr. Antevy has become a driving force in EMS not only locally and at the state of Florida level, but all over the United States. He also receives recognition in many countries around the world, where his initiatives, exemplified by the protocols and practices we have put in place, are constantly being emulated by others. In 2021, Dr. Antevy released a new protocol set with the help of the EMS leadership at the department, keeping the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department at the leading edge of pre-hospital care around the world. This past year Dr. Antevy also continued to guide the city through the pandemic by adding new protocols and revising standard operating guidelines based on the changing science. He provided medical direction and oversight of the Coral Square Mall vaccination site that ultimately provided over 65,000 doses to the community. The site was the crown jewel in the region as it was run impeccably well by city leadership and staff. He also worked with city leadership to open mobile pop-up vaccine sites in the underserved communities thanks to the in-kind donation of FORTS Services. Testing was also a big part of Dr. Antevy’s vision, and he continued to provide new and changing insight as the pandemic persisted. The city provided antibody, antigen, and PCR testing throughout the year and connected with third party providers to ensure that all residents had access to free testing without having to travel outside of the city. Most recently he set up a mass testing program for city employees using RTLAMP, a technology that provided PCR level accuracy at a fraction of the cost. Dr. Antevy published his research on testing with the help of associate medical director, Dr. Paul Pepe for which they received the outstanding research award nationally. Much of the data that is known today regarding antibody production post vaccination was known in Coral Springs first thanks to their work. The pandemic also forced our EMS clinicians to stop using nebulizers for patients due to the risk of aerosolization of the virus. Dr. Antevy and Dr. Pepe once again sought to overcome this hurdle and sourced a nebulizer mask that prevented fugitive aerosols from escaping while being used by the patient. They 34


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT quickly researched the product and presented the information at several national conferences. This product is now being used nationally based on their work. Finally, communication to the community has been very important and Dr. Antevy held frequent Facebook Live sessions that were viewed by thousands of residents. He also posted videos on YouTube in order to provide accurate and up to date information to those who needed it. He continues to hold a Friday morning conference call with members of the 52 Assisted Living Facilities (ALFs) in and around the city to help keep them safe as well. We can expect that Dr. Antevy will always have the best interests of the residents of the city in mind and that he will continue to elevate the care that our residents deserve.

35


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

EMS CONTINUOUS QUALITY IMPROVEMENT GROUP (CQI) Captain Patrick Staab Under the direction of the EMS Division Chief and our Medical Director Captain Patrick Staab took departmental lead of the CSPFD Quality Assurance and Quality Improvement Program in 2021. Captain Staab along with the members of this group provide important feedback, check for compliance with CSPFD EMS protocols and look for training opportunities through the review of their peers’ patient care reports. Through a partnership with area hospitals, the group has been able to cross-reference return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and survival rates, as well as patient outcomes from of trauma, stroke and other illnesses. The QA/QI group enters data into the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES). The information obtained from this database allows the fire department leadership to develop strategies to improve cardiac event survival in our area. In addition, the QA/QI group also reviews patient care reports for billing compliance in an effort to increase reimbursement for the organization.

During fiscal year 2020 (ESO Report writing system), the CQI Group conducted 875 total reviews that included: • • • • • •

83 Cardiac Arrests 108 Stroke Alerts 87 Trauma Calls 43 Cardiac Alerts 8 Drug Facilitated Intubations RSI/DSI 331 Billing Reviews were performed

36


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

COMMUNITY PARAMEDIC Firefighter Paramedic Susan Toolan The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department Community Paramedic Program (CP) remains one of the most innovative and forward-thinking ideas in healthcare. We have put in place a model designed to improve the health of our population, at lower costs, and with patient satisfaction as a strong performance measure. The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department employs one experienced paramedic who works an 8 hour a day, five days per week schedule. She oversees two other Assistant Community Paramedics who cover her during periods of absence, vacation time, etc. The CSPFD Community Paramedic on duty conducts house visits to patients who traditionally have used the 911 system as their primary source of healthcare or for issues that are not necessarily medical emergencies. The goal is to help our citizens make better use of available emergency services and find ways to add value to their lives by helping them stay healthy. Many patients simply are not aware that there are resources available to them other than an already taxed 911 system. The CSPFD Community Paramedic Program becomes that piece of the puzzle that makes the connections between patients and existing resources such as senior assistance programs, veterans assistance, resources for nutrition and meal services, and homeless assistance. The CP program also works closely with the CSPD in cases of elder abuse, to facilitate getting the appropriate help and care for these patients. The Community Paramedic program is going strong. We continue to work with our high-EMS-user population to find ways to reduce the number of calls to 911 for non-emergent issues. We also work with our residents at higher risk of falling to provide them with fall prevention education, as well as resources that can help them avoid falling and sustaining an injury. We conduct follow up with patients that have been discharged from the hospital after being treated for congestive heart failure, pneumonia, diabetes, hip or knee replacements, and who are at a high risk for re-admission. The goal is to help them obtain the necessary resources so that they can remain healthy and out of the hospital. Our CPs get referrals from our crews and assist in providing the best resource(s) for our residents. We provide community paramedic resources and assistance to over 400 patients every year. The CSPFD Community Paramedic Program played a crucial part during the 2020 COVID pandemic as Susan maintains communication with Assisted Living Facilities in Coral Springs and Parkland to ensure they have what they need and continue to get the most updated information. Susan as well as the Assistant CPs, are also actively involved with COVID-19 PCR testing of city employees, antibody testing, and most recently the Community Paramedic Program team members have become part of the Monoclonal Antibody Treatment Team. These members will start providing positive Covid patients the medication Regeneron with the goal of helping in their healing process. Susan, who has been with the department for 23 years, also participates in several community events throughout the year and maintains a Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/CSFDCP/

37


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

MAP – EMS INCIDENTS

38


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

COVID-19 PREVENTION AND RESPONSE Helping the Community and our Employees Stay Safe As the COVID-19 pandemic progressed throughout late 2020 and into 2021, our department and the City of Coral Springs made it a priority to keep employees and residents as healthy and safe as possible. We developed a partnership with the Florida Department of Emergency Management, the Florida Department of Health, Dr. Peter Antevy, and nurses from Memorial Healthcare to open a vaccination site in the Coral Square Mall located in our city, which opened in January 2021. A vacant restaurant was chosen for the site and adapted to house everything needed to distribute vaccines to the public safely and efficiently. Staff was composed of two site managers, three Firefighter Paramedics, 15 nurses, 10 clerical personnel, a team of city employees who volunteered their time, and other city employees who were assigned to the site temporarily. During the five months that the city managed the vaccine site, more than 65,000 vaccines were administered to people ranging in age from 12 to over 100 years old. This effort was extremely successful not only in terms of numbers vaccinated, but in its efficiency. It became a model for others to follow and was frequently praised by those who came to the site, for the short wait times and exceptional personnel. In partnership with the Cleveland Clinic, the Florida Department of Emergency Management, and the Florida Department of Health, we also provided mobile vaccination sites at senior living communities such as St. Andrews Towers, and Country Club Towers, as well as “pop-up” sites in Lyons Park and Betty Stradling Park to accommodate seniors without transportation, or with mobility issues, and those unable to secure an appointment due to language barriers or other challenges. In an effort to protect the vulnerable senior population, we also vaccinated homebound seniors who were registered through our Community Paramedic Program. A Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department Firefighter Paramedic and a Cleveland Clinic nurse visited nearly 20 homes to provide the vaccine to residents who could not leave their homes due to illness or disability.

Lt. Kathy Manza delivers a vaccine to a homebound resident

39


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

IN-SERVICE TRAINING Division Chief Michael Caldaro The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department has strived to maintain the highest level of training and over the past year we have continued to prosper. Our philosophy of safe and functional company training has bolstered the levels of confidence of each member making them more proficient in their personal skills which is a testament to the dedication of our membership and our Training Division. The Training Division has a multitude of responsibilities outside of the development, delivery, and oversight of daily, weekly, and monthly requirements for in-service training to our members. The Training Division recognized the need to restructure to streamline communication and define roles and responsibilities within the division. With the promotion of Michael Caldaro, Captain Anthony Gonzalez was promoted to Battalion Chief assigned to Operations Training. Captain Jonathon Robbins and Lieutenant Johana Cinque were assigned as Training Officers to the Training Division to bring consistent best practices to our members. 2021 would follow the path of 2020 and still prove to be a challenging year for the Training Division as COVID19 continued its path across the nation. The Training Division in collaboration with the Safety, Health, and Wellness Division was able to resume “in-person training” ensuring that members trained within the confines of the COVID-19 policies set forth by the division. The role of the Training Officer is constantly changing, and the members of this division must be ready to pivot their attention at a moment’s notice.

Fire service

training is no longer simply fire based, nor solely decided on a local level. Fire departments are now guided, in part, by national fire service standards, accreditation, certification, and continuing education requirements. There are also increased societal and financial influences with emphasis on topics of firefighter safety, health, and wellness, emergency medical service, expanded roles, large incidents, incident management, current affairs, cultural diversity, ethics, legal issues, and the use of mutual aid and regionalization. The Training Division is focused on implementing the best practices, and creating a workforce that is flexible and proactive, and identifies, reduces, and eliminates redundancies. The Administration’s expectation is our workforce always be well trained, innovative, and 40


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT ethical as well as well prepared. Employee development for the membership and new employees, as well as officer training and leadership mentorship, is essential over the next five years. The Department is prepared to carry out the daily mission and values with readiness and training: Readiness: At any given moment we are ready to respond efficiently and effectively to change the outcome of an emergency from negative to positive to the best of our ability. Training: Provides the foundation to be ready. This includes hands-on evolutions (drills) conducted regularly to support the capabilities of the department. It allows everyone to understand the capabilities of the department and what resources are needed to be brought in for additional support. This is done via company training that falls within Insurance Services Office (ISO) Guidelines and includes: •

Preplanning Training conducted with Community Risk Reduction

State Fire Classes

Countywide & Regional Mutual Aid Drills

41


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

Battalion Chief Anthony Gonzalez Anthony Gonzalez is the Training Battalion responsible for department-wide training and standards. The position works closely in collaboration with the Division Chief of Training, and the Deputy Chief of Operations. Chief Gonzalez is responsible for the coordination, implementation, scheduling, monitoring, training, and documentation of all training activities for the fire department. Anthony also oversees the Field Training Officers, The New Hire program, and Promotional Testing and Development Programs. Chief Gonzalez is focused and committed to providing “realistic” training has been widely accepted throughout the fire department. Chief Gonzalez works closely with our Mutual Aid partners in coordinating training so that our members work cohesively at emergency scenes.

42


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

Captain Jonathan Robbins Jonathan Robbins is currently assigned as the Fire Training Captain responsible for department-wide training and standards. He works closely in collaboration with the members of the Training Division to coordinate the daily, monthly, and yearly training requirements. Captain Robbins is responsible for creating, conducting, and recording training topics that are realistic and maintain the department’s Class 1 ISO rating. He oversees the release of new equipment and ensures members are well trained prior to implementation in the field. Captain Robbins has taken over the coordination and development of the New Hire training schedule and is instrumental in the screening, processing, and teaching the recruit classes. Captain Robbins is deeply involved with the dive team and is currently transitioning the department’s dive team to a new and improved program. He investigated and launched new dive equipment which will move the team to a RIT style approach to further the safety of our members, should one of our divers have their own emergency while deployed.

Captain Robbins has taken a significant role in

the department’s promotional process and assists with the test preparation and candidate interviews.

Lieutenant Johana Cinque Lieutenant Johana Cinque is currently assigned as the EMS Training Officer responsible for department-wide training and standards. The position works closely in collaboration with the Division Chief of Training, the Division Chief of EMS and the fire department’s Medical Director. Lt. Cinque is responsible for all annual EMS training including ACLS and BLS re-certifications, and protocol review. She is also heavily involved in the research, development, and implementation of new equipment. Lt. Cinque is also responsible for teaching and assisting the recruit classes, and she works with the QA/QI program members, area hospital liaisons, and various fire department command officers as well. Lieutenant Cinque’s commitment to EMS Training is a significant development for the department and allows a more comprehensive approach to deliver quality EMS training year after year to the personnel that protects the city and its citizens. 43


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

Administrative Assistant Linda Meyer Linda Meyer works closely with the Training Division Chief and his staff to ensure all training documentation is compiled and maintained according to the various state and federal rules and regulations. She manages the department’s online training platform, maintains all documentation and data necessary to comply with ISO (Insurance Services Office) requirements. She collects, analyzes, and prepares data for benchmarking Target Solutions reports along with preparing performance measures to ensure improvement of organizational training efficiency and effectiveness. Linda manages employee continuing education credits, fire certifications and member credentials. She tracks employees’ ISO training progress, completed and overdue training activities, recruit evaluations and all non-credit course applications. Linda assists the Training Division with teaching members of the Fire Department how to use and maneuver through the fire department’s online training platform She trains employees at the stations and meets with the members individually when requested.

The Training Division conducted the following training and member development in FY2021: •

High Rise, Portable Standpipe Evolutions, Hose line advancement, Bailout Training, Search and Rescue, Fire Behavior, water supply and tactical considerations for the Company Officers.

EMS training, which included Delayed Sequence Intubation, Pediatric Training (Handtevy), EKG 12 Lead Training, Active Shooter Hostile Event Response (ASHER), protocol updates including the implementation of Antibiotics and whole blood products in the field, new Burn Gel Pads, and the deployment of new Zoll cardiac monitors.

Joint Training with the Florida Division of Forestry

Incident Management Training – ICS 300/400 classes through the City of Coral Springs Emergency Management

Wildland S-130/190 Wildland Firefighter for the Tri-County Area

Wildland FL-215 Fire Operations in the Wildland/Urban Interface for the Tri-County Area

Forcible Entry Training: Breaching doors and increasing means of egress.

Extrication & stabilization training.

Dive-Rescue Training

One (1) New Hire Orientation Program (up to 10 weeks of training) with a total of 4 new hires.

Emergency Medical Training for Community Risk Reduction

Assisted the Communications Center with Emergency Medical Dispatch training

44


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT •

Granted approval for 80-hour Battalion Chief Officer Development course through the State Fire College

Annual Emergency Vehicle Operations training including UTV (detail units)

Training tracking for ISO with Company Officers

Haz-Mat Awareness & Preplanning with crews

Standardize Tactical Worksheets/Book for High Risk/Low Frequency events for first-arriving officers and Command Staff – established standard command bag & officer development program received updates.

Expand travel assistance for conferences and workshops – non-educational tuition reimbursement process implemented.

Training conducted on new technology – (ex., ESO, Zoll, SEEK Thermal Imagers, Bailout Kits).

Contributions to media outlets – established workplace site for Training Division.

Joint Training with CSPD/Human Resources/Risk Management – (hazmat awareness, Stop the Bleed, benefits & services overview, situational awareness for professional agitators).

Involvement with Incident Management Team – Provided ICS classes to members to cross-train in areas for command staff positions (i.e., EOC)

Ensure SOPs are up-to-date and reflect training requirements – EMS Protocol training updates completed.

Career Counselor – established resource list & contacts for advancements (coincides with noncredited courses).

Officer Development Programs – 13 different outside SME’s & off-site visits

Captains: 9 members

Lieutenants: 4 members

Implemented the following positions in Training - Division Chief, two (2) Training Officer temporary bid positions.

TOTAL TRAINING HOURS: 25,353

45


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

New Hire Class of 2020

46


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT SERVICES Deputy Fire Chief and Public Information Officer Michael Moser Deputy Fire Chief Michael Moser oversees several divisions in the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department. The Community Risk Reduction Division (CRR) and the Support Services Division report to Chief Moser for oversight. Each area is managed by a Division Chief who handles the day-to-day operations within their assigned division. The Deputy Chief of Support Services also acts as the liaison to the City of Parkland for the services we provide to the citizens and visitors to Parkland. As you will learn in this report, the Community Risk Reduction Division, and the Support Services Division oversee several employees and volunteers, and manages millions of dollars in assets, facilities, and equipment. Chief Moser has been with the department for 21 years and has served as a Firefighter Paramedic, a Driver Engineer, a Lieutenant, and a Captain before being promoted to Division Chief in 2014, and Deputy Chief in February of 2020. Chief Moser continues to be the department Public Information Officer (PIO), and in this role he is responsible for disseminating information to the public in regards to all aspects of the Fire Department including but not limited to emergency calls, evacuations, natural disasters, and special events. All Fire Department news and information will be released to the media through the PIO, and Chief Moser is on call 24 hours a day to answer calls from the media, and for all media and public inquiries. He can be reached via e-mail at mmoser@coralsprings.org During the past fiscal year, Chief Moser has continued to be a department liaison with the city’s I.T. department, overseeing security access, all mobile devices, all radio and communications, and is on the committee for the countywide radio system. As PIO, he manages the department’s social media pages, sharing important updates, safety messages, and department news. Chief Moser is chair of the PIO subcommittee for the Fire Chiefs Association of Broward County, and sits on several other county committees. He is involved with peer support, Honor Guard, and is a board member of the MSD Memorial Foundation. Chief Moser was also instrumental in the implementation of our Drone Program. The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department was the first fire department in Broward County to obtain a Certificate of Authorization (COA) from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This specialized authorization allows the City of Coral Springs to operate several small unmanned aerial vehicles (sUAS) within the airspace of Broward County. The sUAS’s are used for a variety of missions that include searches for missing children or adults, damage assessments after large scale incidents, or safety flights over fires or other 47


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT major incidents where personnel are working. He continues to be a key partner in the drone program as he has since its inception.

The sUAS’s, otherwise known as drones, have become an integral part of the public safety community. Just a few short years ago, this technology was not available or affordable for public safety use. Now that the drone industry has evolved, the technology is readily available for use within fire departments all across the country. The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department has used their drones on several missions since acquiring their authorization. The drone proved to be a worthy addition to the equipment needed during an emergency. The City of Coral Springs sUAS program is a collaborative effort between the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department, the Coral Springs Police Department, and the City of Coral Springs Communications and Marketing Department. The Drone Program Manager is Ryan Himmel, the Senior Video Producer for the City of Coral Springs.

Follow us on social media: https://www.facebook.com/CoralSpringsFireDepartment https://twitter.com/coralspringsfd https://www.instagram.com/coralspringsfd/ and on our You Tube Channel “Coral Springs Fire Our social media pages include quarterly updates from our Fire Chief, Michael McNally

Department” https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCN0GhDT6_xGPZjVOphNW5g

Among the many messages shared on social media was the importance of Pulse Point, and bystander CPR

Chief Moser participated in Read for the Record at our local schools through a virtual program

48


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

FIRE ADMINISTRATION At the heart of the department and behind the scenes are the staff members that make up Fire Administration. In addition to the Administrative Chief Officers whose offices are located at the Public Safety Building, this division includes the support staff that handle all the administrative tasks in the department. This dedicated group of individuals include Administrative Assistants, our Data Analyst, and the Fiscal & Procurement Coordinator whose team handles everything related to budget and purchases. Fire Admin personnel are responsible for maintaining the proper licensing of the fire department with the County and State, payroll, public records requests, correspondence, reports, and all internal documents.

Fiscal & Procurement Coordinator Robin MacDonald

Senior Office Assistant Tammy Kahler

Data Analyst Sharon Maraj

Senior Office Assistant Daisy Diaz

Executive Assistant Debbie Pringle

Principal Office Assistant Annie Norris

49

Office Assistant Estelle Tesler


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

SUPPORT SERVICES DIVISION Division Chief John Barry Captain Zachary Roseboom The Support Services Division works alongside Operations to ensure the continued function and advancement

of

accomplished

by

the

Department.

providing

This

assistance

is for

emergency incidents and the management of the day-to-day activities for the Department.

The

Division achieves these tasks by branching into several

areas:

Fleet,

Facilities,

Research

&

Development, Logistics, Communications, I.T., Asset Management, Traffic Preemption and Mapping. Our mission is to safeguard the goals established by the Department, while prioritizing fiscal responsibility and superior customer service. The Support Services Division recognizes the deep traditions of the Fire Service while simultaneously embracing the advancements in the field. The division acts as the liaison to Fleet, IT, Dispatch, Public Works, Facilities, CERT’s operational response, and Dive Team. The division maintains a 24/7 call out response for emergency services. Each member of the Division is cross trained with another member in a similar role to provide seamless customer service and emergency response. A rotation of personnel specially trained to operate our Incident Support Services apparatus is available around the clock and plays a critical role in on-scene operations. This allows us to meet the increasing needs of the Department without sacrificing the established core values. Operating budget: For FY 2021 the Support Services Division had an operating budget of 1.4 million dollars. This budget was spread over five separate Divisions: Administration, EMS, Suppression and CSRIPS, and included operational needs, supplies, and repairs and maintenance of equipment. The Support Services Division oversees the Fire Department’s approximately 22-million-dollar fleet, consisting of 85 vehicles and apparatus. Additionally, the Support Services Division is tasked with managing the approximate 59 million dollars of facilities that encompass the 8 fire stations within Coral Springs and Parkland. Capital Projects: For FY 2021 the Support Services Division embarked on 21 separate Capital Projects. These projects ranged in complexity from EMS equipment, to bunker gear, and traffic preemption. Due to the large undertaking of these projects, the Support Services Division worked in unison with multiple divisions to accomplish continuity for a result that ensures the Department remains at the forefront of our industry. In total, these projects represented over 1 million dollars of enhancements for the Fire Department and the community in which we serve. FY2021 Support Services and Logistics Division Highlights include: •

Air Van Response: Our Air Van, used as a local and regional asset responded to over 60 incidents throughout the county. This vehicle provides onsite logistics support to incidents such as working fires, 50


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

hazardous material incidents, and dive operations. In response to these incidents this unit filled over 1,500 SCBA bottles to enable to continue on-scene operation of these critical incidents. Logistics Requests: For FY2021 the Support Services Division received over 3,400 requests for service. These requests ranged from equipment repair, supply request, uniform request, facility issues, staffing issues, etc. Staffing Program: The Support Services Division built and migrated the department to a new staffing program. This 18-month project included product research and selection, build out of the program, integration with other City services, training of all department members, and launching the program. Safety, Health, and Wellness: The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department maintains OSHA compliance with annual fit testing and regular evaluation of Department policy. The Support Services Division operates a “Hood and Glove Swap Program” which ensures firefighters continually have gear that is free of possible carcinogens or harmful contaminants. We continue to be a leader in regional safety, health, and wellness innovations and maintain awareness of new best practices and regulations. Emergency Management: Forecasting and emergency preparedness are the cornerstones of the Support Services Division. In additional to preparing for daily emergencies we anticipate the need for events such as hurricanes/natural disasters, civil unrest, and cyber-attacks. Members of the Support Services Division also hold key command staff roles within the city-wide Emergency Management Division.

Support Services Assistant Kim Matz, Captain Zachary Roseboom, Division Chief John Barry, Equipment Technician German Aristegui

51


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

COMMUNITY RISK REDUCTION Division Chief / Fire Marshal Bruce Bowers The primary mission of the Community Risk Reduction Division (CRRD) is to employ the three “E’s” of fire prevention to prevent fire incidents or personal injury before they occur. The 3 E’s are Engineering, Education, and finally, Enforcement. The CRRD staff is multi-certified and highly qualified to provide a wide range of specialized interventions, technical consultations, and fire code enforcement to help ensure safety of the residents and visitors to the cities of Coral Springs and Parkland. As Fire Marshal, Division Chief Bruce Bowers oversees the Community Risk Reduction Division. Chief Bowers reports directly to Deputy Fire Chief Michael Moser.

Chief Bowers is actively involved in a variety of

organizations that draft additions to or amendments to the fire code at the local, state, and federal level. Additionally, he sits on the City’s Development Review Committee. This committee reviews all new buildings (or those that are altered) prior to building permit application submittal. This is to ensure that fire apparatus have access and can maneuver within the site, that there are ample fire hydrants and that they are properly located. He is on the City’s Traffic Management Team, which reviews all matters that have the potential to cause changes in vehicular movement, which could impact response times for first responders. Chief Bowers is also a member of the County’s Drowning Prevention Task Force as well as the Fire Code Committee of the Broward County Board of Rules and Appeals. Finally, he is the chairman of the Fire Prevention Subcommittee of the Fire Chief's Association of Broward County The CRRD provides fire inspections, building permit plan reviews, public life safety education, as well as firerelated investigation services for the residents of Coral Springs and Parkland. Throughout the year, we perform fire and life safety inspections on over 6,300 properties. These include commercial businesses, residential properties containing three or more living units, assisted living facilities, group homes, foster homes, and home-based day care occupancies. We enforce applicable provisions of the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Life Safety Codes and Standards, Florida Fire Prevention Code, State Statutes and Administrative Codes, and the City of Coral Springs and City of Parkland Municipal Codes of Ordinances as it relates to life safety enforcement for the public. These inspections help mitigate potential hazards that may contribute to a fire developing, a personal injury occurring, or hindrance to a rapid evacuation. In the event there are violations noted during the inspection site visit, results are noted, and a re-inspection is performed, if necessary.

During Fiscal Year 2021, CRRD members conducted 8,803 re-inspections.

While the ultimate goal is to achieve compliance with fire codes, should an owner fail to make the required life-safety repairs, the case is processed and set for a hearing in front of a Special Magistrate. At this hearing, 52


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT the presiding magistrate will determine, based on the severity of the violation, a daily fine amount until the repairs are completed. During Fiscal Year 2021, a total of 167 cases were sent to Special Magistrate which resulted in $61,769.13 in fines and fees. The CRRD performed 918 architectural plan reviews prior to any new building being built and any new construction alterations to an existing occupancy. Following approval of the blueprints and issuance of a building permit, these inspections are made throughout the project to ensure the approved plan is adhered to. These inspections are performed on the structural elements, as well as a wide variety of specialized systems, which include: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Fire Sprinkler Systems Fire Alarm Systems Restaurant Hood Suppression Systems Dry Agent Systems for Computer Rooms or other high dollar loss, sensitive areas Propane Tank Installations including gas lines Fuel Tank and Piping Installations for Vehicle Fueling Stations Communication Systems Emergency Backup Power Systems Above ground Fuel Storage Tanks Paint Spray Booth Suppression Systems used in auto body shops Fire Hydrant Placement and Supply Piping Fire Flow Tests Smoke Detectors Smoke Evacuation Tests Hazardous Materials Storage Mobile Food Vendors

During Fiscal Year 2021, CRRD conducted 1,317 Building Permit inspections. Some special events, due to the increased number of people in attendance or the nature of the event, could pose a higher than normal risk of possible safety breaches. Therefore, our Fire Inspectors are present at these special events as well. Their main goal is to make sure exits remain readily accessible, ensure fire and life safety systems are maintained, and, should an issue arise, render the necessary aid. In addition to special events, CRRD also conducts fire watches at facilities where a required life safety system is out of service. Should emergency services be necessary, early notification to dispatch and assistance with resident and/or employee evacuation is instrumental in saving lives. During Fiscal Year 2021, CRRD participated in 32 such special events. Per fire code regulations, a fire investigation is required to determine origin and cause of the fire. Our Fire Inspectors are cross trained as fire investigators and conduct these fire investigations. They have a rotating schedule that guarantees someone is on call to perform investigations when needed. If arson is suspected, the case is turned over to the State Fire Marshal Investigators and local detectives follow through if an arrest is necessary. During Fiscal Year 2021, CRRD completed 11 fire investigations. 53


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT Another critical mission of the CRRD is to educate the public on Fire and Life Safety issues.

During

Fiscal

Year

conducted

105

car

coordinated

station

tours,

appearances

at

schools

2021,

seat

CRRD

installations,

fire

apparatus

and

various

community events on a limited basis due to COVID-19. variety

In addition, they completed a

of

virtual

life-safety

education

presentations to students at all grade levels, scout and youth groups and other community organizations. Life-Safety education areas include:

• • • •

• Basic Fire Safety Education for preschoolers • Home Fire Escape Drills for elementary school children • CPR Introduction Experiences for the entire community • Sleep Safe and Car Seat Education for families • Hurricane Season Preparation and Planning • Drowning Prevention Education and Access to Swim Programs for both adults and children Fire Safety Response Training for staff at special risk community locations Safety Planning for schools and businesses Evacuation and Fire Drill Coordination at community educational and childcare locations Specialized Programs in cooperation with our Fire Academy and Police Department

During Fiscal Year 2021, CRRD recorded 50,985 public education contacts. The achievement of making these contacts is significant considering that in March 2020, due to COVID-19 our inperson Public Education programs were shut down for the safety of the community and our Officers. Although this had a great impact on our community, we realized the potential for

an

even

greater

Public

Education

program

by

implementing virtual life safety education. CRRD has been very successful with the launch of the virtual life safety education. These CRRD programs have been recognized as “Best Practice” models in both drowning prevention and the wide54


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT ranging public education arena. Public Education Officer Robert Bertone has received many accolades in the Public Safety field. CRRD is a data driven and creative marketer of both the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department’s missions and the City of Coral Springs core values.

For more information on the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire

Department’s Community Risk Reduction Division, as well as additional links to Fire Prevention Safety Information, please visit our website at: www.coralsprings.org/fire and click Community Risk Reduction Division

The CRR department photo taken during a Zoom meeting. From left to right: Top Row: Thomas Hayes, Lisa Weiss, Lieutenant Lici Merritt, Phil Botting, Jon Berger. Middle Row: Captain Harold Alcalde, Kenny Henley, Alysa Abzug, Natalia Bueno, Bob Bertone. Bottom Row: Bruno Matos, Ralph Troino, Division Chief Bruce Bowers. Missing: Sara Caputo

55


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

COMMUNITY EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM (CERT) The

Coral

Springs-Parkland

all-volunteer

Community

Emergency Response Team (CERT) program educates residents about disaster preparedness and how to respond to emergency

situations

in

their

community.

When

emergencies happen, CERT members give critical support to first responders and provide immediate assistance to victims at a disaster site. CERT members can also help with nonemergency projects that help improve the safety of the community. Using classroom and hands-on training, CERT members develop skills to assist others when professional responders are not immediately available. CERT members receive basic training in the areas of Small Fire Suppression, First Aid, Triage, Team Organization, Light Search and Rescue, Disaster Psychology, and Terrorism Awareness. CERT volunteers also receive CPR, AED, and Stop the Bleed training. The award-winning Coral Springs-Parkland CERT is one of the most active teams in South Florida. In the last 12 months, Coral Springs-Parkland CERT has been activated numerous times to support the police and fire departments for events such as fires, gas leaks, hazmat situations, and missing person searches. The team has responded to multiple canteen/rehab calls in neighboring cities to assist other CERTs while they assist their fire departments. Since its inception, CSPFD CERT has responded to hundreds of calls. In addition to the calls listed above, CERT has responded to SWAT activations, large brush fires, a recycling plant fire that burned for over 24 hours, and the Goodyear Blimp crash. Coral Springs-Parkland CERT is regularly called upon to help search for missing persons that may be in danger. This includes children, teens or adults with disabilities or cognitive impairments. CERT has been credited with assisting with dozens of successful searches over the years. In FY2021, the team was activated and responded 12 times. Despite

COVID-19

restrictions,

Coral Springs-Parkland CERT had a very

productive

year.

Our

volunteers accounted for almost 700 volunteer hours.

During that

timeframe, CERT responded to 8 fires, 1 Strategic Response scene 1 Bomb Threat, and supported the police and fire departments during 2 funerals.

CERT mobilized 8

members to assist at the Mullins Park July 4th Celebration.

56


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT The Regional CERT Academy Basic Training Classes, offered at the Coral Springs Regional Institute of Public Safety, continue to provide training for new CERT volunteers from across the region. Coral Springs-Parkland CERT trained 20 volunteers from Coral Springs, Parkland, and four other neighboring cities. These trainees have gone on to volunteer in their respective communities. CERT members train continuously throughout the year. This year, members participated in a combined total of almost 300 hours of ongoing and refresher training. include

triage,

first

aid,

fire

Training topics

suppression

(using

fire

extinguishers), cribbing, building markings, and more.

The

Covid-19 Pandemic restrictions forced us to pivot from monthly in person training to virtual training and pause our Basic Training Academy. However, we restarted the in person monthly training and Basic Training Class using the National Hybrid CERT Program model, consisting of on demand course work and in person hands on training. We look forward to hosting more classes in fiscal year 2022. CPR has always been a major component of CERT training. This year, 2 members were certified as CPR trainers, and we plan to recertify our members in CPR in early 2022. Four CERT Members attended the Florida State CERT Conference for additional training and one member was certified as a CERT Basic Training Train the Trainer. CERT Members regularly participate in public education events around Coral Springs and Parkland in conjunction with the Community Risk Reduction Division.

Members educate the public on the basics of using a fire

extinguisher, drowning prevention classes and swimming lessons, hands only CPR, and any other question residents may have. In

February

2021,

Coral

Springs

resident

Joseph

Chalom

transitioned to Program Chief, as Michael DiTocco retired from that position after 17 years of dedicated service. Joe previously served as the Deputy Program Chief and has been a Coral Springs Parkland CERT member since 2007. Joe is a financial services professional and small business owner in Coral Springs. Joe is proud of the service that the Coral Springs Parkland Community Emergency Response Team provides the community and is excited about continuing its legacy. For more information about CERT, and instructions on how to join CERT, visit www.coralspringscert.org

57


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

FIRE STATIONS The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department responds to calls for service from 5 fire stations in Coral Springs, and 3 in Parkland. Each station is responsible for a designated response zone, although all stations are equipped and prepared to respond to any emergency where they are needed.

43 • 64 • 71 • 80 • 95 • 42 • 97 • 109 Station 43

Station 64

Station 71 Station 80 Station 95 Station 109

Station 42 Station 97

58


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

CORAL SPRINGS FIRE STATIONS STATION 43 - 4550 Rock Island Road

Station 1, now Station 43, opened in its current location in 1988 and is named after William Buchanan. In June 2016, the station was torn down and rebuilt funded through a General Obligation bond. The newly built station opened in March 2017 housing firefighters, apparatus, and equipment well into the future.

Legend

<6 Mins 6-8 Mins >8 Mins STATION 43

Station/Unit Station 43 R43 EN43 AC43 BT43

# of Calls 2908 2062 728 94 24

Avg Response

03:34 05:29 05:37 03:10 00:00

59

43


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

60


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

STATION 64 – 500 Ramblewood Drive

In 1977, Fire Station 2 opened to protect the southeast edge of Coral Springs. Volunteers provided service under Chief Russ Donovan. Fire Station 2 adopted its Broward County number of 64 and underwent various changes through the years, leading to a renovation in 2008. Station 64 has been located at 500 Ramblewood Drive for more than 30 years. Station 64 will be moved just to the north in Kiwanis Park and is expected to be complete in 2022.

64

STATION 64 Station/Unit Station 64 R64 EN64 DT64

61

# of Calls 2486 1810 672 4

Avg Response

03:25 04:48 05:26 00:00


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

62


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

STATION 71 – 11800 NW 41st Street

As Coral Springs began to grow and develop in the marshy swamplands in the northwest area of the City, a third fire station was needed. Station 3 became Station 71, its official Broward County designation, provided service to the expanding area and served as a central training point for the then-volunteer Coral Springs Fire Department. In 1991, the City built a four-story training tower behind Station 71 to improve onsite fire service training. Former member Russell Cagle earned the honor of having the station named after him when he retired. Station 71 was torn down and a new station built at the same location in 2012.

Legend

<6 Mins 6-8 Mins >8 Mins

STATION 71 Station/Unit Station 71 R71 EN71 DT71

# of Calls 2447 1801 644 2

Avg Response

05:23 04:27 06:19 00:00

63

71


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

64


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

STATION 80 – 2825 Coral Springs Drive

To house volunteers in a central location, the building located at 2801 Coral Springs Drive, became the home of Station 4. The building was home to the Police Department and other essential public safety services. Station 4 gave way to its Broward County designation of number 80 and became the City’s main fire station because of its location in the heart of Coral Springs. Heavy call volume and the transition from a volunteer to paid professional department placed a heavy toll on the small firehouse. The City recognized the need for an expansion. In 2010, a new era in the City began with a complete Station 80 transformation meant for career firefighters. The new Station 80 is adjacent to the renovated Public Safety Building and is our first LEED certified fire station, with solar panels on the roof. As the central station in the City, Station 80 houses a 100’ platform apparatus, an additional 107’ aerial unit, and a primary rescue, as well as the dive boat, a special events detail unit, and the shift’s Battalion Chief.

80

STATION 80 Station/Unit Station 80 R80 LD80 PL80 ENQ80 BT80 R280 DT80 65

# of Calls 3394 2529 512 191 81 78 2 1

Avg Response

04:49 04:39 05:59 06:05 05:58 03:58 07:00 00:00


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

66


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

STATION 95 – 300 Coral Ridge Drive

Coral Springs Fire Department opened its fifth and final fire station in 1994. Station 5 received its Broward County designation as number 95. Located in the southwest corner of the City at 300 Coral Ridge Drive, Station 95 serves as the primary unit for the Sawgrass Expressway. In June of 2016, the station was torn down and a new building, a twin to Station 43, opened in April 2017.

95

STATION 95 Station/Unit Station 95 R95 EN95

# of Calls 1686 1265 421

Avg Response

06:09 06:58 05:19

67


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

68


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

PARKLAND FIRE STATIONS STATION 42 – 6500 Parkside Drive

The state-of-the-art Fire Station is located on the East end of the city and is situated on 3 acres, which includes a 7,500 square foot fire station along with extensive native landscaping, solar lighting, and associated parking. In 2019, the fire station was expanded to include room for additional firefighter paramedics who would be responding in the new Rescue which went into service in November 2019 to better serve the residents in the eastern section of Parkland. This station also houses an engine in addition to the rescue.

42

STATION 42 Station/Unit Station 42 R42 EN42

69

# of Calls 1106 741 365

Avg Response

06:07 05:35 06:39


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

70


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

STATION 97 – 6650 N. University Drive

Station 97 is Parkland’s centrally located fire station, located within the Public Safety Building complex which shares a home with BSO’s Parkland District Office. At this station is an ALS transport Rescue unit and a 3,000gallon tanker truck. This station opened in 2005.

97

STATION 97 Station/Unit Station 97 R97

# of Calls 1020 1020

Avg Response

06:29 06:29

71


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

72


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

STATION 109 – 11601 Hillsboro Blvd To serve the growing western acres of Parkland, Fire Station 109 was built and opened April 2015. This station houses an advanced life support suppression and transport rescue unit.

109

STATION 109 Station/Unit Station 109 R109 EN109

73

# of Calls 870 575 295

Avg Response

06:10 05:40 06:41


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

74


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

CORAL SPRINGS REGIONAL INSTITUTE OF PUBLIC SAFETY Liz Williams, Operations Manager ⚫ 4180 NW 120th Ave – 954-346-1774 The Coral Springs Regional Institute of Public Safety (CSRIPS) is led by Liz Williams. Liz was appointed to the position in October after serving as the Compliance Coordinator for the past 7 years. During her tenure, Liz led the effort on multiple initiatives including COE accreditation for the main campus, implement the paramedic program, adding Florida Prepaid and Florida 529 student payment options as well as adding additional licensed and accredited campuses. The Coral Springs Regional Institute of Public Safety (CSRIPS), formerly the Coral Springs Fire Academy, sits on approximately four acres in the Coral Springs Corporate Park. Along with the 3 main programs, EMT-Basic, EMT-Paramedic and Firefighter I & II, CSRIPS conducts CPR training, continuing education, facilty usage and promotions for other agencies.

APPROVALS AND ACCREDITING ORGANIZATIONS Approvals • • •

Department of Health Bureau of Fire Standards and Training American Heart Association

Licenses •

Department of Education, Commission for Independent Education

Accreditation • • •

Council on Occupational Education (COE) Committee on Accreditation for the EMS Professions (COAEMSP) Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP)

In 2001, CSRIPS (CSFA) first opened its doors utilizing the training tower at Station 71 then gradually expanding and adding the EMT program in 2003 in an annex on Sample Rd and University Drive. Rapidly expanding in the number of classes offered, CSRIPS had to look for additional space. In 2007, CSRIPS moved to its current facility thus adding additional classroom space and fireground acreage. As CSRIPS became established with Firefighter I & II and EMT-Basic, the focus moved to accreditation. In 2014, CSRIPS became accredited with the Council on Occupational Education and later that year, added the Paramedic program. 21 years after its inception, CSRIPS is a top-rated school and a four-time winner of the Florida Fire Service Training and Education Provider of the Year Award. 75


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT Even during a global pandemic, firefighter/paramedics retire, and positions need to be filled. CSRIPS continued to produce graduates in the firefighter, EMT and paramedic programs while conducting classes in the safest ways possible to protect the students, staff and faculty. Navigating these challenging times was never dull.

Accomplishments: • Add a satellite campus in Lauderhill • Expanded our clinical sites affiliations with the addition of Florida Medical Center • Returned to onsite training • Parking lot expansion • Began construction on back lot to increase fireground space • Began construction on outdoor bathrooms and rehab facility • Added 3 extractors for bunker gear cleaning

The 3 Main Programs; EMT-Basic, EMT-Paramedic and Firefighter I & II EMT-Basic, EMT-Paramedic and Firefighter I & II are the three main programs conducted by CSRIPS. These programs are approved by their governing body and also accredited through the Council on Occupational Education (COE).

No. of Classes

PROGRAM EMT-BASIC EMT-PARAMEDIC Firefighter I & II

11 9 7

No. of Students 212 176 220

AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION The City of Coral Springs is an Authorized Training Center for the American Heart Association. With this designation assigned to the Coral Springs Regional Institute of Public Safety (CSRIPS), there are approximately 8 classes per month held at the main campus. Additionally, CSRIPS provides onsite instruction to companies and schools throughout the region. With the challenges of COVID-19 and teaching the hands-on course, CSRIPS has been able to make in class changes to allow for resumption of classes in a safe manner.

76


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT Under AHA, CSRIPS provides • Heartsaver CPR AED First Aid • BLS Healthcare Provider • ACLS – Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support • PALS – Pediatric Advanced Life Support As an Authorized Training Center, CSRIPS also provides oversight to numerous Training Sites (TS). These locations are external to the City of

No. of Classes

Coral Springs and consist of other

PROGRAM

fire agencies and hospitals. CSRIPS

Heartsaver CPR AED First Aid K-12 Heartsaver BLS Healthcare Provider Stop The Bleed

ensures the training sites comply with all AHA standards and guidelines.

25 8 83 2

No. of Students 78 9 420 15

LOOK WHO’S BACK! As we passed the midway point of 2021, it became more apparent that we were trying to return to some normalcy. That meant the 2 local high schools that have partnerships with CSRIPS were ready to return. We were happy to see our students return at Coral Springs High School and West Boca High School. With updated guidelines in place, each location has been able to return to the classroom and resume the EMTCoral Springs High School

Basic programs.

Students are required to complete all 306 hours of the program including the clinical rotations and station rides. Passing the final and completing all the hours provides the student with the necessary certificate to test for the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT) to receive an EMT license. West Boca High School

Coral Springs High School students take EMT-Basic as an elective while the West Boca High School students are part of the HOSA program. HOSA is Health Occupations Students of America, and a majority of these students will be entering the medical field and the rest into public safety.

77


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT WELCOME ABOARD In 2021, CSRIPS expanded its footprint to Lauderhill. The partnership was formed to assist Lauderhill with community outreach programs and a desire to provide Lauderhill residents with a means to give back and serve their community. With the first class at full capacity, it was quickly realized that CSRIPS and Lauderhill are positioned to make this a successful program. Classes take place at 3120 NW 12th Place, Lauderhill on the second floor of Station 110. The facility provides classroom space, breakout rooms, equipment storage and a full breakroom. CSRIPS and Lauderhill are planning on offering EMT-Basic at Lauderhill 3 times per year during the Winter, Spring and Summer semesters.

OUTSIDE BUSINESS CSRIPS not only provides instruction to students desiring to enter the field of public safety, but we also support the region with continuing education classes and conduct promotions for other agencies. Promotionals • • • •

Completed in FY21

Driver Lieutenant Captain Battalion Chief

6 7 1 1

Classes •

Completed in FY21

Driver Engineer/EVOC

4

Continuing Education & CSRIPS Burn Facility CSRIPS has a Class A burn structure providing the region with one of the only facilities to do a true structure burn. During the FY21, multiple agencies in the region had facility usage agreements in place. The 2020 – 2021 academic and fiscal year presented everyone with training challenges. Our first responders were constantly called in for overtime therefore reducing the number of students on the calendar this year. For the most part classes continued but numbers were a bit lower and in some cases a few classes were cancelled. No. of Classes

PROGRAM Continuing Education

76 78

No. of Students 1160


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

SAFETY, HEALTH AND WELLNESS Division Chief Christopher Bator The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department continues to be a leader in Safety, Health, and Wellness not only in our organization but around the County, State, and Nation. The Safety and Health Committee (SHC) strives to provide the safest and healthiest work environment possible for all members of the department. Now in its 6th year, the SHC has completed numerous projects and continues to work on many other new and exciting advances in the areas of Safety, Health and Wellness. Under the direction of the Fire Chief, the program is led by Division Chief Chris Bator, as well as a very dedicated group of men and women from all areas of the organization. Each shift and each division are represented. Members include Deputy Chief Mike Moser, EMS Chief Juan Cardona, Training Chief Michael Caldaro, Captain Joe Russoniello, Captain Ronald Abou-Semaan, Captain Zachary Roseboom, Lt. Kandice Oltz, Lt. Atwater, Fire Inspector Thomas Hayes, Executive Assistant Debbie Pringle and from our city’s Risk Management Division, Tracy Szatkowski. The main goal of the SHC is to reduce the risk of injury, illness, and exposure to our members by providing information on several topics, and monitoring trends relating to the safety, health, and wellness of our members and to apply the information, research, and best practices to impact the way the organization conducts itself for the better. The SHC meets as a group at least once per quarter and promotes an agenda to improve or modify a current policy or guideline to rectify a specific issue that may arise. The committee is tasked with developing a plan to address the issue and draft a policy, procedure, training, or best practice and submit the recommendations to the Fire Chief for approval. Once approved, the information is sent out to the department for implementation. Despite the pandemic, the fire department has been able to safely conduct its annual Lifescan screening for sworn personnel which has been instrumental in spotting cancerous tumors and other health conditions early, allowing our members to obtain potentially lifesaving treatment in time. Several other initiatives were also implemented this past year: • • • • • •

Developed Clinician Response Team job description and posting to add two additional clinicians to our team. Managed personnel assigned to modified duty, working with HR and Risk management. Infection Control and Baseline vaccinations - Developed new baseline vaccination program bringing our tracking of vaccinations to new baseline. Updated forms for onboarding of new hires. Worked with HR and CareHere to coordinate onboarding for new hires and department personnel. Risk Management Training for Chief Officers Cancer Benefits - Worked with HR to create cancer benefits documents and send all retirees notification letter of this benefit. 79


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Mental health - Developed Behavioral Health Access Program (BHAP), Broward Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM), conducted clinical direction and Clinician Response Team Interviews, Updated the city’s Employee Mental Wellness Resources website and expanded our peer team. Safety Training – Class completed - trained more members to be safety officers. Developed retiree program and sent mailing to retirees notifying of all benefits available to them. Research - UM Occupational Noise Study (ongoing) Cancer research and Recover projects Behavioral Health Annual Frontline Survey Developed a pilot health and fitness program, while collaborating with other Fire Depts and City leadership to create a sustainable health and fitness program for our members. Developing a K-9 Crisis response policy Partnered with State for Statewide Emergency Response Plan (SERP) for Mental Wellness Deployment Submitted for and received grant for Extractor washers Submitted for and awaiting approval for 15- 5 gas monitors and half masks/cartridges for each member Provided additional health and fitness equipment for all Fire stations. Developed covid testing, antibody testing, and safety protocols for Fire dept and city. Supported our members and families with both work and non-work-related injuries and illness to provide guidance and resources to assist our members in getting the best possible care. Clinical Director Agreement completed. Sent BHAP resources including Chaplaincy, Peer Team Members, and Clinicians to the Surfside building collapse to support first responders there.

Captain Stephanie Palmer, USAR Team Member, deployed to Surfside, hugs Peer Support Team Member and former Fire Chief, Frank Babinec

Lt. Kandice Oltz. Peer Support Team Member, at Surfside

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CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT During the Surfside deployment, Chief Bator reported directly to Julius Halas, Director of the State Fire Marshal’s Office, and helped to coordinate mental health resources to all eight Florida USAR teams who were on scene performing search and rescue operations. Lt. Kandice Oltz, Peer Support Team Lead, also spent more than 165 hours helping to coordinate regional peer support for the incident. She was joined by Fire Chief Michael McNally, Deputy Fire Chief John Whalen, Lt. Lici Merritt, Captains Ron Abou-Semaan and Yair Soto, Driver Engineers Rich Piloto and Danielle Corp, Assistant Fire Chief Jason Gonzalez, Retired Assistant Fire Chief Steve Frey, and Coral Springs City Manager Frank Babinec, who are all members of our Peer Support Team. They are part of a dedicated group of individuals who are passionate about helping others when the need arises. The effect of the support they provide cannot truly be measured and the importance of what they do cannot be overstated. We are proud of their commitment to this important cause. Clinicians Sean Khan, Becky Cheresnick, and Stacey Steinbaum, along with Chaplain Ron Perkins also deployed to Surfside to provide support for first responders and families at the reunification site, and to provide faith-based support if needed.

Our participation in annual physicals and Lifescan, cancer research, and our prevention measures are designed to help our members stay healthy. Three of the four members shown above were alerted to their cancer through Lifescan

81


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

COMMUNICATIONS Communications Center Manager Kathy Liriano The Communications Unit serves the City of Coral Springs for Police, Fire and EMS for emergency and non-emergency calls for service. Service is provided 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. For emergencies, dial 9-1-1. Text to 9-1-1 is available now as well. Call if you can, text only if you can’t. For non-emergency service, call (954) 344-1800. The Coral Springs Emergency Communications Center (ECC) consist of 38 highly trained communications professionals who use the latest technology to dispatch and track responding units. The Coral Springs ECC became a CALEA Accredited Communications Center in 2007. We continue to be CALEA Accredited and have earned accreditation with excellence for years 2013, 2016, and most recently in 2020. We are currently in the process for reaccreditation with CALEA. Some of the latest technology includes: • Motorola Digital P25 800MHz Trunked Radio System • Intrado Enhanced 911 System • Central Squares Public Safety ONESolution Computer Aided Dispatch System • Mapping Including LCD Displays through Central Squares ONESolution Computer Aided Dispatch System • Automatic Vehicle Location through the GPS located on Motorola Handheld Radios • Central Squares Public Sector ONESolution MCT Mobile Field Reporting Application • Newly upgraded Russ Bassett workstations with heightadjustable ergonomic consoles

We answered a total of 220,354 calls in fiscal year 2021. Out of those calls, 51,775 were 911 calls. Our 911 call answer time: 10 seconds or less 95.82% of the time. We processed for both Police and Fire 144,373 calls for service this year (this includes selfinitiated calls).

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CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

In April, we honor our hardworking dispatchers, emergency call takers, and other Communications personnel during National Public Safety Telecommunicator’s Week. We are grateful and extremely fortunate to have such dedicated staff who are passionate about serving our residents and ensuring effective communication with police and fire. These often anonymous individuals are the “first” first responders and are truly the unspoken, unheralded heroes of public safety. They are the first voice you hear when you call 911 and often guide callers through CPR and other lifesaving measures until EMS arrives. Although we recognize them officially in April each year, we are indebted to them all year long.

83


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT Director of Emergency Management, Security, and Special Events, Alexander Falcone Alexander Falcone is the Director of Emergency Management for the City of Coral Springs. In this position, he directs the Office of Emergency Management (OEM) to prepare for, mitigate, respond to, and recover from all types of hazards. He holds a master’s degree in public administration from Florida State University with a graduate certificate in Emergency Management and Homeland Security. As our city continues to navigate the COVID-19 pandemic, the Office of Emergency Management continues to focus its efforts on ensuring essential city services are maintained, our most vulnerable populations are protected, and our community needs are met. Emergency Management staff is committed to providing accessible COVID-19 resources for the community. Our city has partnered with the Florida Department of Health and the Florida Division of Emergency Management to provide a COVID-19 vaccination site and a testing location for residents in the City of Coral Springs. In addition to the response for COVID-19, we have worked tirelessly to improve emergency response and school safety. Working with grant funding we were able to install the ALERT software platform at our Charter School

which

provides

our

police department with real time camera feeds and other crucial information during an emergency.

This

groundbreaking

technology

was

on

featured

Good

Morning, America and will be expanded to improve security at sites around our community. See the episode on the Good Morning, America website, or from the electronic version of this report, click here: On the special events side, the team has partnered with the City’s Communications and Marketing Division to reimagine city events while keeping staff and residents safe. This included a Drive In Movie Night to celebrate the Fire Department’s 50th anniversary and a Santa’s Express Parade throughout Coral Springs and Parkland to welcome the holiday season. As always you can stay connected with the Office of Emergency Management by registering for Alert Coral Springs. You can opt in for these alerts by visiting http://www.alertcoralsprings.org or by texting alertcs to 888-777. 84


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT Each year our personnel, both sworn and civilian, partner with other city employees, and organizations throughout our region, in a variety of community events. We raise awareness, we raise funds, and we look for innovative ways to reach out to the community. The pandemic presented new challenges in this area, but we continued to look for ways to serve. The COVID-19 pandemic caused a significant decline in Community Events, and some of our annual traditions could not be followed this year. The photos below show some of the events we were able to reimagine within the COVID-19 restriction parameters. Every October we wear tee shirts with a lavender ribbon to raise awareness for all cancers,

Above, Lt. Johana Cinque participates in a city video about Hispanic Heritage Month in September 2021

Left, Captain Justin Parrinello teaches a class in Bleeding Control for “Stop the Bleed” Month

85


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

Each year, we participate in the 9/11 commemorative ceremony held in front of the Northwest Regional Library. This September represented 20 years since the somber and tragic event. 343 firefighters and 60 NYPD and Port Authority police officers perished in this disaster at the end of that day. The number of first responders that have passed since this attack due to the contaminants continues to climb.

The attacks on the World Trade Center, Pentagon, and toward Washington DC that ended in a Pennsylvania field along with the sacrifices by all will never be forgotten. Each day we put on our uniform and start our shift never knowing what emergency we will be called to assist with. Each day we respond to emergencies and nonemergency incidents and conduct our duties to affect the best possible outcome possible. Our hearts go out to all the lives lost and those impacted on September 11, 2001. We will never forget.

Captain Justin Parrinello and Captain Yair Soto, left, participate in the “Tunnel to Towers” event in Fort Lauderdale. This event honors FDNY firefighter Stephen Siller, who walked from the entrance of the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel to the Twin Towers, wearing 60 lbs of gear, although he had finished working his shift that morning. He raced to the tragedy where he lost his life saving others. The event takes place in many cities throughout the nation each year.

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CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT Santa’s Express rides every December, brining Santa to families across Coral Springs and Parkland for a quick visit and photo. With the pandemic necessitating social distancing,this event was reimagined as two new events: A series of “no-stop” parades throughout as many neighborhoods in Coral Springs and Parkland that we could cover in two nights, with two trucks each night, and a “Virtual Visit with Santa” for the families who had previously signed up for the personal Santa’s Express visit. We plan to continue these new traditions again this year.

Santa rides through Coral Springs and Parkland

Holiday Events 2020

In early December 2020, the City of Coral Springs held a drive through holiday experience at the Sportsplex. We were honored to be a part of this holiday wonderland!

87


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

We are so touched when members of the community, schoolchildren, and other organizations reach out to us with cards, cookies, banners or other ways of saying thank you. It is our honor to serve the community but we greatly appreciate the kindness and generosity!

Captain Jon Robbins with a homemade card Above, the lovely people from One Kind Cookie bring treats to Station 80 Below, local veterans gave us a parade in front of the Public Safety Bldg to say thank you – we cannot express how grateful we are for these kind gestures

88


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

Left, Fire Chief Michael McNally, Deputy Fire Chief Michael Moser together with members of the Coral Springs Police Department help to celebrate resident Abe Friedman’s 100th Birthday

Below, Captain Andrew Robins, Driver Engineer Robert Thomas and Firefighter Paramedic Jesse Weldon-O’Bryen strike a pose for “City Hall Selfie” Day

89


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

In March of 2021 we were honored to host the mayors and commissioners from Coral Springs and Parkland in a special “Fire Ops 101” designed to show them what our members may encounter on a daily basis.

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CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

RETIREMENTS, PROMOTIONS AND DEPARTMENT NEWS In February 2021, Fire Equipment Technician John Ramos retired after 30 years of service to the department. John served his 30 years with integrity and commitment and the department was fortunate to have him. He will always be a part of our family and we wish him a long and healthy retirement. In September 2021, Captain Kevin Sullivan retired after 21 years of service. Captain Sullivan served the community out of Station 71 and was also the Lead Instructor for the Paramedic Program at the Coral Springs Regional Institute of Public Safety. Following his passion for teaching, Kevin retired to take a position as Division Chief of Training for a neighboring department. We wish him well and know he will be successful in his new role!

Retirements, while bittersweet, make room for new opportunities for other personnel. In FY2021, we promoted the following individuals:

Anthony Gonzalez > Battalion Chief, Training Division Jonathan Robbins > Captain Juan Garcia > Lieutenant Robert Thomas > Driver Engineer Hayden Buckner > Lieutenant Alexander del Castillo > Lieutenant Ryan Reinert > Captain Chris Bator > Division Chief, Safety, Health, and Wellness

Alex del Castillo and Ryan Reinert being sworn in as Lieutenant and Captain

91


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

Left, Deputy Fire Chief John Whalen stands with Lt. Hayden Buckner as he proudly shows his new helmet shield.

Below, Chris Bator is sworn in by Fire Chief Michael McNally as Division Chief of Safety, Health and Wellness. Looking on are Retired Assistant Fire Chief Steve Frey, City Manager and former Fire Chief Frank Babinec, and Deputy Fire Chief John Whalen. Above right, Chief Bator signs his oath.

92


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

Above, the city commission, our city manager, and city attorney help us welcome two new rescues to our fleet with a traditional “wet down” ceremony in front of City Hall. Below, ground is broken at the site of the future Public Safety and Public Works Campus west of Coral Ridge Drive. The Fire Department plans to move to its new location in Spring 2022.

93


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

SOUTH FLORIDA URBAN SEARCH AND RESCUE Since 1991, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Urban Search and Rescue Florida Task Force Two (FL-TF2) has been serving the national and international community during manmade and natural disaster incidents. If a disaster event warrants national USAR support, FEMA will deploy the three closest task forces within four (4) hours of notification, and additional teams as necessary. The role of these task forces is to support state and local emergency responders' efforts to locate victims and manage recovery operations.

Florida Task Force Two consists of over two-hundred and fifty members from twenty-four agencies. We currently have seventeen (17) members assigned to this team. The team is made up of various specialized divisions; rescue specialists, technical search specialists, canine search specialists, heavy rigging specialist, planning section, structural specialists, logistics specialists, technical information specialists, communication specialists, swiftwater rescue specialist, hazardous materials specialist, medical specialists, doctors, safety officers and various leadership positions. US&R task force members work in four areas of specialization: search, to find victims trapped after a disaster; rescue, which includes safely digging victims out of tons of collapsed concrete and metal; technical, made up of structural specialists who make rescues safe for the rescuers; and medical, which cares for the victims before and after a rescue. Each member is required to complete a set number of training and equipment familiarization sessions annually. These first responders consistently go to the front lines when America needs them most, but they are not just a national resource that can be deployed to a major disaster or structural collapse anywhere in the country. They are also the local firefighters and paramedics who answer when you call 911 in your local community. In 2021, team members were deployed to Surfside, FL, where the Champlain Towers South apartment building collapsed in the early morning hours of June 24th. Assistant Fire Chief Stephanie Palmer, Captain Jeffrey Hamberger, Firefighter Paramedic Oscar Gomez “worked the pile” of rubble to search for survivors. Division Chief Michael Caldaro, Captain Sophia Moser, Captain Joseph Russoniello, and Fire Chief Michael McNally were deployed shortly after. Five USAR teams totaling 320 members were deployed to the site, including searchers from Mexico and Israel. We are extremely proud of the members of the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department who have chosen to make the commitment to being part of Florida Task Force II, Urban Search and Rescue Team.

94


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

The building

Assistant Fire Chief Stephanie Palmer, Firefighter Paramedic Oscar Gomez, Captain Jeffrey Hamberger

Captain Joe Russoniello, Fire Chief Michael McNally, Assistant Fire Chief Stephanie Palmer, Captain Sophia Moser

95


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

DISASTER MEDICAL ASSISTANCE TEAM (DMAT) The

Coral

Springs-Parkland

Fire

Department currently is part the Florida 5 Disaster Medical Assistance Team

(FL-5

DMAT).

The

team

members meet monthly for training and

are

on

call

for

disaster

deployment four times a year but may be called up at any time the team is needed. Bob Bertone (Safety Officer) currently serves on the team. A Disaster Medical Assistance Team (DMAT) is a group of professional and para-professional

medical

personnel, supported by a cadre of logistical and administrative staff, designed to provide medical care during a disaster or other critical

Bob Bertone, at the Command Post in San Francisco at a previous deployment

national situations. As part of the National Disaster Medical System (NDMS), it recruits personnel for specific vacancies and coordinates the deployment of the teams who respond to state, national, and international emergencies as well as significant large-scale national events. DMATs are a rapid-response element to supplement local medical care until other resources can be mobilized, or the situation is resolved. DMATs deploy to disaster sites with sufficient supplies and equipment to sustain themselves for a period of 72 hours while providing medical care at a fixed or temporary medical care site. In mass casualty incidents, their responsibilities may include triaging patients, providing high-quality medical care despite the adverse and austere environment often found at a disaster site, patient reception at staging facilities and preparing patients for evacuation. NDMS/DMAT personnel are required to maintain appropriate certifications and licensure within their discipline. When personnel are activated as Federal employees, licensure and certification is recognized by all States. They function under the authority of the United States Department of Health and Human Services. The Team members receive high quality and cutting-edge training. In 2018, the FL-5 team received an intensive week of simulation training at a biocontainment facility to enable the team to respond to an EBOLA crisis. This training became invaluable during 2019-20 as the team was called to respond for three COVID-19 emergencies. The team is always prepared to assist with hurricanes, floods and wildfires if needed. We are proud to be able to answer the call!

96


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

SPECIAL OPS - SWAT/TACTICAL PARAMEDICS The Coral Springs Tac-Medic Team was the first in Broward County to provide medical assistance in conjunction with SWAT (Special Weapons and Tactics) as a fully operational team during a high-risk operation. The SWAT Team and Tac-Medics will respond to any incident deemed as a potential hazard for

responding

medical

personnel, as well as police personnel. These incidents include, but are not limited to responding to violent subjects,

citizens, hostage

barricaded situations,

search warrant service, dignitary protection service, and drug-related incidents. The team was also part of the response to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Feburary 14th, 2018. The SWAT medics have participated in numerous competitions including the International Tactical Emergency Medical Support (ITEMS), which brings TEMS providers from around the world to compete in a simulated “real time” style competition involving tactical emergencies and working with other SWAT teams. The Coral Springs SWAT Medics have placed numerous times including 2nd and 3rd with members on two different teams in 2002 (Toronto, Ca), 2nd in 2003 (Dallas, TX) and eventually taking 1st place in 2004 in Virginia Beach, VA. Members of the team are often used to provide tactical medical training to the Police Department, and surrounding Departments, as many of the team members are instructors for Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC). The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department established the SWAT medic program in conjunction with the Police Department’s Special Response Team in 1999. The team was formed to provide close medical support to SWAT Officers during training, search and/or arrest warrants, and any operation outside the scope of normal police operations. The members of the team are chosen based on a selection process involving a physical ability test, oral interview, and experience. The team members are required to attend Tactical Emergency Medical Support (TEMS) Training as part of maintaining a demanding training schedule in order to be active on the team. The team is operating with 8 medics and they have conducted eight

97


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT operations of various sizes since the beginning of October 2019. Six of these took place in 2020, and four since the pandemic was declared a national emergency and operations and training had to be modified. Team members have worked on developing new tools and procedures including: • • •

Fire suppression from the “Bearcat” during high-risk calls. Equipping and deconning members of the team for contact with potential COVID-19 patients and environments. Enhanced hurricane response plan.

They have attended 12 regular training days and two weeks of SWAT school where they have provided medical support to the team and numerous students. They have also attended a half dozen training days that were highly modified due to COVID-19 and social distancing restrictions.

98


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

HONOR GUARD The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department Honor Guard was started in September 2003. The Honor Guard consists of several members of the department who volunteer their time to represent the department with the utmost professionalism.

Examples of the events they participate in are: • • • • • • • •

Award Ceremonies and New Hire Graduations Fire station openings Annual holiday parade Opening of miscellaneous city functions Firefighter/Police Officer funerals 9-11 memorial ceremonies throughout the South Florida area Dignitary welcoming ceremonies Veteran’s Day Ceremonies

Above, Firefighter Paramedic William Glover with City of Parkland Commissioners Ken Cutler, Jordan Isrow, and Mayor Richard Walker

Left, Will Glover, James Miller, and members of our Pipes and Drums: Travis Kane, Joseph Russoniello, German Aristegui, Kasey Easley, and Kevin Olejniczak

99


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

PIPES AND DRUMS Since the inception of the Coral Springs Professional

Firefighters

Pipes

and

Drums in 2008, the band has played at many functions throughout the tricounty area. Members of the band are active members of the fire department and they represent the spirit of the history of the pipes and drums across the country. The Pipes and Drums continue to provide their service for the following

types

of

events

and

fundraisers: • • • • • •

Fire Department Retirements & Funeral Services Award Ceremonies and New Hire Graduations Memorial Parades & events Fire Academy Graduations & Parties Community & Promotional Events Military Events

Left to right, Band members Captain Joseph Russoniello, Captain Kevin Olejniczak, Captain David Schneider, Driver Engineer Kasey Easley, Lieutenant Travis Kane standing with members of Pipe and Drum players of other local departments

During the past year, they played at the funeral service for Coral Springs Police Sergeant Patrick Madison, who was lost to COVID-19. They also played at the September 11th events for both Parkland and Coral Springs.

Captain Joseph Russoniello and Lieutenant Travis Kane

100


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

CORAL SPRINGS PROFESSIONAL FIREFIGHTERS BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION President, Lieutenant Michael Farmer The Coral Springs Professional Firefighters Benevolent Association is made up of the members of the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department. The organization includes members from Suppression (Firefighter Paramedics), Community Risk Reduction (Inspectors) and Administration (Chiefs & Assistants). They have been an established non-profit organization since 2000 providing support and services internally to our members and the community through our own contributions.

The goal and mission of our organization is to create a

partnership with the residents and businesses in the community to assist us in raising funds; gathering donations while providing awareness for local charitable events that offer a direct benefit to the people, person or organization in need. We participate in many community events throughout each

year

and

the

events

can

be

found

on

our

www.coralspringsfirefighters.org

In late 2020, the Benevolent Association donated a generator to a local family who needed a new one for medical needs. This new portable model replaced a much older one that weighed several hundred pounds. Members of B Shift spotted the need after a call during a power outage.

101

website

at


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

METRO-BROWARD PROFESSIONAL FIREFIGHTERS LOCAL 3080 District 11 President, Captain Steve Cross Sworn personnel are also members of the Metro-Broward Professional Firefighters IAFF Local 3080. Metro-Broward Professional Firefighters Local 3080 is a proud member of the International Association of Firefighters (IAFF). The IAFF has a fascinating history, noble cause and provides unwavering service and support for Professional Firefighters throughout the country. Metro-Broward Professional Firefighters Local 3080 was originally formed on January 16th, 1989 when several cities got together and united to form one large Local. Today, our Local currently represent over 800 Firefighters and Paramedics that protect and serve the residents and visitors of 11 Cities in Broward County. Those cities include Coral Springs - serving the City of Parkland, Plantation, Lauderhill, Lighthouse Point, Margate - serving the City of Coconut Creek, North Lauderdale, Oakland Park, Sunrise, and Tamarac.

Metro-Broward Local 3080 is operated by an Executive Board and Board of Trustees who report to the General Membership. The Executive Board consists of three Principal Officers - President, Executive Vice President, Secretary/Treasurer - and nine District Vice Presidents, one representing each of our 9 Districts. The Board of Trustees consists of three members that are elected from the General Membership to oversee the financial operations of the Local and its affiliated internal operations.

Coral Springs-Parkland Fire

Department Captain Steve Cross serves as District President for District 11, Coral Springs, until October 1st, 2021 when his term ends and Lt. John Atwater will take his place.

Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department administration is proud to work hand in hand with the Benevolent Association and Union representatives to better serve our membership and our communities.

102


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

FIRE EXPLORER PROGRAM Daniel Chavez, Program Advisor The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Explorer Program is a hands-on career development program designed for Middle and High School aged students, 14-20 years old, who are interested in the Fire Service profession. The Explorers train alongside Firefighters and Paramedics where they learn firefighting and emergency medical care and develop leadership experience. After successful completion of their probation period, they are permitted to ride along on the fire apparatus and respond to emergency calls. They also complete hundreds of hours of community service each month. Due to the Covid-19 pandemic the Explorer program was suspended for the safety of the members of the post. The local and state competitions that our fire explorers participate in every year was also cancelled. We hope to resume our program fully in FY22. The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Explorer Program has graduated hundreds of young men and women over the years, many of them becoming full-time firefighters, EMTs, and Paramedics. Some of our past Explorers have become high-ranking officials in Fire Departments across the country.

103


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

104


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

AWARDS AND ACHIEVEMENTS We are proud of the accolades that our department and our members achieved this past fiscal year, for the outstanding work that they do. In March 2020, we bestowed the following awards for 2019: 5 Community Involvement Commendations 6 Administrative Service Commendations 15 Letters of Commendation 42 Lifesaving Commendations 3 Unit Citations presented to 53 members 1 Distinguished Service Commendation

• • • • • •

We also honored the following personnel: Firefighter of the Year: Firefighter Paramedic Spencer Ginn Supervisor of the Year: Captain Danny Nyer Civlian Employee of the Year: Office Assistant Linda Meyer Instructor of the Year: Tom Palazzo Fire Explorer of the Year: Claire Blake

Spencer Ginn

Danny Nyer

Linda Meyer

The most meaningful part of our annual awards ceremony is when we are joined by the families of those whose lives we saved during the year. It is a privilege for us to make a difference this way and turn around a situation that could have had a very different result had we not been there. It is an amazingly heartwarming experience for us to see these individuals living their lives and continuing to thrive. Pictured here, the crew that performed a rescue, which included the patient’s 13-year-old daughter who performed CPR prior to the arrival of EMS. 105

Tom Palazzo

Claire Blake


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

In May 2021, Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department Lieutenant Kandice Oltz and her wife, Firefighter Paramedic Jen Oltz of Oakland Park Fire Rescue, saved a toddler from drowning while kayaking in Hollywood. At a Coral Springs Commission Meeting in August, Hollywood Fire Rescue Chief Dan Booker presents an award to Kandice and Jen for their lifesaving actions at the scene. Oakland Park Fire Rescue Chief Stephen Krivjanik was also in attendance. Below, Representative Dan Daley presents a plaque to Fire Chief Michael McNally in December 2020, in honor of the 50th anniversary of our department, a milestone reached earlier in the year.

106


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

IN MEMORIAM

In December 2020, we were saddened to learn of the passing of retired Deputy Fire Chief John Forbes, at the age of 80. Chief Forbes served the department for seven years prior to his retirement in 2007.

The fire service of today is ever changing but is steeped in traditions over 200 years old. One such tradition is the sound of a bell. In the past, as firefighters began their tour of duty, it was the bell that signaled the beginning of that day's shift. Throughout the day and night, each alarm was sounded by a bell, which summoned these brave souls to fight fires and to place their lives in jeopardy for the good of their fellow citizen. And when the fire was out and the alarm had come to an end, it was the bell that signaled to all the completion of that call. When a fire fighter had died in the line of duty, paying the supreme sacrifice, it was the mournful toll of the bell that solemnly announced a comrade’s passing. We utilize these traditions as symbols, which reflect honor and respect on those who have given so much and who have served so well. To symbolize the devotion that these brave souls had for their duty, a special signal of three rings, three times each, represents the end of our comrades' duties and that they will be returning to quarters.

And so, to those who have selflessly given their lives for the good of their fellow man, their tasks completed, their duties well done, to our comrades, their last alarm, they are going home.

107


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

2801 CORAL SPRINGS DRIVE CORAL SPRINGS, FLORIDA 33065 CORALSPRINGS.ORG/FIRE 954-344-5934

108


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IN MEMORIAM

1min
pages 107-108

FIRE EXPLORER PROGRAM

1min
pages 103-104

METRO-BROWARD PROFESSIONAL FIREFIGHTERS LOCAL 3080

1min
page 102

HONOR GUARD

1min
page 99

DISASTER MEDICAL ASSISTANCE TEAM (DMAT

1min
page 96

CORAL SPRINGS PROFESSIONAL FIREFIGHTERS BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION

1min
page 101

SPECIAL OPS - SWAT/TACTICAL PARAMEDICS

2min
pages 97-98

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

1min
page 84

RETIREMENTS, PROMOTIONS AND DEPARTMENT NEWS

2min
pages 91-93

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

5min
pages 85-90

SOUTH FLORIDA URBAN SEARCH AND RESCUE

2min
pages 94-95

COMMUNICATIONS

2min
pages 82-83

SAFETY, HEALTH AND WELLNESS

5min
pages 79-81

CORAL SPRINGS REGIONAL INSTITUTE OF PUBLIC SAFETY

6min
pages 75-78

COMMUNITY EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM (CERT

3min
pages 56-57

SUPPORT SERVICES DIVISION

3min
pages 50-51

COMMUNITY RISK REDUCTION

6min
pages 52-55

ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT SERVICES

3min
pages 47-48

COVID-19 PREVENTION AND RESPONSE

1min
page 39

FIRE ADMINISTRATION

1min
page 49

IN-SERVICE TRAINING

8min
pages 40-46

COMMUNITY PARAMEDIC

2min
page 37

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1min
page 7

Overview of the EMS Division

1min
pages 32-33

OPERATIONS

3min
pages 28-30

EMS

2min
page 31

MEDICAL DIRECTOR

3min
pages 34-35

EMS CONTINUOUS QUALITY IMPROVEMENT GROUP (CQI

1min
page 36

STRATEGIC PLAN

1min
page 8

MESSAGE FROM THE FIRE CHIEF

5min
pages 5-6
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