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Don’t miss the fireworks

Longhouse ladies trekked through nearly a foot of snow to provide latit latit for Celery Feast March 3. See more on Page 20A.

Raven Chacon works on prints with Judith Bauman, Master Printer at Crow’s Shadow. Chacon was artist in residence at the art institute. More on Page 21B.

Wildhorse Resort & Casino celebrates its 24th anniversary with a bang March 9 at 8 p.m.

Confederated Umatilla Journal

2 Sections, 52 pages / Publish date March 7, 2019

The monthly newspaper of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation ~ Pendleton, Oregon March 2019

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Volume 27, Issue 4

STATE CHAMPIONS

Catching air Logan Quaempts zooms down the sled jump he created in February. The slope started on the roof of his house on Willow Drive. For more snow photos, turn to page 10A.

Nixyaawii wins Oregon Class 1A title

CUJ photos/Phinney

Coach Shane Rivera and members of the Nixyaawii Community School’s state championship team salute their fans after winning the state tournament with a 59-42 win over the Trinity Lutherans on March 2. The boys won three games by an average of 20 points at the state tournament. From left, team members are Magi Moses, Mick Schimmel, Tyasin Burns (hidden) and Dazon Sigo. For more photos and stories about the games, see Section B.

Valentine’s Owl Dance Grace Moses-Watchman Owl Dances with her father, Lindsey X. Watchman at the Valentine’s Celebration at the Longhouse on the Umatilla Indian Reservation on Feb. 13. More photos on Page 17A.

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation 46411 Timine Way Pendleton, OR 97801

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CUJ News Wishram selected for proposed ‘N’chi wana’ Housing By the CUJ

MISSION – Wishram across the Columbia River from Celilo has been chosen as the site for eventual federal housing by representatives of a new inter-tribal housing entity. The creation called N’Chi Wana Housing (NWH), which is being coordinated by the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC), has been endorsed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). Marcus Luke, Housing Department Director, is the CTUIR representative of the new entity. According to a resolution passed by the Board of Trustees (BOT), the CTUIR BOT is in “strong support” of additional federal replacement housing, which is a “long-standing obligation” as a result of construction and operation of federal dams, throughout all reservoirs created by Bonneville, The Dalles, John Day and McNary dams. NWH is charged with creating a comprehensive housing plan based on a community needs assessment that also supports the CTUIR Housing Department. The resolution endorsed by the CTUIR BOT said that the “one village development” at Celilo does not satisfy the full federal obligation. According to the resolution, NWH will provide a broad range of housing services such as affordable homes, improvements for health and safety concerns and immediate emergency housing needs of

families living in unsafe and unsanitary conditions. Among others, fishers who live along the river would be able to eventually live in adequate housing. The state of current housing has been described as horrible by Tribal leaders. Further, the NWH will provide services like new homeownership classes, down payment assistance and economic and community development activities that benefit the tribal community along the Columbia River. NWH will also provide drug and alcohol abatement services, the resolution states. Representatives of the Columbia River tribes – Umatilla, Nez Perce, Warm Springs, and Yakama - are expected to establish a steering committee comprised of tribal housing professionals, experts and tribal community representatives to guide the formation of N’chi Wana Housing, including appointing an interim Executive Director. The board membership of NWH will include, at a minimum, representation from those who lost housing or their descendants as a result of the construction and operation of dams in what is known as Zone 6 (Bonneville to McNary dams) on the Columbia River. According to the CTUIR BOT resolution, a board member has the option of holding one seat on the N’chi Wana Housing Board of Directors or to choose a representative, the position is currently filled by Luke. NWH representatives, at

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Pa’xum War Dancing to highlight all-day birthday bash for American Legion By the CUJ

MISSION – Several years after they were defeated in a battle with the Cayuse Army in 1878, a delegation of Bannock Indians came by train from the Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho to the Umatilla Indian Reservation to share the Pa’xum war dance. That Pa’xum will be a part of the 100th anniversary celebration March 16 of the American Legion and the 92nd birthday of American Legion George St. Denis Post 140, which was established on the Umatilla Indian Reservation in 1927 (Cap Sumkin). Later the American Legion Post 140 was renamed George St. Denis, who was killed in action in 1946. The all-day event opens at 9 a.m. at the NixYa-Wii Warriors Memorial and then moves to

American Legion 100th Birthday Celebration Saturday, March 16, 2019

Nixiyaawii Longhouse in Mission, Oregon on the Umatilla Indian Reservation 9 a.m. - Nixyaawii Veterans Memorial Honoring Ceremony 10 a.m. - Grand Entry into Longhouse 11 a.m. - American Legion 100th Birthday Luncheon 2-5 p.m. - Pa’xum (War Dance)

the Mission Longhouse for activities that will last until a Washat song and the colors are retired around 5 p.m. The anniversary celebration for the 100th birthday of the American Legion will take up the morning and the birthday party will began See American Legion page 23A

See N’chi wana housing page 23A

Confederated Umatilla Journal

46411 Timine Way Pendleton, OR 97801 Phone 541-429-7005

Bannock War veterans, as well as descendants of Bannock War veterans, gathered in 1910 for Pa’xum War Dances at the Pendleton Round-Up. The photo was taken by W. S. Bowman.

Fax 541-429-7005 Email cuj@ctuir.org www.ctuir.org

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Confederated Umatilla Journal

March 2019


CUJ News

This elk herd, captured by photographer Robert McClean, meanders in a snow covered field on the south side of Interstate 84 on the Umatilla Indian Reservation. Below, part of a herd of hundreds of elk draw a line across the landscape off Kirkpatrick Road east of Mission.

Elk by the thousands The late winter snow has pushed thousands of Rocky Mountain elk down from the mountains in search of food. Groups of elk scattered across the face of the Blue Mountains from Milton-Freewater to Pilot Rock, according to Carl Scheeler, Wildlife Program Manager for the Confederated Tribes of the

Umatilla Indian Reservation. Scheeler said a preliminary survey documented several thousand elk, which have moved as far as the west side of Highway 395 between Pendleton and Pilot Rock. Until the snow melts, Scheeler said, the elk have nowhere to go. The CTUIR is coordinating with the Oregon

Department of Fish and Wildlife to let landowners know that the elk won’t be moving out until the feed is available at higher elevations. Scheeler said there was “green up” starting in the mountains before the snow and as soon as the snow leaves the elk are expected to return the hills.

Regional opioid conference here March 21 By Casey Brown of the CUJ

A conference on pain management, opioids, and other drugs will be held at Wildhorse Resort Casino on March 21 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) are a partner of the Eastern Oregon Conference of Pain, Trauma, Addiction, Opioids & Other Drugs. It is expected to attract attendees from throughout the state and region. Marcus Luke, CTUIR Housing Director and member of the CTUIR Alcohol and Drug Task Force, will make the opening remarks. He has attended several of these events before, and he said they are statewide conferences that take place in different regions each time. According to Luke, the conference is already sold out, but he is working to add more capacity. He said that everyone from doctors, nurses, pharmacists to CTUIR Executive Management Team and police attend the event. The conference will include panels from community health, healthcare providers, and law enforcement, breakout sessions, lived-experience guests, a keynote address, action planning, and more. Some of the topics of discussion are “Community Driven Overdose Prevention Strategies,” “Harm Reduction in Eastern Oregon,” and “CTUIR Initiatives and Best Practices to Promote Health & Healing.”

March 2019

According to promotional materials, “Attendees will be able to apply concepts they receive on addiction medicine and trauma-informed practices to improve patient/client outcomes. Attendees will use the concepts learned to identify methods to coordinate care as a primary care Medically Assisted Treatment provides” and “Attendees will be able to recognize opportunities where non-opioid therapies can be used to establish internal modalities or combine existing resources for referral.” Luke says heroin and opioids are a nationwide epidemic that affects everyone, including those living on the Umatilla Indian Reservation. The Alcohol and Drug Task Force is comprised of representative from five departments: Housing, Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS), Public Safety, Yellowhawk Tribal Health Center, and Education. The task force works together because addiction affects the whole family, said Luke. He may evict a housing tenant for drug use, and that person will interact with public safety, children will be involved with DCFS and education, and family members could seek services from Yellowhawk. “We meet and talk about issues like this,” Luke said, “because we all work in the community.” For more information, contact Mike Stensrud at the Umatilla County Health Department at mike.stensrud@ umatillacounty.net.

Confederated Umatilla Journal

Training begins network with Yakama, Warm Springs tribes MISSION - A new way to serve patients has arrived at Yellowhawk Tribal Health Center. Yellowhawk staff from various departments, and guests from Yakama Nation and Warm Springs, sat in a training March 5 and 6 that marked the beginning of a new relationship. The Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board is establishing a network of Indian Country healthcare facilities. The training was on Indian Country ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) Substance Use Disorders (SUD). TeleECHO is a new form of medical education and care management developed specifically for rural areas by Dr. Sanjeev Arora. The SUD training kicked off with a discussion on the effect SUD and Opioid Use Disorder in various health and community settings. Presentations were made on neurobiology and diagnosis of SUDs by Dr. Jessica Gregg, the epidemiology of SUD in American Indians/Alaska Natives by Heide Lovejoy, behavioral health interventions in SUD treatment by Dr. Danica Brown, and a slate of training provided by Gregg and Dr. Zeina Saliba. Day two consisted of more presentations and several case studies from Yellowhawk, Lummi Tribal Health Center, Siletz Tribal Health Clinic, Yakama, and Lower Elwah. For more in depth coverage on teleECHO and the impact opioid use is having here, see the April 4 edition of the CUJ.

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CUJ News Collaboration used to determine school snow days District administrators drive around at 4:30 in the morning to check driving conditions By the CUJ

Siddalee Baker, Ella Stewart and Lindsey Littlesky all pose with local youth who attended Youth Lobby Day in Salem Feb. 18. The event was organized by Renew Oregon and aimed at supporting the Clean Energy Jobs Bill. The youth were assisted in their plans by Walla Walla Chief Donald Sampson and his partner Peggy Harris. Sampson urged the students strongly to attend the event and the couple connected them with Renew Oregon staff and student lobbyists. Sampson and Harris were not able to attend but cheered the youth on from afar.

CTUIR Youth Council attend #YouthLobbyDay

A group of seven girls on the CTUIR Youth Leadership Council attended a lobbyist training and used their new skills to advocate for the Clean Energy Jobs Bill with their state legislators in Salem. Senator Bill Hansell, left, talks with some of the girls at the Capitol. From left are Youth Council Members Lindsey Littlesky, Jaedean Looney and Ella Stewart. Before sharing personal experiences, Hansell asked Stewart to say hello to Leo Stewart, her grandfather, someone Hansell said he considers a dear friend.

Youth from all over Oregon showed up for Youth Lobby Day to advocate for the clean energy jobs bill with their district representatives.

New Zealand repatriation, reburial March 16 DALLESPORT, Wash. – Tribal members are welcome to attend the repatriation and reburial March 16 of ancestral remains from the Canterbury Museum in Christchurch, New Zealand. The remains of three individuals and other objects were removed more than 130 years ago from a Columbia River island and have been in New Zealand since the 1880s. The reburial services will take place

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on Saturday, March 16, at 10 a.m. at the Wishxam Cemetery at Dallesport across the river from The Dalles, Oregon. Staff from the Cultural Resources Protection Program will depart from Nixyaawii Governance Center at 7:30 a.m. for those who would like to follow. Also, people who need a ride should contact Jennifer Karson Engum or Dara Williams-Worden at CRPP, 541-2763447.

The international repatriation has been a combined effort of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, plus Te Runanga o Ngai Tahu (Southern Maori Tribe), Ohaki o Nga Tipuna (Maori Advisory Committee), and the Canterbury Museum Trust Board in Christchurch.

Confederated Umatilla Journal

PENDLETON – Schools are closed for snow days based on a number of reasons, not the least of which is getting MidColumbia buses through snow and ice, especially on roads in rural areas. But there’s more to it than that. It’s a collaboration, really, between the bus company, weather forecasters, the Pendleton Police Department, and the School District 16R administration. The Pendleton School District has had seven snow days and two late starts all in February. Up to a point, time is built into the school calendar to absorb weather-related days, which are measured in student “seat hours.” However, graduating seniors are going to be short of their needs to finish the school year. Currently, PHS students have five days built in, but Matt Yoshioka, Director of Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment, said the District will ask the state for a waiver on the other two days. All other grades have more than seven days built into their calendar. Seniors are short five days so PHS is adding three days for the upper classmen, including a seniors-only day on March 15. That still leaves the seniors short so Yoshioka said the last day of school will be on May 31, two days later than originally planned. Graduation is the next day on June 1. Nixyaawii Community School usually follows the Pendleton decision. So far, NCS has had seven snow days. With a four-day school week, NCS will be able to make up their snow days and late starts on three Fridays this month - March 8, 15 and 22, according to Carrie Phinney, NCS Administrative Assistant. More may be scheduled later in the spring. The NCS calendar will not get any longer because it has the option of school on Fridays. When the weather gets nasty, Chris Fritsch, the School District Superintendent, and Yoshioka, get up around 4:30 a.m. and drive around town. On those ugly days, if Yoshioka and Fritsch are sliding around, schools are often closed on that morning. “I’ve been out at 4:30 and the roads are clear. By 6 things are all frozen up,” Yoshioka said. “We’re trying now, though, to make the call the day before to accommodate parents and the community. It’s tough sometimes for parents who work to find a place for their young children to go when they learn late about snow days.

March 2019


Sweet celebration for Valentine’s Day

Denise Wickert and J.D. Gone were all smiles as they moved around the Longhouse floor during an owl dance.

Jillian Morning Owl and Tuma’yis Minthorn look for direction as they circle the Longhouse floor during an owl dance at the Valentine’s Celebration on the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

Providing the hand drum beat for dancers were, from left, Caleb Minthorn, Fred Hill, Leon Totus, Elijah Bevis, Logan Quaempts and Charles Wood.

Quincy Sams and Waptas Brockie were in dancing regalia at the Valentine’s Celebration on Feb. 13.

March 2019

Dancers slide to the left during a circle dance at the Valentine’s Day Celebration at the Mission Longhouse.

Diamond and Tony Greene show their knowledge of the owl dance.

Little Jarene Hines peeks out from behind her ride during a dance at the Valentine’s Celebration.

Confederated Umatilla Journal

Devon Hall and Quincy Sams circle the Longhouse circle at the Valentine’s Celebration.

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CUJ Editorials Sunset on snow A Tutuilla winter sunset shows gray clouds and a dusting of snow in mid-February. By the end of the month, the Pendleton Weather Station reported total of 32.5 inches of snow with 9 inches on the ground on Feb. 11. That amount was still on the ground on Feb. 28 as temperatures were unseasonably cold. The average daily temperature was 27.7 degrees with a low of 3 degrees on Feb. 7.

CUJ photo/Cami Lewis

Indian People dealing with climate change for decades

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uch of today’s origin of climate change can be traced back to the Second Industrial Revolution and the introduction of electricity, mass production, steelmaking and assembly lines beginning around 1870 in the United States. The burning of fossil fuels: coal, oil, and natural gas for industrial and consumer purposes led to a rise in carbon emissions into the earth’s atmosphere. In addition, the reduction of open grass lands and the destruction of forests and the subsequent mismanagement of the forests has led to a diminished capability to naturally clean the air of carbon. This is true of our lands here in the United States and across the globe. For the Indian People of the Columbia Plateau it has been said that our first exposure to climate change came with the dams that were built on the Columbia River. The natural flow of water was dramatically affected by holding water in large lakes behind the manmade structures which caused weather patterns to change all along the river. The impoundment of water caused long rainy periods coupled with shifts in wind patterns. The dams, along with these weather changes, caused significant decreases in salmon populations

CUJ

Confederated Umatilla Journal 6A

and erosion of the natural state of the river. At many times over the past 100 years, these impacts have been devastating for Tribal fishing families. In the 19th century we saw our lands turned into a commodity to be bought and sold. In the 20th century we saw our waters turned into a commodity to be bought and sold. In the 21st century we are witnessing our air being turned into a commodity to be bought and sold. Land, Water and Air are essential to our lives and those of our relatives - the animals and plants. Yet here we find ourselves having to adapt to manmade changes to our climate. In the coming editions of the CUJ we will examine and report on climate change: effects, adaptation strategies, restoration efforts and the costs we face now and those we will face in the future if we are not successful in finding solutions. Now more than ever, traditional ecological knowledge is needed to reverse the current negative trend. We all live on one planet, we have nowhere else to turn to if we cannot move forward in a sustainable way that stewards the natural resources we all depend upon.

46411 Timine Way Pendleton, OR 97801 541-429-7005 FAX 541-429-7005 e-mail: cuj@ctuir.org www.ctuir.org

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Chuck Sams CUJ staff: Wil Phinney, Editor Casey Brown, Reporter/Photographer Jill-Marie Gavin, Reporter/Photographer Dallas Dick, Freelance Photographer

Confederated Umatilla Journal

In the 19th century we saw our lands turned into a commodity that was to be bought and sold. In the 20th century we saw our waters turned into a commodity that was to be bought and sold. In the 21st century we are witnessing our air being turned into a commodity to be bought and sold.

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March 2019


CUJ Op-Ed/Columns How else could we spend $1 million a month?

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imyúume (relatives), may I please have a moment of your time? During General Councils this past year, I learned that in a few months (May 2019) we will pay off our last casino expansion loan from over five years ago. Like paying off a car, this means we will no longer have to send $1 million a month to the bank anymore. This was great news to hear. However, I also learned that our next casino expansion wants to begin right away, and will cost us a whopping $120 million! This means continuing to pay $1 million per month...for the next 120 months (that’s 10 years)! This was not great news to hear. To me, $120 million is a lot of kitsway spent in just one area (to Lindsey Watchman make more money); and binds our hands for a very long time, even though funding is needed for other urgent needs in our community. We all can easily see the success (and entertainment) Wildhorse has brought our People the past 25 years. We’ve come far since my childhood running wild in the projects mid-80s, and rolling up the green carpet that protected the gym floor from Bingo players, so we could shoot hoops. Baby boomers come even further, when our People had to work the farmers’ fields for 12-hour shifts during hot summers … during an era when there truly was no reservation economy. Thus, I highly respect and honor the past efforts of former and current Board of Trustees members who made our current prosperity a reality. We have indeed come a long way in building an economic base.

However, there are other more urgent needs in our community to focus our attention and spend our kitsway on … areas which have not made much progress over the past 25 years. Numerous community surveys indicate the time is now to take action, backed by funding. With our own eyes (and hearts) we can each see other important areas where the community needs help. One example is more low and middle-income housing. Another, our community health assessment provides proof of need for a healthier physical environment: such as a fitness center, sports complex, skate park, and playground equipment. How about pay life insurance premiums for every tribal member, fund year-round youth employment opportunities; or cover 100 percent of college students’ unmet need? Of course, high-quality WIFI too! To be clear, I am not against the casino nor future expansions. But I am for, more open discussion among our 3,100+ tribal members (beyond the BOT chamber and brief dialogues during General Council). I wonder what we could accomplish if we simply paused spending on the casino for a year, and redirected $1 million a month elsewhere towards other urgent community needs? That was, and still is my point. I am a single Tribal Member (just like you), who bravely shared my opinion and passion recently at General Council. Sadly, after sharing my mere twocents over the microphone, I was immediately ‘reprimanded’ from that same pulpit. Even more shocking, hurtful words during this personal attack came from an elected BOT official. As I understand, General Council is a forum for discussion … not a place for public retaliation. So to avoid any of my fellow Tribal Members from the same ridicule that I experienced for having a dis-

How about pay life insurance premiums for every tribal member, fund year-round youth employment opportunities, or cover 100 percent of college students’ unmet need. Of course, high-quality WIFI too. To be clear, I am not against the casino nor future expansions. But I am for more open discussion among our 3,100+ tribal members (beyond the BOT chamber and brief dialogues during General Council). senting opinion, I encourage you to be a sovereign thinker and continue sharing your ideas with one another on where else in our community to spend $1 million a month. I welcome and respect your feedback: lxw15@ yahoo.com; personal cell (541) 310-8458. Yox kalo, Lindsey X. Watchman (Umatilla/Walla Walla), X-1424

CUJ Letters to the editor Five BOT members have overstepped their bounds To the editor, In January 2018 at a General Council meeting it was voted on and passed (40-0) to retain Mrs. Kosey as a board member and to leave section 3.06 in the Election Code. To this day Willie Sigo (General Council chair) has never taken the GC message to the Board. Why? It is his job to do this. Five board members (Vice-Chair Jeremy Wolf, GC Chair Sigo, and at-large members Rosenda Shippentower, Woodrow Star and Aaron Ashley) voted to take out Section 3.06 of the Election Code (Article I of the Treaty of 1855), which is in your Constitution. (During the vote Treasurer Doris Wheeler abstained; Secretary Kat Brigham and BOT member Sally Kosey voted no.) To eliminate this section would require a constitutional amendment by the GC to be placed on an election ballot because the Board doesn’t have the authority to mess with the Constitution. I believe those five members of the BOT have overstepped their boundaries by not defending the Constitution. That’s a recall offense in my opinion. Those five members of the BOT will not tell you, but

March 2019

it’s the diminished boundary that they want. You see if they can use a tiny area to qualify for the Board the same ole names keep turning up, easing their way for another two years. The most puzzling part of all this is those Board members left Article 1 of the Treaty in our TERO, water negotiations, hunting, fishing, water adjudication, water mitigation, and most definitely have to use the Treaty to get back the land on the eastern boundary. So why take it out of the Election Code? Something stinks. There can only be one reason why. You see they tried to bully and intimidate Mrs. Kosey off the Board (couldn’t get it done). They tried to say she doesn’t live on the Res, but according to the Election Code 3.06 she does under Article I of the Treaty. So all that’s left for them to do is to take Article I of the Treaty out of the Election Code. Which was done illegally, for to do this you need a special election; only the people can change the Constitution, but these five Board members don’t want to bring this to the GC and neither does Willie Sigo. Let the people decide what boundary they want to use, not five Board members. The Election Committee had it right by using the land set aside for the sole use of the Umatilla, Walla Walla and Cayuse as stated in Article I of the Treaty. This Board thinks they solved their residency issue by their new sole authority stance on the Election Code.

Confederated Umatilla Journal

I believe you don’t need the Election Code to qualify. Under Article VI, Section 2 in our Constitution to run because our Constitution supersedes the Election Code and if the Board doesn’t think so then let’s move this info to Tribal Court and find out. David Sams Thornhollow, Oregon

Car should not have been tagged and towed It was around the beginning of November when I saw the Housing Authority going around and tagging cars. Before they got to my car, a 1984 Chrysler Fifth Avenue, I told them there was nothing wrong with my car. I went on a senior trip to Idaho, and when I got home my car was gone. My neighbor told me that housing had it towed. I talked to a councilman about this situation, and he advised me to file a complaint with the tribal police. So I did. I never got no results. I thought it was against the law to take a person’s personal property without permission. So, I think that the Housing Authority had no right in having my car towed and should return my car. Tribal Member Ray Watchman X-415

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CUJ Almanac Obituary Augustine “Auggie” Monica Bill February 23, 1927-March 4, 2019 Augustine went to be with the lord at her home in Mission, OR on the afternoon of March 4th. She was born in Thornhollow to her parents Joseph and Rosa (Davis) Thompson. She was raised in Thornhollow where she attended school, she also attended St. Andrews Mission and Chemawa Indian School. She was a tribal member and was a fluent Walla Walla speaker along with her family and especially her sister Mabel. She was married to Jack Sampson and had two sons Wayne “Leo” and Gary, Jack later passed away. She married Kenneth “KB” Bill the traditional way they were later legally married and had Michael “Mike”, Karen, James “Jum”, Alan, Theodore “Ted”, Angene and Christopher. She worked the pea harvest, cleaned homes around the reservation, tried gold panning, drove KB to his meetings for the Board of Trustees and Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission. She enjoyed gathering first foods especially huckleberry picking with family at Mt. Adams, gathering roots, making tule mats, baskets and fishing at Celilo Falls. She enjoyed driving and taking her children to sports games when they were young, she loved to play bingo and gamble at the casino. She was always around to give people rides if they needed one. She was a very

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caring, kind, loving and empathetic woman. Augustine is preceded in death by her parents, husbands Jack and Kenneth, sons Leo Sampson, Christopher and Michael Bill, brothers Patrick, Benjamin and Cecil Thompson, sisters Christine Alexander, Belva Olson, Mabel Sheoships, Geneva Haskie, Shirleen Speedis. She is survived by a sister Faydeena Luke, sons Gary Sampson, Sr., James, Alan, Theodore Bill and daughters Karen Jim and Angene Bill, grandchildren Gary Sampson, Jr., (Angela), Monica Sampson, Christopher Sampson, Isaac Ciriano, Joel Minthorn, Brandie Weaskus (Jerrid), Andrew Wildbill (Ashley), Wallace Wildbill, Kenneth Wildbill, Alec Beavert, Colleen Wildbill (Richard), Naomi Wildbill, 29 great-grandchildren; numerous cousins, nieces and nephews. Dressing is March 6th at 2 p.m. at Burns Mortuary, Rosary at 6 pm at the Longhouse and Washat Services at 7 p.m.. March 7th the final seven are at 7:30 am and Mass at St. Andrews at 9 am, burial to follow and dinner at Mission Longhouse.

Mission Market fuel pump celebration March 8 MISSION - To commemorate the opening of fuel pumps at Mission Market, the Board of Trustees for the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, along with other dignitaries, will cut the ribbon at 1:30 p.m. on Friday, March 8 at the community store located at the Four Corners intersection. Mission Market will offer discounted fuel and raffle prizes through March 15. Fuel purchasers will be eligible to enter the drawing.

Correction

Weather

Last month, a correction concerning the vote on a motion to approve a request from the Celebration Committee mixed up the names of members of the Board of Trustees who voted in opposition. This is the straight skinny from the official BOT minutes: “Celebration Committee donation request. The Committee requests donation to purchase food and items for the community lunch on December 22, 2018. MOTION; Kat Brigham moves to approve Purchase Requesition to Cash and Carry in amount of $200 from BOT Reserve for Celebration Committee’s Annual Christmas dinner. Woodrow Star seconds. Motion carries 4 for (Kat Brigham, Woodrow Star, William Sigo, Doris Wheeler) – 2 against (Aaron Ashley and Rosenda Shippentower) – 0 abstaining.” Rita George was misidentified in the story that listed the people who made remarks at the farewell reception for Dr. Matt “Rex” Quaempts.

Weather information summarizes data taken at the Pendleton Weather Station Feb. 1-28. The average daily temperature was 27.7 degrees with a high of 53 degrees on Feb. 2 and a low of 3 degrees on Feb. 7. That’s almost 11 degrees below normal. Total precipitation to date in February was 2.78” with greatest 24hr average 0.37” Feb. 3. There was a departure of 1.64” from average for the month of February. Snow, ice pellets, hail total for the month: 32.5 inches with greatest 24 hour: 8.9 inches on Feb. 11. Greatest depth was 9 inches on Feb. 28. The average wind speed was 6.9 mph with a sustained max speed of 44 mph from the West on Feb. 11. A peak speed of 51 mph occurred from the southwest on Feb. 11. The dominant wind direction was from the North. There were 20 rain/snow days out of 28, and 25 fog/mist events in the month of February.

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Exempt) Salary: $57,098 --$75,283 (GS 11/1 – GS 12/4; DOQ) Department: Fishery Science Location: Hagerman, ID Recruitment: 2/15/2019 – 3-312019 CRITFC is seeking a Fisheries Geneticist w/experience in population genomics, assoc. with mapping, analyses of mixed stock fisheries. Support lab analyses w/ next gen sequencing methods perform analyses w/ heavy emphasis on population genetics. REQ: M. S (3-year of experience) or Ph.D. in the field of molecular biology, genetics, fishery biology, ecology and/or a related discipline. Please see the attached weblink to full job description and application information. critfc.org/blog/jobs/fisheriesgeneticist-5/

Confederated Umatilla Journal

1. Archaeologist (2 positions) 2. Re-Education Intervention Facilitator 3. Program Manager, First Foods Program 4. Police Officer 5. Child/Youth Advocate 6. Education Specialist: Special Education Facilitator 7. Equipment Operator 8. Secretary/Receptionist 9. Indian Child Welfare (ICWA) Caseworker 10. Fisheries Habitat Biologist II - North Fork John Day River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project 11. Public Transit Bus Driver 12. Tribal Linguist 13. Advocate 14. Communication Officer 15. Technician I - Hatchery 16. Fisheries Habitat Technician I - Grande Ronde Habitat Project 17. Biologist II - Assistant Project Leader 18 Office Manager 19. Tribal Roads Manager 20. Public Works Director 21. Fisheries Habitat Tech. II 22. HUD/Non HUD Maintenance Repairer For more information visit: CTUIR Att: Office of Human Resources Online 46411 Timine Way Pendleton, OR 97801 http://ctuir.org

March 2019


Committee, Commission vacancies

CTUIR Board of Trustees

PUBLIC NOTICE March 4, 2019

General Council

Chair Gary Burke

TRIBAL MEMBERS: This notification formally announces that applications are now being taken from tribal members who wish to serve on the Commissions/Committees listed below. Appointed members will receive a $100.00 stipend per meeting effective January 1, 2016 once the minutes have been approved on CTUIR pay days. 2 positions for Credit Board – 3 year term, meets 2nd & 4th Tuesday @ Noon 1 position for CTUIR Culture Coalition – term ending on May 7, 2020, meets as needed (No Stipends). 1 position for Cultural Resource Committee – 2 year term, meets 1st & 3rd Tuesday @ 1:30 PM 1 position for Enrollment Commission – 4 year terms, meets 2nd Thursday at 10:00 AM as needed. 1 position for Farm Committee to complete one – 3 year terms, meets 2nd & 4th Tuesday @ 2:30 PM 2 positions for Health Commission – 1 term ending Feb. 6, 2020, the other a full term, meets 2nd & 4th Tuesday @ 3:30 PM 1 position for Housing Commission to complete term ending Jan. 16, 2022 – meets 3rd Wednesday 9:00 AM - Noon. 1 position for TERO Commission – 2 year term, meets 1st & 3rd Tuesday @ 1:30 PM 1 position for Water Commission – 2 year term, meets 1st & 3rd Tuesday @ 8:30 AM All applications will be due on Monday, March 18, 2019 by 4:00 p.m. and BOT will make appointments on Monday, March 25, 2019.

Pendleton Pioneer Chapel received three prestigious awards in 2009

Chair Willie Sigo, IV

Vice Chair Jeremy Wolf

Vice Chair Michael Ray Johnson

Treasurer Doris Wheeler

Secretary Shawna Gavin

Secretary Kathryn Brigham

Interpreter Thomas Morning Owl

At-large BOT Members: Aaron Ashley General Council contact Info Sally Kosey Office: 541-429-7378 Rosenda Shippentower Email: GeneralCouncil@ctuir.org Meeting updates and information on: Woodrow Star

www.ctuir.org/government/general-council

Executive Director :

Ted Wright

General Council Meeting

w The Oregon Funeral Directors Association Award of Funeral Service Excellence w The Best Of Eastern Oregon Award as voted by the readers of the East Oregonian

Nixyaawii Governance Center, March 28, 2 p.m.

w Pendleton Chamber of Commerce 2009 Business of the Year

Draft agenda:

Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI) General Council Chair Annual Report State of the Tribal Court Address Our experienced family provides caring, compassionate care including:

Burial Services ~ Military Services Cremation ~ Monuments

March 2019

CTUIR Express Phone Directory

Tribal Court 541-276-2046

Human Resources 541-429-7180

Department of Children and Family Services 541-429-7300

Science & Engineering/Air Quality Burnline 541-429-7080

Enrollment Office 541-429-7035

Senior Center 541-276-0296

Finance Office 541-429-7150

TERF 541-276-4040

Finance – Credit Program 541-429-7155

Confederated Umatilla Journal 541-429-7399

Confederated Umatilla Journal

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Snow much winter fun

D’Andre Rodriguez throws up snow as he descends from the top of the hill near the path from the July Grounds to Tamastslikt Cultural Institute on the Umatilla Indian Reservation. Rodriguez is a 12-year-old fifth grader at Washington Elementary in Pendleton.

Sadie Mildenberger was driving along when she spotted the snow slide created by Logan Quaempts, on the roof. She couldn’t help herself and took a ride to the bottom.

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Ian Melendrez catches some air as his sled hits the end of the snow run where the pavement stops along the path from the July Grounds to Tamastslikt Cultural Institute. Melendrez is a 12-year-old sixth grader at Sunridge Middle School.

Confederated Umatilla Journal

March 2019


Clayton “Clutch” Johnson was walking on Willow Drive and decided to give Logan Quaempt’s off-the-roof sled jump a try. He goes airborne at left before landing on the mattress, and later he landed cockeyed with a laugh.

Loolas Thompson, 5, in back flies down the hill on a raft with, from left, Tracey Elisoff, 5, Maya Thompson, Aaron Thompson, 7, and Ronnie Elisoff, 4.

The sled was occupied so Aaron Thompson, 7, simply slid on his back down a steep snowy hill. Aaron is the son of Valerie Thompson who was joined in the day of fun by her sister Syreeta’s sister.

Syreeta Thompson, in the back, joined by tribal youngsters finds good sledding near the path from the Tamastslikt Cultural Institute trail to the old Yellowhawk. Riding with her are, from left, Dianna Azure,.4, Kayli Azure, 7, and Alice Centre, 11. Thompson is the mom to all three.

CUJ photos by Wil Phinney

March 2019

Confederated Umatilla Journal

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Confederated Umatilla Journal

March 2019


March 2019

Confederated Umatilla Journal

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CTUIR LANGUAGE Sápsikʷat/Téecukwe Word Search

Rawhide Braiders to gather in May at Tamastslikt Institute MISSION - The Northwest Rawhide and Leather Braiders Gathering will take place May 15-17 at Tamastslikt Cultural Institute. Attendance is free for members of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation; non-tribal members have a $200 fee. The event will consist of a round table for braiders to work on their projects and troubleshoot problems. Top braiders from the Pacific Northwest and other areas such as California, Oklahoma, and Australia will be in attendance. Last year, 12-15 people attended, but that number is expected to double this year. Leather braiding is the process of interweaving three or more pieces of material to create items used in horse tack, jewelry, and other applications. Rawhide braiding is the same process but with rawhide, which is green hide that has not been tanned, the intended result is more difficult to attain. For more information, contact Joe Benner at 541-303-3377.

Will-writing, estate planning services offered MISSION – Will writing and estate planning services will be offered to members of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) this month. Enrollment is now making confidential appointments for Mar. 11-19. Various types of documents can be prepared during these appointments, including wills, how to distribute property, powers of attorney, which allow others to make decisions on your behalf, and living wills, which detail end-of-life decisions. Information available on lands and options with private lands, how to get the desired results from wills and estateplanning documents, the importance of wills, and what can be done with a will once it is written. CTUIR Enrollment Office also provides confidential, secure storage of wills, regardless of who prepared them, for Tribal members. Previously, Bureau of Indian Affairs Umatilla Agency stored wills for CTUIR members, but no longer offers that service. To schedule your appointment or for more information, call 541-429-7401 or email mguss@email.arizona.edu.

“The Language Program in the Education Department for the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation - Umatilla, Walla Walla, and Cayuse Tribes - encourages all tribal members to learn their language. This monthly CTUIR Language page is designed to help community members learn words and phrases from the Umatilla, Walla Walla and Cayuse/Nez Perce languages. For more information contact Kristen Parr, Language Program Manager, at ristenparr@ctuir.org.

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Open NA Meetings starting in Mission

Tuesday Just for Today 7-8p.m. Thursday One Day at a Time 7-8p.m. 46770 B Street Pendleton, OR 97801 All Welcome!

Confederated Umatilla Journal

March 2019


Michelle Bratlie, right, staffs the booth during the Tribal Employment Rights Office (TERO) career and trade fair. Bratlie was once a TERO worker and has changed her career path to administrative work.

Please-No-More-Snow

SALE

Everything discounted in March

Below, folks from Oregon Department of Transportation showcase their booth. From left, ODOT staff include Sandy Lowe, Alexis Nesemann, and Amanda Eddie. CUJ photos/Casey Brown

Contributed photo

TERO Career/Trade Fair promotes job opportunities MISSION - The Tribal Employment Rights Office (TERO) hosted a Career and Trade Fair on Feb. 22 at Wildhorse Resort Casino. The event included various businesses and trade unions with informational booths. Event organizer and TERO Manager Aaron Hines said there was a “steady stream” of attendees throughout the day with small groups of two or three people arriving at a time. The conference room was a little more sparse than originally planned. Some organizations that agreed to host a booth were not able to attend due to inclement weather, Hines said. The Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT), native-owned Wenaha Group, Laborers’ International Union of North America, and others set up booths. TERO assistant Michelle Bratlie signed guests in at the front door. Bratlie was once a TERO worker who did a wide

variety of jobs from masonry to traffic control. One attendee, Collette Rosas, showed up at her boss’ request to get some information from the ODOT booth. Rosas works as a flagger. Representing the Laborers’ Union, Jeff Gritz said he came to the event to spread awareness and promote the union’s apprentice program. Scott Rogers of the Weneha Group expressed his support of TERO and their mission. He explained that many of Weneha’s construction projects include a certain number of hours from TERO workers. For example, the Education Facility under construction has a contractual agreement to include at least 25 percent Native American workers. For more information about TERO, call 541-429-7193 or email TEROStaff@ ctuir.org.

Free garden class for adults

MISSION – A free garden class for adults will be offered by Yellowhawk Tribal Health Center. The Seed to Supper program lasts six weeks with classes scheduled every Thursday from 5-7 p.m. April 4-May 9. “Easy, low cost” techniques taught in the class cover planning, planting, and maintaining a successful garden as well as how to harvest. The course takes place in the Laxsimwit Conference Room at Yellowhawk and

March 2019

community garden locations throughout Mission. It is taught by Community Garden Coordinator Adrienne Berry and members of the Oregon State University Extension Service Master Gardeners program. Pictures and other content is available on Facebook and Instagram @yellowhawkgarden. To register, contact Adrienne Berry at AdrienneBerry@yellowhawk.org or 541-240-8432.

Oregon Trail Gallery & Trading Post

621 Sixth St. in downtown Umatilla

Closed on Mondays Open Tuesday-Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. On call 24 hours a day 541-922-5123 Evenings 541-922-5567

Buckskin sale - Deer, elk and moose hides Plus smoked brain-tanned deer hides Three buckskin dresses Come in and see a beautiful old-style dentalia shell tradecloth dress F Large stock of moccasins - all sizes

Stop by and see Jim. Check out a full range of items, including lBeaded antique old and new shawls lTule mats l Men’s, women’s & children’s hard-sole fully beaded mocassins l Roaches, shell dresses for women and children lWhite buckskin dresses for women and children l Old style trade cloth dresses for children l White 3X large deer hides lOtter hair wraps l Wing and jingle dresses for women and girls l Large stock commercial and brain-tanned hides

AA Meetings on Umatilla Indian Reservation 46770 “B” St. (Next to Legion Hall)

Confederated Umatilla Journal

7-9 p.m. Sunday - Friendship Circle Wednesday- Many Trails Friday- Friendship Circle

ALL WELCOME

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CUJ Community Calendar BAAD tourney during Spring Break in March

The Confederated Umatilla Journal will now run a community calendar in each edition. It will include community events large and small to keep readers up to date on what is happening. Please send your community events to cuj@ctuir.org or call 541-429-7368. Include the title, date, time, location, cost, contact information and a short description. Thursday, March 7 Thursday Story Time at 10:30 a.m. Contact: 541-966-0380 Pendleton Public Library, 502 SW Dorion Ave, Pendleton All are welcome to attend though stories and crafts are tailored toward children ages 6 and under. Women with Disabilities and Domestic Violence at 4p.m. Contact: Linda Valentine, EOCIL, 541-276-1037 Eastern Oregon Center for Independent Living, 322 SW 3rd St., Pendleton A safe, secure environment to learn skills and develop tools to move forward after abuse and violence. Ladies Night Out to Benefit Pioneer Relief Nursery – 5:30-8p.m. Contact: Pioneer Relief Nursery, 541-215-1017 Tickets: $25 Pendleton Convention Center, 1601 Westgate, Pendleton Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault Women’s Support Group at 6p.m. Contact: Domestic Violence Services, 541-276-3322 Every Thursday Call for location. Sponsored by Domestic Violence Services. Jam Night at Pendleton Center for the Arts at 7p.m. Contact: 541-278-9201 Pendleton Center for the Arts, 214 N Main St., Pendleton A free drop-in every First Thursday. Sponsored by the Pendleton Music Company. LOL Comedy Night at Wildhorse Sports Bar at 8 p.m. Contact: 541-966-1612 Every Thursday; No cover charge Alfred Carcieri and Mike Walter Wildhorse Resort Casino, 46510 Wildhorse Boulevard, Pendleton Friday, March 8 No School Open Gym from 9a.m.-Noon Contact: 541-276-8100 Cost: $5 Pendleton Parks and Rec, Helen McCune Gym, 510 SW Dorion Ave, Pendleton Get your kiddo some gym time during those days off from school. Blue Hawk Gemstone and Bead Show/Sale from 10a.m.-6p.m. Contact: 541-278-9533 Blue Hawk Beads, 33 SW Dorion Ave, Pendleton An amazing selection of stones and semi-precious gemstone beads; and lots of new beads, stones, and crystals. Friday Story Time at 10:30 a.m. Contact: 541-966-0380 Pendleton Public Library, 502 SW Dorion Ave, Pendleton All are welcome to attend though stories and crafts are tailored toward children ages 6 and under. First Fridays are Free at Tamastslikt Cultural Institute from 10 a.m.-5p.m. Contact: 541-429-7700 Tamastslikt Cultural Institute, 47106 Wildhorse Boulevard, Pendleton Admission is free the first Friday of every month. No School Make & Take Crafts at 10:30 a.m. Contact: 541-278-9201 Pendleton Center for the Arts, 214 N Main St., Pendleton Jeff Crosby and the Refugees Concert at 7 p.m. Great Pacific, 403 S Main St., Pendleton The Talbott Brothers Live in Concert at 7p.m. Tickets: $10 Pendleton Center for the Arts, 214 North Main Street, Pendleton Brothers Nick and Tyler Talbott creatively combine blood harmonies with storytelling. Taylor & the Train Robbers Concert at 9 p.m. Hamley Steakhouse & Saloon, 8 SE Court Ave, Pendleton Boise-based band featuring Helix native Tylor Ketchum playing Americana folk with country grit. Live Music at Wildhorse Sports Bar from 8p.m.-12a.m. Every Friday and Saturday; No cover charge Wildhorse Resort Casino, 46510 Wildhorse Boulevard, Pendleton Saturday, March 9 Blue Hawk Gemstone and Bead Show/Sale from 10a.m.-6p.m. Contact: 541-278-9533 Blue Hawk Beads, 33 SW Dorion Ave, Pendleton First Saturdays Free at Heritage Station Museum from 10a.m.-4p.m. Heritage Station Museum, 108 SW Frazer Ave, Pendleton The first Saturday of each month is free. Come in and check us out! Free Youth Drop-In Art Project at 9:30 a.m. Contact: 541-278-9201 Every Saturday Pendleton Center for the Arts, 214 N Main St., Pendleton Stop in for a fun, free Saturday morning art project. Kids under 8 must be accompanied by a parent or older pal to help with the project. Hip and Handmade Free Drop-In Class at 11a.m. Contact: 541-278-9201 Every Saturday Pendleton Center for the Arts, 214 N Main St., Pendleton Gather around a big table in our craft gallery to work on a different project each week. No need to sign up, no tuition, just come on by! Moving Mountains Painting and Crafts at Noon Contact: 541-278-9201 Tickets: $10 Pendleton Center for the Arts, 214 N Main St., Pendleton Join us and enjoy a visual art experience that will help children develop skills such as self-expression, problem-solving, communication, and building self-esteem. Artworkz Artists Reception & Awards Ceremony at 1 p.m. Tamastslikt Cultural Institute, 47106 Wildhorse Boulevard, Pendleton Contact: 541-429-7700 The annual youth art show and competition features the artistic endeavors from youth

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throughout the region under the age of 19. Happy Hour Zentangles Spring Fling from 4-7p.m. Contact: 541-278-9201 Free, drop-in event Pendleton Center for the Arts, 214 N Main St., Pendleton Zentangles requires zero drawing experience. Umatilla County Historical Society presents: Trivia Games 2019 at 5:30 p.m. Tickets: $25 per person or $120 for table of six Contact: 541-276-0012 Proceeds from trivia and the entertaining live auction benefit Heritage Station Museum. 24th Annual Fireworks Show at 8 p.m. Wildhorse Resort Casino, 46510 Wildhorse Boulevard, Pendleton Be sure to turn into 104.3 KCUW for the piromusical during the show! Live Music at Wildhorse Sports Bar from 8p.m.-12a.m. Every Friday and Saturday; No cover charge Wildhorse Resort Casino, 46510 Wildhorse Boulevard, Pendleton Monday, March 11 Audiobooks with Libby App at 6p.m. Contact: 541-966-0380 Pendleton Public Library, 502 SW Dorion Ave, Pendleton Bring your smartphone or tablet and learn to download audiobooks for free through the library. Taylor & the Train Robbers Concert at 9 p.m. Great Pacific, 403 S Main St., Pendleton Boise-based band featuring Helix native Tylor Ketchum playing Americana folk with country grit. Tuesday, March 12 The Power of Positive Parenting at 10:30 a.m. Free; lunch provided Contact: 541-966-0380 Pendleton Public Library in the National Parks Programming Area, 502 SW Dorion Ave Learn useful tips for dealing with your child’s problem behavior. Lunch provided. FREE for parents and caregivers of children 0-12 years old. Powerful Tools for Caregivers at 1 p.m. Free event Yellowhawk Tribal Health Center, 46314 Timine Way, Pendleton Contact: Ben Bearchum, 541-240-8421, benbearchumjr@yellowhawk.org If you are providing physical or emotional support for a loved one, decline due to age, or you are a family caregiver, then this free class if for you! Crafternoons: Magic 8 Ball at 4:15p.m. Contact: 541-966-0380 Pendleton Public Library, National Parks Programming Area, 502 SW Dorion Ave, Pendleton No Registration Required. Ages 3-12: each Tuesday Ms. Jennifer will lead a fun craft. Wed, March 13 Reel Classics $5 Matinee Movies at Noon Contact: 800-654-9453 Casino (1995) with Robert De Niro, Sharon Stone, and Joe Pesci Wildhorse Cineplex, 46510 Wildhorse Boulevard, Pendleton Showing a classic movie every Wednesday at noon for $5. Includes free popcorn and soda. Beginner’s Computer at 3p.m. Contact: 541-966-0380 Pendleton Public Library, Library Meeting Room, 502 SW Dorion Ave, Pendleton Registration Required. Classes tailored to the needs of the students. Changing the Way We Play at 5 p.m. Washington Elementary School, 1205 SE Byers Ave, Pendleton Contact: Carrier Sampson, 541-240-8728, carriesampson@yellowhawk.org Yellowhawk Community Wellness and CTUIR Housing are teaming up to renovate the Walla Walla Court Playground. Please come and share your feedback. Nifty Knitters at 5 p.m. Cost: $10 drop-in Contact: 541-278-9201 Pendleton Center for the Arts, 214 N Main St., Pendleton Bring your projects and questions. Join the fiber fun gang for a casual and enjoyable get together for anyone who needs help on a knitting project. Crocheters welcome. Matt Hopper and the Roman Candles Concert at 7 p.m. Great Pacific, 703 S Main St., Pendleton An American rock and roll band that has been realizing music since 1999. An array of music rooted in classic rock tradition and modern rock experimentation with a penchant for jams and tender folk. Thursday, March 14 Thursday Story Time at 10:30 a.m. Contact: 541-966-0380 Pendleton Public Library, 502 SW Dorion Ave, Pendleton All are welcome to attend though stories and crafts are tailored toward children ages 6 and under. Artist Reception: Marie Noorani “How It Looks on Paper” from 4:30-6:30p.m. Free and open to the pubic Betty Feves Memorial Gallery at BMCC, 2411 NW Carden Ave, Pendleton Features the work of Marie Noorani, who both creates and destroys as she takes apart and reassembles each piece. BMCC Pow Wow at 6 p.m. Free and open to the public

Confederated Umatilla Journal

McRae Activity Center (the Mac), 2411 NW Carden, Pendleton Contact: Annie Smith 541-278-5935 or asmith@bluecc.edu Free event that is open to the public. Tribal dance contests include “Tiny Tots”, “Junior Boys”, “Junior Girls”, “13 and over men”, and “13 and over women.” Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault Women’s Support Group at 6p.m. Contact: Domestic Violence Services, 541-276-3322 Every Thursday Call for location. Sponsored by Domestic Violence Services. Opening Reception for Ellsworth Kelly: From the Collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer from 6-7:30 p.m. Contact: 541-278-9201 Free and open to the public Pendleton Center for the Arts, 214 North Main Street, Pendleton We’re thrilled to be hosting an exhibit of one of the most important artists of the past 100 years. LOL Comedy Night at Wildhorse Sports Bar at 8 p.m. Every Thursday; No cover charge Isaac Novak and Adam Lee Wildhorse Resort Casino, 46510 Wildhorse Boulevard, Pendleton In 2001, Adam Lee took first place in the Teen Category of the Las Vegas Comedy Competition. With an interactive style, he can be both self-deprecating and insulting. Friday, March 15 Friday Story Time at 10:30 a.m. Contact: 541-966-0380 Pendleton Public Library, 502 SW Dorion Ave, Pendleton All are welcome to attend though stories and crafts are tailored toward children ages 6 and under. Oregon East Symphony: A Flair for the Dramatic at 7:30 p.m. Contact: 541-276-0320 Tickets: $15-$25 Vert Auditorium, 480 SW Dorion Ave, Pendleton Conductor Beau Benson will lead the Symphony in a performance of Tchaikovsky’s Fifth Symphony. The Chorale will join the Symphony. Live Music at Wildhorse Sports Bar from 8p.m.-12a.m. Every Friday and Saturday; No cover charge Wildhorse Resort Casino, 46510 Wildhorse Boulevard, Pendleton Cale Moon Concert at 9 p.m. Contact: 541-278-1100 Hamley Steakhouse & Saloon, 8 SE Court Ave, Pendleton Cale Moon is turbocharged country entertainer who’s deep voice, addictive songs, and old-fashioned charm are loved by all ages. Saturday, March 16 Free Youth Drop-In Art Project at 9:30 a.m. Contact: 541-278-9201 Every Saturday Pendleton Center for the Arts, 214 N Main St., Pendleton Kids under 8 must be accompanied by a parent or older pal to help with the project. Hip and Handmade Free Drop-In Class at 11a.m. Contact: 541-278-9201 Every Saturday Pendleton Center for the Arts, 214 N Main St., Pendleton Masters of Illusion at 8 p.m. Tickets: $49-$69 Wildhorse Resort Casino, 46510 Wildhorse Boulevard, Pendleton These cutting-edge illusionists perform sleight-of-hand, perplexing interactive mind magic, hilarious comedy, dangerous escapes and large scale illusions. Live Music at Wildhorse Sports Bar from 8p.m.-12a.m. Every Friday and Saturday; No cover charge Wildhorse Resort Casino, 46510 Wildhorse Boulevard, Pendleton Monday, March 18 AARP Senior Tax Preparation Help from 8:30a.m.-2:30p.m. Free for adults 50 and older; Available on Mar. 25 and Apr. 1 Contact: 541-966-0201, taxaide@aarp.org City of Pendleton Community Room, 501 SW Emigrant Ave, Pendleton First come, first served. What to bring with you: https://www.aarp.org/money/taxes/ info-01-2011/important-tax-documents.html Tuesday, March 19 Raising Confident, Competent Children at 10:30 a.m. Free; lunch provided Contact: 541-966-0380 Pendleton Public Library in the National Parks Programming Area, 502 SW Dorion Ave Learn useful tips for dealing with your child’s problem behavior. Lunch provided. FREE for parents and caregivers of children 0-12 years old. Powerful Tools for Caregivers at 1 p.m. Free event Yellowhawk Tribal Health Center, 46314 Timine Way, Pendleton Contact: Ben Bearchum, 541-240-8421, benbearchumjr@yellowhawk.org If you are providing physical or emotional support for a loved one, decline due to age, or you are a family caregiver, then this FREE class if for you! Crafternoons: Cootie Catchers at 4:15p.m. Contact: 541-966-0380 Pendleton Public Library, National Parks Programming Area, 502 SW Dorion Ave, Pendleton No Registration Required. Ages 3-12: each Tuesday Wednesday, March 20

Community calendar on page 17A

March 2019


CUJ Community Calendar Continued from page 16A Contact: 800-654-9453 Fort Apache (1948) with John Wayne and Henry Fonda Wildhorse Cineplex, 46510 Wildhorse Boulevard, Pendleton Showing a classic movie every Wednesday at noon for $5. Includes free popcorn and soda. TED Talks Presentation with Live Guest Speaker at 11:30a.m. Contact: nixyaawiichamber@live.com Registration required ($20 for non-members; $15 for members) Wildhorse Cineplex, 46510 Wildhorse Boulevard, Pendleton Nixyaawii Chamber of Commerce is pleased to announce our annual TED Talks event; this month’s talks will feature a live guest speaker, J.D. Tovey, CTUIR Planning Director. Beginner’s Computer at 3p.m. Contact: 541-966-0380 Pendleton Public Library, Library Meeting Room, 502 SW Dorion Ave, Pendleton Registration Required. Classes tailored to the needs of the students. PJ Masks Toddler Party at 4:30p.m. Contact: 541-966-0380 Pendleton Public Library, National Parks Programming Area, 502 SW Dorion Ave, Pendleton Registration Required. Join us for PJ Masks-themed crafts, activities, and face painting! Thursday, March 21 Thursday Story Time at 10:30 a.m. Contact: 541-966-0380 Pendleton Public Library, 502 SW Dorion Ave, Pendleton All are welcome to attend though stories and crafts are tailored toward children ages 6 and under. Eastern Oregon Conference on Pain, Trauma, Addiction, Opioids and Other Drugs – 8a.m.-5p.m. Registration Required Wildhorse Resort Casino, 46510 Wildhorse Boulevard, Pendleton Contact: Mike Stensrud, mike.stensrud@umatillacounty.net A summit on pain and pain management that includes a keynote address, breakout sessions, and panels throughout the day. Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault Women’s Support Group at 6p.m. Contact: Domestic Violence Services, 541-276-3322 Every Thursday Call for location. Sponsored by Domestic Violence Services. Federale Concert at 7 p.m. Great Pacific, 703 S Main St., Pendleton Federale is a seven-piece ensemble based in Portland. Spearheaded by bassist Collin Hegna. Friday, March 22 Medicare 101 – 9a.m.-11a.m. Free event Nicht Yow Way Senior Center, 51 Umatilla Loop, Pendleton Contact: Clifford Stanger, 541-276-0296, cliffordstanger@ yellowhawk.org Learn about all things Medicare. Get your questions answers. Presentation designed with Seniors in mind. Friday Story Time at 10:30 a.m. Contact: 541-966-0380 Pendleton Public Library, 502 SW Dorion Ave, Pendleton All are welcome to attend though stories and crafts are tailored toward children ages 6 and under. Parent’s Night Out from 6-10p.m. Contact: 541-276-8100 Cost: $12 in advance, $15 at the door Pendleton Parks and Rec, Helen McCune Gym, 510 SW Dorion Ave, Pendleton Enjoy a night out and let us watch the kids. Our Parents’ Night Out event will be filled with games, arts & crafts, educational activities, snacks, pizza, and a movie. This event is for kids 3 years and older who are potty-trained up to 14 years old. Live Music at Wildhorse Sports Bar from 8p.m.-12a.m. Every Friday and Saturday; No cover charge Wildhorse Resort Casino 46510 Wildhorse Boulevard, Pendleton Saturday, March 23 Free Youth Drop-In Art Project at 9:30 a.m. Contact: 541-278-9201 Every Saturday Pendleton Center for the Arts, 214 N Main St., Pendleton Kids under 8 must be accompanied by a parent or older pal to help with the project. Hip and Handmade Free Drop-In Class at 11a.m. Contact: 541-278-9201 Every Saturday Pendleton Center for the Arts, 214 N Main St., Pendleton Bingo After Dark Wildhorse Resort Casino, 46510 Wildhorse Boulevard, Pendleton $50 machine; $30 paper; purchase add-ons at the door. Must be 18 years or up. Doors open at 5pm; main session at 7pm. Food & drink specials, no host bar, gift shop specialty items. Live Music at Wildhorse Sports Bar from 8p.m.-12a.m. Every Friday and Saturday; No cover charge Wildhorse Resort Casino, 46510 Wildhorse Boulevard, Pendleton Monday, March 25 AARP Senior Tax Preparation Help from 8:30a.m.-2:30p.m. Free for adults 50 and older; Available on Mar. 25 and Apr. 1 Contact: 541-966-0201, taxaide@aarp.org City of Pendleton Community Room, 501 SW Emigrant Ave, Pendleton First come, first served. What to bring with you: https://www.aarp. org/money/taxes/info-01-2011/important-tax-documents.html Gardening for Beginners at 6p.m. Contact: 541-966-0380 Pendleton Public Library, National Parks Programming Area, 502 SW Dorion Ave, Pendleton No Registration Required. Hints, tips, and PLANS for your first try. Tuesday, March 26

March 2019

Raising Resilient Children at 10:30 a.m. Free; lunch provided Contact: 541-966-0380 Pendleton Public Library, National Parks Programming Area, 502 SW Dorion Ave, Pendleton Learn useful tips for dealing with your child’s problem behavior. Lunch provided. FREE for parents and caregivers of children 0-12 years old. Powerful Tools for Caregivers at 1 p.m. Contact: Ben Bearchum, 541-240-8421, benbearchumjr@ yellowhawk.org Free class Yellowhawk Tribal Health Center; 46314 Timine Way, Pendleton If you are providing physical or emotional support, decline due to age, or you are a family caregiver, then this FREE class if for you! Crafternoons: Crystal Ball Picture at 4:15p.m. Contact: 541-966-0380 Pendleton Public Library, National Parks Programming Area, 502 SW Dorion Ave, Pendleton No Registration Required. Ages 3-12: each Tuesday Ms. Jennifer will lead a fun craft. Be sure to pick up a schedule at the front desk so you can plan ahead! DIY: Embroidery Hoop Wreath at 6p.m. Contact: 541-966-0380 Pendleton Public Library, Library Meeting Room, 502 SW Dorion Ave, Pendleton Registration Required. Teens & Adults: all supplies provided. Come learn to turn an embroidery hoop into a beautiful spring decoration. Wednesday, March 27 Reel Classics $5 Matinee Movies at Noon Matilda (1996) with Mara Wilson, Danny DeVito, and Rhea Perlman Wildhorse Cineplex, 46510 Wildhorse Boulevard, Pendleton Showing a classic movie every Wednesday at noon for $5. Includes free popcorn and soda. Beginner’s Computer at 3p.m. Contact: 541-966-0380 Pendleton Public Library, Library Meeting Room, 502 SW Dorion Ave, Pendleton Registration Required. Classes tailored to the needs of the students. Thursday, March 28 Thursday Story Time at 10:30 a.m. Contact: 541-966-0380 Pendleton Public Library, 502 SW Dorion Ave, Pendleton All are welcome to attend though stories and crafts are tailored toward children ages 6 and under. Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault Women’s Support Group at 6p.m. Contact: Domestic Violence Services, 541-276-3322 Every Thursday Call for location. Sponsored by Domestic Violence Services. LOL Comedy Night at Wildhorse Sports Bar at 8 p.m. Every Thursday Rich Williams Wildhorse Resort Casino, 46510 Wildhorse Boulevard, Pendleton After releasing an R&B album that went “wood in the hood,” (his Mom and 3 of his friends bought copies) Rich Williams parlayed his innate sense of humor into a career in comedy. Friday, March 29 Friday Story Time at 10:30 a.m. Contact: 541-966-0380 Pendleton Public Library, 502 SW Dorion Ave, Pendleton All are welcome to attend though stories and crafts are tailored toward children ages 6 and under. Live Music at Wildhorse Sports Bar from 8p.m.-12a.m. Every Friday and Saturday; No cover charge Wildhorse Resort Casino, 46510 Wildhorse Boulevard, Pendleton Saturday, March 30 Free Youth Drop-In Art Project at 9:30 a.m. Contact: 541-278-9201 Every Saturday Pendleton Center for the Arts, 214 N Main St., Pendleton Stop in for a fun, free Saturday morning art project with one of our creative and enthusiastic staff members. Kids under 8 must be accompanied by a parent or older pal to help with the project. Hip and Handmade Free Drop-In Class at 11a.m. Contact: 541-278-9201 Every Saturday Pendleton Center for the Arts, 214 N Main St., Pendleton We gather around a big table in our craft gallery to work on a different project each week. No need to sign up, no tuition, just come on by! Lincoln Barr with Andrew Norsworthy Concert at 7 p.m. Great Pacific, 703 S Main St., Pendleton Lincoln Barr is a songwriter and singer living in Pendleton. After thirteen years leading Seattle-based pop group Red Jacket Mine, he released his debut solo album in 2017. Live Music at Wildhorse Sports Bar from 8p.m.-12a.m. Every Friday and Saturday; No cover charge Wildhorse Resort Casino, 46510 Wildhorse Boulevard, Pendleton Monday, April 1 AARP Senior Tax Preparation Help from 8:30a.m.-2:30p.m. Free for adults 50 and older; Available on Mar. 25 and Apr. 1 Contact: 541-966-0201, taxaide@aarp.org City of Pendleton Community Room, 501 SW Emigrant Ave, Pendleton First come, first served. What to bring with you: https://www.aarp. org/money/taxes/info-01-2011/important-tax-documents.html Thursday, April 4 Women with Disabilities and Domestic Violence at 4p.m. Contact: Linda Valentine, EOCIL, 541-276-1037 Eastern Oregon Center for Independent Living, 322 SW 3rd St., Pendleton

Confederated Umatilla Journal

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‘Synesthesia’ gives artist unique perspective By Casey Brown of the CUJ

EUGENE - Jessica Lavadour, who hears colors when she paints, is currently focused on three-dimensional images of the ocean. Her artwork is receiving notice across the globe and she will soon collaborate with three other artists on a project facilitated by the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art in Eugene. A member of the Confederated Tribes, Lavadour, who currently lives in Eugene, plans to donate a piece of her artwork upon her return soon to the Umatilla Indian Reservation. Lavadour has a malady known as synesthesia, which is a neurological condition in which someone experiences one sense as another. When painting, she said she “hear[s] music and sound in Jessica Lavadour colors.” Lavadour started creating art when she was about 10 years old, and did beadwork, traditional basket weaving, and writing. Some of her poetry was published when she was a student at Blue Mountain Community College. Lavadour grew up in Cayuse and “spent all of my free time going upriver and hiking around in the mountains.” During her childhood, Lavadour also took family trips to the Oregon Coast, which is what inspires her current work. Lavadour paints with epoxy resin on all sorts of surfaces, including live-edge wood that come from Tina Jackson’s property in Cayuse. Jackson, enrolled CTUIR is Lavadour’s mother. She shares her artwork on her social media accounts, such as her Instagram @jesslavadour.art, which can

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Contributed photo

Jessica Lavadour, enrolled CTUIR member and artist, holds one of her 3D paintings. Lavadour paints scenes of the ocean with epoxy resin and hand makes custom elements such as rocks. Her work has garnered the attention of the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art in Eugene, and she ships her paintings around the world.

reach a worldwide audience. In fact, she ships her artwork around the country and the world to places like Texas, Singapore, Germany, and South America. “I get to share a little bit of what I love and the place that I love with the people who purchase my artwork,” Lavadour said.When she started working with resin, Lavadour did not immediately start making three-dimensional paintings. In fact, she first did abstract work. “Initially when I started out working with epoxy resin, which is the only type of painting I’ve ever done, I didn’t have much of a hand for drawing or painting anything that would look realistic. When I started out using resin, I did abstract work, which I still go back to on occasion.”

Confederated Umatilla Journal

Lavadour chose epoxy resin, which is not a common medium. When she first had the idea, she searched the internet and YouTube, but didn’t find much information on painting with gummy substance. “I landed on epoxy resin because of its fluidity and how well it coincides with my synesthesia,” she said. Her unique perspective has opened up other doors, including the collaboration at Schnitzer Museum in Eugene. She and three other artists will create work, inspired while listening to a four-part symphony, called Symphonic Metamorphosis of Themes by Carl Maria von Weber, composed by Paul Hindemith. They will each choose one of the four musical parts and create work inspired by that piece. The Eugene Symphony will perform while the artwork is displayed in April of 2020. “With my synesthesia, this [collaboration] will open up more opportunities for me in the art world. There are probably people out there in the art world that have these types of neurological conditions,” Lavadour said. Lavadour also creates art with her 7-year-old daughter, Layla. Her daughter is too young for resin, as it is toxic, but they participate together in fluid acrylic painting. Lavadour said that the two styles are fairly similar. She also says that her daughter has talent all her own. “I guess that ‘Lavadour gene’ is going to trickle down a few more generations,” she laughed. She is related to other artistic Lavadours, including the world-renowned painter Jim Lavadour and master beadworker Joey Lavadour, and says “we all joke that it is because we grew up in Cayuse and there is nothing else to do.” Beyond the collaboration next year, Lavadour’s career continues to grow. Currently, she represents herself, which means she is in charge of all the logistics of being a modern working artist - social media management, customer service, sales, and packing and shipping. However, she has recently been offered gallery representation, which may lighten some of that load and give her more time to do what she loves: paint.

March 2019


Basketball friendship at state hoop tournament A big drum and a handful of dancers from the Umatilla Indian Reservation provided the halftime entertainment at the Oregon Class 1A state basketball tournament in Baker City March 2. Among the dancers was Fred Hill, right, who hadn’t been on the floor for a couple of years. Above, people from the bleachers moved to the floor for a circle - or friendship dance. CUJ photos/Phinney

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Confederated Umatilla Journal

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BMCC hires Women brave snow to dig for latit latit seventh president A group of women and girls ventured out into the hills March 1 to dig for latit latit, celery, to prepare for the First Food’s feast on March 3. Most of the women have been out to dig in the snow but many of them said they can’t recall digging in such deep snow before. Trish McMichael, left, drives her kupin, root digging tool, into the snow-packed ground. First-time-digger Tatum Wilson is in the back working on pulling the root from the frozen ground. As the women all perched on the hill side and dug their kupins into the hard earth, drivers slowed on Highway 395 to watch. After they finished at their first location they drove to a second spot before bringing the day’s yield back to the Longhouse welcomed by Washat singers and drummers.

CUJ photos/Jill-Marie Gavin

Cara Greene, above, brought her daughters out to dig for latit latit, celery root, March 2 with a large group of diggers. Celery Feast was held March 3 at the Mission Longhouse, visitors from Yakama Nation made their way over after their own feast was cancelled due to weather.

Keyen Singer removes her gloves to clean off her celery before placing it in her wapas, woven bag used to collect roots. This was Singer’s first time digging for latit latit.

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Beth Looney shows Trish McMichael the size of the celery she gathered halfway through the morning dig.

Confederated Umatilla Journal

PENDLETON – The Blue Mountain Community College Board of Education unanimously approved the hiring of Dennis Bailey-Fougnier as BMCC’s next President at a special Board meeting March 4. Bailey-Fougnier (pronounced “Fournear”) will begin his new role on May 1, 2019. Bailey-Fougnier was one of four finalists selected from a pool of 44 applicants for the position. His selection stems from multiple interviews, a meeting with the Board, and forums with BMCC faculty, staff and students, and the community. Dennis The Board of EducaBailey-Fougnier tion also took into consideration survey feedback it received from the College community on each of the candidates. “Dennis brings a strong background in community colleges, and the ability to develop and foster relationships with the community,” said Chris Brown, Chair of the BMCC Board of Education. “We are excited to bring his expertise and leadership to BMCC as we enter this new chapter.” Bailey-Fougnier received a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Oregon, his Master of Education from Wichita State University, and his Doctor of Education (ABD) in Community College Leadership from Oregon State University. He most recently worked for Colorado Mesa University in Grand Junction, Colorado, as the Vice President of Community College Affairs. There, he supervised the community college division, which was seeing a decline in enrollment. Through the rebuilding of programs, adding new programs, and expanding in new areas, enrollment slowly began to grow. Bringing education to rural, first-generation, and underrepresented students and their families is Bailey-Fougnier’s passion. “I am honored to be the new President of Blue Mountain Community College,” Bailey-Fougnier said. “I am very excited to join the exceptional team at BMCC and to work with them and the community to enhance the educational opportunities for our students. I am looking forward to working with the community to find new avenues to grow our economy and workforce.” The other three finalists included Dr. Anthony Rosilez, Executive Director of the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practice Commission (TSPC); Jeff Sherman, Assistant Director for Oregon State University Extension Service – Strategic Innovation and Statewide Director; and Dr. George McNulty, Vice President of Student Affairs at Colby Community College (Colby, Kansas). Dr. Connie Green will continue to serve as Interim President until BaileyFougnier’s arrival in May.

March 2019


Chief Judge William Johnson, right, gives the oath of office to new members of the Nixyaawii Community Fund, a non-profit Community Development Financial Institution during a brief ceremony March 4. The new members include, from left, Jim Wallis, Kelly George, Aaron Hines, Shane Munkers, Doris Wheeler, Bobbie Conner, and Gabriel Moses. CUJ photo/Phinney

New Nixyaawii Community Fund board sworn in MISSION – Members of the first Board of Directors for the Nixyaawii Community Fund (NCF), the Confederated Tribes’ fledgling Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI), were sworn in by Chief Judge William Johnson in the Tribal Courtroom March 4. Initiated in 2017 by the Business Development Services Center at Wildhorse Resort & Casino, a CDFI is a non-profit organization that works in locations that are underserved by traditional banks and lending institutions. CDFIs can make a wide range of loans and also provide development services such as financial education, training, and technical assistance, according to Dave

Tovey, NCF Executive Director. As of 2018, there were more than 1,000 federally certified CDFIs in the United States and 76 Native CDFIs. The new board members, selected by various Tribal Committees among 22 Tribal and non-Tribal applicants, include four members of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and three non-Tribal members who will serve staggered terms. The new board members are: l Doris Wheeler, Board of Trustees Treasurer, finance/accounting background; l Kelly George, Land Acquisition Coordinator, 10 years in banking industry;

l Bobbie Conner, Tamastslikt Cultural Institute Director, Small Business Administration (SBA) regional manager, as well as a member of boards of Oregon Community Foundation, Eastern Oregon University, and EcoTrust; l Aaron Hines, TERO (Tribal Employment Rights Office) Program Manager, former CTUIR Board of Trustees Treasurer, and recently hired as Yellowhawk Human Resources Director; l Jim Wallis, retired Tribal/Yellowhawk Tribal Health Center Chief Financial Officer and Tribal member family; l Shane Munkers, Assistant Relationship Manager/Credit Analyst at US Bank and coach at Pilot Rock;

l Gabriel Moses, Attorney with Williams Moses, worked with NAPOLS, and has done extensive work on Portland Harbor environmental remediation suit. The new CDFI board will conduct a joint training session with the CTUIR Board of Trustees on March 20 with a facilitator contracted through OWEESTA, a CDFI intermediary and technical assistance organization that provide numerous services to Native CDFI’s. The CDFI board will meet formally in their first official meeting in April. If you have questions related to the new Tribal venture, contact Tovey 541966-1922 (direct line) or Dave.Tovey@ wildhorseresort.com.

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Confederated Umatilla Journal

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Healthy soil workshop March 12-14

Two groups from the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs reservation showed up for Tribal Information Day. One was the Warm Springs Elders group and the other was from Indian Head Casino. Above is beadwork and weaving done by Aurolyn Stwyer who attended the event on behalf of the elders group.

Oregon’s nine Tribes showcase culture in Salem

Aurolyn Stwyer, Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, brought her beaded horse regalia to display during the 2019 Tribal Information day, held in Salem at the Oregon State Capitol building Feb. 22.

SALEM, Ore. - Every February The Legislative Commission on Indian Services organizes Tribal Information Day, held at the Oregon State Capitol. All nine federally recognized tribes of Oregon brought in exhibits that demonstrate their unique cultures and tribal governments. The nine tribes of Oregon include The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Warm Springs, Grande Ronde, Coos Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians and Siletz, the Coquille Indian Tribe, Klamath Tribes and the Burns Paiute Tribe. Employees of each Tribe spent the day answering questions of curious visitors and handing out promotional matierals.

PENDLETON – A “Healthy Soil, Healthy Region” workshop is planned March 12-14 at the Pendleton Convention Center. The workshop is designed to bring people “together to increase the adoption of soil health practices through coordination and training.” Pipa Elias, the Soil Health Strategy Manager for The Nature Conservancy’s (TNC) North American Region, will be the keynote speaker. Her keynote is titled “Taking Action on Soil Health: Aligning science, economics and policies for adoption.” The region-wide approach to bring together agricultural professionals and producers from Oregon, Washington, and Idaho for the three-day workshop to improve awareness of existing, new, and evolving regional soil health practices and assessment methods. According to information from the Center for Sustaining Agriculture and Natural Resources at Washington State University, the workshop will provide hands-on training on soil health practices, improve understanding of the practical barriers producers face when implementing soil health practices, and increase familiarity with tools that can be used by producers to make decisions related to soil health. The workshop hopes to get various groups working on soil health in the region “on the same page” regarding sampling protocols, method selection, and the current state of science. Elias joined TNC in 2014 as a Senior Policy Advisor for land use and climate change and has published more than a dozen reports on sustainable forestry and agriculture related to climate mitigation. She also is considered an expert on sustainable agriculture issues, having participated as a speaker and a panelist at numerous conservation, agriculture and corporate sustainability conferences. Elias holds a master’s degree in forest soils from Virginia Tech and a bachelor’s degree in environmental science from the University of Notre Dame.

Free classes for parents, with lunch

CUJ Photos/Jill-Marie Gavin

Tribal Government Day has taken place each year since at least 2004 and serves as a way for Tribes and everyone in the building to connect and visit. In the photo from the left is Jenn Trosper, Coquille, Legislative Commission on Indian Services Interim Director Danny Santos, Kassandra Rippee, Coquille, Lindsey Dick, Burns Paiute, Beverly Beers, Burns Paiute, Mark Petrie, Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw, Eric Hawley, Chair of the Burns Paiute Tribe, Myron George, of Native American Rehabilitation Association NW Thyreicia Simtustus, Miss Warm Springs, Aurolyn Stwyer, Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indians, Winona Strong, Warm Springs, Robert VanNorman, Tribal Council Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians and Donna Fields, also of the Cow Creek Band.

Ad deadline is March 19 News deadline March 26 22A

Confederated Umatilla Journal

PENDLETON - Three free, lunchincluded parenting classes are being offered by the Pendleton Public Library. Participants can learn useful tips for dealing with a child’s problem behavior. The Tuesday classes, which begin at 10:30 a.m., are free for parents with children age 0-12 and lunch is provided. The Power of Positive Parenting is March 12; Raising Confident, Competent Children is March 19, Raising Resilient Children is on March 26. For more information, contact Pendleton Public Library at 541-966-0380.

March 2019


American Legion Continued from page 2A

at noon for Post 140. Following the grand entry at the memorial, the American National Anthem, a flag song and Washat song, plus a speaker to be determined, the event at Nix-Ya-Wii will close with a rifle volley and taps. Veterans will gather for a Longhouse big-drum war-dance grand entry at 10 a.m. The grand entry will be led by a veteran carrying an Eagle Staff, followed by other flag carriers and veterans. A Washat song and prayer will welcome and open the Longhouse to honor

the 100-year anniversary of the American Legion. Several speakers are expected to make remarks. Recommended to speak are veterans Chuck Sams III, J.C. Penny, Chief Bill Burke, Ron Halfmoon, Bob Shippentower, Toni Cordell, and others. Also expected to speak are John Turner, Mayor of Pendleton and Marine veteran, and Bob Stangier of Pendleton, a WW-2 U.S. Army Air Force pilot. Following an honor circle dance song, a lunch will honor the American Legion’s centennial. The birthday celebration will include a cake-slicing ceremony with additional

N’chi Wana Housing Continued from page 2A

a meeting earlier in January, discussed three potential sites for new housing – Horse Thief near Lyle, Wash., and Spearfish near Dallesport, and Wishram across the Columbia River from Celilo. Representatives of the four CRITFC tribes agreed that Wishram is the best choice because the other two sites contain known ancestral remains. “The only one on the drawing board is Wishram across from Celilo,” Luke said. “That’s where housing would be built.” However, CTUIR General Council Chair Willie Sigo suggested there ought to be housing closer to the Umatilla Indian Reservation, including sites along the pools behind John Day and McNary

dams. When Columbia River dam construction began in the 1930s, tribal communities along the river were displaced. At the four tribes’ instance, recent federal support indicates movement to address the housing “crisis,” according to information provided by the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians/Economic Development Corporation (CTUIR member Dave Tovey is president of ATNI – EDC.) In 2016, the Yakama and Warm Springs tribes authorized an exploration of developing the housing entity, which was later named N’Chi Wana Housing, with the understanding that the Umatilla and Nez Perce tribes would be able to join. Funding from the Meyer Memorial Trust will help carry out the entity’s functions. CRITFC also selected a Project Team

speakers, including Legion Auxiliary elder Tessie James Williams and other guests. The Pa’xum history will be provided by CTUIR elders – Minthorn, Chief Jesse Jones Jr., Elwood Patawa, David Wolf Jr., and J.C. Penny, who is a WW II Navy veteran, and others. A big drum and singers will open with a Pa’xum song. According to Minthorn, the whipman, who is the dance-floor commander, will dance the first verse of the song by himself before signaling with a wave of his whip for all dancers to join him. The official whipman of the 1940’s dur-

comprised of the Native American Youth and Family Center and ATNI-EDC. The Project Team began their work in June of 2017 and concluded at the end of last year. The original project included the development of a new intertribal housing authority, but the tribes expressed concern for competition with federal funding from the Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Act (NAHASDA) and requested a different governance model that is supportive of the four tribes’ housing programs, according to information contained in the most recent ATNI-EDC Update newsletter. Luke noted that the Yakama Nation is already building 50 to 60 homes at Dallesport across the river from The Dalles, Luke said.

Kipp, Thompson reappointed to Election Commission Radford resigns appointment before term begins MISSION – Roberta Kipp and Michelle Thompson have been reappointed to the Election Commission for the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). The CTUIR Board of Trustees (BOT)

on Dec. 10 accepted the recommendation of the General Council and reappointed Kipp to a term that ends Dec. 31, 2022. On Jan. 7, the Board reappointed Thompson after accepting the declination from Shana Radford, who had been appointed to the Election Commission on Jan. 2. Radford was scheduled to be sworn in on Jan. 7, but submitted a letter

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to the BOT declining the appointment on Jan. 5. Thompson’s reappointment to a four-year staggered term was approved by a vote of 6-1 (voting in favor were Sally Kosey, Kat Brigham, Woodrow Star, Aaron Ashley and Jeremy Wolf; voting against was Rosenda Shippentower).

ing World War II was Tom Johnson. His brother, Dick Johnson, was a survivor of the 1877 Nez Perce War, which was followed by the 1878 Bannock War. In that conflict, the Bannocks surrendered to the Cayuse in the Blue Mountains around Starkey, according to 1930 historical texts of Gilbert Minthorn. A break in the Pa’xum routine will include fun dance songs, such as a Circle Dance, Owl Dance, or Rabbit Dance. The fun dance break will include three handdrum singers, which also is part of the Pa’xum routine. The Pa’xum closing song will be a Circle Dance with the big drum.

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Weed ID, Safety & Accuracy in Invasive Weed Control Workshop March 19, 2019 9am – 4pm Tamastslikt Cultural Institute, Theater Room This is a free training hosted by Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation and Oregon State University Extension in collaboration with Washington State University Colville Reservation FRTEP and USDA APHIS. For CTUIR provided lunch must Register by March 11th with Cheryl Shippentower at (541) 4297239 or CherylShippentower@ctuir.org or Chris Schachtschneider at (541) 278-5403 or chris. schacht@oregonstate.edu

Confederated Umatilla Journal

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Confederated Umatilla Journal

March 2019


News & Sports

Section

The monthly newspaper of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation ~ Pendleton, Oregon

B

March 2019

CUJ photos/Phinney

Members of the state champion Golden Eagles include, from left, Assistant Coach Aaron Ashley, Moses Moses, Jace Ashley, Quanah Picard, Head Coach Shane Rivera, Mick Schimmel, Dazon Sigo, D’Andre Rodriguez, Luis Ortega, Magi Moses, Reuben Bronson, Tyasin Burns, Assistant Coaches Alan Crawford and Ken Mayfield, holding daughter Nila. Deven Barkley kneels in front.

NCS rolls to Class 1A championship

Boys dominate foes at state tournament in Baker City By Wil Phinney of the CUJ

BAKER CITY – The boys from Nixyaawii Community School (NCS), by an average of 20 points a game, won three contests in four days and embraced their first Oregon Class 1A State Championship with a 59-42 victory March 2 over the Trinity Lutherans from Bend. There was little doubt from the initial tip-off in all three state tournament games at Baker, not to mention the squad’s play-in game the week before at Pendleton High School. In order, NCS walloped St. Paul, 73-54, on Feb. 22; Horizon Christian, 66-44, on Feb. 27; Prairie City, 71-49, on March 1; and then the 17-point victory in the championship tilt on Saturday night. Nixyaawii finished the year with a 28-2 record. The Golden Eagles maintained strong leads through-

March 2019

NCS fan Gilbert Diaz wraps his arms around Dazon Sigo, center, and Deven Barkley. The seniors’ last high school game was for the state title.

out the tournament, trailing only once (3-0 against Horizon Christian) during the 96 minutes of basketball at Baker City. Although the winner of the championship game was determined as soon as senior Dazon Sigo dropped a three-pointer to open the game, the Nixyaawii fans, out in full force on both sides of the gym, gave the boys a

Confederated Umatilla Journal

loud, rousing ovation at the end. And the NCS players and coaches gave it right back, standing in the center of the gym floor acknowledging the crowd on one side and then the other. “We did it, we made school history,” said Sigo, one of the two seniors on the team. “We did it in front of all the fans; they deserve it just as much as we do … amazing love and support for us and we really appreciate it.” Junior Mick Schimmel had an impressive line – 17 points, 13 rebounds, three blocks and two assists in 31 of the game’s 32 minutes, but it was big sophomore Magi Moses who took Player of the Game honors. Coming off the bench, Magi Moses was in the right place at the right time throughout his 21 minutes, picking up 12 points – he was 5-for-6 from the floor – plus eight rebounds. “I wanted to win the damn game,” Magi Moses said after the game. “I wasn’t losing this game. I feed off the crowd; I love these big games.” Each of the starters, plus Magi and Moses Moses off the bench, contributed in their own ways to the victory. Senior Deven Barkley scored 8, missing only three shots all night. He was fouled on a 3-pointer and made all three free throws in the third quarter when Trinity had cut the lead to 10. Then in the fourth period he stuck in the dagger - and any prayers that the Lutherans had for a comeback were dashed - with a 3-pointer from the left corner to give NCS a 49-27 lead with five minutes remaining. Junior Quanah Picard was 5-for-6 from the line. He Nixyaawii clobbers Trinity, Page 6B

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Sophomore Dakota Sams was a team leader in the point guard spot.

Bucks’ season ends against #2 Wilsonville

Assistant Coach Ryan Sams celebrates the win over Parkrose with Kason Broncheau, 22, and Chauncey Sams, right.

Kason Broncheau, a junior at Pendleton High School, played guard for the Buckaroos.

From the East Oregonian

CORVALLIS – Pendleton High School’s Buckaroo boys’ basketball team, following a come-from-behind overtime win March 2, were scheduled to play Wednesday (CUJ press day) in the Class 5A quarterfinals against Wilsonville, the secondranked team in the state. Their win over Parkrose was classic. Tyler Newsom scored 41 points and the number-10 ranked Buckaroos rallied from an 11-point second-half deficit to down number-7 ranked Parkrose, 74-73. Pendleton, 17-5, have been a mainstay in the post-season for years, but they haven’t reached a boys’ basketball championship game since 1940, and their last state title came in 1931. Wilsonville won’t make it easy for the Buckaroo. Parkrose, 18-6, had the game in control several times and led 36-25 early in the third quarter, but a barrage of three-pointers brought Pendleton back. The Buckaroos made five of their 12 three-pointers in the third quarter and added a fourth in the final frame. Sophomore Dakota Sams, a member of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, hit five from beyond the arc and senior Cam Sandford came off the bench to make four. But the night belonged to Newsom, who scored all 13 of Pendleton’s points in the first quarter. Parkrose led 14-13 after one quarter, 28-25 at the half, and 48-45 through three periods. Both teams had opportunities to win the game in regulation in the final 10 seconds, but each missed two free throws to keep the score knotted at 66. Parkrose led 70-67 in overtime, but committed turnovers and let the lead slip away.

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Jonathan Begay, another junior at PHS, also plays guard for the Bucks. First year Head Coach Zach Dong celebrates on the sideline during Pendleton’s overtime win over Parkrose. Second from left, are tribal players Chauncey Sams, Jonathan Begay and Grayson Sams.

Chauncey Sams, a junior Buckaroo, played guard and post.

Dakota Sams, a top scorer for the Bucks this year, starts the game with encouragement from players and his father, Assistant Coach Ryan Sams, at right in white shirt.

Contributed photos

Confederated Umatilla Journal

March 2019


BAAD kicks off March 22 MISSION- The 32nd Annual Basketball Against Alcohol and Drugs (BAAD) Tournament will be held at the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Recreation Community Gymnasium during Spring Break, Mar. 22-30. More than 40 teams and 100 visitors are expected to descend on the Umatilla Indian Reservation. The tournament is hosted by CTUIR Education Department’s Recreation Program. After each team’s first game, they participate in a 45-minute prevention class sponsored by Yellowhawk Prevention Services. This annual event draws big crowd and lots of support. CTUIR Recreation Program also coordinates all of the volunteers each year, which consist of community members, CTUIR staff, and family members. Those looking to volunteer may contact Age brackets are 6-8 co-ed, 9-11 girls, 9-11 boys, 12-14 girls, 12-14 boys, 15-18 girls, 15-18 boys. Player will not be allowed to play in another age bracket due to safety concerns. The 2019 B.A.A.D. Tournament Committee is currently accepting Team Rosters and Entry Fees for all age brackets. The deadline for Entry Fees and Rosters is Friday, Mar. 8. All money orders can be paid to: CTUIR Recreation Program,

The 2019 BAAD annual logo contest winner is Rena Penney. Read about it on Page 27B.

ATTN: B.A.A.D. Tournament, 46411 Timíne Way, Pendleton, OR 97801 (personal checks will not be accepted). Full Payment must be received in order to secure your spot. Registration forms are located on the CTUIR website https://ctuir.org/2019baad-tournament-press-release. For more information, call 541-4297887, toll free 888-809-8027, or email BAADTourney@ctuir.org.

Merrily Jones, a member of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, makes a pass in a game for Evergreen State College.

Merrily Jones finishes junior hoop season OLYMPIA, Wash. – Merrily Jones has completed her junior basketball season at Evergreen State College and finished among the top players in the Cascade Collegiate Conference (CCC). Although the team had a tough year with a 2-22 record, Jones, enrolled member of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, put up good numbers with an average of 9.3 points a game, with a high of 28 points. Jones, who had two ACL surgeries in high school, averaged 8.3 rebounds a game, which was third in the conference. She led her team in rebounds and had a high game with 15 boards. Jones recorded 2.5 assists per game and was the only center in the CCC that finished among the top 15 players in the conference. She led the team with a total of 61 assists and had a high game of seven assists. Jones was second in blocked shots in the CCC and led the team with a nearly 2-block shot average. She had a game with six blocks, which tied a team record.

March 2019

Merilly Jones averaged 8.3 points per game for Evergreen State College in Olympia, Wash.

Jones is the daughter of Buck and Nadja Jones and the granddaughter of Chief Jesse Jones. Her hometown is Milwaukie, Ore.

Confederated Umatilla Journal

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Hoffman unanimous selection to Blue Mountain all-stars Weston-McEwen junior Stockton Hoffman and Heppner sophomore Sydney Wilson were unanimous picks by the coaches for the Blue Mountain Conference all-star teams. Wilson and Grant Union twins Hailie and Kaylee Wright were unanimous picks on the girls’ team, while sophomore Keegan Glenn of Union joined Hoffman on the boys team. Hoffman, a 6-foot-1 guard, averaged 23 points, 9.5 rebounds and six assists per game for the TigerScots (4-19). Wilson, a forward, averaged 22.5

points, 9.5 rebounds and 2.5 assists per game for the Mustangs. The Heppner boys (18-7), who won the BMC regular-season title and the district title, had seniors Trent Smith and Tyler Carter named to the first Stockton Hoffman team. - East Oregonian

Nixyaawii hoop starters make OOL all-star squad MISSION – Four out of the five starters from Nixyaawii Community School’s (NCS) boys’ basketball team made the Old Oregon League all-star list with junior Mick Schimmel and sophomore Tyasin Burns named to the first team. For the first time in two years, Schimmel wasn’t named OOL Player of the Year. He didn’t score as much this year (19-point average), perhaps because NCS has four other shooters and he chose to make assists more than baskets. Burns, one of two sophomores on the first squad, has developed into a capable point guard that can dish the ball or, because he is so quick, drive to the basket. Senior Deven Barkley, known for his non-stop effort, and sophomore Moses Moses, who proved his three-point prowess in state tournament play in Baker City (seven threes and a total of 25 points in the opener against Horizon Christian) were named to the second team, and

junior Quanah Picard earned honorable mention. Player of the year was Christopher Nobles from Wallowa. First team – Schimmel, Burns and Nobles, plus seniors Omar Benetiz from Powder Valley and Tyler Homan from Joseph. Also on the first team was the other sophomore, Mason Ferre from Joseph. Second team – Barkley and Moses, as well as senior Tucker Gulick from Pine Eagle, junior Jayce Burnett from Imbler, and sophomores Kaden McClure from Elgin and Eli Sprenger from Griswold (Helix). Tim Sprenger, Eli’s father, was for three years the principal at NCS. Honorable mention – Picard, plus senior Blake Witten from Cove, sophomores Chase Murray from Joseph and Gage McKay from Elgin, and freshmen Roper Bingham and Reese Dixon, both from Powder Valley.

Muriel Hoisiington, a freshman at Pendleton High School, passes and shoots around defenders in one of Pendleton High School’s last home games this winter. The girls qualified for state but were knocked out in the first round by Willsonville.

Butler, Lark Moses earn second team OOL honors MISSION – Senior post Ermia Butler and sharp-shooting junior Lark Moses from Nixyaawii Community School’s girls’ basketball squad earned second team honors among Old Oregon League all-stars. Butler played on the state tournament champion team in 2016-17 as a sophomore and was the starting post last year when the NCS girls played in the title game. Moses looked for the three-point shot and led the team this year in scoring. Sabrina Albee from Joseph, which was ranked number one in Oregon Class 1A at the end of the season, was player of the year.

First team – Albee, plus her Joseph teammates Madelyn Nelson and Emma Hite, Megan Bingham from Powder Valley and Tymra Anderson from Elgin. Second team – Butler and Moses, along with Belle Blair and Logan Nedrow from Powder Valley, Haley Miller from Joseph, and Jocelyn Palmer from Elgin. Honorable mention – Riley Ferre and Jamie Johnston from Wallowa, Austin Kendall and Maggie Frisch from Cove, Arianna Krohl from Griswold (Helix), Camille Crenshaw from Joseph, Autumn Davis from Powder Valley, and Maddie Morgan from Pine Eagle.

Send your news to the CUJ at cuj@ctuir.org 4B

Wilson ends Buckaroo girls basketball hopes PENDLETON GIRLS WILSONVILLE – Pendleton High School girls’ basketball team ended their season March 1 when they lost to Wilsonville, 92-41, in the first round of the Class 5A state tournament. Pendleton Coach Kevin Porter said Wilsonville, led by Cydney Gutridge with 23 points, was the best team the Buckaroo girls have faced this year. Wilsonville advanced to the quarterfinals at Oregon State University in Corvallis where they were to play Crescent Valley today (Thursday,

Confederated Umatilla Journal

March 7). Pendleton finished the season with a 10-13 record; Wilsonville was 21-5. The Wildcats led 22-6 after the first period and 49-19 at halftime. Wilsonville then went on a 33-11 run in the third quarter to lead, 82-30. Sophomore Natalie Neveau led the Bucks with a dozen points. The Pendleton team includes Muriel Hoisington, a member of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and Uliyana Guerrero, who was injured earlier in the season.

March 2019


The NIxyaawii Golden Eagles are the Oregon Class 1A State Champions in basketball, winning their three games by an average of 20 points per contest. Here they receive first place medals. From left, Assistant Coach Aaron Ashley, Head Coach Shane Rivera, Moses Moses, Jace Ashley, Deven Barkley, Quanha Picard, Mick Schimmel, Dazon Sigo, D’Andre Rodriguez, Luis Ortega, Magi Moses, Reuben Bronson, Tyasin Burns, Assistant Coach Alan Crawford and Assistant Coach Ken Mayfield.

The people, businesses and CTUIR departments and programs listed below sponsored this Congratulations page.

Congratulations Nixyaawii boys - STATE CHAMPS “"niixmataš patakiyáan!" you all did great.” General Council Officers Chair William Sigo, IV Vice Chair Michael R Johnson Secretary Shawna ShillalGavin Interpreter Thomas Morning Owl “Congratulations!” - Patrick Hunt, Southern Twain BBQ

“Congratulations Nixyaawii Golden Eagles on your championship WIN!” -Wildhorse Resort and Casino “Good job you guys!” -Dallas Dick, Red Elk Images

“Congratulations on your victory. GO EAGLES!!”

-Arrowhead Travel Plaza

“Congratulations to the Nixyáawii Golden Eagles, State 1A Basketball Champions! You boys made is all proud of your great accomplishment. Way to go Deven Barkley, 2nd team all-state tournament team! From The Barkley’s!!!!” -Barkley Family

“You make us proud, Golden Eagles” -Tamastslikt Cultural Institute

“Congratulations!” -Umatilla Tribal Police Department

“Niixmatash Pawikushana!” -Education Department

“Congratulations Nixyaawii Golden Eagles!”

-Cayuse Holdings

“Congratulations Team, Coaches and Fans for Nixyaawii Golden Eagles. We’re very proud of You Oregon STATE Basketball CHAMPIONS. You own the TITLE NUMBER 1.”

“Congratulations to a wonderful team!” -Department of Children and Family Services

-Gary Burke, Board of Trustees Chair

“Congratulations Nixyaawii Boys!” -Tribal Environmental Recovery Facility

“You Make Us Proud!” -Pendleton Center for the Arts The Pamáwaluukt Empower Program of The Office of Human Resources wants to congratulate the Nixyáawii Golden Eagles boys basketball team for ‘raising themselves up’ and winning the Oregon State 1A championship! Pamáwaluukt Pride! -Pamalwaluukt

“Congratulations Golden Eagles!” -Blue Mountain Creations

"You're an inspiration of Excellence!" - Board of Trustees

“Way to go Eagles!” -Indian Lake Program

“Congrats State Champs! Soaring sky high! We are proud to broadcast Golden Eagle Sports!”

-KCUW Radio Station

“Deven and Dazon go do good things. The rest of you get ready for next year!”

-Wil and Carrie Phinney

March 2019

“Congratulations!” -Tribal Employment Rights Office

Confederated Umatilla Journal

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Nixyaawii clobbers Trinity in title game Continued from page 1B

made an old-fashioned 3-point play with 2:06 left to give Nixyaawii its final margin, 59-42. And Tyasin Burns, the quick sophomore point guard, was breaking ankles all night long with his start-and-stop ball handling. The stat sheet says he only had two assists, but that’s debatable. And when he wasn’t dishing the ball around, he put on a dribbling exhibition to help run out the clock. Sigo was the man in the middle supporting the stout defense that halted Trinity players trying to score in the key. Trinity held NCS’s sharp shooters to 37 percent from the field, but it was the Golden Eagles depth that proved the Lutherans’ undoing. “It wasn’t pretty but we got it done,” said an elated Coach Shane Rivera, who showed more animation and emotion in this game – and afterwards - than he has all year. “Trinity is talented, but our depth, especially on defense, was key early in the first half,” Rivera said. “We held them to 10 points for the longest time.” In fact, Trinity scored the last six points of the second quarter to cut the deficit to 12 at halftime. “They made some mini-runs, but I’ve got to credit our team defense,” he said, noting that NCS players took turns guarding Trinity freshman Scooty Gilbert, who led all scorers with 18 points. Gilbert, a baby-faced 6-foot 1-inch 240-pounder, showed no fear going to the hoop, but he was held to six field goals in 19 tries and missed six of his 11 free throw attempts. “We came in and knew we had a big challenge,” said Gilbert, who is the son of Trinity Coach Kyle Gilbert. “We have a brotherhood at Trinity and we play hard, but we struggled and didn’t shoot as well as we wanted.” Later that night, while the Trinity team was shopping for snacks, Gilbert asked that his quote include “It was God’s plan.” Trinity has come a long way since the school’s basketball program began five years ago and will lose just one senior. The Lutherans lost 43 games in a row before winning a varsity contest, Trinity Coach Gilbert said. “Three years later we’re in the state championship game,” he said. The Coach’s defensive strategies worked, he said, but the offense sputtered. “Our defense did what we wanted. We did a great job of holding them to about 35 percent. We held their three pointers down and pressured every shot. But offensively we could not find the hoop.” The Golden Eagles bench, led by Magi with 12 and Moses Moses with four points, outscored Trinity, 16-2. The team outscored the Lutherans 13-5 on second-chance points and 13-6 in points off turnovers. Trinity actually outscored Nixyaawii in the paint, 24-22. Schimmel summed it up after the trophies were presented, noting that “We played together as usual, the way we’ve played all season.” He said it was an amazing feeling to win a state title. “We worked all year for this and it feels even better to do it with my family.” The Schimmel clan was waiting around nearby, but Mick clarified his statement. “I’m talking about my basketball team, that’s my family too,” he said.

Bradley Rivera jumps into the arms of her father, Nixyaawii Head Coach Shane Rivera, after his Golden Eagles ball club won the Oregon Class 1A State Championship March 2 in Baker City. Bradley’s sister, Barrett, waits her turn. That’s Rivera’s older daughter, Hannah, handing little girl to her father.

Trinity Lutheran vs Nixyaawii 3/2/19 7:00 pm at Baker High School NIXYAAWII 59, TRINITY LUTHERAN 42 TRINITY LUTHERAN (24-5) Scooty Gilbert 6-19 5-11 18; Cash Niemeyer 4-10 2-4 11; Matt Eidler 2-9 3-4 7; Niko Utu 1-1 0-0 2; Layton Valentine 1-2 0-0 2; Abe Clift 1-5 0-0 2; Connor Harrell 0-0 0-0 0; Gideon Schippers 0-1 0-0 0; Justin Bennett 0-0 0-0 0; Jayden Dover 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 15-48 10-19 42. NIXYAAWII (27-2) MICK SCHIMMEL 5-13 5-7 17; MAGI MOSES 5-6 2-3 12; QUANAH PICARD 2-10 5-6 9; DEVEN BARKLEY 2-3 3-4 8; TYASIN BURNS 2-6 2-2 6; Moses Moses 1-6 1-2 4; DAZON SIGO 1-3 0-0 3; LUIS ORTEGA 0-1 0-0 0; JACE ASHLEY 0-0 0-0 0; D’ANDRE RODRIQUEZ 0-0 0-0 0; REUBEN BRONSON 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 18-48 18-24 59. Trinity Lutheran.............. 5 11 6 20 - 42 Nixyaawii..................... 14 14 10 21 - 59 3-point goals--Trinity Lutheran 2-8 (Scooty Gilbert 1-3; Cash Niemeyer 1-2; Abe Clift 0-1; Gideon Schippers 0-1; Matt Eidler 0-1), Nixyaawii 5-15 (MICK SCHIMMEL 2-4; DAZON SIGO 1-2; Moses Moses 1-3; DEVEN BARKLEY 1-2; LUIS ORTEGA 0-1; TYASIN BURNS 0-1; QUANAH PICARD 0-2). Rebounds--Trinity Lutheran 41 (Cash Niemeyer 14), Nixyaawii 35 (MICK SCHIMMEL 13). Assists--Trinity Lutheran 3 (Layton Valentine 2), Nixyaawii 6 (TYASIN BURNS 2). Total fouls--Trinity Lutheran 19, Nixyaawii 16. Moda Health Players of the Game: Cash Niemeyer, Trinity Lutheran Magi Moses, Nixyaawii

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Mick Schimmel averaged 13 points and 11 rebounds per game in the three contests Nixyaawii Community School won in Baker City enroute to the state championship. Schimmel was two rebounds shy, in the game against Horizon Christian, of having a double-double in each contest. His top game, against Trinity in the championship, boasted 17 points and 13 rebounds - but his sophomore teammate Magi Moses was named Player of the Game. Schimmel earned that honor in the second game against Prairie City when he had 10 points and 12 rebounds, three assists and a steal. CUJ photos/Phinney

Confederated Umatilla Journal

March 2019


NCS pounds Prairie City in clash of 26-2 teams By Wil Phinney of the CUJ

BAKER CITY – Nixyaawii boys hit four of their first five shots – all 3-pointers - to open up a 12-0 lead and didn’t allow Prairie City to get closer than nine points for the rest of this semifinal game in a battle of two teams with identical 26-2 records. “We came out smoking, that’s for sure,” said NCS Coach Shane Rivera. The Golden Eagles grabbed a 15-point lead after the first quarter and led by as many as 25 points when Deven Barkley hit a pair of free throws to make the score 60-35 with 5:04 remaining in the game. Ironically, it was the only two points Barkley would score, but it didn’t matter to him. “I’m not even mad that I only scored two points,” Barkley said after the game. “It was a team dub (W for win). Those guys were tall but we showed them how we play.” Prairie City sported two big men, including 6-foot 4-inch Levi Burke, one of the team’s five seniors who scored a game-high 25 points. Burke scored more than half his team’s points, hitting 3 of 5 from beyond the arc and 9 for 16 on two-pointers plus four free throws. He also had 9 rebounds and three blocked shots. But the Golden Eagles were flying faster in a pattern that boasted scoring from nine players. Three starters were in double figures led by Tyasin Burns with 15 points and 7 steals. Mick Schimmel had a double-double with 10 points and a dozen rebounds. Quanah Picard, who scored 14, was one of three players with two 3-pointers. The others were Burns and Luis Ortega. In spite of their height advantage – they also had 6-5 junior Cole Dieter – Nixyaawii equaled the Panthers with 40 rebounds for each team, but the Golden Eagles outscored Prairie City 28-12 in the paint. One 12-second stretch showed the frenetic pace in the first period. Between 5:57 and 5:45, Burns had two steals, Burns and Schimmel put up unsuccessful shots before Barkley rebounded and passed to Schimmel who earned an assist on a 3-pointer by Picard. NCS maintained a healthy lead into the second quarter when Barkley, driving the baseline, slipped a pass to Magi Moses underneath the hoop for a 35-15 lead.

Magi Moses, a 6-foot 2-inch sophomore, didn’t let a little foul in the face stop him from scoring on this play against a Trinity Lutheran defender in the championship game. Moses averaged just short of 11 points and 8 rebounds per game at Baker City. CUJ photos/Phinney

Prairie City on page 8B

At left, Nixyaawii senior Deven Barkley goes to the floor after a loose ball with three Trinity Lutheran defenders. A fourth Lutheran, all-tournament team player Scooty Gilbert (32), watches the action. Above, a Prairie City dribbler finds himself in jail against, from left, Mick Schimmel, Dazon Sigo, Tyasin Burns, and Quanah Picard.

March 2019

Confederated Umatilla Journal

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Prairie City Continued from page 7B

In the third quarter, Picard stole the ball at half court and tossed it backwards over his head to a streaking Burns to make it 43-22. Also in the third, Burns had three steals that he turned into seven points. Burns was the team’s leading scorer but he credited tough play on the other end of the floor for the win. “It’s all about defense,” said Burns, who humbly added, “It’s just another game.” The NCS defense forced 15 turnovers by the Panthers that produced 21 points. Assistant Coach Aaron Ashley also praised the defense in what he called “good, solid team ball.” “We told them before the game to maintain our identity. We made no dramatic changes. We are who we are and play Nixyaawii basketball.” That identity equated to 16 more points in the paint and 10 more fast break points for Nixyaawii. Then NCS bench outscored Prairie City, 23-7. Coach Rivera reminded his team that Prairie City really only had five guys against the Golden Eagles’ deep bench. “We were trying to get the ball as fast up and down the court as we could,” Rivera said. “They only had five guys and it’s hard to be your best for four full quarters.” Barkley said the players told each other “we all had to box out” for rebounding position. “The coaches told us they were bigger, but we knew they didn’t have a bench. All we do is play our game, run and get ‘em tired.” Senior Dazon Sigo, who had 7 points, said the Golden Eagles simply “moved the ball like a cohesive unit. We’ve done that all season and now we’re going to the championship.” March 1, 2019, noon at Baker High School

Tyasin Burns, Nixyaawii’s quick sophomore point guard, rakes the ball along the baseline to the hoop against Prairie City in the Golden Eagles’ semifinal win. Both teams were 26-2 coming into the game, which Nixyaawii won by 22 points. Burns led NCS with 15 points, 7 steals and 5 rebounds.

CUJ photos/Phinney

They said after the game... Nixyaawii’s number one fan, Gilbert Diaz, after the championship game: “They forget how we can shoot 3’s. We played the big guys tough and came together, shared the ball. This is a good team. I love ‘em.” Coach Shane Rivera after the Prairie City contest: “This is what it takes to beat the best teams. You give it to the open guy because everyone can score.”

NIXYAAWII 71, PRAIRIE CITY 49 PRAIRIE CITY (26-2) Levi Burke 9-16 4-7 25; Jojari Field 3-16 3-4 11; Syd Holman 1-4 1-2 4; Brandon Horrell 1-1 0-0 3; Opie McDaniel 1-1 0-0 3; Cole Deiter 1-7 0-0 2; Jayden Winegar 0-3 1-2 1; Brett Copenhaver 0-1 0-0 0; Lucas McKinley 0-6 0-0 0; Declan Zweygardt 0-1 0-0 0; Marcus Judd 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 16-56 9-15 49. NIXYAAWII (26-2) TYASIN BURNS 6-11 1-2 15; QUANAH PICARD 5-9 2-2 14; MICK SCHIMMEL 4-15 1-2 10; MAGI MOSES 4-9 0-0 8; DAZON SIGO 3-6 0-0 7; LUIS ORTEGA 2-3 0-0 6; Moses Moses 2-9 1-2 6; REUBEN BRONSON 1-4 0-0 3; DEVEN BARKLEY 0-2 2-2 2; JACE ASHLEY 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 27-68 7-10 71. Prairie City................... 10 11 14 14 - 49 Nixyaawii..................... 25 14 16 16 - 71 3-point goals--Prairie City 8-29 (Levi Burke 3-5; Jojari Field 2-10; Opie McDaniel 1-1; Brandon Horrell 1-1; Syd Holman 1-3; Brett Copenhaver 0-1; Lucas McKinley 0-4; Jayden Winegar 0-2; Cole Deiter 0-2), Nixyaawii 10-27 (TYASIN BURNS 2-5; LUIS ORTEGA 2-3; QUANAH PICARD 2-4; REUBEN BRONSON 1-2; MICK SCHIMMEL 1-7; DAZON SIGO 1-2; Moses Moses 1-4). Rebounds--Prairie City 40 (Cole Deiter 11), Nixyaawii 40 (MICK SCHIMMEL 12). Assists--Prairie City 4 (Syd Holman 2), Nixyaawii 9 (MICK SCHIMMEL 3; DEVEN BARKLEY 3). Total fouls--Prairie City 8, Nixyaawii 15. Moda Health Players of the Game:Mick Schimmel, Nixyaawii Levi Burke, Prairie City

NCS Principal Ryan Heinrich as the players and fans were celebrating a state title: “It’s cool, great for the boys - they’ve played hard all year. Now everybody will be looking for us coming back next year. I figured we’d be playing on Saturday night in Baker. Now we just have to stay on top because everybody is going to be coming after us.” Magi Moses on how Nixyaawii won the title: “It’s a talented group we have and at the start of the season I knew we had the tools to get us here for sure. We’re focused and we’re clicking at the right time.” Assistant Coach Aaron Ashley: “We told them before the game to maintain our identity. We made no dramatic changes. We are who we are and play Nixyaawii basketball.” Deven Barkley after game two: “I’m not even mad that I only scored two points.”

One of the Nixyaawii coaches on the court looking for Quanah Picard after the Prairie City game: “He’s upstairs in the balcony taking pictures with his family.”

All-Tournament Team Four players from Nixyaawii Community School’ championship team earned All-Tournament Team honors. Junior Mick Schimmel and sophomore Moses Moses made the first team, while senior Deven Barkley and sophomore Tyasin Burns were selected to the second team.

Nixyaawii Community School fans react to a bucket in the Golden Eagles’ win over Trinity Lutheran in the Oregon Class 1A State Championships in Baker City March 2.

Class 1A Boys’ All-Tournament Team First Team Levi Burke, 12, Prairie City (unanimous) Mick Schimmel, 11, Nixyaawii (unanimous) Matt Eidler, 11, Trinity Lutheran Moses Moses, 10, Nixyaawii Scooty Gilbert, 9, Trinity Lutheran Second Team Blake Ellis, 12, Days Creek Jacob Zakharyuk, 11, Damascus Christian Luke Martin, 12, Sherman Deven Barkley, 12, Nixyaawii Tyasin Burns, 10, Nixyaawii

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Confederated Umatilla Journal

March 2019


Moses Moses scored 6 points against Prairie City, shooting here over 6-2 senior Syd Holman. Moses scored 25 in the first round game against Horizon Christian.

Nixyaawii Head Coach Shane Rivera holds up what was left of the net after each player and assistant coach cut off their pieces after the game.

NCS slams Horizon Christian

BAKER CITY – Moses Moses went off for 25 points in 24 minutes and earned Player of the Game honors in Nixyaawii’s 66-44 first round win over Horizon Christian Feb. 27.

Moses Moses’ scoring line was more than impressive. He made 7 of 9 shots from outside the arc for 21 points and hit 2 of 3 from short range. Three others scored in double figures – Magi Moses was 6 for 8 from the floor for 12 points and added 7 rebounds; Mick Schimmel had 11 points, 8 rebounds and 6 assists; and Tyasin Burns had 11 points, shooting 5 for 8 from the field. This was the only game in which Nixyaawii trailed, but it was short-lived. Moses Moses scored 14 points in the first quarter, including three straight 3-pointers and NCS led 21-12 at the end of one. Moses Moses scored 5 points in the second quarter and had 19 points by halftime. With Moses and Magi Moses playing so well, the two seniors on the team, Deven Barkley and Dazon Sigo, didn’t have to play so much. Each recorded just nine minutes in the 32-minute game. Also, Barkley was nursing a sprained ankle.

Quanah Picard wasn’t satisfied shooting from the perimeter so he drove to the basket against Trinity Lutheran. His efforts sent him to the free throw line six times and he made five of those tries. CUJ photos/Phinney

March 27, 2019 3:15 pm at Baker City NIXYAAWII 66, HORIZON CHRISTIAN 44 NIXYAAWII (25-2) Moses Moses 9-12 0-0 25; MAGI MOSES 6-8 0-1 12; TYASIN BURNS 5-8 0-0 11; MICK SCHIMMEL 5-12 1-1 11; QUANAH PICARD 2-9 0-0 4; DAZON SIGO 1-2 0-0 3; LUIS ORTEGA 0-2 0-0 0; DEVEN BARKLEY 0-1 0-0 0; JACE ASHLEY 0-0 0-0 0; REUBEN BRONSON 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 28-55 1-2 66. HORIZON CHRISTIAN (19-6) Derek Johnston 4-13 2-2 12; Alex Petshow 3-14 2-2 11; Bailey Holste 3-9 2-2 8; Caleb Lingel 3-14 1-1 7; Kyle Brown 3-3 0-0 6; Skyler Leeson 0-0 0-0 0; Alex Whitaker 0-2 0-0 0; Josh Rogers 0-0 0-0 0; Jesse Williams 0-0 0-0 0; J.J. Holste 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 16-55 7-7 44. Nixyaawii.......................... 21 18 12 15 - 66 Horizon Christian............. 12 13 13 6 - 44

Deven Barkley, one of two seniors on the NCS team, takes the ball to the hoop on a fast break against Trinity Lutheran in the championship game.

March 2019

Mick Schimmel, who was a unanimous selection to the Class 1A All-Tournament Team, talks on the phone after the game - and gets a hug from Titto Moses.

3-point goals--Nixyaawii 9-26 (MOSES MOSES 7-9; TYASIN BURNS 1-3; DAZON SIGO 1-2; QUANAH PICARD 0-3; LUIS ORTEGA 0-2; DEVEN BARKLEY 0-1; REUBEN BRONSON 0-1; MICK SCHIMMEL 0-5), Horizon Christian 5-18 (Alex Petshow 3-9; Derek Johnston 2-4; Caleb Lingel 0-5). Rebounds--Nixyaawii 36 (MICK SCHIMMEL 8), Horizon Christian 31 (Alex Petshow 8). Assists--Nixyaawii 14 (MICK SCHIMMEL 6), Horizon Christian 2 (Alex Petshow 1; Alex Whitaker 1). Total fouls--Nixyaawii 9, Horizon Christian 7. Moda Players of the Game: Moses Moses, Nixyaawii Derek Johnston, Horizon Christian

NCS Coach Shane Rivera reacts after the final buzzer, here giving a hug to senior Deven Barkley, after the Golden Eagles won it all.

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Dazon Sigo, still sporting the gauze needed to stop his bleeding nose, gets a hug from his mom, Dora Sigo.

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CUJ Community News Heart disease is number one NA killer

Yellowhawk offers info on Heart Health Day By Casey Brown of the CUJ

MISSION - Cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of American Indian/Alaska Native adults in Umatilla and Union counties, according to a recent study by Dr. Rex. Quaempts, the former Medical Director at Yellowhawk Tribal Health Center (YTHC). Nationwide, it is the number one killer for the general population, but the risk factor is double in American Indians/Alaska Natives, according to the U.S. Center for Disease Control. In response, YTHC hosted a Heart Health Day on Valentine’s Day. The event boasted booths, presentations, cooking demonstrations, and Tai Chi, a form of Chinese martial arts that is practiced as a low-impact exercise. Carrie Sampson, Community Wellness Director, said that Yellowhawk’s approach to heart health followed a path recommended by the Centers for Disease Control, but the effort was not necessarily implemented in a cohesive way. “When we started planning for this event, we found information on the CDC ... that identified all the preventative factors that you can take,” Sampson said. “As we were looking at this, we realized that Yellowhawk is doing this. We are doing a lot of this and offering services that will ultimately reduce the impact of cardiovascular disease, but we realized we are not really tying it all together. The event covered a large footprint in the Yellowhawk building. Attendees signed up for the raffle drawings and received maps just inside the main entrance. Presentations from Yellowhawk’s medical team, cooking demonstrations, and healthy snacks were in

Dusty Dressler gives a “High Five” presentation on the impact of nutrition on heart health at the Heart Heath Day on Valentine’s Day at Yellowhawk Tribal Health Center. Five ways to promote heart health are increase fruits and vegetables, choose healthy fats, reduce sodium, moderate alcohol consumption, and choose whole grains for fiber. CUJ photo/Casey Brown

the Laxsimwit large conference room. One of the presentations was by Yellowhawk’s new dietician, Dusty Dressler. Her talk was on the topic of nutrition and heart health, and the theme was “High Fives.” She had five items to consider when thinking of heart health: increase fruits and vegetables, choose healthy fats, reduce sodium, moderate alcohol consumption, and choose whole grains for fiber. In between presentations, Tai Chi was also offered in Laxsimwit. Booths were set up around the Yellowhawk Circle, including one staffed by Adrienne Berry, Community Garden Coordinator, who educated attendees on the

Herbal teas, infusions promote health By Casey Brown of the CUJ

An important part of physical health is what we eat, and drink. Teas and infusions are an alternative to carbonated beverages and sugary drinks. One particular infusion is made locally by Adrienne Berry, Community Garden Coordinator at Yellowhawk Tribal Health Center. It has been quite a hit at a number of tribal functions recently such as at Yellowhawk’s Heart Healthy Day on Feb. 14. The infusion contains nettles and peppermint. It is slightly sweet, despite not containing any sugar or sweetener, and has sparked excitement, Berry says. The tea’s presence has opened conversation on a variety of topics. People talk about when they used to gather nettles with their grandmothers, the smell reminding people of family members, and that this an opportunity for children to learn about nettles for the first time, Berry said. Berry is a member of the Northwest Food Sovereignty Coalition, which is where she learned more about herbal teas and infusions. The group offered a workshop called “Native Infusion: Rethink Your Drink,” which included educational information and a “Guide to Ancestral Beverages.” Berry said she has always used natural remedies and infusions. “It is nice to have the opportunity to do so for other people,” she said. Berry’s “Rethink Your Drink” curriculum explains how to dry plants, harvest plants (also known as wild-

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A station with different ingredients allowed attendees to make their own blends. Some of the ingredients on this cart were grown and harvested locally in the community gardens by Adrienne Berry, Community Garden Coordinator. CUJ photo/Casey Brown

crafting), and how to infuse water with “herbs, spices, edible flowers, fruit and vegetables.” The handout also talks about the difference between teas, infusions, and decoctions (the process of simmering dense ingredients such as roots and bark in water). To learn more about this curriculum or teas and infusions in general, contact Adrienne Berry at AdrienneBerry@yellowhawk.org.

Confederated Umatilla Journal

community garden and herbal teas. She handed out a gardening survey and had a make-your-own tea station. Ingredients ranged from organic peppermint leaf to whole elderberries and rosehips. For those wanting to try a brew without mixing, Berry brewed a tea that includes nettles and peppermint. Yellowhawk provided some tips for preventing heart disease, encouraging people to “kick the smoking habit and avoid tobacco, get active, eat for health, know your numbers” for blood pressure, blood sugar, blood cholesterol, and blood lipids. The motto of the day was “Take Heart, Take Care” with information about cardiovascular disease, heart disease, and heart health. In an interview about heart health, Dressler emphasized the large role nutrition plays. She said healthy eating is both preventative and helps to manage heart conditions once present. For example she said, “There’s evidence that choosing higher fiber foods, especially soluble fibers, will help to reduce cholesterol, which reducing your cholesterol numbers helps to keep your heart healthy.” In conjunction with Heart Health Day, Yellowhawk staff also visited Cay-Uma-Wa Head Start and provided 40 Nixyaawii Community School athletes with healthy sack lunches as they travelled to district basketball games. While the Heart Health Day was the first of its kind, Yellowhawk’s Community Wellness Department has plans for continued outreach throughout the year, according to Sampson. Focus areas include childhood obesity, physical activity, and breastfeeding awareness. “We thought it was really successful, and we hope to have more of these types of events, each with different focuses, all with the goal to help improve the health of our community,” Sampson said.

Yellowhawk Exercise Class Schedule MISSION - Yellowhawk Tribal Health Center offers free exercise classes multiple times per day, Monday through Friday. Classes range from yoga to INSANITY Live! with a few in between such as general Yellowhawk Aerobics, Tai Chi, Dance Fitness, and High-Intensity Interval Training. Every class is free and open to all: Yellowhawk patients, community members, and the general public. Several fitness instructors offer the various classes. Anna Harris teaches High-Intensity Interval Training on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays bright and early at 6 a.m., and strength training on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 6 in the morning. Jennifer Lewis offers Tai Chi, which is a low impact exercise, at 10:30 a.m. on Tuesdays at Yellowhawk and on Thursdays at the Senior Center. Willa Wallace instructs Yoga Flow on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at 1 p.m. She “begins with gentle movements to warm up, progressing to more challenging poses,” according to schedule information published by Yellowhawk. Shoshoni Walker offers Dance Fitness, a cardio class, on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 12:30 p.m. Kelly George leads Yellowhawk Aerobics on Mondays and Wednesdays at 4:30 p.m. The schedule reads, “Increase your cardiovascular and muscular endurance with aerobic choreography and body strengthening.” Leigh Pinkham-Johnston teaches the cardio-based class INSANITY Live! on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 4:30 p.m. Pinkham-Johnston is a certified INSANITY Live! instructor who received her certification in April 2016. She said there is room for everyone, including elders, in her classes, noting that every exercise in her class can be modified for individuals. Pinkham-Johnson also likes to switch out the workout every month with a new round, which offers new music and new moves. For more information, contact Shoshoni Walker at 541240-8436 or shoshoniwalker@yellowhawk.org.

March 2019


Dietician hired at Yellowhawk By Casey Brown of the CUJ

MISSION - Yellowhawk Tribal Health Center welcomed Dusty Dressler, a full-time dietician, to the clinic in early January. Dressler is the first full-time dietician on the Yellowhawk staff since Jean Farmer retired in 2016. Dressler sees medical patients, works with Women Infant and Children (WIC) patients, and is a member of Yellowhawk’s diabetes team. Dressler has a Bachelor of Science degree in Food Science and Human Nutrition from Washington State University. Originally from LaCrosse, Washington, she moved in 1998 to Pendleton, where she worked in a similar role at St. Anthony Hospital. She also has worked for organizations like Willowbrook Terrace, a nursing home located in Pendleton. During the Heart Health Day at Yellowhawk on Feb. 14, Dressler presented a talk on heart health. She emphasized five nutritional choices Dusty Dressler that can make a big impact on heart health: increase fruits and vegetables, choose healthy fats, reduce sodium, moderate alcohol consumption, and choose whole grains for fiber. “Hopefully doing those five things can not only keep the heart healthy but help to control blood sugar... possibly help to manage weight,” she said. “Hopefully other things spin off of that to help the whole person be healthy.” Dressler’s supervisor, Carrie Sampson, Community Wellness Director at Yellowhawk, said that anyone who is interested in seeing a dietician will start the process by talking to their Yellowhawk medical provider. When she sees patients, Dressler said care may range from sharing resources and handouts all the way to “sitting down and going through some strategies and planning out a new way of eating or just sitting down and figuring it out together” - and anything in between. Dressler said she enjoys her work: “It is exciting to teach people and to help people to better their lives through food.” Dressler was inspired to become a dietician when she was in high school. She said seeing her diabetic grandfather’s relationship to food, as a tool for wellness and as a stumbling block at times, and how it affected his disease, motivated her. “The trials and the day-to-day things that he had to deal with kind of gave me a passion,” she said. Family still plays a large role in Dressler’s life. She and her husband have two boys, ages 9 and 12, who participate in various sports, including hockey, basketball and soccer. She said she spends much of her free time enjoying time with her children and their sports and school events, but she also likes to garden, craft, and take photographs. Currently, Sampson said, “People are starting to hear that Yellowhawk has a dietician and they are really excited about it. That is reassuring that people are excited about these services.” Looking ahead, Sampson said that Dressler’s knowledge will be incorporated in more information and programs such as guidance on how produce from the community garden can be used at the Senior Center and Cay-Uma-Wa Head Start. For more information, contact Yellowhawk Tribal Health Center at 541-966-9830. Yellowhawk is open Monday-Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. except on Tuesday when they are open from 12:30-5 p.m.

March 2019

The four artists with a group exhibit in Baker City are, from left, Lori Sams, Roberta Lavadour, Nika Blasser, and Shari Dallas. The exhibit is called “Place/Making: A Four-Way Conversation” that is showing at Crossroads Carnegie Art Center.

Artists’ group exhibit in Baker City BAKER CITY – Four Pendleton artists, all women, put on a show here March 2 titled, “Place/ Making: A Four-Way Conversation” at Crossroads Carnegie Art Center. Artists included Nika Blasser, Shari Dallas, Roberta Lavadour and Lori Sams. The high-ceilinged art center drew many people to the group exhibit, including Gov. Kate Brown and her husband, Dan Little, who dropped in to the evening reception. The exhibit will run through March 30. The four artists’ work is connected by place, according to Sams. “While our perspectives, backgrounds and mediums are very diverse, we are all influenced by our surroundings in rural eastern Oregon,” Sams said in an email. Blasser, a multi-disciplinary artist who is the Marketing Director at Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts, focuses on exploring the properties of materials. Dallas, an abstract painter, works in oil and graphite on Masonite. Dallas is retired and works from her home. Lavadour, a book artist who is Executive Director at the Pendleton Art Center, uses diverse materials to explore memory and storytelling. Sams, a fiber artist who operates the Betty Feves Memorial Gallery at Blue Mountain Community College, translates the expressive quality of line and hand-sewn drawings. “The four us started an informal art group a couple of years ago to offer support and constructive feedback of each other’s work,” Sams said. “When we saw the Call for Artists for Crossroads, we were intrigued by the opportunity to turn our conversation about art, place and artmaking in a rural area into an exhibit.”

A visitor to the reception checks out the work of Nika Blaser. a multi-disciplinary artist, who is Marketing Director at Crow’s Shadow Institute of Art on the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

Pendleton artist Shari Dallas talks about her abstract painting showing at the Crossroads Carnegie Art Center in Baker City.

Confederated Umatilla Journal

Women look at the books created by Roberta Lavadour, who is the Executive Director at the Pendleton Arts Center.

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Tribal Member artist’s “One Woman Show” coming to Tamastlikt

Happy Birthday to the cutest Gavin Happy Birthday Sweet Dani March 13th

MISSION - Local contemporary artist Ellen Taylor, enrolled Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, will have her art on display at the Tamastslikt Cultural Institute beginning April 19. Taylor’s exhibit is described as a one woman Ellen Taylor show and

is titled “Different Places in Her Heart.” The opening day of the show is free. Her paintings and prints are always vibrantly colored and can be found on the walls and shirts of many local residents. Taylor is well known for her portraits of Jackson Sundown, Chief Peo Peo Mox Mox, and Chief Joseph. Taylor’s great-great Grandfather was the late Chief Clarence Burke who lived on the Umatilla Indian Reservation from the 1930’s until his passing in 1987. She studied art locally at Blue Mountain Community College in

Pendleton and continued her education in the arts at the College of Santa Fe (Santa Fe, NM). On her “about me” section EllenTaylorArtist.com, Taylor writes that her inspiration “Comes from visions, feelings, life experiences, death, turmoil, new birth, illness, relationships, and the history of life. The perfect balance comes from finding the time to create, articulate, and harmonize these ideas onto canvas, in an otherwise busy life.” The show will be on display from April. 19 until June 15.

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46314 Timine Way Pendleton, Oregon 97801 541- 966-9830 www.yellowhawk.org

March 2019

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J.D. Kindle played guitar and Fred Hill beat a hand drum at the Eastern Oregon Forum held at Blue Mountain Community College on Feb. 19. The two have taken different paths and have little in common musically, but they both write songs and perform - Kindle with his Eastern Oregon Playboys band and Hill with other hand drummers and on the big drum at the Longhouse on the Umatilla Indian Reservation. CUJ photos/Phinney

Two musicians, two melodius paths ‘Our Music’ performed by Fred Hill and J.D. Kindle spent a few years in Portland writing songs. “It was hard to eat thinking about how the Hill, who teaches Tribal Language and Drum songs would go,” said Hill, who also has sung Ways at Nixyaawii Community School, said he with a Cree Drum “in their language not knowPENDLETON – A pair of Pendleton musiwas influenced by family members, including his ing what I was singing. They told me not to cian who couldn’t be farther apart in their craft uncle who played big band music on Friday and worry about it: ‘Just say what we say.’” met together on stage, although they didn’t play Saturday nights in the 1940s. Hill said it was privilege to sing with the together, during a recent Eastern Oregon Forum Kindle said music taught at Pendleton High elders, who tested him on his progress, and he at Blue Mountain Community College. School put him on track to be a musician, but he’s eventually became familiar with songs from this One thing they have in common, however, is also been influreservation. that they are both song writenced by the likes Now he creates ers. of Bob Dylan and his own songs in Fred Hill, a member of the ‘I had every intention of ‘They invited me Elliot Smith, and, of his own language, Confederated Tribes of the going back to Portland,” to sing and I was course, the symUmatilla, and gets Umatilla Indian Reservation he said. “But I found I so excited. I shook phony. as much enjoyment (CTUIR), and J.D. Kindle, exAs a young man teaching students at ecutive director of the Oregon wanted to spend more all their hands and just learning, Hill Nixyaawii what he East Symphony (OES) and the time with friends to flush walked away thinking was inspired by learned as a youth. lead in the band J.D. Kindle out songs I’d already I just got to sing with the elders, “gruff in “At NCS it’s a priviand the Eastern Oregon Playnature,” who sang leged place to be with boys, talked about their musiwritten.’ all those men.’ with the big drum. real singing and drumcal influences, played their He remembered ming … I’m proud of instruments and sang in front - Fred Hill - J.D. Kindle a time at White the students who have of about three dozen people Swan when he was taken hold of these in the Science and Technology invited to sing with songs,” Hill said. Building. the older men. Kindle took a much different path. He first Using his hand drum, Hill sang his “initiation “They only spoke in hand signals,” Hill recalls. learned to play guitar, then he and his sister took song” for the first time outside the Longhouse “They invited me to sing and I was so excited. I piano lessons. He began playing violin on his while Kindle played guitar and sang about fishshook all their hands and walked away thinking I grandfather’s old fiddle. ing in Eastern Oregon. just got to sing with all those men.” Once he reached high school, Kindle wanted to Hill grew up on McKay Creek and was imAnother time, Hill told the audience, which play saxophone. mersed as a young boy in tribal drumming and included several college students, a bell ringer at “Everybody wanted to play sax. I was late signlanguage. His grandmother spoke only in Umaa root feast noticed him before the meal and told ing up so I learned to play clarinet,” Kindle said. tilla and Yakama. him he was going to sing. Kindle was born and raised in Pendleton but Hill and Kindle on page 15B By Wil Phinney of the CUJ

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Hill and Kindle Continued from page 14B

As a PHS senior he played the drums, perhaps the closest musical talent he shares with Hill. And even though he could play multiple instruments, write songs and sing, Kindle was weighing the possibilities of a theater arts career. Kindle played in garage-rock bands, but learned early on that there were no appropriate venues for concerts in Pendleton. So he and his pals played in the basement of the Bowman Building, which he called a “dungeon.” They took over a truck bay and played at what was then a thriving Floyd’s Truck Ranch a few miles west of Pendleton along Interstate 84. He bounced around Portland in his 20’s. “I was a song writer slumming around the open mic scene,” he said. In 2007 Kindle moved back to Pendleton to care for his ailing father. “I had every intention of going back to Portland,” he said. “But I found I wanted to spend more time with friends to flush out songs I’d already written.” Soon after he created J.D. Kindle and the Eastern Oregon Playboys, a band that includes CTUIR member Peter Walters. “We call ourselves country, but really we are a rock band with country signifiers,” he said. The band has been together for 11 years and has produced four albums “in actual studios,” even if that includes the high-ceilinged Masonic Lodge on the second floor of Great Pacific on Main Street.

In 2014, Kindle served as program manager for the Oregon East Symphony, a job that made him realize community resources had to be “galvanized” to maintain a strong music scene in Pendleton. Soon after Kindle was named EOS executive director. On March 15 the symphony will perform an opera. “You will recognize certain songs even if you are not an opera fan,” Kindle said. Today, Kindle continues to write songs and sing, with his band and with the Pendleton Men’s Chorus. “I try to write music that has a local interest of lyrical content,” Kindle said. A current project will juxtapose growing up in Portland and “how I feel now” about his life in Pendleton. Hill finished his presentation with a hand drum song that would lead the movement of a circle or friendship dance. The song used to be just for veterans, but now it includes men, women, boys and girls. At the Oregon Class 1A state tournament in Baker City, at halftime of the boys’ championship game that was won by Nixyaawii, Hill danced while a big drum was beat in the center of the gymnasium. To prove his point about the circle dance, he invited people from the bleachers to join and close to 100 did. Among Kindle’s influences are the “joys of outdoors.” He finished the night with a song called “Trout Fishing in Eastern Oregon,” perhaps the only song ever written about steelhead. The two musicians offered insights into their musical backgrounds, maybe not as far apart as it would seem.

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CTUIR students visit Oregon State University

Tribal students from Mission area visited Oregon State University Jan. 25-26. Contributed photo

CORVALLIS – Students from the community on and around the Umatilla Indian Reservation spent time in January checking out the Superfund Research Program (SRP) on the campus of Oregon State University (OSU). Tour guides were Sydelle Harrison and Lyndsi Lewis, both members of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). Harrison, MPH, and Lewis are graduate research assistants for the SRP – Community Engagement Core/ Lewis is a new addition to the program; Harrison has been there since 2015. During the tour, Lewis helped with planning and implementation of a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) activity for the high school stu-

dents. Harrison, with the help of her supervisor and SRP colleagues, has led the tour three times since 2016. This year’s tour included CTUIR community students only. In the past, participation has come from Warm Springs Tribes of Oregon, and Harrison said other tribes have shown interest in the program. Future tours could include Nez Perce, Siletz, Warm Springs and Grande Ronde. Harrison started the tour as an undergraduate student in anthropology and public health. When she returned to complete her degree, she sought out departments at OSU that work with tribal nations. The Superfund Research Program is unique among other National Institute of Environment Health funded program across the nation; it works with tribal partners in the Pacific Northwest. Harrison said the objective of the program is to help improve tribal health through environmental health research. The community engagement core works to ensure the partnership between the university program and the community is held to the highest standard with equal participate through the research process. The Tribal Campus Tour, Harrison said, was developed for community members and their children to visit OSU, see the science at work in the lab, and create opportunities to share knowledge between community members and university staff and students. The schedule include a three-hour tour and fun at Gill Colliseum, the Dixon Rec Center, Kelley Engineering, Valley Library, Kerr Administration and an art exhibit. That first evening the students had dinner in the Native American Longhouse on the OSU campus. The following morning, Harrison led the group to the Sinnhuber Aquatic Research laboratory and the youth took part in a STEM activity at the Hallie Ford Museum. Harrison said she and Lewis think students took away a “valuable real-life experience” on the OSU campus “where unique interests and experiences met acceptance and encouragement to explore their possibilities in STEM and beyond.”

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CAPECO provides commodities for dozens of tribal households Program now offers fresh eggs and milk By Casey Brown the CUJ

Nutritious foods and a well-balanced diet go a long way in heart and overall health. Dusty Dressler, Yellowhawk Tribal Health Center Registered Dietician and Nutritionist, says individuals can improve their health with five important food choices that include increasing fruits and vegetables, choosing healthy fats, reducing sodium, moderating alcohol, and choosing whole grains for fiber. Foods that facilitate these choices are available through the Confederated Tribes’ commodity food program, which

is administered by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Locally, Community Action Program of East Central Oregon (CAPECO) distributes commodities to qualifying households. Recipients receive canned, frozen, and fresh foods. Mindy Long, CAPECO Food Program Coordinator, said that the number of households served varies per month. In January, CAPECO distributed commodities to 43 tribal households. According to CAPECO’s website, “The program allows income eligible households, who reside on the Umatilla Indian Reservation or who are enrolled in a recognized tribe to receive a month’s supply of USDA commodities in lieu of food stamps. The program provides an opportunity for individuals to obtain a good nutritious supply of food plus

gain educational information regarding health issues, nutrition and menu ideas.” While availability of specific items changes month-to-month, when the CUJ visited CAPECO’s distribution facility in February there were foods for each of the five areas identified by Dressler. Fresh and canned fruits and vegetables that are available include canned peaches and peas, fresh lettuce, and even seed packets to grow your own produce. Healthy fat options include frozen salmon. Long explained that many items have low or no sodium – salt that is not a heart-healthy spice. For instance, the canned vegetables are no salt added and the crackers are unsalted. Whole grain breads are available, and Tori Colvard, CAPECO Food Nutrition Program Manager, said that bread is one item that is always available. Not

all breads available are whole grain, but some are. The program has changed over the years. It is well-known for powdered milks and eggs. However, through a recent USDA program called FAVORS, CAPECO has started receiving fresh milk (some 486 half gallons per week) and will soon receive fresh eggs. The equally famous “commod cheese” will remain unchanged. The program also includes nutrition education, and a new display in Long’s office offers information and material to go home with commodity recipients. For more information about the Tribal Commodities program, contact CAPECO at 541-276-5073, extension 105. Applications for the program can be picked up in person at the CAPECO Airport Location, 1605 NW 50th Drive, in Pendleton.

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TED Talks lunch scheduled for March 20

DCFS looking for foster families

MISSION- Nixyaawii Chamber of Commerce to hold TED Talks presentation, highlighting local speaker. The annual TED Talks Presentation by NCC will be on Mar. 20 from 11:30 to 1 p.m. at Wildhorse Cineplex. Lunch is included with purchase of ticket. The featured live guest speaker is J.D. Tovey, CTUIR Planning Director. He will speak on the positive impacts of CTUIR economic development, Indian Household Income, and economic resiliency over the last 30 years. The cost for nonmember is $20, member tickets are $15. RSVP by Mar. 11. For more information, email nixyaawiichamber@live.com.

MISSION - Foster parents and family needed by CTUIR Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS). Minors In Need of Care (MINOC) are currently facing a lack of eligible foster family placements. DCFS staff advises that foster parents can be single, married or in a domestic partnership; own or rent; and can already have children in the home. DCFS encourages people to consider the importance of fostering: “Help our

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Native American children grow with a strong connection to their heritage. Take on the responsibility to help our children maintain cultural and familial values.” MINOC’s in Eastern Oregon have increased greatly due to recent widespread and tactical “drug busts.” To apply, contact DCFS and schedule and appointment. For more information, contact DCFS at 541-429-7301 or email Marla Mayfield at marlamayfield@ctuir.org or Cristina Ferea at cris�naferea@ctuir.org.

March 2019


Chacon’s prints showcased at Crow’s Shadow Reception includes original composition performed by chamber orchestra ensemble By Casey Brown of the CUJ

MISSION – An audience gathered at Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts (CSIA) on Sunday, Feb. 17 to see the work of Navajo artist Raven Chacon. In addition to a showcase of original prints, Oregon East Symphony (OES) chamber orchestra ensemble performed an original composition by Chacon. Chacon was the collaborative artistin-residence at CSIA from Jan. 27 to Feb. 17. During that time, he composed the original piece, titled Horse Notations, and worked with CSIA Master Printer Judith Baumann to make two original prints. He created a large print with the same title as the composition and a second series titled For Zitkala-Sa, which includes six unique prints. Printmaking was a new foray for Chacon: “I appreciated the Crow’s Shadows [residency] because it was an educational one because I got to learn about a medium I previously knew nothing about.” His background is in music, which has been part of his life since he was a child. “I played the piano and guitar at a young age. I experimented with making instruments and recording sound,” he said. “I thought it was probably necessary to formally learn about music, music notation, Western music history, so I studied all of that.” Chacon said he had a plan in mind when he started his research for this residency. He said he wanted to write a piece that could incorporate rhythm, be inclusive of Native drummers who might not read musical notations, and be aware of the history of horses in the local area. He discovered an 1874 article in Popular Science that had just those elements. The article, “The Paces of the Horse,” was a study of horse locomotion that included plenty of visuals including notations, tracings, and graphics. Figure 5, “Graphic curve and the notation of a horse’s trot,” inspired Chacon’s composition and large print. Chacon said, “The momentum of the horse speeding up in nature was something that I wanted to speak about in this piece as it relates to how maybe humans perceive time throughout the day as well as how human history has been accelerating through time.” Chacon said he was fascinated by the figure and that when he shared it with Baumann she was also intrigued. Baumann said that working with Chacon was somewhat different from the artists she usually works with. “It was challenging at first because he does not consider himself a visual artist,” Baumann said. “At one point, he said he used to draw a lot, but then he lost patience for it.” Since Crow’s Shadow does a specialized type of printmaking (a niche art form in itself) called lithograph, Baumann explained that artists-in-residence at Crow’s Shadow are often not printmakers. However, they are usually visual artists of some type. The response from the crowd was

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positive. Baumann said she heard several people remark that this was probably something that has never happened before in Pendleton. She said that Chacon’s work leaves audiences with a lot to unpack and mull over. It has been giving her a lot to think about as well. “I have been thinking a lot about music and sound and the way that we culturally related to it,” she said. “In visual arts, there’s this idea of mark making. In visual art, you make marks. Everyone’s mark is different … This [composition] made me think about how sound is unique, and that sound can be interpreted in different ways.” The printmaking process is currently in its early stages. The finished editions will be completed later in the year. Meanwhile, Chacon’s proofs are currently on display at Crow’s Shadow, 48004 St. Andrews Road. CSIA Marketing Director Nika Blasser says that they are happy to have visitors and answer questions.

Raven Chacon, enrolled Navajo Nation, holds a page from an 1894 issue of Popular Science magazine that inspired his original composition and large print (visible in the background). Chacon shares the background of his pieces with a large audience at Crow’s Shadow on Feb. 17 before an encore performance of his composition and a viewing of his two print series.

DID YOU KNOW? “In the best interests of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Board of Trustees shall exert the Tribes’ sovereign authority to protect the rights reserved by the Treaty of 1855 and to promote the interests of the members and residents of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. The Board of Trustees shall exercise the authority of the Confederated Tribes so as to promote, enhance, and achieve the maximum degree of self-government, selfsufficiency, and self-determination in all Tribal affairs. Doing so objectively and ably is the abiding mission of the Board of Trustees of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.” - CTUIR BOT Mission Gathered from CTUIR.org

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GO EAGLES!

CTUIR Notice to Purchase

The whole town is proud of you guys! Way to go young men, congratulations on your big win! Get your Nixyaawii Golden Eagles gear at

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HOME BUYER & RENTER CONVENTION

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March 2019


CUJ Briefly

Fireworks light up sky March 9 MISSION-The 24th annual Wildhorse Anniversary Fireworks Show starts at 8 p.m. Mar. 9. The fireworks are free and open to the public. A live pre-show will air on the KCUW airwaves. While families park they can listen to the pre-show hosted by Jill-Marie Gavin and Aaron Hines, both members of the Nixyaawii Chamber of Commerce and CTUIR employees,. Hines and Gavin’s pre-show will air from7-8 p.m. Followed by a choreographed firework show beginning at 8 p.m. The fireworks are an annual event that celebrate 24 years of operation for Wildhorse Resort & Casino, which first opened its doors in 1994.

Congratulations Umpqua Riverhawks Women’s Basketball! Southern Regions Champions!!! Good Luck at the NWAC Women’s Sweet 16 Championship!!! -Janet L. Maddern

Free tax prep available to elders PENDLETON - Free Tax Prep Classes are offered by American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) from March 11 to April 1. Located in the City of Pendleton Community Room, 501 SW Emigrant Ave., the classes are from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. The classes are free for adults 50 years and older on a first-come, firstserved basis. For a list of what documents to bring, visit www.aarp.org/money/taxes/ info-01-2011/important-tax-documents.html. For more information, contact City Hall at 541-966-0201 or email AARP at taxaide@aarp.org.

Free for Tribal Youth

‘Parents Night Out’ March 22 PENDLETON – Parents who want a night out on March 22 can take advantage of babysitting offered from 6-10 p.m. by Pendleton Parks and Recreation. The service is for children 3 (must be potty trained) to 14 years old. The event will include games, arts and crafts, educational activities, snacks, pizza and a movie. Cost is $12 in advance or $15 at the door. For more information, contact Pendleton Parks and Rec at 541-276-8100.

March 2019

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Toastmasters hold first open house of 2019 her improve her public speaking skills. She is working her way through a Toastmasters public speaking program MISSION - The Cay-Uma-Wa chapand has earned her Advanced Commuter of Toastmasters International nicator Bronze and Advanced hosted their open house Feb. Leader Silver recognitions. 13 at the Wildhorse Resort & Pinkham-Johnson said she Casino. has improved in her role as a The open house was during supervisor due to her experione of the club’s regular meetence in public speaking and ings, which takes place every leadership. Wednesday at the same time According to Toastmasters, and location (noon). “The mission of a Toastmaster The Valentine-themed open meeting showcased sweet Club is to provide a mutually treats and a welcoming atmosupportive and positive learnsphere. ing environment in which every Ten members and a handful member has the opportunity to of guests sat down for an hourdevelop communication and long meeting that included leadership skills, which in turn a round of TableTopics, durfoster self-confidence and pering which several members sonal growth.” presented one-to-two-minute Roy Jones, Wildhorse Hotel Director and VP Public Relations and On the Toastmasters website impromptu speeches. Ad- Treasurer, evaluates Leigh Pinkham-Johnson, not pictured, creation it states membership costs $45 ditionally, Sergeant-at-Arms story, which she had 7-9 minutes to deliver to the group of 12+ every six months with a $20 Leigh Pinkham-Johnson told a members and guests. new member fee. Nez Perce creation story, Heart All guests of the open house left of the Monster, and President Mary 2009, two years after they formed, after with a welcome packet, which included Halfmoon practiced her story called reading about them in the Confederhandouts and a membership applicaBossy Big Sister for an area Toastmas- ated Umatilla Journal. tion. She said Toastmasters has helped ters competition. By Casey Brown of the CUJ

Evaluators offered feedback about each story. Pinkham-Johnson joined the CayUma-Wa Toastmasters in September

Thank you letters Diane Pierre would like to thank her family, friends and community that came in to help her during her time of need. She received donations, groceries, door lock changes, transportation and emotional support in the time she needed it the most. She sends her love and prayers out to you all.

Make your voice heard. Express your opinion. Let the community know what you think. Write a letter to the editor. Send it to CUJ@ctuir.org.

EMPLOYEES OF THE MONTH!

Carole Reese, F&B Traditions Server Recently Carole noticed that a guest seemed to be in some kind of distress and holding her neck. Carole approached her and asked if she was choking her husband became very anxious and afraid and said yes. Carole slipped right next to her in the booth and started doing sideways Heimlich maneuver while security were in route. The female was able to get the food that became lodged in her throat, EMT were called and they praised Carole’s fast acting that saved her life.

Pam Peterson, Custodial Secretary Pam goes above and beyond to decorate the breakroom for the Holidays. Especially during Christmas it gives you a little Christmas spirit each and every time when you are in there. Plus it is also nice to be able to see and feel the pride she has for WRC and herself. Pam always has a smile and a warm hello when you see her.

Catherine Hunter, Vault Lead Cashier Cat is a hard worker, leads by example and is not afraid to get her hands dirty along with everyone else. Cat sets the bar high and keeps our staff on track. She has a great sense of humor and should be recognized.

Casino • Hotel • Golf • Cineplex • RV • Museum • Dining • Travel Plaza 800.654.9453 \\ Pendleton, OR \\ I-84, Exit 216 \\ wildhorseresort.com

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CTUIR Board of Trustees minutes DATE: January 14, 2019 BOT Present: Jeremy Wolf, Vice Chairman; Rosenda Shippentower, Member; Aaron Ashley, Member; Woodrow Star, Member; Sally Kosey, Member and William Sigo IV, General Council Chairman. Gary Burke, BOT Chairman on travel. Doris Wheeler, Treasurer on personal leave. Kathryn Brigham, Secretary on travel. Quorum present. Old Business. None. Resolution 19-002: Topic: NW Farms Credit Loans. RESOLVED, that the Board of Trustees hereby approves the Commitment Letter and Note for a loan in the amount as set forth in the Commitment Letter and Note from Northwest Farm Credit Services (Bank) attached to this Resolution as Exhibits 1C and 3C (Loan 1); AND BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Board of Trustees hereby approves the Commitment Letter and Note for a loan in the amount as set forth in the Commitment Letter and Note from Bank attached to this Resolution as Exhibits 2C and 4C (Loan 2); AND BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Board of Trustees hereby approves the Amended and Restated Security Agreement between the Confederated Tribes and the Bank attached to this Resolution as Exhibit 5C; AND BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Board of Trustees hereby authorizes its Chair to execute the Commitment Letters, Notes and the Amended and Restated Security Agreement attached to this Resolution as Exhibits 1C-5C (collectively referred to as Loan Documents), or documents containing substantially similar terms; provided, that the Chair of the Board of Trustees may approve on behalf of the Confederated Tribes any further changes to the Loan Documents recommended by the Finance Director and legal counsel to the Confederated

Tribes, and the signature of such official on the Loan Documents shall conclusively evidence the approval of the Confederated Tribes of such changes; and provided further, that the signature of such official may be manual or facsimile; AND BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Board of Trustees hereby authorizes the Chairman, ViceChairman, Treasurer or Secretary of the Board of Trustees (each an Authorized Official) on behalf of the Confederated Tribes, to execute, deliver and/or file (or cause to be delivered and/or filed) any government forms, affidavits, certificates, letters, documents, agreements and instruments and to take or direct such other actions that such Authorized Official determines to be necessary or desirable to give effect to this Resolution and to consummate the transactions contemplated herein or in the Loan Documents; AND BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Board of Trustees hereby approves and authorizes the application of the governing law selected in the Loan Agreement and Loan Documents to govern the construction, interpretation and enforcement of the Loan Agreement and Loan Documents; AND BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, as an inducement to the Bank to make the agreements with the Confederated Tribes that are contained in the Loan Documents, the Board of Trustees and the Confederated Tribes hereby reconfirms the following terms contained in the Loan Agreement between the Confederated Tribes and the Bank dated November 2, 2015 whereby the Confederated Tribes: a. expressly, unequivocally, and irrevocable waive the sovereign immunity of the Confederated Tribes (and any defense based thereon) and consent to arbitration provisions and the jurisdiction of the courts as provided in the Loan Agreement, in connection with any suit, action or proceeding (including

an arbitration proceeding) or any legal process brought by the Bank against the Confederated Tribes in respect of any of the Loan Documents, in each case as further set forth in and only to the extent of the limited waivers of sovereign immunity and consents to arbitration and the jurisdictions of the courts set forth in the Loan Agreement. b. expressly, unequivocally and irrevocably waive and limit the sovereign authority of the Confederated Tribes to limit, withdraw or repeal such waiver of sovereign immunity, or to repeal, amend or modify any of the provisions of the Loan Agreement or the Loan Documents in a manner that impairs or interferes, or could impair or interfere, in any manner, with any right or remedy of the Bank against the Confederated Tribes under the Loan Agreement or the Loan Documents, or the ability of the Bank to enforce any of the same; c. expressly, unequivocally, and irrevocably waive and limit the sovereign authority of the Confederated Tribes to repeal, or modify in a manner adverse to the Bank the provisions of Tribal law that reciprocally provide for recognition and implementation by the Tribal Courts of the Confederated Tribes of orders, judgments and decrees of the courts of general jurisdiction of the State of Oregon and the courts of the United States; d. irrevocably commit to and agree with the Bank, and irrevocably resolve, that the Confederated Tribes will not modify Tribal law in a manner that impairs or is adverse to the ability of the Bank to enforce any of the provisions of the Loan Agreement and Loan Documents or any security interest granted therewith; AND BE IT FURTHER RESOVLED, the Board of Trustees hereby makes the following representations for the benefit of the Bank: a. on behalf of the Confederated Tribes, the Board of Trustees has authority to adopt and enact this Resolution

Drive safe this St. Patty’s day, call a cab!

JMG

EASTERN OREGON CENTER FOR

INDEPENDENT LIVING A Global Disability Resource and Advocacy Center EOCIL is a proud supporter of the CTUIR community and other communities and programs that promote and value inclusion, equality and opportunities for people with disabilities. EOCIL is a global disability resource and advocacy center that provides an array of services for people with disabilities. EOCIL is operated by people with disabilities.

Services Available:

- Informational and Referral - Independent Living Skills Training (budgeting and financial management, cooking, application assistance, etc.) - Peer Counseling - Individual Advocacy - Life Transitions (school to employment, home to home, corrections to community, etc.) - LGBTQ and two spirit resources

- Support Groups - Youth Mentoring Project - Representative Payee Project - Emergency Financial Assistance - Accessibility Assistance - HIV/AIDS Independent Living Project - And many other services

Locations: EOCIL has three locations: 322 SW 3rd St., Pendleton, Ore. webpage: www.eocil.org Email: eocil@eocil.org 541-276-1037 711 Relay Toll free: 1-877-711-1037 1021 SW 5th Avenue, Ontario, Ore. 541-889-3119 Voice 711 Relay Toll free 1-844-489-3119

SCH

The Shop We do tires, alignments, full automotive repairs, and more! Need an oil change? We recommend Pendleton Quicky Lube

The Dalles Office 400 East Scenic Drive Building 2, Third Floor, Suite 2 The Dalles, Oregon 541-370-2810 Toll free: 1-844-370-2810 Providing services in Harney, Malheur, Baker, Union, Grant, Wallowa, Umatilla, Morrow, Wheeler and Gilliam, Wasco, Sherman and Hood River counties.

EOCIL is a supporter of:

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and the provisions hereof, and to irrevocably bind the Confederated Tribes to the provisions hereof, the irrevocable waivers of sovereign authority made herein, and those made in the Loan Agreement and Loan Documents, and the provisions of the same; and b. the Board of Trustees has authority to waive, and authorize the waiver of, the sovereign immunity of the Confederated Tribes, as authorized herein; AND BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Board of Trustees herby authorizes and directs Tribal legal counsel to prepare the legal opinions required under the Loan Documents; AND BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, each Authorized Official, Tribal Executive Director and Finance Director are authorized and directed to take such actions as are necessary, upon the advice of the Confederated Tribes legal counsel, to carry out the purposes of this Resolution; AND BE IT FINALLY RESOLVED, this Resolution shall be in full force and effect from and after its adoption; AND, that said Resolution has not been modified amended or repealed and is still in full force and effect. DATED this 14th day of January, 2019. MOTION: Woodrow Star moves to adopt Resolution 19-002. Sally Kosey seconds. Motion carries 5-0-0. Other Board Action: None. BOT Travel Reports. Deferred. BOT Leave and Travel Requests. 1) Doris Wheeler, April 14-17 to Portland to attend NAFOA Annual Conference. 2) Kat Brigham, Fri., Jan. 11 polled travel to Portland as PSU speaker. 3) Rosenda Shippentower, Jan. 15 for 1.5 from 9:30 to 11 AM. Jan 30 all day. Jan. 31 for 4.5 hours 7:30 AM to 1 PM. 4) Woodrow Star, personal leave Feb. 25-28. MOTION: Woodrow Star moves to approve leave requests. Aaron Ashley seconds. Motion carries 4-0-0.

Confederated Umatilla Journal

238 SW Court Ave Pendleton Phone:

Main 541-276-8949 Fax 541-276-0581 Email:

theshop1.biz@gmail.com

Ron Dirkes, Owner March 2019


Penney wins some serious change

The 2019 BAAD annual logo contest winner is Rena Penney. Penney was awarded $200. Her winning design will be featured on all clothing and awards. The design includes images of a basketball and an eagle with text stating the year, Basketball Against Alcohol and Drugs and Cayuse, Umatilla, and Walla Walla. While the design changes every year, many people keep their clothing for years, so her art will continue to be worn and seen. Penney is a 2017 graduate of Weston-McEwen High School.

ILYSCPH

March 2019

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Profile for Confederated Umatilla Journal

Confederated Umatilla Journal 03-2019  

The Confederated Umatilla Journal Monthly Print Edition for for March 2019

Confederated Umatilla Journal 03-2019  

The Confederated Umatilla Journal Monthly Print Edition for for March 2019

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