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THE COOL ISSUE J U LY 2 014 TOWNCAROLINA.COM


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FIRST

Glance Wall of Fame: Baltimore- and Brooklyn-based street artist Andrew Pisacane, known as Gaia, stands in front of his mural at 307 Falls Street, which was dedicated on June 12, 2014. The work was commissioned in association with the Year of Altruism. (photograph by Paul Mehaffey)

8 TOWN / towncarolina.com


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Contents 15

THE LIST

See, hear, read, react. The month’s must-dos.

55

21 ON THE TOWN

Pics of the litter: Upcountry fêtes & festivities.

34 37

WEDDINGS

69

TOWNBUZZ

Painter and educator Paul Yanko, swimming holes for mid-summer salvation, and Just the Answers with tennis champion Andy Roddick.

44 TOP BUNK

It’s far too easy to get lost in everyday luxury at the Belmond Charleston Place.

47

STYLE CENTRAL

52

MAN ABOUT TOWN

76 80 88

PLACE HOLDER

Film artist and native Greenvillian Jeff Sumerel reflects on integrity, authenticity, and the allure of fame in the film business.

EAT & DRINK

Share food with company by the grill or at Asheville’s Cúrate tapas bar; plus, locally coldpressed juices from Kuka Juice.

8 5

STAGE COACH The talentad drama grads of the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts & Humanities are taking stage and screen by storm.

/ by Jac Valitchka

DINING GUIDE

// photography by Paul Mehaffey

TOWNSCENE

Got plans? You do now.

SECOND GLANCE

Sharon Dowell unravels layers of influence and history in her architectural landscapes.

Carefree West Coast vibes at Lily Downtown and poolside glamour via old Hollywood.

The Man realizes that going back to basics has its own cool appeal.

THIS PAGE: The drama classroom at the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts & Humanities. For more, see “Stage Coach,” page 58. Photograph by Paul Mehaffey. COVER: Ray Wing Fold, by Paul Yanko. For more, see “Coat of Many Colors,” page 38. Photograph by Eli Warren; artwork courtesy of Hampton III Gallery.

The Cool Issue

10 TOWN / towncarolina.com


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EDITOR’S

Letter

Mark B. Johnston PUBLISHER mark@towncarolina.com Blair Knobel EDITOR-IN-CHIEF blair@towncarolina.com Paul Mehaffey ART DIRECTOR

Stars & Stripes

J

uly brings more than just heat, humidity, and cocktails on the roof. In the realm of our calendar, we offer the Cool Issue, by and large a wild card, allowing us to explore a different sub-theme each year. For this edition, we’ve chosen entertainment, fame, and celebrity culture. Think of it as TOWN’s nod to Hollywood—swimming pools, movie stars, and West Coast couture. The impetus of our focus stems from the fact that several graduates of the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities are enjoying thriving acting careers on stage and screen. The 2013 Oscar-winning heartbreaker 12 Years a Slave? 2006 Governor’s School grad and Charleston native Liza J. Bennett plays a memorable role. Watch the Tony Awards last year? You might’ve noticed a striking woman accepting the Tony for Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Musical. That was Patina Miller, who won for her stirring triple threat in Pippin—which will come to the Peace Center for the Performing Arts in March 2015. Patina, a Pageland, South Carolina, native, graduated from the Governor’s School in 2002. Then, there is Danielle Brooks, a 2007 graduate from Simpsonville. Danielle cut her teeth in productions such as The Laramie Project at SCGSAH. Now, she beams on red carpets and television interviews as a star on the megahit Netflix series Orange Is the New Black. These and others are evidence of the quality of the Governor’s School’s drama program, led by Daniel Murray (see “Stage Coach,” page 58). In this issue, we also touch on film culture, where interest here grows for celluloid storytelling. Though the pull of Hollywood is exhilarating, the brighter light, as film artist Jeff Sumerel has discovered during his prolific career, is one’s authentic voice (“Reason Being,” page 55). And, while the thought of cool is worth exploring, we offer actual ways to cool off, look cool, and otherwise thrive during the hottest month of the year. If the Cool Issue is any indication of what’s hip, notable, or just plain entertaining, then hopefully you’ll take pleasure in learning more about our special corner of the globe that continues to be in the spotlight.

SENIOR EDITORS M. Linda Lee Steven Tingle Jac Valitchka ASSISTANT EDITOR Andrew Huang CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Mary Cathryn Armstrong Dixie Dulin Laura Linen Kathleen Nalley Jeff Sumerel CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS & DESIGNERS Chelsey Ashford Eric Graham TJ Grandy Kate Guptill

Holly Hardin PRODUCTION MANAGER GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Kristy Adair Michael Allen Whitney Fincannon MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Kristi Jennings Donna Johnston Annie Langston Lindsay Oehmen Pam Putman Kate Madden DIRECTOR, EVENTS & CREATIVE PRODUCTION kate@towncarolina.com

Emily Price DIGITAL STRATEGIST Blair Knobel Editor-in-Chief

IN THE REALM OF OUR CALENDAR, WE OFFER THE COOL ISSUE, BY AND LARGE A WILD CARD, ALLOWING US TO EXPLORE A DIFFERENT SUB-THEME EACH YEAR. The alternative cover for our second annual Cool Issue: Anchored Propped Bordered by Paul Yanko 12 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Lorraine Goldstein Sue Priester Hal Weiss CONSULTING MEMBERS

TOWN Magazine (Vol. 4, No. 7) is published monthly (12 times per year) by TOWN Greenville, LLC, PO Box 2266, Greenville, SC 29602, (864) 679-1200. If you would like to have TOWN delivered to you each month, you may purchase an annual subscription (12 issues) for $65. For subscription information or where to find, please visit towncarolina. com. Postmaster: Send address changes to TOWN, PO Box 2266, Greenville, SC 29602. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA.


Come, be impressed!

Legacy of Impressionism: Languages of Light

Andrew Thomas Schwartz (1867-1942) The Bathers, c. 1920 oil on canvas 40 x 521â „ 8 inches

through September 21 Sun-drenched and spontaneous, these American Impressionist paintings from the GCMA collection invite viewers to consider the ideas and techniques that opened the door to modern visual expression.

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

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the hollingsworth park community is growing.

Hollingsworth Park’s newest neighborhood, Braydon, will launch custom home construction very soon. Offering a similar architectural style found in Ruskin Square, lot sizes are slightly larger and feature side driveways that lead to privately-positioned garages. Already extremely popular, availability in this prime location will not last long. Other Highlights Include: • Sidewalks, Pocket Parks and Beautiful Street Lighting • Adjacent to Legacy Square and Legacy Park • Neighborhood Amenity Pond and Walking Trail • Maintenance-Free Lawns • Homes Priced from the High $300s

Braydon is an Approved Builder Team Community

Sales Offiice Open Daily • 3 Legacy Park Rd., Greenville, SC (864) 329-8383 • verdae.com


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THE MONTH’S MUST- DOS

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TOP OF THE

July 2014

List

JOHN HIATT & THE COMBO AND THE ROBERT CRAY BAND

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

Counted among the blues world’s most influential and acclaimed musicians, John Hiatt and Robert Cray have been touted by critics for both their vocal capacities and uncompromised songwriting. Now the musicians pair up for a dual Peace Center performance, bringing a combined 79 years of experience to the masses. While each will have solo sets with their respective bands, the highlight of the evening will an unforgettable jam session. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, July 24, 7:30pm. $45-$55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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List z

WELLS FARGO RED, WHITE, AND BLUE FESTIVAL It’s just not the Fourth of July without a few fireworks lighting up the night sky. Sponsored by the Bon Secours St. Francis Health System, the free festival has one of the largest fireworks displays in the state, not to mention plenty of kiddie activities. Live music will be hosted on both the TD and Pepsi stages in the downtown area, and local vendors will be on tap to sate all your brew and food needs.

MARC COHN “Walking in Memphis” may have put Cleveland native Marc Cohn on the musical map, but his strong sense of melody and poignant lyrics have given him staying power. Sorely missed during his ten-year hiatus, Cohn made his mainstream return with 2007’s Join the Parade, an album that was lauded by critics and adored by longtime fans. Cohn brings his trademark studio intimacy to the downtown stage, performing a signature songbook for every taste.

Flat Rock is certainly famous for many things, but few know the rich history behind this stunning and ever-growing community. Thankfully, Historic Flat Rock Inc. is sponsoring a full day of history immersion, opening the doors of some of the area’s most elegant landmark homes. Take a stroll through Apple Acres, St. John in the Wilderness Episcopal Church, McCullough Cottage, Dunroy, and Hopewood, all of which were built long before the turn of the last century.

TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, July 11, 7:30pm. $25. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Locations vary, Flat Rock, NC. Sat, July 12, 10am–4pm. $25-$30. (828) 698-0030, historicflatrockinc.org

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

Downtown Greenville. Fri, July 4, 5–10pm. Free. greenvillesc.gov

zWhat-Not-To-Miss / FLAT ROCK HISTORIC HOME TOUR

Photograph courtesy of the Library of Congress

THE

”We SERVE and SUPPORT our

Karla McCall, Yolonda Walker, Art Seaver, Robert Thompson, William Johnston, Liz Smith, Jamie Ertter 16 TOWN / towncarolina.com


CAROLINA MOUNTAIN RIBFEST

ZZ TOP

ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA

Load up those Wetnaps—it’s time for Carolina Mountain Ribfest. The eighth-annual event packs a punch with a menu chock-full of mouthwatering brisket, ribs, chicken, and pulled pork crafted by pitmasters from Tennessee to Texas. The weekend also includes musical acts like Pure Prairie League, Carolina Rex, and The Jimmie Van Zant Band. Patrons can get in on the fun with a $500 grand prize karaoke competition. There’s even a Sunday car show for the auto enthusiast and a carnival for the wee ones.

The men of many beards have been rocking for 45 years, with hits like “La Grange,” “Legs,” and “Gimme All Your Lovin’,” attracting countless fans. As part of the Biltmore Estate’s summer concert series, the “sharp dressed” Texans are guaranteed to turn it up throughout the Blue Ridge Mountains, playing favorites from their catalog of 15 albums and numerous incarnations of their hard-rock sound. Just don’t forget to wear your cheap sunglasses.

Giving new meaning to the term “dysfunctional relationship,” Shakespeare’s historical tragedy isn’t your typical tale of star-crossed lovers. Esteemed Roman general Mark Antony falls for the bewitching Egyptian queen Cleopatra, a woman both revered for her beauty and feared for her temper. Under Cleopatra’s spell, Antony neglects his duties, betrays his friends, and in the end gives the ultimate sacrifice in the name of love. Amphitheatre at Falls Park, 601 S Main St, Greenville. July 10–Aug 3; Thurs–Sun, 7pm. Free. (864) 235-6948, warehousetheatre.com

July 2014 Photograph courtesy of the Biltmore Estate

Photograph courtesy of Carolina Mountain Ribfest

Photograph courtesy of Bon Secours Wellness Arena

WNC Agricultural Center Fairgrounds, 1301 Fanning Bridge Rd, Fletcher, NC. Fri, July 11, 4–11pm; Sat, July 12, 11am–11pm; Sun, July 13, 11am–7pm. Adults, $7; under 12, free with adult. wcpshows.com/ribfest.html

Biltmore South Terrace, Biltmore House, 1 Lodge St, Asheville, NC. Wed, July 30, 8pm. $60. (800) 411-3812, biltmore.com

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List z

THE

Quick HITS SUMMER ON AUGUSTA z The annual event makes its seasonal comeback with an additional day on the calendar, packing the weekend with even more local bands, shopping, and dancing. Sure, there are six livemusic acts, but Summer on Augusta is also home to the Mater Pie Contest, delicious barbecue, and children’s activities. A mere stone’s throw from downtown Greenville, there’s simply no excuse not to make the drive. Augusta Rd, Greenville. July 24–27. Thurs–Sun, check site for times. onlyonaugusta.com/summer

CRAFT FAIR OF THE SOUTHERN HIGHLANDS z An array of contemporary and traditional-style crafts goes on display at this biannual fair presented by the Southern Highland Craft Guild. More than 200 juried artists working with various media, from pottery to leather and paper to jewelry, set up shop for the long weekend, creating an impressive landscape. In addition, mountain musicians will perform on Friday, and craft demonstrations will be held throughout the fair.

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

US Cellular Center, 87 Haywood St, Asheville, NC. July 17–20. Thurs–Sat, 10am–6pm; Sun, 10am–5pm. Adults, $8; under 12, free. (828) 298-7928, southernhighlandguild.org

HOT DOG DAY z Let’s face it: it’s been far too long since anything cost fifty cents. The good news is you can relive the glory days of soda fountain prices at Hot Dog Day, where families can munch on grilled dogs, chips, soda, and ice cream for less money than a gallon of gas. Admission is free to Greenville Zoo members, and the event is the perfect summertime distraction for children of all ages. The Greenville Zoo, 150 Cleveland St, Greenville. Sat, July 12, 9am–4pm. Adults, $8.75; ages 3–15, $2.25. (864) 4674300, greenvillezoo.com

COLORS ANNUAL EXHIBITION z The Spartanburg Art Museum provides a muchneeded creative outlet for local, underprivileged youth with its COLORS program, designed to join established artists with students from regional schools. The result is this annual exhibition, where watercolors, sketches, and other student handiwork will be on display for the public to enjoy. Additionally, an auction of these pieces will be held on July 12, with proceeds benefitting the COLORS program. Spartanburg Art Museum, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. July 2–Aug 15. Tues–Sat, 10am–5pm; Sun, 1–5pm. Free. (864) 582-7616, spartanburgartmuseum.org

18 TOWN / towncarolina.com

JJ Grey & Mofro The soul-funk favorites have seen more than a decade of changes, catapulting the band from local celebrities in their Jacksonville hometown to fullscale celebrities of jam rock. Narrative songwriting marries well with the septet’s rootsy, unique instrumentals, taking the audience on a rollercoaster ride of high-octane rock music and emotionallycharged acoustic tunes. With the release of The River in 2013, JJ Grey & Mofro have only increased their fan base, drawing sold-out shows nearly everywhere the road takes them. TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, July 17, 7:30pm. $25. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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Town

ON THE Chris Stone, president of VisitGreenvilleSC

Stephanie Kins & Monica D’Onofrio

THAT Party May 29, 2014 Industry, business, and community leaders packed the Certus Loft for VisitGreenvilleSC’s second annual THAT Party. With the help of a fashion show featuring “Yeah, THAT, Greenville”–themed clothing and a surprise performance by local The Voice contestant Delvin Choice, VisitGreenvilleSC celebrated a record-breaking year with more than $1 billion in visitor spending, as well as the awardwinning “Yeah, THAT Greenville” campaign.

Robin Wright, Alexandra & Sandra Stone with Wanda Pearcy

Delvin Choice

Photography by Chelsey Ashford ))) Find more photos at facebook.com/towncarolina Greg Cordell & Maureen Megan

Amy LeRoy & Clayton Kale

Allison McGarity & Jenn Park

Bill Norman & Cameron King

Lindley Mayer, Chase Hawkins & Lanie Hudson

Chris Stone & Jack Bacot

Jane Harrison Fisher, Ellis Fisher & Ryan Heafy

J U LY 2 0 1 4 / 2 1


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Todd & Erin Dando with Sara & Jeff Lindley 22 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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ON THE

Town

Centre Stage Gala April 26, 2014 Tim McKinney, host and presenting sponsor, welcomed nearly 250 guests to his home via Hollywood red carpet for the annual Centre Stage Gala. This stage-worthy event featured paparazzi, gourmet eats, signature cocktails, and plenty of dancing. Actors and actresses from Centre Stage also gave impromptu performances—tangible and entertaining reminders of the talents and programs supported by the gala. Photography by Chelsey Ashford

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South Carolina Children’s Theatre Caribbean Crush May 2, 2014 Live steel drums by Pantasia, a silent auction, an outdoor tiki bar, and gloriously tasty food by local restaurants highlighted an evening of fun and generosity sponsored by the SC Children’s Theatre. The guests— nearly 400 in attendance—raised more than $65,000, making the seventhannual Caribbean Crush the most successful to date. The funds support the SCCT’s education and outreach programs, which were able to serve more than 48,500 Upstate families in the previous fiscal year.

More home sweet homes. For more than 80 years.

Photography by TJ Grandy Kelly Carson & Lori Knoblauch

Since 1933, Caine has been the first name in Upstate real estate. Although a lot has changed in those eight decades, some things haven’t: people still rely on our dedicated team of agents, and they still look for our blue and white signs whenever they’re thinking of buying or selling. Learn more about both at cbcaine.com.

cbcaine.com Tammy Crabtree & Sandy Young Beth Landis & Liza Ragsdale Nicole & Griffin Bell, with Matt & Katy Smith

24 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Lauren Sigmon with Will & Meg Riley


RAG & BONE/JEA ON THE

Town

ELIZABETH & JAME

DIANE VON FURSTENBURG ELIZABETH & JAMES

Leadership Greenville Graduation Dinner

RAG & BONE/JEAN

May 22, 2014

TOLANI

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ELLIOTT LAUREN

BELLA DAH

ISDA Families and Leadership Greenville alumni gathered to honor the 55 members of Leadership Greenville’s 40th graduating class. Community leaders shared their appreciation for these graduates and challenged them to engage and contribute to their communities. The graduates, who were selected through a highly competitive process, participated in a 10-month program to educate and promote quality and dynamic leadership in the Upstate. Photography by Chelsey Ashford

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ON THE

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Greenville Women Giving’s Eighth Annual Meeting May 7, 2014 Fifty dedicated members of the Greenville Women Giving Grants Review Committee sifted through 60 grant applications to arrive at this year’s very deserving slate of eight grant awards. In total, $500,255 was awarded, which brought GWG’s eightyear total to more than $3 million in funds given back to the community. The organization, which began in 2006 as a special initiative of the Community Foundation of Greenville, now counts 425 members in its ranks.

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Laurens Electric Business After Hours Million Dollar Shootout April 24, 2014 About 200 guests from the Greenville, Mauldin, Simpsonville, Fountain Inn, and Greer chambers of commerce gathered to kick off the Laurens Electric Million Dollar Hole-In-One Shootout. Four participants qualified for the finals (and a shot at one million dollars), while others enjoyed barbecue, a live DJ, and a silent auction. All funds from the event will be put toward the Laurens Electric Cooperative’s 75 Acts of Kindness initiative. Photography by TJ Grandy

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ON THE

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The Red Party for AID Upstate May 3, 2014 If “shiny” is any indication of how festive something is, it’ll be hard to match AID Upstate’s Red Party in sheer fun. In some cases, guests took the “All That Glitters” theme quite literally, while local drag queens added their own sizzle with unofficial appearances. The event raised more than $80,000 in support of AID Upstate’s mission to raise awareness about HIV/AIDS and provide support services to Upstate families affected by HIV/AIDS.

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One-Stop Open Studios Reception May 3, 2014 In the spirit of Artisphere and with an eye toward November, the Metropolitan Arts Council hosted a retrospective exhibit featuring 86 artists who have previously participated in Greenville Open Studios. About 175 guests, including MAC board members, artists, and patrons, attended the reception. The twelfth-annual Open Studios weekend will take place on the first weekend of November this year. Photography by TJ Grandy

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ON THE

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May 18, 2014 The Greenville County Museum of Art celebrated 40 years of hard work and community generosity in building a permanent collection for the Upstate to enjoy. Museum Association members, as well as many former board and staff members, joined in the fun with a 1970s-themed party, disco ball included. The exhibition 40 Years on Heritage Green: Building Greenville’s Collection was on display, as well as photographs from the museum’s ribbon-cutting and fifth anniversary.

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TOWN

Weddings

/ by Andrew Huang

Bonnie Chasteen & Todd Elrod April 5, 2014 As Gamecocks deep in Tiger territory, it was only natural that Bonnie and Todd would gravitate toward each other. They found themselves in Clemson for 2008’s annual football rivalry game and ended up meeting when they went out with mutual friends. The couple dated for four-and-a-half years. One evening, after dinner at Grill Marks, their favorite burger joint in Greenville, Todd suggested a walk through Falls Park. They stopped at a small waterfall, and there Todd popped the question. The couple held their ceremony and reception in the Gold Ballroom of the Poinsett Hotel and featured a medley of anthems from the couple’s favorite musicals. Todd, a mechanical engineer at Michelin, and Bonnie, a first grade teacher at Sue Cleveland Elementary, now live in Greenville. PHOTOGRAPH BY ANGELA COX // ANGELA COX PHOTOGRAPHY

Sara McGee & Graham Cobb April 5, 2014 Sara jumped the gun, or perhaps she was just too in tune with Graham, when she blurted out, “You’re about to propose, aren’t you?” Sara had noticed that Graham was unusually nervous and that his hands were sweaty, not to mention the fact that the couple was on Liberty Bridge in Falls Park, mirroring the Ravenel Bridge in Charleston where couple first said “I love you.” To his credit, Graham went ahead and got on one knee, despite Sara ruining the surprise. The couple, which met through mutual friends, spent four years going back and forth between Clemson and the Citadel, Sara and Graham’s respective colleges. They were married at First Presbyterian Church in Greenville and held their reception at the Children’s Museum of the Upstate. PHOTOGRAPH BY TIFFINEY ADDIS // TIFFINEY PHOTOGRAPHY

Sarah Yates & Andrew Dobson April 26, 2014 A discussion about Spanish verbs hardly seems like a promising romantic beginning, but then again, it is a passionate language. And while Sarah and Andrew didn’t begin dating immediately after that conversation in 2005, they stayed in touch through high school and college. They reconnected on a December weekend in 2009 when they were both home from college and began dating. Three years later, Andrew surprised Sarah underneath the Liberty Bridge (she thought she was just celebrating a friend’s birthday) with a proposal. Family and friends, perched above on the bridge, were able to witness the couple’s special moment unfold. Sarah, a beauty consultant at Merle Norman Cosmetics, and Andrew, a CPA at McAbee, Schwartz, Halliday & Co., reside in Greer. PHOTOGRAPH BY KIM DELOACH // KIM DELOACH PHOTOGRAPHY HEARING WEDDING BELLS? TOWN Magazine wants to publish your wedding announcement. If you currently live or grew up in the Upstate and were recently married, please write to us at TOWN Magazine, Attn: Andrew Huang, PO Box 2266, Greenville, SC 29602, or e-mail ahuang@towncarolina.com. Due to space constraints, inclusion is not guaranteed. 34 TOWN / towncarolina.com


No home here is the same.

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Artwork photographed by Eli Warren; courtesy of Hampton III Gallery

TOWN

Buzz

OUTSIDE THE BOX / FIELD GUIDE / TOP BUNK

Shape of Things Paul Yanko presents the world in colorful abstraction J U LY 2 0 1 4 / 3 7


OUTSIDE THE

Box

Coat of Many Colors Paul Yanko explores the sur face of things / by Kathleen Nalley

38 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Different Strokes: For more information on Yanko or to view his works, visit paulyanko.net

Yanko’s process is one of building: layer after layer, shape after shape, the original concept evolving organically. His is a slow, deliberate process. From the first gestural swipe of a brush onto a pristine, white canvas, he opens a dialogue with the work itself. He then fashions a loose grid that morphs by placing, painting, and removing masking tape to delineate lines, shapes, colors, images, or vignettes. He goes through the process multiple times in multiple configurations until he feels the work is close to complete. Densely layered compositions of color, texture, and form, Yanko’s paintings have an almost hypnotic effect—kaleidoscopic and prismatic. “I let the work find its own logic,” reveals Yanko. The result is a composition new and sharply defined in some places, wrought with nostalgia in others, with many “intentional accidents” along the way. “Sometimes I want a perfectly straight line whose points and angles can be measured equally. Other times, I allow the imperfect—the color bleeds, the off-angles—to create something unexpected,” says Yanko. These accidents often give his works a sense of some vintage object that, while a little battered, has otherwise traveled well—a nod to the past, a signal to the future.

Portrait by Paul Mehaffey; photographs of artwork by Eli Warren, and courtesy of Hampton III Gallery

A

bstract art truly is in the eyes of the beholder. It demands that viewers derive meaning through interpretation. An ochre-colored sphere becomes a sun for one viewer, a symbol of wealth for another. A lavender rectangle: a punch of geometric color or a house filled with joy. “Marcel Duchamp once said that a piece is never finished until it is viewed by an audience, that the viewer completes the work,” says Yanko, who teaches painting, drawing, and 2D design at the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities. Indeed, Yanko’s art allows the viewer to “develop an engagement through multiple points of entry—seams, cracks, fissures.” It’s this sort of unspoken dialogue between artist and viewer that has thrust Yanko’s work into the national spotlight. The award-winning artist exhibits throughout the country and has upcoming exhibitions in South Carolina and Ohio. Like many artists, Yanko’s culture and surroundings inform his paintings. A “total Gen X-er,” Yanko draws inspiration from 1970s TV shows, fashion, and plastic toys, and, in particular, how these modern, colorful designs sharply contrast with the environment of his formative years. Growing up in Youngstown, Ohio, in the Rust Belt corridor, Yanko witnessed once-thriving communities giving themselves back to nature after the collapse of the steel industry. “The sidewalks were cracked slate; the brick buildings had layer after layer of paint, at times revealing what was beneath,” he says. “This led me to think of how things, particularly architecture, are constructed, disintegrate, then re-formed.”


FIELD

Guide

Splash Down Make summer more bearable at these local swimming holes / by Andrew Huang

Your Michael Phelps impression aside, summer is simply not the same without a little (or a lot of) splashing about. From waterslides to waterfalls, there’s more than one way to beat the heat. NATURE CALLS

WILDCAT FALLS Make a pit stop along the Cherokee Foothills Scenic Highway (SC 11) with this twofer. At the lower end of the falls, there’s a 20-foot cascade down exposed granite into a shallow pool perfect for wading. Off to the left, there’s a quarter-mile trail to another set of falls, which features a 130-foot waterslide ending in a deeper pool. SC 11/US 76, about 9 miles northwest of Slater/Marietta, SC

HICKORY NUT FALLS Just across the North Carolina state line is the second-tallest waterfall east of the Mississippi. Located in Chimney Rock State Park, Hickory Nut Falls boasts a 404-foot vertical drop—and a small unofficial swimming pool at the bottom. Even if you don’t take a dip, the mist from the falls is enough to rejuvenate on a hot summer day. Take the three-quarter-mile Hickory Nut Falls Trail to get to the base of the falls.

SKINNY DIP FALLS Disregard the scandalous name—bathing suits are still recommended. But if you do decide to go au naturel, you’re in luck because this waterfall is a little off the beaten path and more of a local secret. In addition to the main falls and swimming hole, there are secondary falls and smaller pools around, perfect for just a quick splash. Park at the Looking Glass Rock overlook on the Blue Ridge Parkway (near milepost 417). The trail begins across the parkway from the parking area. Follow the white blazes along the trail to reach the falls.

AROUND TOWN

THE FOUNTAINS AT RIVERPLACE Take your cues from the children (and adults) splashing their way to grins and laughs. The splash pad beneath the Lazy Goat pays homage to the old Swamp Rabbit Railroad crossing at the Reedy River with a miniature train engine and railroad tracks. Better yet, you can dry off afterward with treats in hand from riverfront shops like O-CHA Tea Bar and Papi’s Tacos.

WESTSIDE AQUATIC COMPLEX While you can pay per visit ($3–$7), it might be a little more economical to just fork out for a monthly membership—you’re going to want unlimited access to enjoy all that Westside has to offer: a 20-lane competition pool, a heated therapy pool, and a fun zone (complete with slides, catapults, and an inflatable water structure).

2700 W Blue Ridge Dr, Greenville. (864) 679-7946, greenvillerec.com/parks/ westsidecomashevillebrewscruise. com

DISCOVERY ISLAND WATERPARK Instead of getting sweaty and dirty running around on the neighborhood playground, there’s the water jet– and water slide–infused version at Discovery Island. Add a lazy river and a Flowrider wave machine (one of the few in the Southeast) for surfing and knee-boarding, and you’ve got a full array of relaxation and thrills on hand. 417 Baldwin Rd, Simpsonville. (864) 963-4345, greenvillerec. com/welcome-to-discovery-island

550 S Main St, Greenville comashevillebrewscruise.com

Chimney Rock State Park, 431 Main St, Chimney Rock, NC. (828) 6259611, chimneyrockpark.com

Sink or Swim Stay afloat with these fit-for-water essentials

ECASE WATERPROOF PHONE CASE // $25. From Half-Moon Outfitters, 1420 Laurens Rd, Greenville. (864) 233-4001, halfmoonoutfitters.com CHACOS OUTCROSS SHOE // $120. From Appalachian Outfitters, 191 Halton Rd, Greenville. (864) 987-0618, appoutfitters.com

40 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Photographs by Paul Mehaffey

CASIO TOUGH SOLAR ILLUMINATOR WATCH // $60. From Mast General Store, 111 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 235-1883, mastgeneralstore.com


JUST THE

Answers Match Point: Retired tennis star Andy Roddick, a part-time resident of Cashiers, NC, faces off against another former world tennis champion on July 26 for the UCB Mountain Challenge.

I

t’s a match made in North Carolina mountain heaven. No, we’re not talking about Andy Roddick and his Sports Illustrated model/actress wife Brooklyn Decker, who live part-time in Cashiers, but the exhibition match between the retired former World No.1 tennis players Roddick and Jim Courier—all to raise money for Mountain Youth Charities, which will create the Boys and Girls Club of the Plateau to help the underserved youth of western North Carolina. The second annual United Community Bank Mountain Challenge is a weekend full of festive fun, food, music (Grammy Award winners Steep Canyon Rangers and the Carolina Chocolate Drops), and lots of smoke and heat: not because they’re serving up BBQ, but because of the serves, slices, and smashes on the court. Get your tickets now for July 25–26 to see Cashiers’ resident ace, who is using his fame for Mountain Youth Charities the same way he has for his Andy Roddick Foundation, started when the 31-year-old was 18 in Austin, Texas: to help others. TOWN caught up with Roddick about living in Cashiers and the upcoming event:

> What I like about Cashiers is that it is a beautiful mountain village with a wonderful small-town vibe and convenient for our family and friends who live in the region. When I started my tennis career, Andre Agassi took me under his wing and encouraged me to start a foundation when I was only 18 years old. Since then I’m happy to report that the Andy Roddick Foundation has grown, and we are serving youth needs in a big way in Austin, Texas. I’m looking forward to helping in a similar way in the North Carolina mountains.

> Despite my effort to mature and not care about the result [of the exhibition match July 26th against Jim Courier], I’m sure when we are in the match, I’m going to want to win as much as possible—but of course, the most important thing is the Mountain Youth Charities.

Serving Right Tennis ace Andy Roddick helps youth in Cashiers, NC / by Jac Valitchka

42 TOWN / towncarolina.com

> Spending more time in Cashiers, I’m definitely enjoying playing more golf and slowly, but surely, improving. > This summer, I’m looking forward to getting back to the mountains as often as possible. For tickets to the UCB Mountain Challenge on July 25–26, call (828) 743-2775 or visit cashiers.com

Photog r aph by Tr avi s M at hews ; cour tes y of t he A ndy Rodd ick Found at ion

> The majority of the proceeds from the Mountain Challenge are assisting with a startup of a new Boys & Girls Club based right in Cashiers. While Cashiers and the mountains are beautiful and a great second-home destination, the youth of this area still have the same types of needs you find anywhere else.


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TOP

Bunk

Gold Standard

All That Glitters: (clockwise, from left) Belmond Charleston Place’s majestic entrance; executive chef Michelle Weaver crafts elegant cuisine at the hotel’s Charleston Grill; Charleston offers carriage tours of its historic streets; renovated rooms at the hotel marry vintage style with modern updates; (opposite) the hotel’s saltwater pool under a retractable glass roof

The Belmond Charleston Place wraps daily life in leisure

I

t is difficult to arrive at the Belmond Charleston Place and not feel a twinge of guilt. After all, it is one of Charleston’s most luxurious hotels, a bastion of the Holy City, flanking Meeting, Market, and King streets. But after about an hour in my plush room, I give in to bliss. Perhaps owing to its historic location—the port city of Charleston was settled by English colonists in 1670—the Belmond Charleston Place mirrors European grandeur. With a window to the past but with an eye on modern conveniences, the hotel’s princely quarters fuse luxurious French accents with lofty hues of white, blue, and grey. The hotel has begun renovating its rooms in this style, in addition to one-touch lighting (clever trick), flat-screened televisions, and deep, marble waterfall showers. After breakfast on the Club level, featuring a standout continental spread including smoked fish, charcuterie, and sweet and savory pastries, I settle in for a Swedish massage and rooftop swim in the saltwater pool (which is heated in cooler months and under a retractable glass roof). The Spa at Charleston Place is one of the country’s top hotel spas, with massages, facials, manicures, pedicures, and even treatments for kids, offered separately or as packages. (Among its formidable selection are two notable facials: the Intraceuticals Rejuvenate

44 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Restoring Oxygen Treatment and the Luxe 24 Karat Gold Facial.) After indulging, I grab a drink at the pool’s bar and take a lounge view of the city’s antiquated skyline. At this point, it becomes clear that the m.o. of the Belmond Charleston Place is to relinquish my every worry, doubt, or pang, particularly at its formidable Charleston Grill, with illustrious executive chef Michelle Weaver helming the kitchen and gregarious general manager Mickey Bakst, the mastermind of Charleston’s successful social programs Feed the Need and Teach the Need, minding the front. Chef Weaver has organized the menu into four sections—Cosmopolitan, Southern, Pure, & Lush—to highlight her exciting range and direct my palate. Such attention makes for fine dining, indeed, and the hotel’s other options, The Palmetto Café and the handsome Thoroughbred Club bar, are equally as rich. Before going, and without stepping foot outside, I head to the Shops at Belmond Charleston Place to rack up everything from electronics to gourmet chocolate to wardrobe essentials. Here, it’s easy to confuse such luxury with daily life. Best to leave, as I did, while it still feels a dream. Belmond Charleston Place, 205 Meeting St, Charleston. (888) 635-2350, charlestonplace.com

Photographs courtesy of the Belmond Charleston Place

/ by Blair Knobel


Grab a drink at the pool’s bar and take a lounge view of the city’s antiquated skyline. At this point it becomes clear that the m.o. of the Belmond Charleston Place is to relinquish every worry, doubt, or pang.

J U LY 2 0 1 4 / 4 5


Severino Alvarez swagger by appointment

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46 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Central

STYLE

ALL THINGS STYLISH / UNIQUE / EXTRAORDINARY

Rock & Roll

Photog r aph by Paul Meha f fey

Lily Wikoff brings bohemian chic to downtown Greenville

Chain Gang: Quartz pendant necklaces, $36-$42; pink agate necklace, $22; both by Lily Pottery. For more, see page 48.

J U LY 2 0 1 4 / 4 7


SHOP

Talk 2

3

5

/ by Blair Knobel

4 4

1 1

5

5

West Coast Roll

Lily Downtown 220 E Coffee St, Greenville lilypottery.com Tues–Sat, 11am–6pm; Sun, 12–4pm

Lily Wikoff brings a spirited collection to Coffee Street / by Andrew Huang

I

t takes a little forethought to find Lily Downtown, designer Lily Wikoff’s latest retail venture. The squat brick building on East Coffee Street, unassuming and decidedly anonymous, is closer to Christ Church Episcopal than the sparkling glass façades around ONE City Plaza and Main Street. But going off the beaten path is nothing new for Wikoff. Her Lily Pottery studio was in West Greenville well before the area became a hip artists’ enclave, and Lily Pottery designs veer far from conservative traditions. Earthy textures and natural materials are at play with global influences—in short, Wikoff has an eye toward the adventurous, the nomadic, and the bohemian. With Lily Downtown, Wikoff makes the natural expansion of that aesthetic into a full lifestyle experience. The store itself is demonstrative of that verve: originally a bank building, Wikoff and her team gutted and refinished much of the space on

48 TOWN / towncarolina.com

7 their own, discarding (drop ceilings) and keeping features (an original vault) from the building, according to her aesthetic. That experience of curation extends to every item in the boutique. The main showroom is grounded by jewelry and flanked by a selection of contemporary made-in-the-USA goods—gauzy tanks, denim cutoffs, artisan leather goods, and lacy intimates—culled from independent designers (such as Knot Sisters, Peg and Awl, and Wikoff’s own LP line). To the rear of the showroom, the original vault opens to reveal a converted dressing room. On the left are two rooms—a collection of women’s vintage goods and a denim-heavy room of vintage menswear—designed as living look-books for an entire lifestyle aesthetic, from art, décor, and furnishings to candles and coffee-table books. And while a full-blown bohemian lifestyle might not suit everyone, if you’re willing to walk away from Main Street, you’ve already got the spirit.

1 MINI DISC COLLAR BY LILY POTTERY, $145 2 TANKS, T-SHIRTS, AND SKIRTS BY LP VINTAGE AND KNOT SISTERS, $38 - $76

7

3 CANDLES BY TOBACCO & OAK, $19- $26 4 VINTAGE DENIM CUTOFFS AND WOMENSWEAR, $28 - $40 5 CHARM BRACELETS BY LILY POTTERY, $165 EACH

6


LIFE MOMENT #26:

They’ll get their first scraped knee on that sidewalk. Your hug will make everything better on that porch.

LIFE’S MOMENTS HAPPEN IN A HIGHLAND HOME.

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DRESS

Code

Shades of Summer Classic poolside glamour will have you sitting pretty / styled by Laura Linen // photography by Eric Graham

1 UNDER COVER Straw hat, $27. From Traveling Chic Boutique, 122 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 365-5501, travelingchicboutique.com 2 SUN BLOCK Islay sunglasses, $385, by Tom Ford. From Monkee’s of the West End, 103-A Augusta St, Greenville. (864) 239-0788, monkeesofthewestend.com 3 ROCK SOLID Oval white-gold turquoise halo ring, $4,030. From Hale’s Jewelers, 532 Haywood Rd, Greenville. (864) 297-5600, halesjewelers.com 4 LINKED IN Flat chain-link necklace, $28. From Monkee’s of the West End 5 WET SUIT Ruched blue swimsuit, $119, by La Blanca. From Dillard’s, 700 Haywood Rd, Greenville. (864) 987-9229, dillards.com Special thanks to Meredith Merritt (Millie Lewis Models) and Megan Diez Salon (hair & makeup) 50 TOWN / towncarolina.com


200 Industrial Drive Greenville, SC (864) 232-2545

7412 Asheville Highway Spartanburg, SC (864) 327-4025

1104 Salem Church Road Anderson, SC (864) 225-0012

629 Market Street Hendersonville, NC (828) 233-0180

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MAN

About TOWN

Each month, the Man About TOWN will share his Upstate rendezvous, which may or may not involve cocktails.

Hip to Be Square The Man About TOWN sees the benefit of age in L.A.

“O

h, to be cool.” I remember my father saying those words as he drove me to my first day of ninth grade. My father, who wore khaki pants, a button-down Oxford shirt, and a blue blazer every day of his adult life, was commenting on my outfit. Up to that point, and for several years to come, I thought of his clothing as ridiculous, yet here I was wearing red Converse high tops, red parachute pants, a Frankie-Says-Relax t-shirt, a red bandana tied at the neck, and, the icing on the cake, a mullet I had groomed to glorious new lengths over the summer. My dad was right: there were two people in the station wagon that morning, and one of them was not cool. Now, some thirty years later, I often find myself sarcastically muttering “Oh, to be cool,” under my breath. On a recent trip to Los Angeles, I practically chanted the phrase. L.A. is the most diverse city in the country, and that diversity breeds and fuses all types of trends. Take dining out for example. L.A. restaurants are a maze of paleo, gluten-free, ancient grains, coconut oil and kale, with offerings such as $7 artisanal toast leavened with ambient yeasts and served with locally-sourced, organic apple butter. As a chef friend once told me, “When the menu has more adjectives than nouns, you know you’re in trouble.” From the bartender “hand-chipping” ice while dressed like an extra from Oliver Twist to the bespectacled woman in a pilgrim hat crafting items for her Etsy store while drinking a “single-origin, fair-trade,

52 TOWN / towncarolina.com

low-acidic, mocha macchiato,” there is a palpable anxiety to be cool in L.A. And those are just the hipsters. L.A. is also full of new-age hippies, young punks, trust-fund fashionistas, and a dizzying number of old men in Ferraris. And they’re all writers, and they’d all rather be in New York. It’s really not fair to pick on L.A., as Brooklyn, Portland, Austin, and Asheville are just as guilty of embracing, and glorifying, trends. Even Greenville is not immune. For proof just spend a morning at the TD Saturday Market. But for every new trend that is born, an old one dies. Oxygen bars become vaping stores, 10Ks become Tough Mudders, low-carb beer becomes high-gravity ale. The undercut fades, and selvedge jeans of today are the mullets and parachute pants of yesterday. After working my way through new-wave, hair metal, and finally grunge, I gave up on fashion-trend-following in my early twenties and settled on a look my dad had perfected years earlier. A look that is as classic today as it was fifty years ago. Now, when I see a bearded twenty-something in suspenders or a young woman in high-waisted, cut-off denim shorts, I can’t help but wonder if one day they’ll look back and say the same thing I say when I see old photos of myself: “What the hell was I thinking?” ))) Catch up on the Man at towncarolina.com/blog


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Holder

Reason Being

Film artist Jeff Sumerel reflects on life worth seeing

/ by Jef f Sumerel

To My Great Chagrin: The Unbelieveable Life of Brother Theodore Premiered at the Museum of Modern Art, NYC, 2008 Producer/Director: Jeff Sumerel Editor/Co-Producer: Jeter Rhodes He is considered one of the most significant links in the history of comedy, admired by such people as Woody Allen, Eric Bogosian, Penn & Teller, and Orson Welles. His television appearances have spanned from Merv Griffin to David Letterman. His long-running Off-Broadway show was hailed as “diabolical genius.” He is Brother Theodore. A former millionaire playboy in the late 1930s of Germany, Theodore endured the sobering loss of his entire family, his fortune, and his own identity, as a survivor of Dachau concentration camp. Shipped to America humiliated and stunned, Theodore yearned to reclaim his high-status and wealth. Continually haunted by his loss, and hindered as a displaced foreigner, he tapped “the power of despair” to re-invent himself, and created a distinguishing brand of dark, existential, philosophical humor to become one of America’s most respected humorists and monologists.

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n February of 2001, after passing muster, I was allowed to meet Brother Theodore with the intent to produce a documentary about him. Although flattered, I took it as a caustiouslyoptimistic step, based on what I had heard about working with him and his tendency to self-sabotage efforts to further his career. Yes, even at the age of 95. I had four nights of interviewing him—or perhaps “listening to him” is more apt. Although showing physical signs of his age, he was stunningly sharp-witted and keen, and even rose to perform, in German, a spirited version of a dark, childhood poem entitled “The Rat.” About a month after the interview, Theodore contracted pneumonia and was put in Mt. Sinai Hospital. Naturally, I returned to New York for an extended stay to see him as often as I could. One night while visiting him, as soon as I walked into his semiprivate room, he seemed especially frustrated. A nurse tending to his roommate left to continue her rounds. Immediately Theodore somehow found the strength to raise himself up on one elbow. I leaned down to him. Without even saying hello to me, he asked, “Would you do me a great favor? Would you please take me out of here?” There was real seriousness to his request. I said, “Theodore, I can’t do that. I don’t even have any authority to do that.” His voice was whispered but had the intensity of yelling, “You don’t understand. It’s humilating. There are gorgeous nurses here wiping my butt.” (continued on page 56) J U LY 2 0 1 4 / 5 5


Holder

I felt a stinging pang. Of course it was humilating. Perhaps even more so for a former millionaire playboy. As my heart went out to him, I wasn’t sure how to respond. I knew there was no remedy. So, I took a chance. I said, “Would you like for me to arrange for the ugly nurses to wipe your butt?” There was a moment of uncertainty as he continued to glare at me. Slowly a rare grin slid across his face, and his eyes lightened. He seemed to give-in to the dark humor. But only for a second, as he quickly reverted to his characteristic scowl, and gave a curt, “No.” He leaned back and gazed straight-ahead in a reflective pause, as he frequently did during these visits. It was not uncomfortable. Suddenly he grabbed my arm. The arm of this 95-year-old man, that honestly still looked the arm of a young boxer, which at one time he was, pulled me to him, not in a touching way, but with firm intent. He softly yet clearly articulated with his slight German accent, “There’s a reason you’re going to meet all these people.” I must have looked baffled. “Do you understand?!” All these people? What people? My initial reasoning was he was speaking about the interviews for the documentary; however, “all these people” felt like it went way beyond the documentary. A strong prophetic tone. All I could respond with was, “No. I don’t understand. But maybe I will in a few years.” He relaxed his grip and eased his head back on the pillow. Theodore died a couple months after that visit. I assumed that put an end to the documentary. After all, I only had 4 nights with him. However, his closest friends insisted I continue and that, actually, this would be the only time Theodore could not sabotage such a project. So, even with no funding secured (as with most personal documentaries), the project became a labor of respect over the next 7 years. As time and financing would allow, I would knock-off interview after interview by having access to Theodore’s personal address book that provided contacts from local eccentrics to national celebrities. Throughout that time, Theodore’s comment continued to pop into my head. How could it not, considering the people I was meeting? Woody Allen, Henry Gibson, Tom Schiller, and Eric Bogosian, as well as non-celebrities who were equally as genuine and compelling. Shortly after each interview, I would wonder about the reason. Are Penn & Teller going to ask me to do a documentary about them? Does Harlan Ellison have a new short story for me to produce? Will Dick Cavett let me adapt his TV material into a one-man show for him? It was natural to think that the reason would be about contacts and work, a gateway to the Hollywood scene. But deep down I knew that was not what Theodore meant. He made it clear with his piercing eyes and tone. Yet my ego could not resist thinking otherwise. In February 2008, through happenstance and luck, the film was selected by the Museum of Modern Art for opening night of their annual documentary-film series. It was sold out with diehard Theodore fans, close friends, and celebrities. As I told Jeter Rhodes, the film’s editor/co-producer, “This will either be our easiest audience or our most difficult.” Fortunately, the film did not disappoint. And the evening remains a highlight of my career. It was only a few years ago that the reason began to come into focus for me. I don’t know exactly when, but it occurred to me that nearly everyone I interviewed for the film had a commonality. One they shared with Theodore. And that is it is well worth the sacrifice, and even wise, to steer clear of compromise. And to continually do a self-review to be as genuine as possible in all efforts.

56 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Right Direction: The opposite pulls of fame and authenticity have long challenged film artist Jeff Sumerel (above), though his experience of directing and producing a documentary on Brother Theodore instilled in him the value of remaining true to self.

As Penn Jillete said, “Brother Theodore was the truest performer I’ve ever seen.” Doing so may lead to Hollywood, for those wishing for that. Or it may not. But if it does, it will be on your terms. It’s not easy to walk that tightrope of fame and authenticity, to go against the norm and risk humiliation. For some time now, I’ve been trying to balance on that tightrope, yet still not getting it quite right. It remains precarious, because the wind of fame and fortune has a mighty pull. Theodore’s integrity continues to inspire me. Recently I took the step to finally complete a very personal film, incidental. It’s probably the most genuine work I’ve produced. And not surprisingly, it’s felt the most rewarding, even though not nearly the most acknowledged. Nevertheless, it’s a motivation to continue. When it comes to the public’s perception of success in film entertainment, Hollywood is still the gold standard. I’m not down on that style of product. Even though predictable and familiar, some of it is very entertaining and provocative. So, it’s natural for flourishing film producers throughout communities to emulate that same product. Plus, today’s technology makes it nearly irresistible to replicate the look and feel of Hollywood. In Greenville, we have several people actively producing films, and they’re finding their audience. However, where are those wanting to produce more in the line of David Lynch, Michel Gondry, and Todd Solondz? Work that pushes boundaries. Work with bite to it, that puts the artist out on that tightrope. Timi Brennan’s stop-motion animation comes to mind. I don’t know him well, and maybe he’s just getting started. But from what little I’ve seen, he seems willing, and, perhaps more important, motivated. Maybe others need to be cultivated and made to feel they’re welcome to come out and play. I just wonder if indeed they are welcome in Greenville. I’d like to think so. It would be fulfilling if we could offer artists who’re making films with the same integrity and boldness as Brother Theodore. Jeff Sumerel is a film artist, producer, and native Greenvillian. Since 2009, he divides much of his time between Greenville and Vilnius, Lithuania. He can be contacted at jeff.sumerel@gmail.com.

Photograph courtesy of Jeff Sumerel

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stage coach The South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities has a tendency for attracting, fostering, and propelling big-time talent. How big? Just turn on your television.

/ b y J a c Va l i t c h k a // photography by Paul Mehaffey

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e h

Daniel Murray, chair of the Department of Drama and teacher of Acting and Movement at the Governor’s School, has been with the school since its inception and led students to stage and screen. J U LY 2 0 1 4 / 5 9


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There are numbers and statistics, and glowing praises of the merits and accomplishments of the founders and faculty of the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities at 15 University Drive in Greenville, South Carolina. You can read the mission statement and research the bold-faced names and hear about the millions of dollars raised that made this place possible. You can, sure. All of those factuals and actuals validate the worth and value of why this free, residential, public high school exists and should exist. But it won’t make your heart go “lub dub.” Facts are great, but they’re maybe not as great as the feeling that bookends them.

What you should know, then, is the story of student Brandon Hall. Hall, a then-junior at Pendleton High School, had a single mother who overcame numerous obstacles to raise her children. Hall was “as raw as you could possibly be,” says Daniel Murray, the chair of the Department of Drama at the Governor’s School. “He couldn’t read particularly well, but he had a lot of charisma, and we took him and he just took off.” Hall finished out his two years of high school at the Governor’s School. He had never been on a plane until he took the ride of his life to audition at the elite Juilliard School’s Drama Division in New York City—one of the most prestigious acting programs in the country. Out of 1,500 applicants, nine men and nine women were chosen for the 2011–2012 year. Hall was one of them. He’s now in his senior year at Juilliard and is poised to potentially become the Governor School’s first big male breakthrough (no pressure, Brandon, Murray wants you to know!).

60 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Empire State Lexington’s Wrenn Schmidt, star of HBO’s Boardwalk Empire, found her footing at SCGSAH

These success stories—as special as Hall’s might be—are not unusual, especially to Murray, who is a founding faculty member and has been with the school since 1996, in its earlier days when it was still located at Furman University, and has served as the director for the Summer Programs in Drama since 1999. “Brandon spent most of his weekends sitting right there,” Murray says, pointing to the chair at the conference table in his office, “teaching himself to be a student because his reading and writing skills were deficient. He was maybe the hardest-working student we’ve ever had.” But as one high-powered New York City agent called it, Murray recalls, “this South Carolina magic school” doesn’t run by hard work (by both the students and faculty) alone. The scholarship Juilliard awarded to Hall didn’t cover all of the nearly $53,000 annual cost of attendance, so the Governor’s School Foundation found “a generous and amazing donor,” Murray says, in Aiken, South Carolina, through the partnership program called Juilliard in Aiken, and they covered the difference of the cost of what remained.

HBO star Wrenn Schmidt, Mad Men’s Teyonah Parris, and Danielle Brooks, star of Netflix hit Orange Is the New Black, are graduates of Greenville’s prestigious Governor’s School for the Arts & Humanities.

The best acting comes from an authentic place. If actress Wrenn Schmidt’s interview with TOWN is any indication, she’s got the right technique down. Also great for honing that skill? Graduating from the Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities, as Schmidt did—part of the inaugural class of 2001 when, as her former drama department chair Dan Murray says, “You had to be a real risk taker in those days. There was no physical school yet, save for the dormitory. We rehearsed in empty dormitory rooms and a not-yet-finished library space. The theatre and studios for drama were not fully functional until her senior year.” Schmidt calls from the Bombay Sandwich Company at 27th Street and Sixth Avenue in New York City, around the corner from where she takes acting classes “to hit the reset button from any bad habits.” Like her fellow classmates, she greatly credits SCGSAH for getting her instincts honed before she arrived at college (she, like Murray, attended the Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas.) If you’re a fan of HBO’s Prohibition-era series Boardwalk Empire, you’ve likely seen the willowy, strawberryblonde playing Julia Sagorsky, the love interest of Jack Huston’s character Richard Harrow. But before that, nearly nine years ago when she first arrived in New York, Schmidt slugged it out the hard way holding three jobs: at Starbuck’s, a theater that worked on international conflict resolution through clowning, and a nutritionist’s office. “I was working 60–70 hours a week, working all three jobs and I broke a bone in my foot,” says the effusive actress. “I had that moment of asking myself, ‘Why are you here? What do you really want to do? Why don’t you do what you’ve wanted to do since you were five and be an actor and try that out?’ So I just started auditioning on my crutches.” Soon, she would be cast in a play at Lincoln Center, which earned her a review in the New York Times, an agent, and an appearance on Law & Order, then subsequent roles in theater and television. Her spot on FX’s The Americans with Keri Russell recently aired, and she’s shooting a short film directed by Steven Soderbergh. The young actress from Lexington, South Carolina, who once worried about getting an A at the Governor’s School—“I was kind of uptight and tense,” she says. “It wasn’t, ‘What did I learn from that?’ It was, ‘Was that good? Did I do it good?’—soon might find she’s made the grade on a whole new A-list.—JV


JosĂŠ de Guadalupe, a Native American from the Pascua Yaqui tribe, was given his stage name by a flamenco instructor who could not pronounce his real name.

J U LY 2 0 1 4 / 6 1


“WE HAVE AVERAGED A KID A YEAR AT JUILLIARD FOR THE PAST 11 YEARS NOW,” SAYS MURRAY. “SO WE’VE HAD 11 KIDS IN 11 YEARS. THAT’S MORE THAN ANY HIGH SCHOOL IN THE COUNTRY.”

62 TOWN / towncarolina.com


Murray, who began working at the Governor’s School in 1996 when it was on the Furman University campus, credits a “superb and dedicated” faculty for attracting and honing stellar talent.

W

e have averaged a kid a year at Juilliard for the past 11 years now,” says Murray, “so we’ve had 11 kids in 11 years. That’s more than any high school in the country, and Juilliard has an acceptance rate of about one third of a percent. They see 1,500 applications from around the world—they take 10. And we’ve penetrated that a bunch of times.” Murray isn’t bragging, though he is extremely proud, but he is almost as surprised as you might be to know that this—at its very core—“free, public high school for the arts” in Greenville, South Carolina, can count a Tony Award winner (Patina Miller, from Pageland, South Carolina, class of 2002), as well as an actor who was in the 2014 Oscar-winning film 12 Years a Slave and starred on Broadway with Al Pacino (Liza J. Bennett, from Charleston, class of 2006), and an actor who plays the lead on the FOX series Sleepy Hollow (Nicole Beharie, from Orangeburg, South Carolina, class of 2003) among its graduates. But that’s just scratching the surface. There’s Wrenn Schmidt, from Lexington, South Carolina, from the inaugural class of 2001—a class of nine—who is a regular on HBO’s drama series Boardwalk Empire, and Danielle Brooks from the class of 2007, who appears on the smash Netflix series Orange Is the New Black, and Teyonah Parris, from Columbia, from the class of 2005, who is a cast member on the Emmy Award–winning show Mad Men.

J U LY 2 0 1 4 / 6 3


64 TOWN / towncarolina.com


Stage and Screen

“ THEY’VE GOT TO BE ABLE TO TAKE A PUNCH. THEY’VE GOT TO BE ABLE TO HUMBLE THEMSELVES BEFORE THE PROCESS. THEY’VE GOT TO BE THE KIND OF STUDENTS THAT MAKE OTHER PEOPLE BETTER.”—DANIEL MURRAY

Charleston native Liza J. Bennett stuns in 12 Years a Slave 2006 Governor’s School graduate Liza J. Bennett’s first audition—her very first—landed her in a play with Al Pacino. Now, she has an Oscar-winning movie on her growing resume: 12 Years a Slave. From chilling our spines as the character of Mistress Ford in 12 Years to an upcoming comedic film with Morgan Freeman and Diane Keaton called Life Itself, Bennett’s seemingly steady road to stardom started here. Bennett took time during a week of auditions to talk to TOWN: Q: Where are you in New York— Brooklyn or the city? A: My wife [a casting director] and I bought a house two years ago in Brooklyn, but I’ve been here for eight years when I moved here for Julliard. Q: At what point did you start answering people ‘I’m an actor,’ when they would ask what you did? A: I was incredibly lucky. I booked my first job before I graduated from Juilliard. My deal with myself is that I could say I was an actor if I were making money working as an actor. I was able to work at the Public Theater with Shakespeare in the Park for three months and then the play we were doing—The Merchant of Venice with Al Pacino—went to Broadway, so I did the Broadway contract with them. Q: What’s happened since 12 Years a Slave? A: I’ve stayed about as busy as I was before, but it’s certainly given me a little more clout. People take me more seriously. The real job of a working actor is auditioning most of the day because it’s up and down. You can be in the Oscar-winning movie of the year one second and then next you’re going from job to job trying to figure it out. Q: Dan Murray from the Governor’s School says that you are “so loyal to the school.” A: I love them. I would say it’s among the best pre-professional training programs in the country. They take kids from all over and different walks of life and different cultures and backgrounds, and you all start in the same place as artists. I’m still close friends with a lot of my classmates, and we get together and talk about how crazy it was that we were treated like adults at that age and expected to behave like adults. It didn’t take me any time to realize how great it was. Q: Can you imagine if you hadn’t gone to the Governor’s School? A: I don’t think I would have attempted this kind of crazy life as an artist. It’s very volatile; there’s no stability whatsoever. I had talented, focused adults telling me from a young age, “This is a hard life. It’s a very fulfilling one, but prepare yourself,” and that started at Governor’s School.—JV

Patina Miller, a Pageland, SC, native, won the Tony Award in 2013 for her role in Broadway’s Pippin; Liza J. Bennett shared the stage in The Merchant of Venice with Al Pacino and appeared as cold-hearted Mistress Ford in 12 Years a Slave; Nicole Beharie stars in FOX’s hit Sleepy Hollow

The conservatory or college-level instruction from passionate instructors like Murray has largely been responsible for setting off the trajectory to these name-inlights moments. “We have a world-class faculty of artist-mentors with deep knowledge and hard-won experience, people like Candace Dickinson in singing, Rhonda Murray in dance, and Jayce Tromsness in speech and Shakespeare. They are the backbone of our program,” says Murray. That the school is residential—with community-building atmosphere and a two-year immersion in acting, theatre movement, dance, voice and speech, singing, performance, as well as audition preparation, playwriting, and theatre history—is an obvious recipe to help, what Murray calls, “crack the code” and get his kids into the bold-faced realm—or at the very least—into some very prestigious schools including Juilliard, but also Carnegie Mellon and Harvard. In addition to the residential high school, SCGSAH offers the two-week Discovery Program for rising ninth graders and a two-week academy for high school sophomores. he curriculum, Murray says, is about developing the three things that an actor needs. “You’re developing the physical instrument to be athletic, expressive, and available to impulses. You’re developing the vocals—that includes voice for the stage and speech. You’re teaching them to access their imagination, to think abstractly and to stay open to instinct, and to learn the technique and process of acting.” That can be taught. But what cannot be taught? The student’s character—meaning their “will,” according to Murray. “They’ve got to be able to take a punch. They’ve got to be able to humble themselves before the process. They’ve got to be the kind of students that make other people better. So there’s got to be a generosity about them, and if those things are in them or can be developed in them, the instinct that attends the talent will be a synergistic effect.” This would be in the school’s DNA, as founder and first president Virginia Uldrick, whom Murray describes as a “field general of a leader,” wouldn’t stop or take no for an answer until this idea—formalized in 1980 as a summer program by order of thengovernor Dick Riley on the campus of Furman University—came into its illustrious own, in

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the heart of downtown Greenville. From the lump of red clay to the Tuscan-village-inspired campus it is now, the Governor’s School—like the students who come in “green” or “raw,” yet blossom in film, television, and on Broadway—shines brightly at 15 University Drive. “We set the bar high with that first class in 2001,” says Murray, “and I would have felt very good just to achieve those things— to get kids into some good schools. But to see Nicole in Sleepy Hollow and then a Colgate commercial with Teyonah in it, that’s something I hadn’t quite imagined fully.” But beyond the “we knew them when” moments, Murray knows there’s a greater good and mutual goal this now nationally-renowned school is working toward. “For the whole school—and what feels best—is that you might be making a contribution to the betterment of the next generation—a generation that is more sensitive, more tolerant, more compassionate, these are all the traits of an artist,” says Murray. And, if you just happen to get thanked in someone’s Oscar/ Tony/Emmy Award speech because of it? That’s some drama you might just want. J U LY 2 0 1 4 / 6 5


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// photography by Paul Mehaf fey

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nergy sizzles as the lanky young woman with arresting hazel eyes greets me in the entrance to her restaurant. “Hi, I’m Katie Button,” she smiles, shaking my hand. She wears jeans and a sweater, belying her role as executive chef of Cúrate in Asheville. She is clearly bright and articulate, but when this awardwinning chef tells me what career she almost followed, my jaw drops. “I was always good in math and science,” says Button, “so I majored in chemical and biomedical engineering at Cornell.” She always loved to cook, though, and grew up in a “food-focused family.” After graduation, she headed to Paris to earn her Master’s degree. Between all the studying, Button still found time to cook. “I taught myself how to make puff pastry by rolling out the dough on the floor of my studio apartment,” she recalls. Poised to begin a PhD program in neuroscience at the National Institutes of Health, Button suddenly realized what she really loved. The nascent chef ditched her PhD for a job as a server at Minibar in Washington, D.C., owned by top toque José Andrés. To get line experience, she volunteered in the kitchen on her days off. Through her connection with Andrés, she eventually landed an internship at El Bulli in Catalonia, Spain, Ferran Adrià’s temple of avant-garde cuisine. At El Bulli, Button put her knowledge of science to good use working for the man hailed as the father of molecular gastronomy. It was also here that she met her husband Félix Meana. She and Felix returned to the states to help her parents open a restaurant, settling on Asheville as home. When the Buttons offered Katie and Félix the opportunity to share ownership of the restaurant, Cúrate and its tapas concept was born. Just steps from Pack Square, Cúrate fills a narrow dining space with

70 TOWN / towncarolina.com

small tables and a long marble-topped bar bellying up to the open kitchen. It’s not easy to decide between all the incredible dishes, but a tasting of cured Spanish hams is a good place to start. The tabla de embutidos ibéricos includes the prized ibérico de bellota, made from free-roaming pigs that feed predominantly on acorns. From there, try signatures such as ajo blanco, a chilled almond milk and garlic soup brightened with green-grape granité and Dungeness crab. Mariscos en escabeche, tender mussels, scallops, and clams swimming in a roasted tomato and garlic vinaigrette, comes whimsically presented in a sardine tin. Among the hot dishes, albondigas con jamón incorporates some of that nutty ibérico de bellota ham, giving them a silky, moist texture. Button’s version of paella, rossejat negro, pairs squid in its ink with thin noodles instead of rice—Button’s twist on the traditional Spanish accompaniment. For dessert, walk around the block to Cúrate’s new sibling, Nightbell. Linger over a nightcap while you tuck into a box of three jewel-like petit fours. Molecular gastronomy inspires Button’s interpretations of the miniature French cakes. The first, a vivid orange riff on carrot cake, pairs a crunchy carrot-flavored meringue with a cream-cheese filling. In a clever take on Key lime pie, fluffy meringue crowns a tiny “cup” of refreshing Key lime sorbet. A bite through the chocolate coating of the s’mores petit four surprises with a taste of smoked marshmallow. Whether in science or the culinary arts, hard work, passion, and drive have taken Katie Button where she wanted to go. “I work more now than I ever did,” she admits, “but when you’re doing what you love, it doesn’t feel like work.


Milky Way: (This page) Chef Katie Button pours her elegant ajo blanco, a chilled almond milk and garlic soup with green-grape granité and Dungeness crab; (opposite) pulpo a la gallega, Galicianstyle octopus served with sea salt, olive oil, Spanish paprika, and Yukon Gold potato purée; Curaté’s small, yet vibrant interior; Chef Button; ajo blanco, plated

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KITCHEN

Aid

Fire Station Take a few tips from a master griller before your next cookout / by M. Linda Lee // photograph by Paul Mehaf fey

E

ver since the first man threw a hunk of meat over an open fire, humans have been hooked on barbecue. There’s something primal about cooking outdoors, as many a cowpoke of yore could attest. Barbecue has other advantages, too. In the Upstate, the mild climate makes it possible to grill outdoors nearly year-round, preventing you from having to heat up the kitchen and use lots of pots and pans that will need to be cleaned later. For Chef Anthony Gray, who grew up in Georgia, grilling is de rigueur. “Barbecue is something I do on my days off,” the chef says. “There’s just something nostalgic about lighting the fire and cooking outside.” At his eastside restaurant Bacon Bros. Public House, Gray has the luxury of his own smokehouse. “When we opened the restaurant, I knew I wanted to do items like brisket and pulled pork here,” he says, “and I wanted to preserve the tradition I grew up with.” When he was a boy, his father did 75 percent of the cooking on the grill. Although his father marinated almost everything in Italian dressing, Gray now favors a dry rub (he uses a mix of paprika, garlic, and onion powders, cumin, and chile powder) on his grilled meat. He also likes to mop the meat as it grills, versus glazing it with a heavier barbecue sauce. “The idea here is to keep the meat moist by brushing it with a solution of vinegar, honey and Worcestershire sauce,” Gray says.

WHEN IT COMES TO GRILLING & SMOKING, TAKE A CUE FROM CHEF ANTHONY: • Use a charcoal grill with natural charcoal and a chimney for starting the coals. Avoid chemical fire-starters. • If you marinate meat, be careful to wash your utensils to avoid crosscontamination. • If you’re using wood chips in a grill or smoker, be sure to soak them first. Then let them burn for 5 minutes to burn off the “green smoke” that causes a bitter taste. • Allow large cuts of meat (and even steaks) to come to room temperature before grilling them. This makes for more even cooking. • Let the meat rest after you grill or smoke it. Wrap it in foil and leave it for 15 minutes to an hour, depending on the size of the cut. If you don’t get the hang of it at first, don’t worry. “I tell people what my Dad used to tell me,” Gray says. “There’s no such thing as bad barbecue.”

72 TOWN / towncarolina.com

MUSTARD Q SAUCE Since Chef Anthony is partial to mustard-based sauces, he shares the mustard barbecue sauce recipe he makes at Bacon Bros. Public House. He recommends using it on almost any meat you grill, from chicken to pork shoulder, as the vinegar and mustard cut through the meat’s fattiness. This recipe yields a halfgallon of sauce. INGREDIENTS: 2 ½ cups yellow mustard 2 ½ cups white vinegar ½ cup ketchup ½ cup honey ½ cup Worcestershire sauce 6 dashes hot sauce Salt and pepper to taste METHOD: Combine all the ingredients in a saucepan. Whisk to blend and then bring to a boil. Strain the sauce and allow it to cool.


Rub Down: Chef Anthony Gray prefers a dry rub to season his grilled meat and uses a lighter blend of vinegar, honey, and Worcestershire sauce to keep the meat moist.

GO LOCAL WITH MEAT FROM THESE AREA FARMS Want to turn up the taste—and health benefits—of your burger? Try LOCAL, PASTURE-RAISED BEEF. “Grass-fed and grassfinished beef is a health food,” asserts Dr. Nancy Walker of Walker Century Farm in Anderson. She’s right. Beef that is completely grass-fed is higher in good omega-3 fatty acids and lower in bad omega-6 fatty acids, so forsake grain-fed meat for healthier pastureraised beef, right from where you live.—MLL

BRICKHOUSE FARMS On their family farm in Gaffney, Jim and Eve Lyle raise Devon and Angus cows according to organic practices. That means the animals are grown on pasture without hormones, steroids or antibiotics. Want to beef up those burgers with a little ground pork? The Lyles also raise rare Red Wattle hogs. Brickhouse Farms delivers half and whole cuts of beef once a month to locations in Greenville, Spartanburg, and Fort Mill. 1139 Brickhouse Rd, Gaffney. (864) 490-7108, brickhousefarms1943.com

WALKER CENTURY FARMS

“Barbecue is something I do on my days off.” —Chef Anthony Gray

Red Devon cows and crosses make up the herd that Drs. Nancy and William Walker pasture on land that has been in the Walker family for more than 100 years. To sustain their farm, they use organic fertilizers and rotate the cattle around their 200 acres. Buy the Walkers’ beef and pork at their farm store and the Swamp Rabbit Café & Grocery in Greenville, as well as at the Slow Food Earth Market and farmers’ markets in Anderson and on the Clemson University campus. 110 Walker Rd, Anderson. (864) 226 -2668, walkercenturyfarms.com

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OPEN

Bar Pressing Matter: Find these selections and more at the TD Saturday Market, Whole Foods’ local farmers’ market on Tuesdays, and via kukajuice.com

On the Whole Kuka Juice delivers fresh, cold-pressed juices / by Steven Tingle

T

74 TOWN / towncarolina.com

GREEN WITH ENVY // Kale Spinach Swiss Chard Cucumber Parsley Lemon Ginger

MINT TO BE // Cucumber Green Apple Pineapple Mint

UPBEET // Beet Carrot Orange Lime

SKINNY GENES // Spinach Grapefruit Green Apple Ginger Lemon Cayenne

TICKLE ME PINK // Watermelon Mint

Photog r aph by Paul Meh a f fey

ruth be told, a 16-ounce bottle of liquefied kale, spinach, cucumber, and parsley is not the most visually appealing of breakfast choices. But according to Samantha Shaw and Abigail Ellison, the health benefits of drinking such a concoction far outweigh the visual concerns. “It will improve every aspect of your health,” says Shaw. “Plus, it will give you more energy.” As owners of Kuka Juice, a Greenville-based, cold-pressed juicery, Shaw and Ellison have turned their passion for health and wellness into a startup that is quickly gaining momentum. And with each 16-ounce bottle of Kuka Juice containing three to five pounds of produce, it’s also keeping them up at night. “We juice four days a week,” says Shaw. “Sometimes we start at midnight and go on for hours.” It was while trekking through South America that the two young entrepreneurs discovered the popularity and power of juicing. By the time they returned to the States, they had become juice evangelists and were dedicated to bringing the benefits of juicing to the Upstate. Kuka Juice is currently available for delivery as well as for pickup at the TD Saturday Market in downtown Greenville and at the Whole Foods’ local farmers’ market each Tuesday. Mint To Be (pineapple, cucumber, apple, mint), Kale Yeah (kale, spinach, green apple, lemon), Skinny Genes (spinach, grapefruit, green apple, lemon, ginger, cayenne), and Kick Some Acid (spinach, orange, pineapple) are just a few of the 14 varieties currently available. And with the cold-pressed juicing method, Kuka juices have three to five times more nutrients that typical fresh juice. If the girls’ glowing skin is any indication, they just might be onto something.


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DINING

Guide

Saffron

The Pickwick D (Mon–Sat). 1440 Pelham Rd, Ste M, Greenville. (864) 458-7866, bangkokgreenville.com

HOT & COLD HOT

BANGKOK THAI CUISINE

It’s not easy to find pad Thai that has flavor beyond noodles drenched in sweet sauce. Luckily, Bangkok Thai manages to bridge the expectation gap with a fragrant offering. The curries are also a surefire hit, though the green curry is of particular note: it is the only one made from fresh chilies. For a different dining experience, take a seat on the floor pillows in the back room. $$, L (Mon–Fri),

COMPADRE’S

This Mexican grill and cantina in the West End is a good spot to grab a bite and a margarita before a Drive game. Tried-and-true combinations of chalupas, burritos, tacos, and chile rellenos don’t disappoint, but authentic Mexican accents spark dishes such as a ribeye with cactus (nopales) and camarones a la mojo de ajo (grilled shrimp in a garliclaced marinade). $, L, D. 929 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 282-8945, mycompadres.com

FONDA ROSALINDA

If you’re looking for Mexican food beyond the usual tacos, enchiladas,

and burritos, head for this little storefront around the corner from East North Street. Mexican-born chef/owner Rosalinda Sala, who started cooking at her mother’s side when she was a small girl, goes beyond the standard in her menu of South of the Border fare: sea bass with shrimp and scallops comes doused with salsa nopales (cactus sauce); traditional barbacoa (slow-cooked lamb shank) in Rosalinda’s choice of sauces; and chicken choices such as pollo en mole poblano, smothered with a spicy, housemade mole.

HANDI INDIAN CUISINE

$$-$$$, L, D (no dinner Mon & Tues; no lunch Sat). Closed Sunday. 1124 N Pleasantburg Dr, Greenville. (864) 292-7002, mexicanrestaurantgreenville.com

Lemongrass Thai brings flavor to please. Choose from curry, noodles, and fried rice, or vegetarian dishes. The Bangkok Street Cuisine menu includes Siam Chicken (marinated chicken breast, grilled, with

This Main Street staple offers the best of northern Indian cuisine. At lunch, sample items from a reasonably priced buffet with plentiful choices that change daily. From the menu, try the Handi Special: a sampler of tandoori chicken, lamb kabobs, lamb or chicken curry, and vegetable korma, served with basmati rice, naan, condiments, and dessert. $$-$$$, L, D. 18 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 241-7999 LEMONGRASS

KEY : Average price of a dinner entrée (lunch if dinner isn’t served): Under $10 = $, $10-$15 = $$, $16-$25 = $$$, $25+ = $$$$ Breakfast = B Lunch = L Dinner = D Sunday Brunch = SBR 76 TOWN / towncarolina.com


BARS, CAFÉS, & RESTAURANTS pineapple, carrots, bell pepper, cashew nuts, and mushrooms) and Prik King (chicken or pork sautéed in spicy chili sauce), while the chef’s specialties offer even more choices. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 106 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 241-9988, lemongrassthai.net MEKONG

Formerly with Stella’s Southern Bistro in Simpsonville, Chef Huy Tran delivers the nuances of fine Vietnamese cuisine at Mekong. Among favorites is a noodle feast, featuring grilled pork, marinated with lemongrass, ginger, garlic, soy, and oyster sauces, and shredded pork simmered in a flavorful broth. Chef grows the herbs that are heaped in the bowl, and finishes the dish with nuoc cham, a Vietnamese sauce. Add a crispy spring roll and take your ’buds to a new dimension. $, L, D. 2013 Wade Hampton Blvd, Greenville. (864) 244-1314, mekongrestaurantsc.com

PAPI’S TACOS

Table 301 plankowner Jorge “Papi” Baralles brings family tradition and the familiar childhood flavors of Cuautla, Mexico, to this walk-up taqueria on the Reedy River. The menu is short and to the point. Get your tacos with shrimp, barbacoa, al pastor, carne asada, carnitas, or chicken and chorizo, or sample some gelato in the display case. Get in, get out, and enjoy Falls Park. $, L, D. 300 River St, Greenville. (864) 373-7274, eatpapistacos.com

PITA HOUSE

Located at the intersection of Pleasantburg and Faris Road, the Pita House has been family-operated since 1989. Inside, it’s bare bones— plastic booths and simple tables—but the cognoscenti come here for good Middle Eastern fare, such as hummus, falafel, kibbeh, and shwarma. The menu is basically the same for lunch and dinner; if you’re having trouble deciding, go for one of the sampler plates (they may set you back a few more bucks). And save room for baklava and other Mediterranean sweets for dessert. Want to cook up some authentic dishes at home? Check out the little grocery in the back of the restaurant. $, L, D. Closed

Photog r aph s by Paul Meha f fey

Sunday. 495 S Pleasantburg Dr, #B, Greenville. (864) 271-9895, pitahousesc.com

SACHA’S CAFÉ

Bright walls and a long, inviting bar make a sunny backdrop in which to chow down on Colombian food at Sacha’s. Arepas are available with ingredients like beans, chorizo, avocado, shredded beef, and more stuffed inside (rellenas) or piled on

top (encima). The patacones, or deep-fried plantains, are thick and sweet. Hungry groups can order the Fiesta Platter, a sampler that serves six people. To drink, try one of the natural fruit juices, or the imported cervezas. $, L, D. Closed Sunday. 1001 N Pleasantburg Dr, Greenville. (864) 232-3232, sachascafe.com SAFFRON INDIAN CUISINE

The aromas of north Indian spice blends are apparent the moment you step into Saffron’s modern, upscale dining room. The restaurant’s tandoor oven produces a mix of slow-cooked, flavorful meats as well as freshbaked breads like naan and roti. If the spicy flavors of your dish need taming, try the raita, a blend of cool yogurt and shredded cucumbers. For more selection, go with the lunch buffet’s rotating offerings. $$-$$$, L, D. 1178 Woodruff Rd, Ste 16, Greenville. (864) 288-7400, saffrongreenville.com TORTILLA MARIA

Local, organic, and gluten-free— while a growing number of restaurants check off those boxes, it is still a rarity to find Mexican food that satisfies those requirements. Enter Tortilla Maria. In addition to the innovative takes on enchiladas and tacos, the restaurant offers a colorful selection of healthy smoothies and juices. The Mean Green Juice blends apples, celery, cucumber, ginger, lemon, and spinach together for a refreshing, cleansing beverage. $, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 115 Pelham Rd, Greenville. (864) 271-0742, tortillamaria.com

COLD BLUEBERRY FROG

The frozen yogurt artisans on South Main Street pride themselves on being the first and best fro-yo establishment in South Carolina. Pop into the bright, sleek storefront to sample some of their fresh yogurt, prepared daily. Make sure you enhance your cold treat with a plethora of toppings: fresh fruit, nuts, chocolate and caramel chips, chewy mochi, and more. $, L, D. 624 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 517-7971, blueberryfrog.com GRILL MARKS

The newest concept in the Larkin’s family, Grill Marks marries oldschool charm with creative twists for a modern burger-and-shake joint. Brioche buns sourced from a local baker and 100-percent-certified Angus beef form the base of these succulent burgers. Gourmet cheeses, mushrooms, and bacon round out the list of toppings. Grab a milkshake for

the full experience. If you want to experiment, there are also ShakeTails. Familiar flavors—Irish coffee, cherry cola, s’mores, and more—get blended into adult versions of those creamy shakes. $-$$, L, D. 209 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 233-5825, marksburgers.com KILWIN’S

Who doesn’t like chocolate and ice cream? If Kilwin’s business model is any indication, there aren’t a whole lot of people who fall into that category. The American confectioner has been dishing out every imaginable cause of cavities since 1947, including chocolate, toffee, caramel, fudge, brittles, and salt-water taffy. It only makes sense that there would be ice cream—more than 40 unique flavors of Kilwin’s original recipe—to take advantage of all those sweets lying around. $-$$, L, D. 220 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 241-2003, kilwins.com LUNA ROSA GELATO CAFÉ

From the cobbled streets of Italy and the hustle-bustle of New York, gelato has found a home in Greenville. Indulge in this creamier, healthier version of ice cream, in a selection of satisfying flavors made fresh daily. $-$$, L, D. 9 W Washington St, Greenville. (864) 241-4040, lunarosagelato.com NORTHGATE SODA SHOP

This North Main staple doesn’t just have one of the best pimiento cheeseburgers in town (even disregarding its $4 price tag—which just makes it even better)—it’s a hotbed for nostalgia. The oldschool counter, vintage ads, and memorabilia are the result of being open for more than 60 years. The soda shop still serves up flavors and smells of a bygone era, including the hand-spun milkshakes in classic chocolate, vanilla, strawberry, and peanut butter banana incarnations.

THE PICKWICK

The Pickwick began its life as a soda fountain, and though it became strictly a pharmacy, the Greenville institution has returned to its roots. The Odom brothers, owners of the Pickwick, salvaged a 1949 soda fountain (restored to its original glory) from the old Carpenter Bros. soda shop and reopened the Pickwick soda fountain in 2007. Counter seating and a diner menu out of the 1940s compliment the 30 flavors of ice cream, milkshakes, and floats served from this stainless-steel and marble soda fountain. $, B, L, D (Mon–Fri). Closed Sundays. 3219 Augusta St, Greenville. (864) 2774180, thepickwick.net

SPILL THE BEANS

Whether for post-dinner dessert or a weekend treat in the park, Spill the Beans fits the bill. This Greenville institution has been providing gourmet custom-blended ice cream and coffee to Main Street shoppers for years. A long list of ingredients ensures that it’ll be a time before you’ll taste the same combination twice. $, B (Mon–Sat), L, D. 531 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 242-6355, stbdowntown.com

YOGURT MOUNTAIN

For those with poor self-restraint, YoMo probably isn’t the best idea. For everyone else, it’s self-serve frozen yogurt heaven. A bank of 16 rotating yogurt flavors lines one wall, while a buffet-style counter contains more than 50 toppings containing everything from the moderately healthy (blueberries) to the monstrous fever dreams of small children (chocolate-covered gummy bears). In addition to the Cherrydale location, YoMo has outposts on Woodruff Road and in Spartanburg. $-$$, L, D. 3220 N Pleasantburg Dr, Greenville. (864) 232-2505, yogurtmountain.com

$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 918 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 235-6770, northgatesodashop.com O-CHA

A trip to O-CHA will have you considering tea in an entirely new light. This sleek space, located right on the river in Falls Park, specializes in bubble tea (flavored teas with chewy tapioca pearls), but also has an assortment of mochi ice cream for a more intense cooling experience in the summer. The dessert combines the chewy Japanese confection (a soft, pounded sticky rice cake) with ice cream fillings in fun flavors: tiramisu, green tea chocolate, mango, and more. $, L, D. 300 River St, Ste 122. (864) 283-6702, ochateabaronline.com

TOWN Magazine accepts no compensation for Dining Guide reviews and selects entries by its editorial discretion. Reviews are conducted anonymously.

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TOWN

Scene 2–Aug 15

back to the Upstate, armed with all the hits from your favorite artists, including Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry, and Jimmy Buffett. The group has won numerous awards for their musical endeavors, so be sure not to miss the “South’s Finest Show Band.” TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, 7:30pm. $15. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

COLORS ANNUAL EXHIBITION

JULY

2, 9, 16, 23, 30 SC BLUE REEDY RIVER CONCERT SERIES Amassing a number of genres over only a few weeks, this annual concert series is an ideal spot for families and music lovers. This year’s lineup includes blues stylings by the Greenville-based Wiredogs and Alabama native Cecil Thompkins, sandwiched by reggae powerhouse Mystic Vibrations and rockers Palmetto Swamp Congregation. The summer set kicks off in July with performances by South Carolina’s 246th National Guard Army Band and country crooner Clay Page. TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Wed, 7–9pm. Free. greenvillesc.gov

The Spartanburg Art Museum provides a much-needed creative outlet for local, underprivileged youth with its COLORS program, designed to join established artists with students from regional schools. The result of this is the annual exhibition, where watercolors, sketches, and other student handiwork will be on display for the public to enjoy. Additionally, an auction of these pieces will be held on July 12, with proceeds benefitting the COLORS program. Spartanburg Art Museum, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. Tues–Sat, 10am–5pm; Sun, 1–5pm. Free. (864) 582-7616, spartanburgartmuseum.org

3

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WELLS FARGO RED, WHITE, AND BLUE FESTIVAL It’s just not the Fourth of July without a few fireworks lighting up the night sky. Sponsored by the Bon Secours St. Francis Health System, the free festival has one of the largest fireworks displays in the state, not to mention plenty of kiddie activities. Live music will be hosted on both the TD and Pepsi stages in the downtown area, and local vendors will be on tap to sate all your brew and food needs. Downtown Greenville. Fri, 5–10pm. Free. greenvillesc.gov

THE FANTASTIC SHAKERS

Specializing in original and cover beach tunes guaranteed to get those feet shagging, the Fantastic Shakers’ career has spanned nearly five decades and countless venues throughout the Southeast. Now, the verifiable kings of the Carolinas make their way

4–26

BEATS, BURGERS, AND BLUES AT THE OLD ROCK CAFÉ

What is the perfect summer combination? A top-notch burger with a cold beer, or a picturesque mountain backdrop set to the harmonious sounds of local musicians? Why bother choosing when there’s this weekly event at the Old Rock Café. Every Friday and Saturday evening, the Zagatrated restaurant hosts a different regional artist, ranging in genre from folk to bluegrass, outside on the riverside deck. With plenty of scenery and plenty of eats, there’s no reason not to take to the hills. The Old Rock Café at Chimney Rock Village, 431 Main St, Chimney Rock, NC. Fri–Sat, 6–8pm. Free. (828) 625-2329, chimneyrockpark.com

5

ANNUAL COON DOG DAY FESTIVAL

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CAN’T-MISS CULTURE / EVENTS / ATTRACTIONS find their identity in a whirlwind of miniskirts, sexuality, and selfexpression. A fun, tongue-in-cheek ride through everything mod, Shout! stacks the deck high with tunes by Dusty Springfield and Nancy Sinatra, along with a vibrant wardrobe Twiggy herself would envy. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $25-$35. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

sporting dog, Coon Dog Day kicks off with an early morning 5K run through the region, followed by a downtown parade, Coon Dog Royalty Court, shopping, and other family activities. Downtown Saluda, NC. Sat, 8am–11pm. Free. cityofsaludanc.com

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G IRLS GONE MOD

With plenty of wine and tasty appetizers served fresh, this is the ideal evening to ditch your significant other and have some “me” time mingling with girlfriends. The evening caps off with a special premiere showing of Shout! The Mod Musical at Centre Stage, almost certain to get you out of your seat and dancing to the fabulous tunes you grew up with. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Wed, 6:30pm. $30. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

WAITING ON IMAGE

10–Aug 3 ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA Giving new meaning to the term “dysfunctional relationship,” Shakespeare’s historical tragedy isn’t your typical tale of star-crossed lovers. Esteemed Roman general Mark Antony falls for the bewitching Egyptian queen Cleopatra, a woman both revered for her beauty and feared for her temper. Under Cleopatra’s spell, Antony neglects his duties, betrays his friends, and in the end, gives the ultimate sacrifice in the name of love. Amphitheatre at Falls Park, 601 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs– Sun, 7pm. Free. (864) 235-6948, warehousetheatre.com

10–Aug 2 SHOUT! THE MOD MUSICAL Set in London during the colorful 1960s, Shout! follows five women of various generations trying to

Celebrate a special time both past and present with this fine collection of sterling silver inspired by historic wrought iron gates throughout the South.

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679 Fairview Road, Suite B • Simpsonville, SC 29680 • 864-228-2920 J U LY 2 0 1 4 / 8 1


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MARC COHN

“Walking in Memphis” may have put Cleveland native Marc Cohn on the musical map, but his strong sense of melody and poignant lyrics have given him staying power. Sorely missed during his ten-year hiatus, Cohn made his mainstream return with 2007’s Join the Parade, an album that was lauded by critics and adored by longtime fans. Cohn brings his trademark studio intimacy to the downtown stage, performing a signature songbook for every taste. TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, 7:30pm. $25. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

11–13

CAROLINA MOUNTAIN RIBFEST

Load up those Wetnaps—it’s time for Carolina Mountain Ribfest. The eighth-annual event packs a punch with a menu chock-full of mouthwatering brisket, ribs, chicken, and pulled pork crafted by pitmasters from Tennessee to Texas. The weekend also includes musical acts like Pure Prairie League, Carolina Rex, and The Jimmie Van Zant Band. Patrons can get in on the fun with a $500 grand prize karaoke competition. There’s even a Sunday car show for the auto enthusiast and a carnival for the wee ones. WNC Agricultural Center Fairgrounds, 1301 Fanning Bridge Rd, Fletcher, NC. Fri, 4–11pm; Sat, 11am–11pm; Sun, 11am–7pm. Adults, $7; under 12, free with adult. wcpshows.com/ribfest.html

12

DISNEY JUNIOR ON TOUR: PIRATE AND PRINCESS ADVENTURE

Perfect for parents mediating the timeless disagreement inherent in brother-sister entertainment choices, Disney Junior unites the spirit of the high seas with the majesty of a royal castle. Young Sofia isn’t quite sure about what it means to be a princess—that is, until she gets a little know-how from the beautiful Cinderella. As for Jake, he and his band of comrades jet off to Never Land with Peter Pan, searching for hidden treasure while battling Captain Hook along the way. Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium, 385 N Church St, Spartanburg. Sat, 1pm. $23-$53. (864) 582-8107, crowdpleaser.com

82 TOWN / towncarolina.com

12

FLAT ROCK HISTORIC HOME TOUR

Flat Rock is certainly famous for many things, but few know the rich history behind this stunning and ever-growing community. Thankfully, Historic Flat Rock Inc. is sponsoring a full day of history immersion, opening the doors of some of the area’s most elegant landmark homes. Take a stroll through Apple Acres, St. John in the Wilderness Episcopal Church, McCullough Cottage, Dunroy, and Hopewood, all of which were built long before the turn of the last century. Locations vary, Flat Rock, NC. Sat, 10am–4pm. $25-$30. (828) 6980030, historicflatrockinc.org

12

HOT DOG DAY

Let’s face it: it’s been far too long since anything cost fifty cents. The good news is you can relive the glory days of soda fountain prices at Hot Dog Day, where families can munch on grilled dogs, chips, soda, and ice cream for less money than a gallon of gas. Admission is free to Greenville Zoo members, and the event is the perfect summertime distraction for children of all ages. The Greenville Zoo, 150 Cleveland St, Greenville. Sat, 9am–4pm. Adults, $8.75; ages 3–15, $2.25. (864) 467-4300, greenvillezoo.com


what is pure barre? The fastest, most effective way to change the shape of your body. Using small isometric movements at the ballet barre set to motivating music, Pure Barre lifts your seat, tones your thighs, abs and arms and burns fat in record breaking time. Clients see results in just 10 classes, lose inches in weeks and have fun

15, 22, 29

LOVE, LOSS, AND WHAT I WORE Some say clothes make the man, but for women, a wardrobe is often the most vocal outlet of expression. Such is the basis for Nora and sister Delia Ephron’s play, chronicling the stories of five women on different life paths, but sharing similar struggles with selfhood. Based on Ilene Beckerman’s book of the same name, the narrative highlights how choice of clothes reflects much more than surface value, alluding to our personal crises, confidence, and the rich material that molds our entire lives. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Tues, 7pm. $20-$30. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

Illustration courtesy of the Library of Congress; Artwork (necklace) by Kim Thompson; (sculpture) by Catherine Murphy, both courtesy of SHCG

17

JJ GREY & MOFRO

The soul-funk favorites have seen more than a decade of change, catapulting the band from local celebrities in their Jacksonville hometown to full-scale celebrities of jam rock. Narrative songwriting marries well with the septet’s rootsy, unique instrumentals, taking the audience on a rollercoaster ride of high-octane rock music and emotionally-charged acoustic tunes. With the release of The River in 2013, JJ Grey & Mofro have only increased their fan base, drawing sold-out shows nearly everywhere the road takes them. TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, 7:30pm. $25. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

17–20

C RAFT FAIR OF THE SOUTHERN HIGHLANDS An array of contemporary and traditional-style crafts goes on display at this biannual fair presented by the Southern Highland Craft Guild. More than 200 juried

artists working with various media, from pottery to leather and paper to jewelry, set up shop for the long weekend, creating an impressive landscape. In addition, mountain musicians will perform on Friday, and craft demonstrations will be held throughout the fair. US Cellular Center, 87 Haywood St, Asheville, NC. Thurs–Sat, 10am–6pm; Sun, 10am–5pm. Adults, $8; under 12, free. (828) 298-7928, southernhighlandguild.org

18–20

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6/10/14 4:13 PM

MONSTERCON 2014

If you daydream about meeting a walker in a dark alley or eating dinner with Leatherface’s family, you’ve struck gold. A celebration of all things horror, MonsterCon invites fans to link up with each other and industry professionals through a series of workshops, panel discussions, and question sessions. This year’s guests feature F/X artists from Syfy’s hit Face/Off series, filmmaker Jaysen Buterin, and numerous cosplay superstars. A film fest, costume contest, and Con Culture Magazine will also be on hand. Timmons Arena at Furman University, 3300 Poinsett Hwy, Greenville. Fri, 3pm–12am; Sat, 10am–7pm; Sun, 10am–4pm. Adults, $16; 10 & under free with adult. monstercon.org

19

GLOW IN THE PARK

Light up the summer night with the return of Glow in the Park, where running in the dark is actually fun. New this year are the addition of glow tunnels at the color stations as well as even more foam. Deck yourself out in the finest fluorescent fashions before taking off through Heritage Park, where a dazzling display of backlights, neon, and J U LY 2 0 1 4 / 8 3


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colors are there to greet your every stride. Proceeds benefit the American Diabetes Association. Heritage Park, 310 W Curtis St, Simpsonville. Sat, 8:45– 10:30pm. $45-$55 registration. glowintheparkrun.com

from television to stage. There’s no Ryan Seacrest, but who says that’s a bad thing? The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues, 7:30pm. $65-$95. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

18

JOHN HIATT & THE COMBO AND THE ROBERT CRAY BAND

26

YOU GO GIRL WOMEN’SONLY TRIATHLON

Proving that girl power didn’t die with the Spice Girls breakup, this triathlon is dedicated to celebrating the athleticism and strength of women. For females only, the triathlon combines a challenging itinerary of a 250-yard swim, 10-mile bike ride, and a two-and-a-half mile run, with each competitor encouraged to complete the course in less than two hours and 15 minutes. Lace up, ladies. GHS Life Center, 875 W Faris Rd, Greenville. Sun, 7–11am. $69-$119 registration. setupevents.com

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Counted among the blues world’s most influential and acclaimed musicians, John Hiatt and Robert Cray have been touted by critics for both their vocal capacities and uncompromised songwriting. Now the musicians pair up for a dual Peace Center performance, bringing a combined 79 years of experience to the masses. While each will have solo sets with their respective bands, the highlight of the evening will an unforgettable jam session. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, 7:30pm. $45-$55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

A MERICAN IDOL LIVE!

Though perhaps not quite as entertaining as the audition process (who can forget William Hung?), the live version of America’s favorite singing contest connects fans with the singers in a memorable performance. This season’s top 10 contestants—including winner and Asheville native Caleb Johnson— make a pit stop in the Upstate for an evening of music favorites straight

24

The annual event makes its seasonal comeback with an additional day on the calendar, packing the weekend with even more local bands, shopping, and dancing. Sure, there are six livemusic acts, but Summer on Augusta is also home to the Mater Pie Contest, delicious barbecue, and

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dressed” Texans are guaranteed to turn it up throughout the Blue Ridge Mountains, playing favorites from their catalog of 15 albums and numerous incarnations of their hard rock sound. Just don’t forget to wear your cheap sunglasses. Biltmore South Terrace, Biltmore House, 1 Lodge St, Asheville, NC. Wed, 8pm. $60. (800) 411-3812, biltmore.com

children’s activities. A mere stone’s throw from downtown Greenville, there’s simply no excuse not to make the drive. Augusta Rd, Greenville. Thurs– Sun. onlyonaugusta.com/ summer

24–Aug 24

30

31–Aug 9

GLOW LYRIC THEATRE FESTIVAL SEASON One of the Upstate’s most popular summer productions, GLOW returns with one of its most exciting showcases yet. The 2014 edition juxtaposes separate adaptations: Puccini’s La Boheme and Jonathan Larson’s Rent—a mid’90s adaptation of Henri Murger’s iconic Scenes de la vie de Boheme novel. Though set in different eras, each play explores similar issues of love and tragedy, paralleled by relatable characters, topical themes, and gripping lyricism. Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Wed–Sun, 8pm; Sat–Sun, 2pm. $45. (864) 467-3000, glowlyric.com

ZZ TOP

The men of many beards have been rocking for 45 years, with hits like “La Grange,” “Legs,” and “Gimme All Your Lovin’,” attracting countless fans. As part of the Biltmore Estate’s summer concert series, the “sharp

A Real Estate Experience With A Personal Touch

Sherry, Jason, and Katie in Beijing on buying trip.

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Photograph (American Idol) and (Robert Cray) courtesy of the Peace Center

MISS SAIGON

When American GI Chris meets Kim in the ravaged city of Saigon during the Vietnam War, the two quickly fall in love and make plans for a lifetime together. However, the city’s fall spurs the soldier’s quick departure home, leaving a pregnant Kim to merely dream of his eventual return. Nominated for eleven Tony awards and ripe with classic songs, Miss Saigon illustrates the transcendence of romance in the harshest of circumstances, as well as the power of hope in the eyes of darkness. Flat Rock Playhouse, 2661 Greenville Hwy, Flat Rock, NC. Wed–Sat, 8pm; Wed–Thurs, Sat– Sun, 2pm. $40. (828) 693-0731, flatrockplayhouse.org

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J U L Y 2 0 1 46/12/14 / 8 7 11:31 AM


SECOND

Glance

String Theory

I

f only time was so neat as to fit on a tidy line. But as painter Sharon Dowell sees it, history is composed of an infinite number of threads: each of our choices woven and intertwined by the universe’s guiding (or unguiding) hand. The present moment is only a product of these knotted influences. But Dowell is not daunted by the task of unraveling such complexity. Her solo exhibition Re: tackles the murky mystique of the South, which she characterizes as “an honor culture, complex, simultaneously full of triumph, sordid controversy, charm and nostalgia.” Familiar architecture and landscapes come to the fore, but faintly visible underpaintings and vibrant colors suggest life beyond contemporary geometries. Rather, they spill forth a rich tapestry of past generations uncontained by the present.—Andrew Huang

Re:, a solo exhibition of Sharon Dowell’s work, is on display at Gallery Seventeen until July 25. The gallery, located at 17 W North St, Greenville, is open Mon, by appointment; Tues & Wed, 11am–6pm; and Thurs–Sat, 11am–7pm.

88 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Sharon Dowell, West End; acrylic and ink on canvas, 48” x 48”; artwork courtesy of Gallery Seventeen

Sharon Dowell tackles the complexity of time in layers


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TOWN July 2014