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B CULTURAL MAY 2011

THE OFFICIAL BCULTURAL EVENT MAGAZINE

PLUS! EVENT NEWS, INTERVIEWS, FASHION, FOOD, SPORT AND MUCH MORE!


BCULTURAL MAGAZINE Dear Readers,

CONTENTS MULTICULTURALISM POLITICS DETECTIVE DIVERSITY

4 5 6

BRITISH CULTURE LIBYA NEWS JAPAN NEWS BRAMU AMNESTY CULTURAL EXPANSION

8 10 11 12 15 16

TOP 20 FILMS TOP 5 RESTUARANTS

17 18

RECIPE RACISM IN SPORT FASHION B CULTURAL: ONLINE B CULTURAL: PR B CULTURAL: MUSIC

20 21 22 24 25 26

B CULTURAL: RADIO

30 B CULTURAL: PHOTOGRAPHY 32 B CULTURAL: TV

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Welcome to B Cultural! This magazine aims to open people’s eyes to how multicultural Birmingham is today and will go hand in hand with today’s event, acting as your go to guide throughout the day. At B Cultural we feel it’s important to celebrate diversity and multiculturalism, especially in Birmingham as it is one of the most multicultural cities in the UK. In the magazine you will find articles celebrating this, from food to fashion and other exciting things! As editors we would just like to thank you all for attending our multicultural event and also thank our team of talented writers and our amazing designer Charlee Greenhalgh, without you all this would have been impossible! Have a fantastic day everyone!

Emma and Sophie xx

The B Cultural Team


M S I L A R U T L U C I T L U M : S NEW WHAT IS LTURALISM? MULTICU There are several ways people can read multiculturalism; my preferred meaning is the appreciation, promotion and acceptance of different cultures. In British society today we are extremely diverse and as part of this multicultural event we feel that the diversity we see in British culture today should be celebrated.

identity. From chicken curry to martial arts to traditional roast dinner, all of these demonstrate cultural diversity and show that the UK welcomes diversity into its culture.

Multiculturalism allows people to truly express who they are within a society, which is more tolerant and adapts to social issues. It can be said that culture is not definable by race or religion but a multitude of factors that are ever changing. In David Cameron’s speech at Munich Prime Minister David Cameron said that “state multiculturalism has failed”, arguing that Britain today needs a stronger national identity. We aim to show that the diversity within the United Kingdom is what gives us our own national

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WRITTEN BY: SOPHIE POTTER PHOTO: ZIZI ELHARITH


S C I T I L O P : NEWS ULTURALISM MULTIC UK IN THE Multiculturalism is a word that’s becoming ever-more common in today’s society. As more cultures become visible and are celebrated by the mainstream, there too becomes an increase in opposition to diversity. In Munich on February 5, David Cameron made a speech in which he said “we have allowed the weakening of our collective identity,” and urged “we need a clear sense of shared national identity that is open to everyone”. Historically, multicultural policies have not been in place very long, only since the 1980s or so. The Labour Government of Tony Blair in particular implemented many of these policies; however it appears a lot of communities are segregated from the mainstream. David Cameron, in the same speech, said “we have encouraged different cultures to live separate lives”, and suggested there should be much more integration before we can call the UK truly ‘multicultural’. Birmingham is the second most diverse city in the UK after

London, and it has been suggested that soon there will be no majority ethnic group at all. The idea of multiculturalism has faced criticism since some

believe it has failed to promote social integration. Arguably, UK society is not multicultural because there is a high level of social segregation. The UK can only become multicultural when different cultures integrate and communicate.

WRITTEN BY:KELLY PURPLE PHOTO:THE PRIME MINISTER'S OFFICE VIA FLICKR


M S I L A R U T L U WS: MULTIC

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E V I T C E T DE DIVERSITY Working for West Midlands Police, Kirk Dawes has made a great impact to the services of diversity. Kirk’s respectable career has shaped him into a highly influential man who has advised Prime Ministers and liaised with Royalty. His hard work was recognised when he received the Queen’s Police Medal for services to the cause of diversity.

Your work focuses heavily on multiculturalism. What culture do you feel you belong to?

“My parents are Jamaican, therefore I have a West Indian element, but I consider myself Black English because I’ve lived in England all my life. I speak Jamaican Patois; my father used to hate it, but you had to speak it to fit in.”

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How would you define multiculturalism? “Multiculturalism has different meanings which can give so much confusion. It may denote the need for respect for diversity. It might be to do with the fact that so many of us have grown up in two cultures, like me. I was born in England (with its definite culture) to Jamaican parents with their own West Indian culture, and I needed to fit in to both.” Do you feel that you were split between the two cultures? “I was split because I was living in England but I had Jamaican core values. Such values included being very religious; we would regularly go to church. Another difference is the food; West Indian food is full of spice, such as ackee and saltfish, and school food consisted of mash and meat without seasoning. such as ackee and saltfish, and school food consisted of mash and meat without seasoning. such as ackee and saltfish, and school food consisted of mash and meat without seasoning.


Is it different now you live in Solihull? “I would walk down my road and people would look at me. Some ignore me and others say hello, but I know they’ll be thinking “where’s he come from?” but it’s not racism – it’s a lack of understanding. Predominantly white villages don’t know what multiculturalism is. What work have you done as the lead for the National Black Police Association? “My work has mostly been to do with gun and gang crime once thought to be mainly an issue for black communities. I see my job as one where the truth is reflected, which is that whilst it does affect the black community, it also affects many other communities in the UK. I’ve dealt with race conflicts in Birmingham; cases of white organised crime gangs conflicting with black gangs – mostly issues regarding drugs. You wouldn’t expect it, but racism isn’t as prominent in guns and gangs as people think; most gang members shoot within their own gang in conflicts over power.” What impact have you made with your multiculturalism work?

“I sit on the Board of Directors of Birmingham Royal Ballet. People assume ballet is for white, upper class people. However, thanks to our work, people of differing cultures go to ballet now. We gave inner city kids the opportunity to audition for the ballet.”

Do you think Birmingham celebrates Multiculturalism? “Birmingham has let immigrants here for over 100 years, and statistics have shown that in 2015 there will be more ethnic minorities than white in Birmingham. We don’t get racial disorders here. Nationally, Britain has an ever changing face because of its immigration policies leading to a melting pot society.”

WRITTEN BY: HANNAH MONTGOMERY PHOTOS: CHLOE JONES


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H S I T I R B S I WHAT LTURE U C NEW

Commonly British culture connotes many things to different people. From tea to roast beef, summer BBQ’s to red telephone boxes - there are a never ending amount of stereotypes and icons of what represents the country we live in. We asked a few random Birmingham residents to see what they thought best represented British culture. Britain remains one of the most multicultural countries in the world and this whirlpool of different cultures may lead to Britain not having a dominant cultural identity. However 20 year old Rebecca Begum says it is this very thing that best represents British culture as she exclaims: “for me multiculturalism is what best symbolises British culture”. She is certainly not alone in her view

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as the next resident we ask declares exactly the same thing. “Multiculturalism and the languages used in Britain is what best represents British culture I feel” says 35 year old Phildelis. Multiculturalism is a relatively new representation of British culture and was a popular choice to our question. That, however doesn’t mean the old stereotypes have been and gone... “Bland food” says Halima Razzak laughing. It is clear that food, whatever way it is looked at, plays a great part of British culture. The 19 year old said “infact anything with a like or carbohydrates such as mashed potatoes is what represents British culture for me”. An interesting choice we must admit and it was refreshing not to hear the typical fish and chips for once! Retired pensioner Jenny Reynolds however draws back to the old stereotype of queuing as she tells us what best represents our countries culture


for her. “Freedom of speech is a great thing about Britain but I suppose true British culture is the ability to queue.” I’m sure there are many keen shoppers out there who wouldn’t argue with her. 21 year old Shera Dhesy on the other hand thinks that it is a sport that is the sole identity of British culture. “Everyone in England loves football. It is part of our countries identity” he exclaims. With the amount of teams and supporters that turn up week in and week out you certainly can’t argue against him. Our short survey found there to be many ideas and icons of what best represents British culture. Whatever response given, it can be noted that none of them are negative and it is with this we leave you with perhaps our most emotive

response as 39 year old Zaib tells us “British culture is living together equally, being very careful about other people, intelligence, heart for other people. It is beautiful, fantastic, one of the best countries in the world and I would happily die for this country”.

WRITTEN BY: RYAN MILLWARD


S T N E V E D L EWS: WOR

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IN S I S I R C E TH LIBYA

Human Rights! Liberty! Freedom! Democracy! These have been the reasons for many people to go onto the street and protest for many centuries already. Now the people of Northern Africa and the Arabic states are beginning to seek these objectives. It started at the end of last year, when first the people of Tunisia and then the people of Egypt went onto the streets and demanded their dictators to step down. Now, this movement has moved towards Libya. However, unlike in the countries before, the Libyan dictator, Colonel Muammar Gaddafi, isn’t willing to give up his comfortable throne and therefore came into the centre of the worlds attention. The United Kingdom, United States of America, France and a couple of other western states have joined forces to help the protesters and rebels win their war for freedom. “We simply can not stand back and let a dictator whose people have rejected him, kill his people indiscriminately,” UK’s Prime Minister David Cameron said at the beginning of the war.

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Many things have happened since the United Nations have declared the no-fly zone over Libya and if Britain should be engaging in this (formerly) civil war or not can be seen and argued from many varying perspectives, but that we should support the rebels is a given.

To get rid of our oppressors, we fought against them and demanded to be heard, just like the people of northern Africa are doing right now. Freedom of speech and freedom of will are human rights that all the people of the world should be granted, otherwise we will never be able to live peaceful lives. We need to stand for what we believe in, in order to make this world a better place.

WRITTEN BY: MIRJA GERTCHEN PHOTO: CAROL DARWIN


O T D I A G N PROVIDI JAPAN Japan, a country bursting with heritage, tradition and culture. A country which is right now in need of love and support. On March 11th Japan was hit by an earthquake measuring 8.9 on the Richter scale, followed by a devastating tsunami which shocked the world.

Throughout BCultural and as a print magazine we are dedicated to helping people all over the world. Alongside supporting the fantastic charity Amnesty international, we want to help Japan and its people in their time of need. We want everybody who is reading this magazine and who is attending our event to stop

a take a second to think. Think about the people of the world and the suffering they face. Some people have no human rights, some face injustice, some have no home and nowhere to turn. We are the lucky ones. Think of Japan and think of those people and help them if you can. Donate your change, learn more about Amnesty and spare a thought for the world. Please visit http://www.redcross. org.uk/japantsunami to donate and for more information.

WRITTEN BY: EMMA BUCKLEY


S W E N Y T I R CHA AM RACIAL

IT N BIRMINGH U G N I R O T NI O M K C A T T A Birmingham Racial Attack Monitoring Unit was established by the Home Office in 1989 because of a report produced by the Home Office. BRAMU is an independent community based organisation which works with victims of racial harassment. They seek to educate and empower victims of racial attack through a support system. Today I have interviewed Maxie Hayles chairman of BRAMU

As you may know I’m writing about Multiculturalism in Birmingham, in your opinion would you say Birmingham is a Multicultural society? Yes definitely, Birmingham is the most popular for multi-racial

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communities in the country. The community is together, you might be shocked to know that in the north, such as Bradford, different cultures such as Chinese and Black people didn’t meet till the hospitals, which just shows how separated different communities are. By 2020 Birmingham will be mainly Black. It is a fact that Birmingham is a multicultural society. How would you say Bramu has helped ease the plight of victims since setting up? And how would someone go about contacting yourselves if they were victims of a racial attack? In 1989 Racial Attacks were on the increase. Bramu was step up in communities to empathise with victims. We came out the back of the Birmingham Uprising of 1989, between 1976 and 1981,


blacks were murdered, which caused them to hit back. Since we’ve established there has been more sensitivity about Racial Attacks most Statutory Agencies were insensitive. Bramu has dealt with over 3000 live cases; however funding was cut when we had 120 live cases. Bramu has fought for perpetrators of race crime to be brought to justice. For example the Chiswell Road case, Bramu helped to give physical assistance to the victim. We are a very important part of helping the fight against racial attacks, we monitor and influence policies, keep a record of factual information and campaign for victims of racial attack. We have lots of media coverage such as radio 4 and 5, BBC WM, politics show. We also spread our message through word of mouth. People can contact us through the website www.bramu.info In 2003 almost half (46 per cent) of adults of Mixed race had been the victim of a crime in the previous 12months, but in 2009 a total of 52,028 crimes were recorded in which

the offence was motivated by prejudice. Would you say that race crime has decreased in the past years or just taken a different flavour? First answer is no it has no decreased. We cannot become complacent, legislation is progressive. There are more than enough laws to keep blacks safe but we need meaningful punishment and meaningful legislation and more of a will to


act on the government’s part. There also needs to be legislation to help the victims, for example attacks come from neighbours social problems like unemployment and lack of money raises racial attack. At Bramu we are critics of the police, and police cuts will not help. Bramu needs to be strengthened and not weakened at the moment we are living off donations and shouldn’t be. Most local authorities don’t address the issues raised in certain enquires. Birmingham is institutionally racist, which is subtle and hard to detect therefore racism is still there just more subtle.

consistently stopped 900 blacks and made 60 arrests for minor offences, it was regarded as a ‘resounding success’ and known as operation swamp which lead to an uprising. The failure to report to the police stems from the history of these things. People are still reluctant because they don’t trust statutory agencies. How much do you need volunteers to help you combat racial crime in Birmingham, and how can someone get involved?

Would you say that people still find it difficult to report hate crimes to authorities? Yes, there is a saying in my culture ‘creep before you can walk’. There needs to be damage limitation from police, the history is so long and bitterness can prevail. For example, in the 80’s there was a situation in London where they use the law to stop black people at random. Police

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All the usual ways of getting in contact. We desperately need them as don’t have the money to support paid places.

WRITTEN BY: SOPHIE POTTER PHOTOS: BRAMU


S W E N Y T I R CHA STY AMNE L A N O I T A N INTER Amnesty International is an international charity that was founded in 1961. They campaign to protect people from all over the world when their rights to justice, truth and freedom are denied. Their biggest campaigns focus on poverty, human rights, women’s rights, refugees and asylum, the death penalty, and keeping the arms trade under control.

Amnesty have had a number of successes in the past, and in 1977 they won the Nobel Peace Prize for “contributed to securing the grounds for freedom, for justice, and thereby for peace in the world”. Their work is vital for the future of many cultures around the world, and so they encourage anyone who supports their principles to become members and take action on their campaigns. Find out more about Amnesty International and their campaigns at http://www.amnesty.org.uk/

WRITTEN BY: KELLY PURPLE The organisation encourages governments, political organisations, businesses and individuals to support and respect human rights. They have 2.8 million members worldwide, and are committed to undertaking research that leads to action in ending the abuse of these rights.


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AL R U T L U C N O I S N A P EX As a man of girth, I will no longer stand for the discrimination my people have faced. For years we have struggled, living life in a constant punch line. Gone are the glory years of the 1500s, when a healthy pot belly was considered a sign of wealth and thus, an attractive trait. Yes, I’m talking about chunky folk. The thickset, the plump, the rotund. To all my fellow chubaroos out there. Now is the time to stand up and be counted (take care when rising and survey your sofa groove for any crushed but salvageable snacks). It is not acceptable in our society to point at a Chinese person and laugh at their eyes. So why, I ask of you, is it socially acceptable to direct your chuckles at a person of the pudgy persuasion? It is time we are given the respect we deserve and recognized as our own individual culture. A culture can be defined as “the behaviours and beliefs characteristic of a particular social group.” We are certainly a social group. Since my cultural

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awakening I have refused to mingle with the svelte. I will enlighten any uninformed sceptics reading this, to just a few of our unique cultural practices. We gather our portly comrades and attend water parks in. We exceed the weight limit and fly down at quadruple the velocity of the rest of humanity. When we chortle heartily, we place our palms under our rippling paunches. When we attend buffets, we clean up. Attracted by this 21st century Cultural Revolution? Initiation is really quite simple. Firstly, gain the weight. Secondly, contact a representative in your area. Thirdly, purchase a ticket to your nearest water park. Don’t heed the scaremongering of the media. The perpetual sweatiness, the reduced life expectancy and the endless shortness of breath, will pale in comparison with the joy your new found cultural identity will bring.

WRITTEN BY:SAM BRIGGS


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AL R U T L U C I T L TOP 20 MU FILMS The film industry celebrates culture in abundance, from Bollywood to Sundance cinema informs, celebrates and embraces cultures from all over the world, so much so that the film industry has become a culture within itself. In line with our event, here at B Cultural magazine have decided to make a list of some of the greatest multicultural films from around the globe.

Slumdog millionaire

East is East

Made in Dagenham

Roots

My beautiful laundrette

Crash Amelie

La Haine

Cairo time

This is Spinal Tap

Curse of the Golden flower

Bloody Sunday

Trainspotting

City of God

Eat Pray Love

Memoirs of a Geisha

Cool Runnings

The Secret life of Bee’s The wind that shakes the barley Pot Luck So I suggest you jump online, run down to your local store and grab as many of these films as you can and find yourself transported and educated in a whole new world of culture!

WRITTEN BY: EMMA BUCKLEY


BC: FTOOOPD5 RESTUARANTS IN THE M BIRMINGHA showing off their skills by There are so many restaurants within Birmingham that it can make choosing one just so difficult. This is the food guide to the top five restaurants within Birmingham. These restaurants are very different in style and will cater to everyone’s needs as well as being affordable. Azzari Too Azzari Too is a very bold restaurant that offers a fusion of many global cuisines. This restaurant not only provides a fantastic variety of food but also provides a very comfy atmosphere. This is helped by the friendliness and efficiency of the staff. For more information go to www. azzaritoo.co.uk or simply phone on 0121 429 6621. The pricing of this restaurant is a little pricey averaging a main meal at around £9.00, but it’s well worth it for its culinary tastes. This restaurant is here today at our fabulous multicultural event and will be

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holding a barbeque! So come and join in at five, just follow the smell! Nando’s Specializing in Portuguese dishes, Nando’s is the chicken house that serves the famous Perri-Perri Chicken! Hot, delicious and succulent this is the place to eat if you like spicy food. Although slightly pricey averaging once again at £9.00, your dishes are full and will leave you satisfied. To contact this restaurant simply phone: 01216 326 866. Or just travel to the Bullring in Birmingham to enjoy some chicken! Toby Carvery The Toby Carvery is the place to be if you love the great British Sunday roast! Three meats and a variety of seasonal veg! Yes please! Warm gravy and as much food as you can fit onto your plate. The best bit about this restaurant the day time carvery costs just £5.49! It’s


cheap as chips. For more information go to www. tobycarvery.co.uk/carvery, where you can find your nearest restaurant. Bombay Mix This Indian restaurant is top notch. They give great service and amazing curries. They also have some great deals like 25% off for students! The average pricing for this restaurant is around £6, but don’t forget that discount. Bombay mix is located on Broad Street which provides easy travelling. To contact call 0121 643 3557.

Café Rouge This French restaurant has an amazing breakfast deal. For only £5 you get a choice of French pastry with butter, a pot of Bonne Maman confiture and a choice of orange juice, apple juice and also a hot drink of your choice. Simply visit www. caferouge.co.uk to get the latest deals.

WRITTEN BY LIZ JOHNSON PHOTO: AZZARI TOO


BC: FTOICOUDLTURAL

MUL RECIPES Want to give cooking something new a go? Below is a quick and easy recipe to make a tasty thai red prawn curry. Ingredients: 1 packet of king prawns (250 grams) 1 tin of coconut milk 1 large table spoon of red thai curry paste 1 bunch of coriander 2 large table spoons of olive oil 1/2 cup of white rice Step 1: Wash Prawns thoroughly and leave them to the side Step 2: Add olive oil in a pan leave to heat Step 3: Add a table spoon of red Thai curry paste Step 4: Leave to heat then add prawns, cook prawns for two minutes Step 5: Then take the pan off the heat and leave for two minutes to cool down, then add coconut milk and stir gently. Step 6: Put pan back on the heat Step 7: Cover the pan with a lid and leave until prawns are cooked for 20 minutes Step 8: Wash 1/2 cup of rice

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in a pan with water two or three times then add one full glass of water and put on heat for 20 minutes while the prawns are cooking. This should take 20 minutes and the water should disappear Step 9: Chop coriander finely and add when cooked and serve with rice Serving Suggestion Plate with rice and thai red prawn curry on top with a sprinkle of finely cut coriander

WRITTEN BY DEVINA MORJARIA PHOTO: AZZARI TOO


T R O P S : C B RACISM INOTBALL FO In its long history, English football has many things that it can be proud of, but unfortunately one thing that has blighted it for almost as long as it’s existence is racism.

The difference between the 1970s and now is that incidents of racism have decreased, but the isolated incidents that do come out somehow seem more severe.

Throughout every major era, something has happened that has made people aware that there are still a minority of people that have these vile views.

It is a difficult thing to act upon. For instance, a fan could make a comment but no further action can really be taken unless witnesses can back up what happened. It would be wrong to say that people are turning a blind eye to this behaviour when it occurs but people may just want to avoid trouble and not say anything, which would be disappointing.

It doesn’t matter if it was Everton’s Dixie Dean, who was allegedly told in 1938, “We will get you yet, you black bastard”, or if it was Liverpool’s John Barnes, who was famously photographed backheeling away a banana that had been thrown at him, or even, recently, in 2008, if it was Middlesbrough striker Mido, who was subjected to Islamophobic chants from Newcastle fans due to the fact that he is a Muslim from Egypt. The fact of the matter is that, despite excellent work from prominent anti-racism charities like ‘Kick It Out’, which became a full organisation in 1997, there is still a lot of work to be done.

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That is slowly changing, after then-Blackpool player Jason Euell confronted a fan who was arrested by police in 2009. Maybe football still can be the beautiful game, for all.

WRITTEN BY: ANTHONY WILLIAMS


N O I H S A F : C B N O I H S ? A L F A R IS U T L TICU L U M Fashion is of course multicultural. This is because fashion allows us to portray our cultural backgrounds as well as our personalities. It provides an identity and a history. It gives us the ability to create a visual language that communicates with others revealing a story about our many cultures/life experiences. It’s used as a social differentiation. This is because; well let’s face it who wants to be the same? Samantha Pugh a student from Birmingham says ‘fashion used to be about making everyone the same. If someone looked differently to the culture that you were in they were criticised and often disliked.’ Today we embrace other cultures and let their culture inspire the fashions that we wear and see within magazines. Fashion is also influenced by religion and is one of the reasons why fashion is so diverse. For example Muslim women must wear a burkha to cover their bodies within public places.

This diversity of fashion is not only seen and widely accepted on our streets today but it can also be seen through its representation in magazines and on catwalks. This helps us to associate specific dress codes and trends. For example safari prints link to Africa and the wrapping of saris to India. However these fashions along with many others are widely used within Britain. This is because in today’s society many cultures are accepted and in turn so is their fashion. Many now use these statement pieces of clothingwhich can now cross cultures. BCultural and embrace all fashions! Go out and buy,buy, buy! Be individual and respect others for their diversity in the fashion world.

WRITTEN BY: LIZ JOHNSON


BC: ONLINE

D N A T N I R P ONLINE WEB Can’t get enough of our multicultural bonanza? Don’t panic!

We’ve all been working hard to bring you all the multicultural and event news on every format. From radio podcasts to Youtube adverts, we’ve covered it. Alongside B Cultural magazine another group of journalists have been working round the clock to bring you an online magazine – Mosaic magazine! The magazine covers a range of different topics leading up to and on today’s event that truly celebrate multiculturalism! But where do you find the magazine? You can access the magazine via the official event website. Our web team have been working hard to bring you an exciting website full of information, articles and images that truly encapsulate our event! So what are you waiting for? Visit www.bcultural.co.uk today for everything you need to relive this fantastic day!

WRITTEN BY: EMMA BUCKLEY PHOTO: ZIZI ELHARITH BCpage24


BC: PRION, LOCATION LOCAT N O I T A C O L You’ve got the guests, you’ve got the date, you’ve got the entertainment. All is set? No, all this counts for nothing without a venue and, in March, it was up to the Public Relations team to find a suitable venue for today’s event. The Public Relations team took this unenviable task upon themselves and, after finding out the room requirements of all specialisms, searched feverishly for a suitable venue for the event. Public Relations Team Leader Will Allan said, with reference to the early ideas and search, ‘We feel this [the venue] was something the PR team could co-ordinate... The sooner we get on this, the better”. With the criteria as tight as a drum, it was a gruelling job. Photography groups needed exhibition areas, television teams wanted space to show their tprogrammes, music students pined for room for bands and dancers – the list went on. PR rang, PR quoted, they rang again, they quoted again.

Eventually, the group made a decision, a point at which Will Allen commented, ‘The Rainbow Warehouse has great facilities that meets all our needs and is popular with students,’. The Rainbow Warehouse, today’s venue, is an ideal location for a multiculturalism event because it boasts a ‘different genres of music, scenes... already taking part in that multiculturalism collaboration’. The spacious venue, set in the urban Digbeth environment, was an old Victorian pub.

WRITTEN BY: BRADLEY JOLLY


BC: MUSUIC C I S M S P O H S K R O W Workshops have been set up at various points throughout the day here at the BCUltural event. We’d like you to have a go at something that you’ve never done before, either because you never thought you could or maybe, you just never had the opportunity for it to be more accessible. You never know you might find something you really like and if you do we have loads of information about ways you might be able to take up lessons. The workshops include Drum & Bass and Hip hop lessons, where you’ll be shown how to make amazing tunes from the beat up, as well as looking at the history of hip-hop, the culture and influences behind it. It’s definitely one not to be missed! These lessons will be run by Luke Hunter from the Access to Music College. Capoeira will also be taught throughout the day, a Brazilian art form that incorporates martial arts, sports and music. It is thought to have been invented during the 16th century and is

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still taught all over the world today. It’s a very lively and energetic sport that requires plenty of stamina and you can get a taste of that today at BCUltural. There will also be African drumming workshops, during which participants will be exposed to the history and culture behind this exciting and tuneful tradition. The drumming itself is characterized by an intense rhythmic playing self and is fascinating and tuneful to listen to, we’re offering the opportunity to listen and then have a go yourself.

WRITTEN BY: EMMA ALLEN


G N I M R O F PER LIVE As you may already know The Rainbow is a massive music venue and is known around Birmingham as the place to be for new and exciting movements in local music. Today is no different. We have set up a special part of BCUltural that is devoted to exciting multicultural jams. It will be happening between 5 and 12 and will feature around 20 different acts. We’ve specifically chosen each act as up and coming multicultural masterpieces and we’ll know you’ll love them all. So get down to the performance area and look out for: - Rena Sparks, Gidz, Angry Kid, Romans, Hannah O’Connell, Bigger than Barry, Xova and Of Kings and Captains to name but a few. DJ Billy Hilton, also known as B.Hill will also be doing an extra special set today, between the hours of 5 and 7 he will be mixing as many different cultural tunes as possible and warming us up for a night of amazing music. So if you’re as excited as I am then

you’ll be heading down to the performance area and catching his set with all your friends.

WRITTEN BY: EMMA ALLEN


BC: MUASMIC O M ALWAR T Ammo Talwar MBE is the founder and chief executive of Punch records in Birmingham, he opened his record shop in 1997 and hasn’t looked back since. He quickly positioned himself in the forefront of the music scene in Birmingham and his shop quickly became a hub of exciting musical talent. After vast expansion, Punch Records is now making waves on a national scale. Although an extremely busy man Ammo is still devoted to the expansion and acknowledgement of Black music throughout Birmingham and the wider community. We are lucky enough to have him with us today When Punch Records was born, no one could have guessed just how successful it could be. It began in 1997 as a record shop in Birmingham that sold Black music, it quickly expanded into something much, much more than that. He has also kindly agreed to donate several tracks for our BCUltural charity download that

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can be accessed through www. bcultural.co.uk and he will be speaking during the day about what he feels is the importance of multiculturalism within the music industry and how his company Punch are breaking ground and introducing black music to the masses. His expertise don’t simply lie within the music industry, oh no, he consults for the public sector on issues surrounding culture and the arts and is very much involved in bringing arts and culture to the masses. To find out more about this inspirational and revolutionary man, get yourself to www.punch-records.co.uk and find out what the fuss is all about.

WRITTEN BY: EMMA ALLEN


R O F G N I K BUS AMNESTY You might have noticed on your travels around the city some beautiful music in the air and smiles on the faces of shoppers and students. That would be our special multicultural buskers! They were spotted around the North Campus (Perry Barr) on the 3rd May. They were set the task of raising money and awareness for Amnesty and the BCUltural event and they definitely succeeded. They set up camp at several important landmarks around the University and were filling the air with their exciting melodies for hours. All reports indicate they did an amazing job and it was all arranged by the music specialists here at BCUltural. If you’d like to hear more of the same then head to the performance area at the BCUltural event and we’ll have several bands playing throughout the day for your delight and delectation. You’re sure to find something that you’ll like and maybe even find your new favourite sound.

BCULTURAL DOWNLOAD Several Multicultural artists from in and around Birmingham have agreed to compile an exciting and innovative C-d download especially for us at BCUltural. It will be a compilation album with each artist contributing a pre-recorded track and a ‘bonus’ collaboration track recorded alongside an artist of their choice from another cultural or artistic background. Bands ranging from Hip-hop to Rock, Rnb and Bhangra have devoted their time, so there promises to be flavours from all over the world. Artists include Ammo, Ian Wallman, Xava and Aceldama to name but a few. All of the music on the CD will be available for download at www. bcultural.co.uk and proceeds from the sale, as with the rest of the event will go to Amnesty International to help with their efforts all over the world.

WRITTEN BY: EMMA ALLEN


O I D A R : C B F O D N U O S THE E R U T L U C For the event our Radio Production guys, are putting on a live radio show running from 10-7. They will be airing live from the event, including a variety of songs, interviews and a four part documentary. Our whole event, is based around one subject ‘Multiculturalism’ so the Radio team, have created a Radio show about Multiculturalism, by using a mix of songs and a documentary about multiculturalism. However, you may have a slight idea of what you will be expecting from our talented radio team, but have you asked yourself why they have chosen to make certain decisions. I spoke to Jessica Bailey, who is a member of the Radio team. I asked her some questions which I felt were relevant about the event and its subject ‘Multiculturalism’. What’s the idea behind your name of the station?(if you have a separate name from the event) The name of the station is called

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BCUltural radio, we thought it’d be important to stick to the same name as the main event to ensure it’s evident that we are part of it and are supporting the same theme. What music have you chosen to play and why e.g. style? We’ve chosen to play a range of music genres and styles, but we have chosen to particularly play music from around the world and by artists from many cultures, again sticking to the theme of multiculturalism. For example, we’ve researched the top 10 albums from all different countries, and used a selection of these songs to ensure there’s a variety. What is the purpose of the documentary and the interviews? We are interviewing students involved in the event through weekly podcasts which will be played on the website and on our live show on the day, as we think this will portray the effort


that went into the event and the reasons why we think the theme is important. We are also planning on interviewing bands and artists that perform on the day of the event, to get their opinions of multiculturalism, the event itself, and perhaps get a taste of what they are going to perform if we interview them before their slot. We will also be interviewing and recording vox pops from visitors at the event, and leaders of different specialisms at the event to ensure the listeners are kept up to date with the schedule so they don’t miss a thing.

I think that this shows that the radio production team have worked really hard and have thought about what multiculturalism is and what it means to people. The radio team is full of skill full people both off and on the screen, so we have every luck that the radio show will be a success so make sure your there to listen.

WRITTEN BY: HANNAH AMBROSE PHOTO: MIRJA GERTCHEN

BCUltural’s Radio Team from left to right: (top) Chris Jones, Carlo Hemp, Ash Dhindsa, Tom Jeavons, Will Manning, Sophie Evans, Holly Wall, Victoria Cable, Niall Magennis (bottom) Charlee Greenhalgh, Amanda Johansson, Nadia Moy.


Y H P A R G O T BC: PHORT OF Y H THE A P A R G O T O H P Photography is a art that can warm our hearts by capturing the moment. The one moment that tells the story of a lifetime. The one moment that makes us weep in sorrow or laugh in joy. This years photography specialists have decided to use their art in order to make people aware about the multiculturalism of Birmingham in which we all live and thrive. The photographers decided on five general topics that would best show the multicultural society we are a part of. These topics are religion, culture, music, fashion and food. Four images per photographer will be exhibited during todays production event with around five people focusing on each category, giving us a large range of photos to admire. “We want to show [the different] ways of life over here,” Megan Fisher, one of the leading photographers, told our magazine. Megan chose the topic ‘culture’ as her main focusing point. “I wanted to

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walk past the traditional ideas of multiculturalism,” Megan began, “I wanted to do a more political point of view.” In her hometown Liverpool she got to know ‘prjctgrzly‘, a group of people that came together to spread the word of positivity through graffiti, and decided to focus her portrayal of multiculturalism on their work.

Also Seeta Versani will exhibit her work in the gallery, she focused her photos on Indian fashion. “Photography is really hard because you never know what to shoot. You need your own specific style, but thats why I like it. It is my own work and you can be as creative as you want to be,” Seeta told our magazine.


Other fashion photographers that will be featured in this years exhibition are Becky Tunney and Rhianna Davies. The two of them are focusing on the different western european fashion cultures, including indie, gothic and many more. To show a contrast, Robert Rehak will give you a preview of the eastern european culture.

Joe Hagan is one the photographers responsible for the music category. “I’m doing my photo shoot at a number of different concerts in birmingham. One of the bands I’m going to be photographing are called Jet Pack, a Punk/Rock band from Cheltenham. I’m focusing on rock bands in specific because I feel they have a specific following, different from those that follow pop or RnB music,” Joe explained. “When most people think of other cultures they immediately think of foreign customs. But I think the Rock Culture should still be considered as they have their own clothes, attitudes, accessories, habits and social interactions. Instead of being tied down to one country or location rock culture could be embraced by anyone anywhere. Thats why I think it’s important to multiculturalism. I aim to photograph both bands and fans to really create a feel of what rock culture is like.” Most of the pictures taken for the shoot, will be done here in the United Kingdom. The pictures of


Charli Brighton however, will focus on the “the cultural differences in the culture” of South Africa - Cape Town, with local shoots there. But that isn’t the only extravagant set of photos we can look forward to. Aušra Kelpšaite is looking at the idea of multiculturalism in a

loneliness that comes with multiculturalism. “Many people from different cultures are living, working or studying in the same area, but are ‘strangers’ to each other. Even if they are polite and friendly to people from other cultures does not mean they really understand each other,” Ausra told us. Many “people who I met here in Birmingham feels lonely and misunderstood,” she added. As you can see, there is a vast and exciting range of photo’s exhibited in the exhibition part of the rainbow today and all of the photographers cant wait to present their work to the visitors of the event. For all of the interested people, the photographers will be there to show you around and answer any questions.

WRITTEN BY: MIRJA GERTCHEN PHOTOS: AUSRA KELPSAITE, ROBERT REHAK AND CHLOE JONES

totally different perspective. Her abstractly manipulated pictures are focusing on the

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N O I S I V E L E BC: T ATTER IF

M IT DOESN'T CK OR WHITE! A L B E R ' U O Y ‘It doesn’t matter if you are black or white’, this was the message that the television group aimed to get across when they produced their own version of this chart chart-topper. I interviewed the Production Manager Latoya Wilson, after she filmed this exciting production.

What is the music video about? Why have you done this? We have decided that to do this we must produce a product that is light-hearted and fun. The video will have a little twist so it will incorporate different genres such as Pop, Bhangra and Rap. The actual video shows a journey of a man meeting different people along the way. What messages are you trying to put across about multiculturalism here? I would say that really the ultimate message is that we may all look different but it doesn’t matter because we are all human beings; and I think that the best way to do this is in a fun way.

Who is in the video? Where was it filmed? The video is going to feature different people from all races, religion etc. David Bates has agreed to be our ‘Michael Jackson’. And it was shot on Campus and in Halls of residence.

What problems did you encounter in actually producing the music video? Our main complication was the Copyright issue so it means that we cannot put the video on the website. Nevertheless, the music video can and will be shown at the event today in the ‘cinema style’ viewing, along with the other TV productions.

WRITTEN BY: BRADLEY JOLLY


L L A E R A E W HUMAN

The cast of the television commercial ‘I am Irish, I love Jerk Chicen, I am human... I am Japanese, I love Chicken Curry, I am human...I am Spanish, I love hiking, I am human’. Thousands of nationalities; all the same, that was the message put across by a television group when they came together to create an awareness

“It’s not about colour or where you come from, in the end we all love the same things.” commercial for today’s event. Bright lights, a multi-camera setup, a long queue of students

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all waiting for their moment in the spotlight. The advert encompassed a group of international or bilingual students who, in front of the cameras, purposely told they were of a nationality that they didn’t actually belong to, and then said they ‘love’ an icon from a seperate country before saying ‘I am Human’ in their own, mother tongue language. For instance, a student from England was told to say ‘I am Greek, I love Bollywood, I am human’ and then a Nigerian student said, ‘I am German, I


love Origami,’ and then ‘I am human’ in Nigerian. The commercial ends with the whole group, each member with a smile as broad at Birmingham, shouting ‘You are, we all are human.’ Production Manager Humaira Razzq said, regarding why television chose to do this for the event, ‘People from all backgrounds are all the same... It’s not about colour or where you come from, in the end we all love the same things. We are human.”

She went on to add, ‘The idea represents the whole event...It’s really fascinating that we are all from different backgrounds but our goals are the same’. The advert has been used, by PR and television, as promotional material for the event as is expected to be shown later today at te event.

WRITTEN BY: BRADLEY JOLLY PHOTOS: SARAH ELHASSINE

Commercial star Miguel Alicante


N O I S I V E L BC: TE HING A BIT SOMET DIFFERENT A small television group produced a documentary for today’s event with the aim of highlighting how the media are promoting multiculturalism positively.

The television team felt that too often the media in the outside world disregards or misinterprets the idea of multiculturalism, and so David Woolridge intended to

‘Behind the Scenes’ was filmed in March and follows students from other media specialisms to discover what they were producing for the event and how that related to, and represented multiculturalism in a positive light. David Woolridge, the Production Manager of this project told us, ‘I didn’t want to do something the same as everyone else was; I wanted to do something a bit different and that’s the reason why I chose this.”

“I didn’t want to do something the same as everyone else.” ‘switch it’ to show ‘how media at BCU (Birmingham City University) promotes multiculturalism.’ The documentary will air today at the event itself in the special, designated area (with all television viewings today) in a ‘unique, cinema-style’ showing.

WRITTEN BY: BRADLEY JOLLY PHOTOS: KAT BENNET BCpage38


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