Issuu on Google+

VODUN, VODOU, CONJURE: THE ANIMISTIC ARTS OF THE AFRICAN DIASPORA

CAVIN-MORRIS GALLERY 1 < VODOU

New York, NY


VOD U N, VODOU, CO NJU RE The Animistic Arts of the African Diaspora

Cavin-Morris Gallery New York, NY


VODUN, VODOU, CONJURE The Animistic Arts of the African Diaspora By Randall Morris

Cavin-Morris Gallery is pleased to present this catalog as the second in a series of exhibitions examining the arts of the African Diaspora. The first catalog was Homeground, written in 2012 (see www.cavinmorris.com catalogues) which featured the arts of the United States, Haiti and Jamaica. This exhibition expands on Homeground by including the Vodun of West Africa, namely Togo and Benin, with some magical pieces from Tanzania as well. This exhibition also marks the beginning of a collaboration with Galerie Jean-Jacques Mandel in France. Our shared interests are many and profound. Every day when I come to work I pass a series of bronzes made for the Transit Authority by Tom Otterness. On the path to the subway, down a long stairway, sits a piece based on the Monopoly game rich guy, with a dollar sign emblazoned on him. This part of the sculpture is rubbed and glowing with the patina of thousands of hands touching it for the luck of money. We all need. This Vodun, Vodou, Conjure cosmology is the visual manifestation of those human needs that hold us all together and universalize our souls. They follow the spiral cycle of life that was so interrupted by the slave ships: birth, life, age, death, passing to the ancestors, and for those who believe, rebirth. The sculptures from Africa featured in this exhibition are about human needs being met on spiritual levels. The materials themselves are irrelevant until human agency sets them on their functional course, whether to heal, cause harm, or to influence the course of human events in some way, for example; to bring luck. They work literally and metaphorically. The symbolism can be obvious or it can be hidden, secret, locked deep in the body of the sculpture by accumulations of sacrificial materials and cloth. There are essentially two kinds we are displayingâ&#x20AC;Śthe cumulative magic objects with their accretions of sacrificial materials, and the bocios - ancestral protection sculptures placed in the ground in spiritually significant locations. One could say there is almost an anti-aesthetic at work. This deliberate imperfection agitates the universe, keeps it buzzing and moving. It activates amuletic capabilities. It manifests anger and memories of slavery and resistance. It also unifies the home and village by protecting it with the watchful eyes of known ancestors. For the most part these sculptures at their inception are morally neutralâ&#x20AC;Śit is the humans that set them on their way to good or evil meanings. They can cause harm, they can also be the antidote to that harm. They are the vernacular manifestations of a much larger ethical and religious system. The ultimate goal is balance and unification. We are privileged to show these sculptures of magic and spirit from Africa, Haiti, Jamaica, and the United States. They are often much maligned in the public arena, tarnished by Hollywood stereotypes, but stereotypical language falls apart when speaking about this kind of magic. The end product of the piece is less important than the means by which it was made. The sculpture itself is neutral until the priest or seer empowers it with a magical charge. The art itself is all about process and intention. Vodun is an animistic magic that


relies on Nature for its material and spiritual sources - for healing, for respect for one’s ancestors, for love, for midwifery, for remembrance, for power, for cultural resistance, and ultimately for achieving a balance in human nature. Conjure and Vodou’s earliest manifestations were in the Old World (Africa), but when the slaves were forced here from West Africa and the Kongo area, it was remembered and reinvented (creolized) in an American form. Always covert, Vodun is more in the open now. It is not the court art we associate with the major empires of Benin, it is the vernacular art of common people struggling to survive in a contemporary world. Part of the exhibition includes a large selection of West African magic and spirit objects from the Jean-Jacques Mandel Collection, and other collections that have not been shown in this country before. This work is from Togo, Benin, and Tanzania. Often covered with a thick sacrificial patina and charged with metal and the binding powers of ropes, these pieces from the early to mid-Twentieth Century demonstrate that Vodun is still alive, highly functioning, and changing in the contemporary Pan-African world. The ancestors of these Pan-Diasporic peoples provided the ethos and spiritual influences for the black people of the Caribbean, South America and the United States. In organizing this show we wanted pieces that were not narratives about religion but were actual pieces made for partaking in spiritual messages by priests and/or culture bearers. From Jamaica we include art by the Atherton’s, father and son, practitioners in healing and Bongo spirituality, and the instruments of Everald Brown, created for services in his mountaintop ceremonial center while he was alive. We also included paintings by Leonard Daley, which covered the walls of his various homes, upon which he pondered and reasoned the vicissitudes of daily spiritual survival in a classist and racist society. All the pieces in this exhibition were made to use in spiritual ceremonies, or as amulets of protection. The Haitian metalwork in this exhibition is rare and spectacular, including a forged iron staff of Dambala made for a Vodou temple, and a forged iron Masonic sword. Many practitioners who took Legba, the lwa (loa) of the crossroads, as a spirit guide were also Masons. The Dambala staff was made by the same hand as the one in the Harold Courlander’s book Drum and Hoe, first published in 1960, in which he identifies it as the work of a local blacksmith in Leogane. He later used a drawing of this piece on the cover of his book Afro-American Folklore. The two pieces have enormous artistic and historical importance for this hemisphere--they were made before there was any kind of recognition or market for the arts of Haiti. Note also the drapeau, the temple flags of Haiti. We chose unusual examples or ones that have been actually used--again made before the flags were recognized as a contemporary craft in their own category. To signify the present we included the drawings by a man widely known for his incredible sculpture; Guyodo, whose work is as much about the Haitian spirits of eros and cultural resistance as it is about spiritual matters. The yard shows or spirit yards of the American South and Caribbean are, to use a phrase from Dana Rush, Trans-Atlantic Shrines. Found throughout the South, they encode and


encapsulate the moral groundings and reasonings from when there was an actual slave religion unto itself, in this country. Racism, migrations and ambivalence pushed this religion into the black church where it became something else. The yard shows offer direct references to the African cycle of life and hold the ideas from which so much African American spiritual art by self-chosen culture bearers emerges. From the United States we honor work that extends out from the Southern Black Belt Yard Show or Conjure Complex with pieces by Bessie Harvey whose works directly manifest animistic spirit through her deep knowledge of conjure; Kevin Sampson who has taken the normally outdoor Yard Show indoors in his altars and sculptures of remembrance and social commitment; important conjure works not shown before by Georgia artist J.B. Murray, who used spirit writng and the intermediary of sacred water to combat evil and save souls; sculpture by Osker Gilchrist, who used bleached white animal bones on his property in compositions to ward off evil spirits; lastly a piece by another contemporary spirit yard creator and philosopher, Lonnie Holley. It may very well be that much of this work can show with trained Contemporary artists because of its formal power. But to limit this huge rich body of work to only its formal power, prodigious as it is, would be to sorely limit and deny its real breadth and range. This work demands to be read in a larger context. It plays with all the ideas of process and performance. It includes the recipient of its message as well as the maker of its message in its final message. This is not an exhibition about African retentions. Religion and spirituality in Africa also have continued to grow and change and spread. When work is not made for the art world or the art world marketplace, its intentionality becomes inextricable from its impact. Every aspect enriches, protects, educates and aesthetically pleases the community on some level. The work is constantly added to and changed, what Dana Rush refers to as an â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;unfinished aestheticâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, in this case the incompleteness alluding to the fact that the work is in constant motion, serial, like the wheels in a Southern yard show. We have shown just the tip of the iceberg of what can be done with these ideas. We could just as easily have included Thornton Dial, Hector Hyppolite, Georges Liautaud, Robert St, Brice, more works from Cuba, Brazil and Colombia, Bill Traylor, Errol McKenzie and on and on. There can be no more discourse about pan-Global and Pan-African art without the inclusion of these self-taught artists. We hope we are helping to keep a door open that can never be closed again. Ashe! Randall Morris NY, NY April, 2015


We wish to thank Jean-Jacques Mandel for his passion, Dana Rush for her encouragement and deep well of insight, Aarne Anton, Jose Bedia, Galerie Dagbomey, and Wayne Cox as always. Grateful to Suzanne Preston Blier for the in depth perception in her writings. Thanks also to our staff: Marissa Levien, Jurate Veceraite, Sam Richardson, and Caroline Casey for their hard work and enthusiasm in putting together both the show and this catalog.


VODOU, VODUN, CONJURE By Country BENIN

10

TOGO

66

TANZANIA

80

NIGERIA

92

GHANA

96

HAITI

100

CUBA

118

JAMAICA

122

USA

142


9 < VODOU


BENIN

VODOU> 10


11 VODOU > Benin


Vodun Sculpture - Fon People Mid. 20th C. Wood, fabric, iron, shells, sacrificial materials 40 x 9.5 x 8 inches / 101.6 x 24.1 x 20.3 cm Af 289 Benin < VODOU 12


13 VODOU > Benin


Hevioso Figure - Fon People Mid. 20th C. Wood 29.5 x 15 x 6 inches / 74.9 x 38.1 x 15.2 cm Af 300 Benin < VODOU 14


15 VODOU > Benin


Bocio - Fon People Early 20th C. Wood 36 x 5.5 x 5 inches / 91.4 x 14 x 12.7 cm Af 286 Benin < VODOU 16


Title, year medium size M 17 VODOU Benin < VODOU > Benin 17


Portable Vodun Altar - Fon people Mid. 20th C. Wood, clay, metal, pigment, shells, mirror 19.5 x 14 x 6.5 inches / 49.5 x 35.6 x 16.5 cm Af 354 Benin < VODOU 18


19 VODOU > Benin


Vodun Sculpture - Fon People Mid. 20th C. Wood, padlocks, clay pots 29.5 x 12 x 13 inches / 74.9 x 30.5 x 33 cm Af 304 Benin < VODOU 20


21 VODOU > Benin


Vodun Sculpture - Nago People Mid. 20th C. Wood, iron box, fabric, sacrificial materials 7.5 x 4 x 2 inches / 19.1 x 10.2 x 5.1 cm Af 343 Benin < VODOU 22


23 VODOU > Benin


Vodun Sculpture - Fon People Mid. 20th C. Wood, rope, sticks, grass, shells, sacrificial materials 10.25 x 5.5 x 4.25 inches / 26 x 14 x 10.8 cm Af 316 Benin < VODOU 24


25 VODOU > Benin


Vodun Sculpture - Fon People Mid. 20th C. Wood, iron, bone, fabric, string, sacrificial materials 11 x 5.5 x 4 inches / 27.9 x 14 x 10.2 cm Af 320 Benin < VODOU 26


27 VODOU > Benin


Vodun Sculpture - Fon People Mid. 20th C. Wood, metal, rope, sacrificial materials 13 x 4 x 3.5 inches / 33 x 10.2 x 8.9 cm Af 322 Benin < VODOU 28


29 VODOU > Benin


Bocio - Fon People Mid. 20th C. Wood, iron, sacrificial materials 19 x 3 x 2.5 inches / 48.3 x 7.6 x 6.4 cm Af 325 Benin < VODOU 30


31 VODOU > Benin


Vodun Sculpture - Adja People Mid. 20th C. Wood, twine, metal padlock, sacrificial materials 27.5 x 4.5 x 4 inches / 69.9 x 11.4 x 10.2 cm Af 338 Benin < VODOU 32


33 VODOU > Benin


Vodun Sculpture - Fon People Mid. 20th C. Wood, fabric, shells, string, and sacrificial materials 18 x 5.5 x 7 inches / 45.7 x 14 x 17.8 cm Af 400 Benin < VODOU 34


35 VODOU > Benin


Bocio - Nago People Mid. 20th C. Wood 26.5 x 6.5 x 6 inches / 67.3 x 16.5 x 15.2 cm Af 290 Benin < VODOU 36


37 VODOU > Benin


Bocio - Ewe People Early 29th C. Still wood 44 x 13 x 6 in/ 111.8 x 33 x 15.2 cm Af 285 Benin < VODOU 38


39 VODOU > Benin


Bocio - Fon People Mid. 20th C. Wood, iron base 23 x 4.5 x 2.5 inches / 58.4 x 11.4 x 6.4 cm Af 298 Benin < VODOU 40


41 VODOU > Benin


Bocio - Fon People Mid. 20th C. Wood 22.5 x 4 x 6 inches / 57.2 x 10.2 x 15.2 cm Af 299 Benin < VODOU 42


43 VODOU > Benin


Vodun Sculpture - Adja People Mid. 20th C. Wood, metal, natural fibers 9 x 3.5 x 3.5 inches / 22.9 x 8.9 x 8.9 cm Af 308 Benin < VODOU 44


45 VODOU > Benin


Bocio - Fon People Mid. 20th C. Wood, metal, fabric, string, sacrificial materials 22.5 x 3 x 3 inches / 57.2 x 7.6 x 7.6 cm Af 331 Benin < VODOU 46


Cyprien Tokoudagba Agotonon, 2008 Acrylic on canvas 62 x 78 inches / 157.5 x 198.1 cm CTk 1 47 VODOU > Benin


Cyprien Tokoudagba GononfohouĂŠ, 2008 Acrylic on canvas 50 x 63 inches / 127 x 160 cm CTk 2 Benin < VODOU 48


Bocio - Adja People Colonial Era, Mid. 20th C. Wood, metal, painted lock, shells, bound with natural fibers 8.5 x 2.5 x 2.5 inches / 21.6 x 6.4 x 6.4 cm Af 309 49 VODOU > Benin


Bocio - Adja People Mid. 20th C. Wood, shells, pigment, natural fiber, sacrificial materials 10 x 2.5 x 2.5 inches / 25.4 x 6.4 x 6.4 cm Af 310 Benin < VODOU 50


Vodun Sculpture - Fon People Mid. 20th C. Wood, iron, bone, fabric, string, pigment, sacrificial materials 11.75 x 5.25 x 3.5 inches / 29.8 x 13.3 x 8.9 cm Af 312 51 VODOU > Benin


Vodun Sculpture - Adja People Late 20th C. Wood, rope, fabric, shells, and metal padlocks 10 x 3.5 x 3.5 inches / 25.4 x 8.9 x 8.9 cm Af 313 Benin < VODOU 52


Vodun Sculpture - Fon People Late 20th C. Wood, fabric, mirror, shells, string, hair, and sacrificial materials 8 x 4 x 2 inches / 20.3 x 10.2 x 5.1 cm Af 314 53 VODOU > Benin


Vodun Sculpture - Fon People Mid. 20th C. Wood, iron, string, metal padlocks 6 x 2 x 2 inches / 15.2 x 5.1 x 5.1 cm Af 315 Benin < VODOU 54


Vodun Sculpture - Fon People Late 20th C. Wood, fabric, bottle, sacrificial materials, bound with rope 13.25 x 3 x 3 inches / 33.7 x 7.6 x 7.6 cm Af 319 55 VODOU > Benin


Vodun Sculpture - Fon People Late 20th C. Fabric, string, feathers, shells, metal padlocks, keys, pigment, unknown materials within fabric Af 323 Benin < VODOU 56


Vodun Sculpture - Fon People Mid. 20th C. Wood, metal, rope, sacrificial materials 16 x 6 x 5 inches / 40.6 x 15.2 x 12.7 cm Af 324 57 VODOU > Benin


Vodun Sculpture - Adja People Mid. 20th C. Wood, fabric, monkey skull, feathers, sacrificial materials 18.5 x 8 x 7 inches / 47 x 20.3 x 17.8 cm Af 339 Benin < VODOU 58


Set of 7 Tron Vodun Objects - Fon People Mid. 20th C. Twine, metal, sacrificial materials 8 x 5 x 4 inches / 20.3 x 12.7 x 1a0.2 cm Af 340 59 VODOU > Benin


Tron Vodun Sculpture - Fon People Late 20th C. Shell, cowries, fabric, string, leather, knife blade, chain, and other organic materials. 7 x 4 x 3 inches / 17.8 x 10.2 x 7.6 cm Af 349 Benin < VODOU 60


Sakpata Sculpture - Fon People Mid 20th C. Iron, shells, iron bell and sacrificial materials 10 x 4 x 2.5 in/ 25.4 x 10.2 x 6.4 cm Af 341 61 VODOU > Benin


Assan Mid. 20th C. Iron 54 x 13 x 13 inches / 137.2 x 33 x 33 cm Af 402 Benin < VODOU 62


AglankpĂŠ Counter-Sorcery Sculpture - Fon People Mid. 20th C. Duck skull, fabric, string, pigment, metal padlock, sacrificial materials 5.5 x 2.5 x 2.5 inches / 14 x 6.4 x 6.4 cm Af 311 63 VODOU > Benin


Benin < VODOU 64


65 < VODOU


TOGO

VODOU> 66


67 VODOU > Togo


Didier Ahadsi Dr. Vodou, n.d. Metal 14 x 12 x 10 inches / 35.6 x 30.5 x 25.4 cm DiAh 1 Togo < VODOU 68


69 VODOU > Togo


Vodun Sculpture - Ewe People Mid. 20th C. Wood, string, bone, shells, nails, padlocks, pigment, iron, feathers, patina, and sacrificial materials 8 x 5.25 x 4 inches / 20.3 x 13.3 x 10.2 cm Af 317 Togo < VODOU 70


71 VODOU > Togo


Bocio - Ewe People Mid. 20th C. Wood, shells, natural materials 19 x 5 x 3 inches / 48.3 x 12.7 x 7.6 cm Af 330

Togo < VODOU 72


73 VODOU > Togo


Vodun Sculpture - Adja People Mid. 20th C. Wood, fabric 8 x 3.5 x 5 inches / 20.3 x 8.9 x 12.7 cm Af 342 Togo < VODOU 74


75 VODOU > Benin


Bocio - Ewe/Adan People c. 1970-1980 Wood, fabric, feathers, pigment, shells, grass, and other natural materials 35.5 x 8.5 x 6.5 inches / 90.2 x 21.6 x 16.5 cm Af 293 Benin < VODOU 76


77 VODOU > Benin


Bocio - Adan/Ewe People 1980 Wood, fabric, pigment, shells, twine 40 x 4 x 4 inches / 101.6 x 10.2 x 10.2 cm Af 295 Benin < VODOU 78


79 < VODOU


TANZANIA

VODOU> 80


81 VODOU > Tanzania


Magic Sculpture - Nyamwezi People Late 20th C. Wood, fabric, natural materials 21.5 x 5 x 9.5 inches / 54.6 x 12.7 x 24.1 cm Af 326

Tanzania < VODOU 82


83 VODOU > Tanzania


Medicine Container - Nyamwezi People Mid. 20th C. Wood, Horn, woven fibers, natural materials 13.5 x 3 x 2 inches / 34.3 x 7.6 x 5.1 cm Af 332 Tanzania < VODOU 84


85 VODOU > Tanzania


Medicine Figure - Nyamwezi People Mid. 20th C. Wood, fabric, sacrificial materials 15 x 3.5 x 3 inches / 38.1 x 8.9 x 7.6 cm Af 347 Tanzania < VODOU 86


87 VODOU > Tanzania


Magic Sculpture - Nyamwezi People Mid. 20th C. Shell, wood, fabric, string, sacrificial materials 7 x 3 x 3 inches / a17.8 x 7.6 x 7.6 cm Af 348

Tanzania < VODOU 88


89 VODOU > Tanzania


Magic Sculpture - Nyamwezi People Late 20th C. Shell, earth, organic materials, twine 4.5 x 2.5 x 2.5 inches / 11.4 x 6.4 x 6.4 cm Af 350 Tanzania < VODOU 90


91 < VODOU


NIGERIA

VODOU> 92


93 VODOU > Nigeria

Korea < ASIAN MASKS 93


Mami Wata - Punch-decorated tray - Efik peoples Mid. to late 19th C. Brass with native repair 18 x 18 x 1.5 inches / 45.7 x 45.7 x 3.8 cm Af 401 Nigeria < VODOU 94


95 < VODOU


GHANA

VODOU> 96


97 VODOU > Ghana


Bocio - Ewe People Mid. 20th C. Wood, metal whistles, bottles, bones, bound with natural fibers 11 x 5 x 5 inches / 27.9 x 12.7 x 12.7 cm Af 306 Ghana < VODOU 98


99 < VODOU


HAITI

VODOU> 100


Bosou Flag, c. 1960 Sequins on cotton cloth 34 x 25.5 inches / 86.4 x 64.8 cm Hai 1 101 VODOU > Haiti


Bosou Flag Mid. 20th C. Sequins on cotton cloth 31 x 25.5 in / 78.7 x 64.8 cm Hai 17 Haiti < VODOU 102


Bosou Flag Mid. 20th C. Sequins on cotton cloth 31.5 x 26.5 inches / 80 x 67.3 cm Hai 18 103 VODOU > Haiti


St. Jacques Flag c. 1960 Sequins on cotton cloth 33 x 25.5 inches / 83.8 x 64.8 cm Hai 2 Haiti < VODOU 104


Bosou Flag Mid. 20th C. Sequins on cotton cloth 41 x 33 inches / 104.1 x 83.8 cm Hai 6 105 VODOU > Haiti


Gabriel Bien Aime Untitled (Gede Cross), 20th C. Iron 38.5 x 16 x 9 inches / 97.8 x 40.6 x 22.9 cm GBA 3 Haiti < VODOU 106


107 VODOU > Haiti


Forged Dambala Temple Staff - Léogâne Early 20th C. Iron 54 x 13.5 x 1 inches / 137.2 x 34.3 x 2.5 cm Hai 24

Haiti < VODOU 108


109 VODOU > Haiti


Masonic Sword Early 20th C. Forged iron, polychrome wood 34.25 x 5.25 x 1 inches / 87 x 13.3 x 2.5 cm Hai 26 Haiti < VODOU 110


Iron cross with forged snake (possibly forged by Georges Liautaud) Mid. 20th C. Forged iron 23.25 x 9.5 x 5 inches / 59.1 x 24.1 x 12.7 cm Hai 25 111 VODOU > Haiti


Guyodo (Frantz Jacques) Untitled, 2014 Ballpoint pen on recycled corn-flakes box 15.87 x 23.23 inches / 40.3 x 59 cm Gyd 5 Haiti < VODOU 112


Guyodo (Frantz Jacques) Untitled, 2014 Ballpoint pen on recycled corn-flakes box 15.94 x 23.23 inches / 40.5 x 59 cm Gyd 7 113 VODOU > Haiti


Guyodo (Frantz Jacques) Untitled, 2014 Ballpoint pen on recycled corn-flakes box 23.23 x 15.35 inches / 59 x 39 cm Gyd 8 Haiti < VODOU 114


Guyodo (Frantz Jacques) Untitled, 2014 Ballpoint pen on recycled corn-flakes box 23.23 x 15.75 inches / 59 x 40 cm Gyd 10 115 VODOU > Haiti


Haiti < VODOU 116


117 < VODOU


CUBA

VODOU> 118


119 VODOU > Cuba


Jose Bedia Untitled (Siren and Sinking Ship), n.d. Oil and crayon on Paper 39 x 27 inches / 99.1 x 68.6 cm JBe 8 Cuba < VODOU 120


121 < VODOU


JAMAICA

VODOU> 122


123 VODOU > Jamaica


Kapo (Mallica Reynolds) Self-Portrait, n.d. Lignum Vitae 19 x 8 x 7 inches / 48.3 x 20.3 x 17.8 cm Kap 13 Jamaica < VODOU 124


Lloyd Atherton Untitled (amulet), c. Early 1990s Cedar 7 x 3.125 x 3.125 inches / 17.8 x 7.9 x 7.9 cm LAt 1 125 VODOU > Jamaica


Lloyd Atherton Untitled (Amulet), c. early 1990s Cedar 7.75 x 2.5 x 3.75 inches / 19.7 x 6.4 x 9.5 cm LAt 2 Jamaica < VODOU 126


Lloyd Atherton Untitled (Standing Figure), c. early 1990s Cedar 11.25 x 2.625 x 1.75 inches / 28.6 x 6.7 x 4.4 cm LAt 3 127 VODOU > Jamaica


Lloyd Atherton Untitled (Standing Figure), c. early 1990s Cedar 16 x 2.5 x 2.3125 inches / 40.6 x 6.4 x 5.9 cm LAt 4 Jamaica < VODOU 128


129 VODOU > Jamaica


Lloyd Atherton Untitled, c. early 1990s Cedar 15.375 x 2.25 x 3 inches / 39.1 x 5.7 x 7.6 cm LAt 5

Jamaica < VODOU 130


131 VODOU > Jamaica


Everald Brown Star Harp, 1998 Metal, polychromed wood 35.5 x 17.75 x 5 inches / 90.2 x 45.1 x 12.7 cm EB 31 Jamaica < VODOU 132


Everald Brown Dove Harp, 1992 Metal, polychromed wood 67 x 29 x 13 inches / 170.2 x 73.7 x 33 cm EB 32 133 VODOU > Jamaica


Jamaica < VODOU 134


Leonard Daley White Egg, 1993 Mixed media/pressed board 21.25 x 23 inches / 54 x 58.4 cm LE 6 135 VODOU > Jamaica


Leonard Daley Living in Green, 1993 Mixed media/canvas 36 x 36 inches / 91.4 x 91.4 c LE 8 Jamaica < VODOU 136


Leonard Daley Why, 1993 Mixed media/canvas 52.5 x 28.5 inches / 133.4 x 72.4 cm LE 9 137 VODOU > Jamaica


Leonard Daley Marjorie, 1994 Mixed media/canvas 26.5 x 38 inches / 67.3 x 96.5 cm LE 42 Jamaica < VODOU 138


Leonard Daley Helmet, 1991 Oil/canvas 26.5 x 17.5 in / 67.3 x 44.5 cm LE 33 139 VODOU > Jamaica


Leonard Daley Untitled, 1996 Mixed media/canvas 32.75 x 25.5 in / 83.2 x 64.8 cm LE 22 Jamaica < VODOU 140


141 < VODOU


USA

VODOU> 142


143 VODOU > USA


J.B. Murray Untitled, c. 1978-1988 Tempera paint on paper 24 x 18 inches / 61 x 45.7 cm JBM 435 USA < VODOU 144


J.B. Murray Untitled, c. 1978-1988 Marker on paper, gold paint marker on reverse 14 x 10.5 inches / 35.6 x 26.7 cm JBM 622 145 VODOU > USA


J.B. Murray Untitled, c. 1978-1988 Watercolor and ink on paper 14 x 10.5 inches / 35.6 x 26.7 cm JBM 583 USA < VODOU 146


J.B. Murray Untitled, c. 1978-1988 Tempera, marker, crayon on paper 14 x 10.25 inches / 35.6 x 26 cm JBM 300 147 VODOU > USA


J.B. Murray Untitled, c. 1978-1988 Tempera and marker on paper 18 x 12 inches / 45.7 x 30.5 cm JBM 533 USA < VODOU 148


J.B. Murray Untitled, c. 1978-1988 Ink on paper 10.75 x 8.5 inches / 27.3 x 21.6 cm JBM 8 149 VODOU > USA


J.B. Murray Untitled, c. 1978-1988 Ink on paper 14 x 10.5 inches / 35.6 x 26.7 cm JBM 398 USA < VODOU 150


J.B. Murray Untitled, c. 1978-1988 Ink and marker on paper 10.75 x 8.5 inches / 27.3 x 21.6 cm JBM 199 151 VODOU > USA


J.B. Murray Untitled, c. 1978-1988 Watercolor and marker on paper 17 x 14 inches / 43.2 x 35.6 cm JBM 281 USA < VODOU 152


J.B. Murray Untitled, c. 1978-1988 Tempera and ink on paper 17 x 13.5 inches / 43.2 x 34.3 cm JBM 540 153 VODOU > USA


Joseph Yoakum The Only Woman Kingdom of the World 10/16/1970 Graphite, colored pencil, ink on paper 24 x 18.5 inches / 61 x 47 cm JY 32 USA < VODOU 154


Osker Gilchrist Untitled, n.d. Bone, wire 31 x 19.25 x 7 inches / 78.7 x 48.9 x 17.8 cm OG 6 155 VODOU > USA


Osker Gilchrist Untitled (protective amulet), n.d. Bone, wire, ribbon, feather, natural fibers 24 x 13 x 7 inches / 61 x 33 x 17.8 cm OG 7 USA < VODOU 156


Osker Gilchrist Untitled, n.d. Bone, wire 19 x 18 x 9 inches / 48.3 x 45.7 x 22.9 cm OG 8 157 VODOU > USA


Lonnie Holley Untitled, c. 1990 Shovel, clothing iron, electrical cord 34 x 9.5 x 7 inches / 86.4 x 24.1 x 17.8 cm LH 2 USA < VODOU 158


159 VODOU > USA


Kevin Sampson The Kron-Printzen, 2014 Wood, metal, string, and found materials 26 x 27 x 12 inches / 66 x 68.6 x 30.5 cm SK 203 USA < VODOU 160


161 < VODOU


Bessie Harvey Snake Eye, 1989 Polychromed wood 25 x 14 x 10 inches / 63.5 x 35.6 x 25.4 cm BH 40 USA < VODOU 162


163 VODOU > USA


Bessie Harvey Egyptian King,1985 Polychromed wood, hair, beads 19 x 13 x 9 inches / 48.3 x 33 x 22.9 cm BH 17 USA < VODOU 164


165 VODOU > USA


Bessie Harvey Untitled, 1985 Paint, mixed media/wood 15 x 10 x 11 in / 38.1 x 25.4 x 27.9 cm BH 88 USA < VODOU 166


167 < VODOU


Copyright Š 2015 CAVIN-MORRIS GALLERY Cavin-Morris Gallery 210 Eleventh Ave, Ste. 201 New York, NY 10001 t. 212 226 3768 www.cavinmorris.com Catalogue design: Sam Richardson & Marissa Levien Photography: Jurate Veceraite


VODUN, VODOU, CONJURE: The Animistic Arts of the African Diaspora